9,954 results match your criteria Dysbarism


Effects of Breath-Hold Deep Diving on the Pulmonary System.

Respiration 2019 Feb 15:1-8. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Department of Sports Medicine, Medical Clinic, Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.

This short review focuses on pulmonary injury in breath-hold (BH) divers. When practicing their extreme leisure sport, they are exposed to increased pressure on pulmonary gas volumes, hypoxia, and increased partial gas pressures. Increasing ambient pressures do present a serious problem to BH deep divers, because the semi-rigid thorax prevents the deformation required by the Boyle-Mariotte law. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000495757DOI Listing
February 2019

Effect of Titrating Positive End-Expiratory Pressure (PEEP) With an Esophageal Pressure-Guided Strategy vs an Empirical High PEEP-Fio2 Strategy on Death and Days Free From Mechanical Ventilation Among Patients With Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

JAMA 2019 Feb 18. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Importance: Adjusting positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) to offset pleural pressure might attenuate lung injury and improve patient outcomes in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

Objective: To determine whether PEEP titration guided by esophageal pressure (PES), an estimate of pleural pressure, was more effective than empirical high PEEP-fraction of inspired oxygen (Fio2) in moderate to severe ARDS.

Design, Setting, And Participants: Phase 2 randomized clinical trial conducted at 14 hospitals in North America. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.2019.0555DOI Listing
February 2019

SCUBA Medicine for otolaryngologists: Part I. Diving into SCUBA physiology and injury prevention.

Laryngoscope 2019 Feb 18. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, University of Connecticut Health, Farmington, Connecticut, U.S.A.

Objectives: Introduce pertinent self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) physiology and corresponding terminology. Appreciate the scope of diving and related otolaryngological injury. Illustrate pathophysiologic mechanisms for diving injuries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lary.27867DOI Listing
February 2019

SCUBA Medicine for Otolaryngologists: Part II. Diagnostic, Treatment, and Dive Fitness Recommendations.

Laryngoscope 2019 Feb 18. Epub 2019 Feb 18.

Department of Surgery, Division of Otolaryngology, University of Connecticut Health, Farmington, Connecticut, U.S.A.

Objectives: Challenge current practices and misconceptions in treating recreational SCUBA (Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus) divers. Differentiate patients who are fit to dive and those with relative and absolute contraindications. Redefine the standard of care for fitness to dive parameters based on the most up-to-date evidence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/lary.27874DOI Listing
February 2019

Pulmonary Barotrauma Including Huge Pulmonary Interstitial Emphysema in an Adult with Status Asthmaticus: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges.

Eur J Case Rep Intern Med 2018 25;5(5):000823. Epub 2018 May 25.

Medical Intensive Care Unit, Farhat Hached Hospital, Sousse, Tunisia.

Introduction: Pulmonary interstitial emphysema is a rare finding defined as abnormal air collection inside the lung interstitial tissues. Described more frequently in ventilated new-borns, pulmonary interstitial emphysema is an uncommon barotrauma-related complication in adults. Management and clinical sequelae are poorly described. Read More

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https://www.ejcrim.com/index.php/EJCRIM/article/view/823
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http://dx.doi.org/10.12890/2018_000823DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6346923PMC
May 2018
4 Reads

Effects of Stepwise Lung Recruitment Maneuvers in Patients with Early Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome: A Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Trial.

J Clin Med 2019 Feb 10;8(2). Epub 2019 Feb 10.

School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan (R.O.C).

Since the clinical benefit of lung recruitment maneuvers (LRMs) is still conflicting, we performed this prospective, randomized, controlled study to investigate whether LRMs should be used in the routine management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This trial was conducted in four intensive care units (ICUs) to compare application of a modified stepwise LRMs with solely lung-protective ventilation in patients with moderate to severe ARDS within 72 h from the onset. The primary outcome was 28-day mortality, and the secondary outcomes were ventilator-free days and ICU-free days. Read More

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http://www.mdpi.com/2077-0383/8/2/231
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/jcm8020231DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Feasibility of an alternative, physiologic, individualized open-lung approach to high-frequency oscillatory ventilation in children.

