262 results match your criteria EMS and Terrorism


Wisdom of the Crowd in Saving Lives: The Life Guardians App.

Prehosp Disaster Med 2018 Oct 17;33(5):550-552. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

3Department of Emergency Medicine,Shaare Zedek Medical Center,Jerusalem.

Multi-casualty incidents (MCIs) continue to occur throughout the world, whether they be mass shootings or natural disasters. Prehospital emergency services have done a professional job at stabilizing and transporting the victims to local hospitals. When there are multiple casualties, there may not be enough professional responders to care for the injured. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049023X18000754DOI Listing
October 2018
6 Reads

Intuitive versus Algorithmic Triage.

Prehosp Disaster Med 2018 Aug;33(4):355-361

3Department of Emergency Medicine,University of Massachusetts Medical School,Worcester,MassachusettsUSA.

IntroductionThe most commonly used methods for triage in mass-casualty incidents (MCIs) rely upon providers to take exact counts of vital signs or other patient parameters. The acuity and volume of patients which can be present during an MCI makes this a time-consuming and potentially costly process.HypothesisThis study evaluates and compares the speed of the commonly used Simple Triage and Rapid Treatment (START) triage method with that of an "intuitive triage" method which relies instead upon the abilities of an experienced first responder to determine the triage category of each victim based upon their overall first-impression assessment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1049023X1
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049023X18000626DOI Listing
August 2018
24 Reads

Comparison of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Technology-Assisted Triage versus Standard Practice in Triaging Casualties by Paramedic Students in a Mass-Casualty Incident Scenario.

Prehosp Disaster Med 2018 Aug 13;33(4):375-380. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

3Department of Emergency Medicine,Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel,Research Group in Emergency and Disaster Medicine,Vrije Universiteit Brussel,Jette,Belgium.

IntroductionThe proliferation of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology has the potential to change the way medical incident commanders (ICs) respond to mass-casualty incidents (MCIs) in triaging victims. The aim of this study was to compare UAV technology to standard practice (SP) in triaging casualties at an MCI.

Methods: A randomized comparison study was conducted with 40 paramedic students from the Holland College Paramedicine Program (Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049023X18000559DOI Listing

Primary mass casualty incident triage: evidence for the benefit of yearly brief re-training from a simulation study.

Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med 2018 Apr 27;26(1):35. Epub 2018 Apr 27.

Department of Anesthesiology, University of Erlangen Medical Center, Krankenhausstraße 12, 91054, Erlangen, Germany.

Background: Triage is a mainstay of early mass casualty incident (MCI) management. Standardized triage protocols aim at providing valid and reproducible results and, thus, improve triage quality. To date, there is little data supporting the extent and content of training and re-training on using such triage protocols within the Emergency Medical Services (EMS). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13049-018-0501-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5923025PMC
April 2018
4 Reads

Acceptability and perceived utility of drone technology among emergency medical service responders and incident commanders for mass casualty incident management.

Am J Disaster Med 2017 ;12(4):261-265

Assistant Professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical Center, North Worcester, Massachusetts.

Objective: This study seeks to understand the acceptability and perceived utility of unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technology to Mass Casualty Incidents (MCI) scene management.

Design: Qualitative questionnaires regarding the ease of operation, perceived usefulness, and training time to operate UAVs were administered to Emergency Medical Technicians (n = 15).

Setting: A Single Urban New England Academic Tertiary Care Medical Center. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2017.0279DOI Listing
April 2018
5 Reads

Ghost Attack: The East Providence Carbon Monoxide Mass Casualty Incident.

R I Med J (2013) 2018 Feb 2;101(1):26-27. Epub 2018 Feb 2.

Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University.

A routine call for a common medical emergency was expeditiously identified by the responding emergency medical service as a multiple victim carbon monoxide exposure. The event circumstances, exemplary fire department emergency medical services response, and ensuing hos- pital emergency department response are described. [Full article available at http://rimed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2018
1 Read

Presence of undertriage and overtriage in simple triage and rapid treatment.

Am J Disaster Med 2017 ;12(3):147-154

Cooper University Hospital, Cooper Medical School of Rowan University, Camden, New Jersey.

Objective: We evaluated the use of the Simple Triage and Rapid Treatment (START) method by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and hypothesized that EMS can categorize patients using the START algorithm accurately.

Design: Retrospective Chart Review.

Setting: Inner-city Tertiary-Care Institutional Emergency Department (ED). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2017.0268DOI Listing
April 2018
7 Reads

A Chief's Worst Day: Director of Hamilton County EMS reviews school bus rollover MCI.

Authors:
Ken Wilkerson

JEMS 2017 02;42(2):16-7

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
February 2017
1 Read

Police Transports: MCI plans should consider alternatives to EMS transport.

Authors:
Stephen R Wirth

JEMS 2017 03;42(3):17

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2017
1 Read

Medical Response to the Tianjin Explosions: Lessons Learned.

Disaster Med Public Health Prep 2018 06 4;12(3):411-414. Epub 2017 Dec 4.

2Peking University People's Hospital,Beijing,China.

Background: On August 12, 2015, a hazardous chemical explosion occurred in the Tianjin Port of China. The explosions resulted in 165 deaths, 8 missing people, injuries to thousands of people. We present the responses of emergency medical services and hospitals to the explosions and summarize the lessons that can be learned. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S193578931
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/dmp.2017.64DOI Listing
June 2018
5 Reads

Developing a Mass Casualty Surge Capacity Protocol for Emergency Medical Services to Use for Patient Distribution.

South Med J 2017 12;110(12):792-795

From Emory University Office of Critical Event Preparedness and Response, the Department of Emergency Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, and Grady Health System, Atlanta, Georgia.

Objectives: Metropolitan areas must be prepared to manage large numbers of casualties related to a major incident. Most US cities do not have adequate trauma center capacity to manage large-scale mass casualty incidents (MCIs). Creating surge capacity requires the distribution of casualties to hospitals that are not designated as trauma centers. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.14423/SMJ.0000000000000740DOI Listing
December 2017
8 Reads

EMS Coverage of a Female-Only Event with 10,000 Attendees: Preparation and Implementation in One Week.

Prehosp Disaster Med 2017 Dec;32(6):694-698

King Abdullah Bin Abdulaziz University Hospital;Princes Nourah bint AbdulRahman University,Riyadh,Saudi Arabia.

This report describes the medical coverage provided for 10KSA, a charity event held in Saudi Arabia for breast cancer awareness. More than 10,000 women attended the event. A total of 41 attendees sought medical care; four patients (9. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049023X17006963DOI Listing
December 2017

60 seconds to survival: A pilot study of a disaster triage video game for prehospital providers.

Am J Disaster Med 2017 ;12(2):75-83

Departments of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut.

Introduction: Disaster triage training for emergency medical service (EMS) providers is not standardized. Simulation training is costly and time-consuming. In contrast, educational video games enable low-cost and more time-efficient standardized training. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2017.0263DOI Listing
April 2018
21 Reads

Prehospital Response Time Delays for Emergency Patients in Events of Concurrent Mass Casualty Incidents.

Disaster Med Public Health Prep 2018 Feb 19;12(1):94-100. Epub 2017 Sep 19.

4Department of Emergency Medicine,Hallym University College of Medicine and Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital,Hwaseong,Gyeonggi,Korea.

Objective: We investigated the extent of delays in the response time of emergency medical services (EMS) as an impact of mass casualty incidences (MCIs) in the same area.

Methods: We defined an MCI case as an event that resulted in 6 or more patients being transported by EMS, and prehospital response time as the time from the call to arrival at the scene. We matched patients before and after MCIs by dividing them into categories of 3 hours before, 0-1 hour after, 1-2 hours after, and 2-3 hours after the MCIs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/dmp.2017.42DOI Listing
February 2018
9 Reads

[Mass casualty incident - special features of "threatening situations"].