Ann Intensive Care 2019 Jan 18;9(1). Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Department of Paediatrics, Division of Paediatric Critical Care Medicine, Beatrix Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Huispost CA 80, P.O. Box 30.001, 9700 RB, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Background: High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) is a common but unproven management strategy in paediatric critical care. Oscillator settings have been traditionally guided by patient age and/or weight rather than by lung mechanics, thereby potentially negating any beneficial effects. We have adopted an open-lung HFOV strategy based on a corner frequency approach using an initial incremental-decremental mean airway pressure titration manoeuvre, a high frequency (8-15 Hz), and high power to initially target a proximal pressure amplitude (∆P) of 70-90 cm HO, irrespective of age or weight. Read More

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https://annalsofintensivecare.springeropen.com/articles/10.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13613-019-0492-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6338613PMC
January 2019
7 Reads

Abdominal CT Scan Findings of Decompression Sickness: A Case Report.

J Radiol Case Rep 2018 Oct 31;12(10):17-23. Epub 2018 Oct 31.

Department of Radiology, Hahnemann University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

This case report depicts the radiologic findings of a 51-year-old male presenting with Decompression Sickness. Decompression Sickness is diagnosed clinically, therefore radiologic imaging of this disease entity is limited. Our patient's history includes a scuba dive to depth of 110 feet with a descending time of 24 minutes and an ascending time of 8 minutes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3941/jrcr.v12i10.3425DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6312119PMC
October 2018
1 Read

The use of drug eluting stents in infrapopliteal arteries: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials.

Int Angiol 2019 Jan 16. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.

Background: Endovascular treatment below-the-knee is safe and effective but limited by poor potency. Coronary DES may play a role in providing mechanical scaffolding and deliver anti-proliferative drug to the site of vascular barotrauma to reduce the incidence of restenosis. Our aim was to evaluate and compare the use of contemporary drug-eluting stents (DES) with standard endovascular-therapies for atherosclerotic disease of infrapopliteal arteries. Read More

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https://www.minervamedica.it/index2.php?show=R34Y9999N00A190
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http://dx.doi.org/10.23736/S0392-9590.19.04049-5DOI Listing
January 2019
16 Reads

Strain by the train: Patterns of toad fatalities on a Brazilian Amazonian railroad.

Sci Total Environ 2019 Apr 4;660:493-500. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

Programa de Pós-Graduação em Análise e Modelagem de Sistemas Ambientais, Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais CEP 31270-901, Brazil; Transportation Research and Environmental Modeling Lab (TREM Lab), Instituto de Geociências, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Av. Presidente Antônio Carlos, 6627, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais CEP 31270-901, Brazil.

Transportation infrastructures are directly responsible for killing billions of animals worldwide. Although the understanding about road impacts have recently increased, the impact of railroads on wildlife has received less attention. The current knowledge concerning the impacts of railroads focuses mainly on large mammals although amphibians might be affected. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00489697183526
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.12.371DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Headache Attributed to Aeroplane Travel: An Historical Outline.

Headache 2019 Feb 11;59(2):164-172. Epub 2019 Jan 11.

Headache Centre, Department of Neurosciences, Padua University, Padua, Italy.

Introduction: Headache attributed to aeroplane travel (AH) is one of the new nosological entries in the International Classification of Headache Disorders (ICHD) 3 beta.

Materials And Methods: This study retraces the history of headache related to flight, from the initial description to the modern reports, on the basis of original sources.

Results: Head pain related to flight has been reported since the beginning of flight era. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/head.13467DOI Listing
February 2019

The anatomic substrate of irreversible airway obstruction and barotrauma in a case of hurricane-triggered fatal status asthmaticus during puerperium: Lessons from an autopsy.

Respir Med Case Rep 2019 21;26:136-141. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Arkadi M. Rywlin M.D. Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, FL, USA.