Anasthesiol Intensivmed Notfallmed Schmerzther 2017 Sep 8;52(9):618-629. Epub 2017 Sep 8.

Terrorist attacks or amok runs may cause "threatening situations" for emergency medical services (EMS), fire fighters and physicians. Cooperation with the police is of paramount importance. In order to minimize the risk to rescue personnel and affected persons, emergency medical care has to follow tactical principles. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0042-120229DOI Listing
September 2017
1 Read

Comparison of START and SALT triage methodologies to reference standard definitions and to a field mass casualty simulation.

Am J Disaster Med 2017 ;12(1):27-33

Director of Academic Clinical Research, Attending Emergency Physician, Orlando Regional Medical Center, Orlando, Florida; Professor, University of Central Florida College of Medicine, Orlando, Florida; Associate Professor, Florida State University College of Medicine, Orlando, Florida.

Objectives: We compared Sort, Assess, Lifesaving Intervention, Treatment/Transport (SALT) and Simple Triage and Rapid Treatment (START) triage methodologies to a published reference standard, and evaluated the accuracy of the START method applied by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel in a field simulation.

Design: Simulated mass casualty incident (MCI). Paramedics trained in START triage assigned each victim to green (minimal), yellow (delayed), red (immediate), or black (dead) categories. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2017.0255DOI Listing
November 2017
40 Reads

Local emergency medical response after a terrorist attack in Norway: a qualitative study.

BMJ Qual Saf 2017 Oct 4;26(10):806-816. Epub 2017 Jul 4.

Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

Introduction: On 22 July 2011, Norway suffered a devastating terrorist attack targeting a political youth camp on a remote island. Within a few hours, 35 injured terrorist victims were admitted to the local Ringerike community hospital. All victims survived. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjqs-2017-006517DOI Listing
October 2017
19 Reads

Post-9/11 sarcoidosis in WTC-exposed firefighters and emergency medical service workers.

Respir Med 2017 Nov 7;132:232-237. Epub 2017 Jun 7.

Fire Department of the City of New York, Bureau of Health Services, 9 Metrotech Center, Brooklyn, NY, USA.

Introduction: The World Trade Center (WTC) disaster released a huge quantity and variety of toxicants into the environment. To-date, studies from each of the three major cohorts of WTC-exposed workers have suggested "greater than expected" numbers of post-9/11 cases in some workers. We undertook this study to estimate the incidence of post-9/11 sarcoidosis in ∼13,000 male firefighters and EMS workers enrolled in The Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) WTC Health Program; to compare FDNY incidence to rates from unexposed, demographically similar men in the Rochester Epidemiology Project (REP); and, to examine rates by level of WTC exposure. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rmed.2017.06.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5720928PMC
November 2017
12 Reads

Basic Disaster Life Support (BDLS) Training Improves First Responder Confidence to Face Mass-Casualty Incidents in Thailand.

Prehosp Disaster Med 2017 Oct 13;32(5):492-500. Epub 2017 Jun 13.

4Phramngkutklao Hospital and College of Medicine,Bangkok,Thailand.

Background: Medical response to mass-casualty incidents (MCIs) requires specialized training and preparation. Basic Disaster Life Support (BDLS) is a course designed to prepare health care workers for a MCI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the confidence of health care professionals in Thailand to face a MCI after participating in a BDLS course. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049023X17006550DOI Listing
October 2017
2 Reads

Policies for managing emergency medical services in mass casualty incidents.

Injury 2017 Sep 27;48(9):1878-1883. Epub 2017 May 27.

Department of Disaster Management & Injury Prevention, School of Public Health, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel; The National Center for Trauma and Emergency Medicine Research, The Gertner Institute for Health Policy and Epidemiology, Tel-Hashomer, Israel.

Introduction: Diverse decision-making is needed in managing mass casualty incidents (MCIs), by emergency medical services (EMS). The aim of the study was to review consensus among international experts concerning policies of EMS management during MCIs.

Methods: Applicability of 21 EMS policies was tested through a 2-cycle modified e-Delphi process, in which 38 multi-disciplinary experts from 10 countries participated. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.injury.2017.05.034DOI Listing
September 2017
9 Reads

Are Dutch Hospitals Prepared for Chemical, Biological, or Radionuclear Incidents? A Survey Study.

Prehosp Disaster Med 2017 Oct 8;32(5):483-491. Epub 2017 May 8.

2Center for Research and Education in Emergency Care (CREEC),University Leuven,Belgium.

Introduction Being one of Europe's most densely populated countries, and having multiple nuclear installations, a heavy petrochemical industry, and terrorist targets, the Netherlands is at-risk for chemical, biological, or radionuclear (CBRN) incidents. Recent world and continental events show that this threat is real and that authorities may be underprepared. Hypothesis The hypothesis of this study is that Dutch hospitals are underprepared to deal with these incidents. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049023X17006513DOI Listing
October 2017
5 Reads

Graduate Medical Education in Tactical Medicine and the Impact of ACGME Accreditation of EMS Fellowships.

J Spec Oper Med Spring 2017;17(1):101-104

Physician interest in tactical medicine as an area of professional practice has grown significantly over the past decade. The prevalence of physician involvement in terms of medical oversight and operational support of civilian tactical medicine has experienced tremendous growth during this timeframe. Factors contributing to this trend are multifactorial and include enhanced law enforcement agency understanding of the role of the tactical physician, support for the engagement of qualified medical oversight, increasing numbers of physicians formally trained in tactical medicine, and the ongoing escalation of intentional mass-casualty incidents worldwide. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
June 2017
2 Reads

Preparing for Active Shooters and Hostile Events.

EMS World 2017 Mar;46(3):35-42

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
March 2017
1 Read

Special Considerations for Mass Violence Events in Senior Living Facilities: A Case Report on the Pinelake Health and Rehab Center Shooting.

Disaster Med Public Health Prep 2017 02 2;11(1):150-152. Epub 2017 Feb 2.

2Charlotte-Mecklenburg Emergency Management,Charlotte,North Carolina.

The 2009 Pinelake Health and Rehab Center shooting in Carthage, North Carolina, presents a unique case study for examining the specific considerations for mass violence events in senior living facilities. A variety of factors, including reduced sensory perception, reduced mobility, and cognitive decline, may increase the vulnerability of the populations of senior living facilities during mass violence events. Management of response aspects such as evacuation, relocation, and reunification also require special consideration in the context of mass violence at senior living facilities. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/dmp.2017.2DOI Listing
February 2017

Post-9/11/2001 lung function trajectories by sex and race in World Trade Center-exposed New York City emergency medical service workers.

Occup Environ Med 2017 03 3;74(3):200-203. Epub 2016 Nov 3.

Fire Department of the City of New York, Bureau of Health Services, Brooklyn, New York, USA.

Objective: To determine whether lung function trajectories after 9/11/2001 (9/11) differed by sex or race/ethnicity in World Trade Center-exposed Fire Department of the City of New York emergency medical service (EMS) workers.

Method: Serial cross-sectional study of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) taken between 9/11 and 9/10/2015. We used data from routine PFTs (forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV) and FEV% predicted), conducted at 12-18 month intervals. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2016-103619DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5573813PMC
March 2017
3 Reads

Occupational Practitioner's Role in the Management of a Crisis: Lessons Learned from the Paris November 2015 Terrorist Attack.

Front Public Health 2016 20;4:203. Epub 2016 Sep 20.

AP-HP UVSQ, Occupational Health Unit, University Hospital of West Suburb of Paris, Garches, France; UMR-S 1168, Versailles St-Quentin University UVSQ, Villejuif, France; U1168, INSERM, VIMA: Aging and Chronic Diseases. Epidemiological and Public Health Approaches, Villejuif, France.

In massive catastrophic events, occupational health practitioners are more and more frequently involved in the management of such situations. We aim to describe the multiple aspects of the role that occupational health practitioners might play, by focusing on the recent example of the Paris terrorist attack of November 2015. During and after the Paris attack, occupational practitioners, in collaboration with emergency and security professionals, were involved in psychological care, assembling information, follow-up, return-to-work, and improving in-company safety plans. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5028718PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2016.00203DOI Listing
September 2016
5 Reads

A comparison of command center activations versus disaster drills at three institutions from 2013 to 2015.

Am J Disaster Med 2016 ;11(1):33-42

Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Vice Chair for Operations, Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.

Objective: Disaster exercises often simulate rare, worst-case scenario events that range from mass casualty incidents to severe weather events. In actuality, situations such as information system downtimes and physical plant failures may affect hospital continuity of operations far more significantly. The objective of this study is to evaluate disaster drills at two academic and one community hospital to compare the frequency of planned drills versus real-world events that led to emergency management command center activation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/ajdm.2016.0222DOI Listing
June 2017
5 Reads

Geographic Discordance Between Patient Residence and Incident Location in Emergency Medical Services Responses.

Ann Emerg Med 2017 01 3;69(1):44-51.e3. Epub 2016 Aug 3.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT.

Study Objective: The location of a patient's residence is often used for emergency medical services (EMS) system planning. Our objective is to evaluate the association between patient residence and emergency incident zip codes for 911 calls.

Methods: We used data from the 2013 National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) Public-Release Research Dataset. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.annemergmed.2016.05.025DOI Listing
January 2017
11 Reads

Training, Drills Pivotal in Mounting Response to Orlando Shooting.

ED Manag 2016 Aug;28(8):85-9

Emergency providers at Orlando Regional Medical Center in Orlando. FL, faced multiple challenges in responding to the worst mass shooting in U.S. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2016
1 Read

MCI Transports. EMS liability for non-EMS patient transports.

JEMS 2016 08;41(8):16

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
August 2016
5 Reads

FDNY and 9/11: Clinical services and health outcomes in World Trade Center-exposed firefighters and EMS workers from 2001 to 2016.

Am J Ind Med 2016 09 18;59(9):695-708. Epub 2016 Jul 18.

Bureau of Health Services, Fire Department of the City of New York, Brooklyn, New York.

Background: After the World Trade Center (WTC) attacks on September 11, 2001, the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) instituted a WTC medical monitoring and treatment program and established a data center to document health outcomes in the WTC-exposed workforce of ∼16,000 firefighters and EMS workers.

Methods: FDNY schedules routine monitoring exams every 12-18 months and physical and mental health treatment appointments, as required.

Results: FDNY research studies have consistently found that early arrival to work and/or prolonged work at the WTC-site increased the risks for adverse physical and mental health outcomes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ajim.22631DOI Listing
September 2016

A Geographic Simulation Model for the Treatment of Trauma Patients in Disasters.

Prehosp Disaster Med 2016 Aug 25;31(4):413-21. Epub 2016 May 25.

5University of Pennsylvania,Perelman School of Medicine,Philadelphia,PennsylvaniaUSA.

Background: Though the US civilian trauma care system plays a critical role in disaster response, there is currently no systems-based strategy that enables hospital emergency management and local and regional emergency planners to quantify, and potentially prepare for, surges in trauma care demand that accompany mass-casualty disasters.

Objective: A proof-of-concept model that estimates the geographic distributions of patients, trauma center resource usage, and mortality rates for varying disaster sizes, in and around the 25 largest US cities, is presented. The model was designed to be scalable, and its inputs can be modified depending on the planning assumptions of different locales and for different types of mass-casualty events. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049023X16000510DOI Listing
August 2016
1 Read

Preparedness of Finnish Emergency Medical Services for Chemical Emergencies.

Prehosp Disaster Med 2016 Aug 24;31(4):392-6. Epub 2016 May 24.

2Emergency Medical Services,Department of Emergency Medicine,Helsinki University Hospital,Finland.

Unlabelled: Introduction The preparedness level of Finnish Emergency Medical Services (EMS) for treating chemical emergencies is unknown. The aim of this study was to survey the preparedness level of EMS systems for managing and handling mass-casualty chemical incidents in the prehospital phase in Finland. Hypothesis The study hypothesis was that university hospital districts would have better clinical capability to treat patients than would central hospital districts in terms of the number of patients treated in the field within one hour after dispatching as well as patients transported to hospital within one hour or two hours after dispatching. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S1049023X16000546
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049023X16000546DOI Listing
August 2016
2 Reads

Attitudes Towards and Experience of the Use of Triage Tags in Major Incidents: A Mixed Method Study.

Prehosp Disaster Med 2016 Aug 23;31(4):376-85. Epub 2016 May 23.

6Sophiahemmet University,Stockholm Sweden and Karolinska Institutet,Department of Clinical Sciences,Danderyds sjukhus,Stockholm,Sweden.

Unlabelled: Introduction Disaster triage is the allocation of limited medical resources in order to optimize patient outcome. There are several studies showing the poor use of triage tagging, but there are few studies that have investigated the reasons behind this. The aim of this study was to explore ambulance personnel attitude towards, and experiences of, practicing triage tagging during day-to-day management of trauma patients, as well as in major incidents (MIs). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049023X16000480DOI Listing
August 2016
14 Reads

Epidemiology of Emergency Medical Services-Assessed Mass Casualty Incidents according to Causes.

J Korean Med Sci 2016 Mar 25;31(3):449-56. Epub 2016 Feb 25.

Laboratory of Emergency Medical Service, Seoul National University Hospital Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul, Korea .

To effectively mitigate and reduce the burden of mass casualty incidents (MCIs), preparedness measures should be based on MCIs' epidemiological characteristics. This study aimed to describe the epidemiological characteristics and outcomes of emergency medical services (EMS)-assessed MCIs from multiple areas according to cause. Therefore, we extracted the records of all MCIs that involved ≥ 6 patients from an EMS database. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.3346/jkms.2016.31.3.449DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4779872PMC
March 2016
22 Reads

Usefulness of a multiplying factor in predicting the final number of victims during a mass casualty incident.

Eur J Emerg Med 2017 Oct;24(5):377-381

aEmergency Department bOperational Planning Office, Fire Brigade of Paris, Paris cAP-HP, EMS (Samu92), University Poincare Hospital, Garches dCHU H Mondor, AP-HP, Créteil, France.

Objective: Whenever a mass casualty incident (MCI) occurs, it is essential to anticipate the final number of victims to dispatch the adequate number of ambulances. In France, the custom is to multiply the initial number of prehospital victims by 2-4 to predict the final number. However, no one has yet validated this multiplying factor (MF) as a predictive tool. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MEJ.0000000000000366DOI Listing
October 2017
12 Reads

First Responder Accuracy Using SALT during Mass-casualty Incident Simulation.

Prehosp Disaster Med 2016 Apr 9;31(2):150-4. Epub 2016 Feb 9.

1Division of Emergency Medicine,Department of Medicine,Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry,Western University,London,Ontario,Canada.

Introduction: During mass-casualty incidents (MCIs), patient volume often overwhelms available Emergency Medical Services (EMS) personnel. First responders are expected to triage, treat, and transport patients in a timely fashion. If other responders could triage accurately, prehospital EMS resources could be focused more directly on patients that require immediate medical attention and transport. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S1049023X16000091
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049023X16000091DOI Listing
April 2016
13 Reads

Health Conditions as Mediators of the Association Between World Trade Center Exposure and Health-Related Quality of Life in Firefighters and EMS Workers.

J Occup Environ Med 2016 Feb;58(2):200-6

Fire Department of the City of New York (Ms Yip, Dr Zeig-Owens, Dr Webber, Ms Olivieri, Ms Schwartz, Dr Kelly, Dr Prezant), Bureau of Health Services, Brooklyn; Montefiore Medical Center (Ms Yip, Dr Zeig-Owens, Ms Olivieri, Ms Schwartz), Department of Medicine; Department of Pulmonary Medicine (Dr Prezant); Department of Epidemiology and Population Health (Dr Webber); Albert Einstein College of Medicine (Dr Webber and Dr Hall), Department of Epidemiology and Population Health; and Department of Medicine (Dr Prezant), Pulmonary Division, Bronx, New York.

Objective: Studies have reported reduced health-related quality of life (HrQoL) in rescue/recovery workers for years postdisaster. Few have examined specific postdisaster physical and mental health conditions as mediators of the association between exposure to disaster and HrQoL.

Methods: We used the Short Form-12 to measure HrQoL in 7190 male World Trade Center (WTC)-exposed first responders. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/JOM.0000000000000597DOI Listing
February 2016
14 Reads

Agreement Between Self-Reported and Confirmed Cancer Diagnoses in New York City Firefighters and EMS Workers, 2001-2011.

Public Health Rep 2016 Jan-Feb;131(1):153-9

Fire Department of the City of New York, Bureau of Health Services, Brooklyn, NY; Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Bronx, NY.

Objectives: Because of the delay in availability of cancer diagnoses from state cancer registries, self-reported diagnoses may be valuable in assessing the current cancer burden in many populations. We evaluated agreement between self-reported cancer diagnoses and state cancer registry-confirmed diagnoses among 21,437 firefighters and emergency medical service workers from the Fire Department of the City of New York. We also investigated the association between World Trade Center (WTC) exposure and other characteristics in relation to accurate reporting of cancer diagnoses. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4716483PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/003335491613100122DOI Listing
June 2016
3 Reads

Description of Medication Administration by Emergency Medical Services during Mass-casualty Incidents in the United States.

Prehosp Disaster Med 2016 Apr 3;31(2):141-9. Epub 2016 Feb 3.

4Department of Pediatrics,University of Utah School of Medicine,Salt Lake City,UtahUSA.

Background: Emergency Medical Services (EMS) preparedness and availability of essential medications are important to reduce morbidity and mortality from mass-casualty incidents (MCIs).

Objectives: This study describes prehospital medication administration during MCIs by different EMS service levels.

Methods: The US National EMS Public-Release Research Dataset maintained by the National Emergency Medical Services Information System (NEMSIS) was used to carry out the study. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049023X1600008XDOI Listing
April 2016
9 Reads

A Course on Terror Medicine: Content and Evaluations.

Prehosp Disaster Med 2016 Feb 11;31(1):98-101. Epub 2016 Jan 11.

1Department of Emergency Medicine,Rutgers New Jersey Medical School,Newark,New JerseyUSA.

Introduction: The development of medical school courses on medical responses for disaster victims has been deemed largely inadequate. To address this gap, a 2-week elective course on Terror Medicine (a field related to Disaster and Emergency Medicine) has been designed for fourth year students at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School in Newark, New Jersey (USA). This elective is part of an overall curricular plan to broaden exposure to topics related to Terror Medicine throughout the undergraduate medical education. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S1049023X15005579DOI Listing
February 2016
8 Reads

An assessment of Chemical, Biological, Radiologic, Nuclear, and Explosive preparedness among emergency department healthcare providers in an inner city emergency department.

Authors:
Joseph G Kotora

J Emerg Manag 2015 Sep-Oct;13(5):431-46

Primary Investigator, Fellow, EMS and Disaster Medicine, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, Newark, New Jersey.

Introduction: Emergency healthcare providers are required to care for victims of Chemical, Biological, Radiologic, Nuclear, and Explosive (CBRNE) agents. However, US emergency departments are often ill prepared to manage CBRNE casualties. Most providers lack adequate knowledge or experience in the areas of patient decontamination, hospital-specific disaster protocols, interagency familiarization, and available supply of necessary medical equipment and medications. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.5055/jem.2015.0253DOI Listing
February 2016
17 Reads