Non-fully reversible airway obstruction in fatal asthma is often seen in association with profound structural changes of the bronchial wall, termed airway remodeling. Evidence suggests that heavy precipitation events can trigger epidemics of severe asthma. We present a case of fatal asthma in a young woman with no prior near-fatal exacerbations and postulate that the patient's extensive airway remodeling and puerperal state (susceptibility factors), in combination with a massive allergen challenge during a hurricane landfall (triggering factor), played a central role in her death. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S22130071183038
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rmcr.2018.12.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6306954PMC
December 2018
3 Reads

A Case of Pott's Puffy Tumor Associated With Barosinusitis From Scuba Diving.

Pediatr Emerg Care 2018 Dec 28. Epub 2018 Dec 28.

McGill University Faculty of Medicine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.

Barosinusitis, or sinus barotrauma, is a well-described condition associated with changes in barometric pressure during flight and diving that can result in sinonasal mucosal injury. In this case report, we present an adolescent who experienced barosinusitis during scuba diving and subsequently developed Pott's puffy tumor (PPT), characterized by frontal sinusitis, frontal bone osteomyelitis, and overlying subperiosteal abscess. This unique case of PPT following scuba diving provides the opportunity to review the pathophysiology of both barotrauma-induced sinus disease and PPT, a rare and unreported serious complication of barosinusitis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000001657DOI Listing
December 2018
0.923 Impact Factor

Barotraumatic blowout fracture of the orbit after sneezing: Cone beam CT demonstration.

Clin Ter 2018 Nov-Dec;169(6):e265-e268

Section of Diagnostic Imaging - DIBIMED, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy.

A 40-year-old man with no history of trauma or previous sinus surgery complained sudden right diplopia after vigorous sneezing. The patient was submitted elsewhere to a MRI study for persisting diplopia, with inconclusive findings. One week later the patient was submitted to a maxillofacial cone beam CT (CBCT) in our Institution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7417/CT.2018.2089DOI Listing
January 2019

An unusual case of pulmonary fat embolism following blunt trauma.

Forensic Sci Med Pathol 2018 Dec 7. Epub 2018 Dec 7.

Institute of Forensic Medicine, University of Belgrade - School of Medicine, 31a Deligradska str, Belgrade, 11000, Serbia.

Fat embolism is markedly underdiagnosed, even though it is a well-known phenomenon following fractures of the long bones, injury to subcutaneous fat tissue, rupture of a fatty liver, surgical operations on fatty tissues, septicemia, burns and barotrauma. Forensic pathologists tend to "simplify" autopsy report conclusion in cases with multiple injuries where fat embolism and exsanguination could be considered to be the concomitant causes of death. Herein we present a case of 24-year-old male who was beaten with a metal rod by several persons. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12024-018-0053-0
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12024-018-0053-0DOI Listing
December 2018
10 Reads

Bedside respiratory physiology to detect risk of lung injury in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Authors:
Jeremy R Beitler

Curr Opin Crit Care 2019 Feb;25(1):3-11

Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Center for Acute Respiratory Failure, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York, USA.

Purpose Of Review: The most effective strategies for treating the patient with acute respiratory distress syndrome center on minimizing ventilation-induced lung injury (VILI). Yet, current standard-of-care does little to modify mechanical ventilation to patient-specific risk. This review focuses on evaluation of bedside respiratory mechanics, which when interpreted in patient-specific context, affords opportunity to individualize lung-protective ventilation in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MCC.0000000000000579DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Mineralocorticoid receptor: A hidden culprit for hemodialysis vascular access dysfunction.

EBioMedicine 2019 Jan 5;39:621-627. Epub 2018 Dec 5.

Division of Kidney Disease and Hypertension, Department of Medicine, Brown University School of Medicine, Providence, RI, United States; Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, OH, United States. Electronic address:

Hemodialysis vascular access dysfunction is a common and intractable problem in clinical practice with no definitive therapy yet available. As a key mediator of vascular and cardiac maladaptive remodeling, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) plays a pivotal role in vascular fibrosis and intimal hyperplasia (IH) and is potentiated locally in hemodialysis vascular access following diverse injuries, like barotrauma, cannulation and shear stress. MR-related genomic and non-genomic pathways are responsible for triggering vascular smooth muscle cell activation, proliferation, migration and extracellular matrix overproduction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2018.11.054DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6354623PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

A diver with immersion pulmonary oedema and prolonged respiratory symptoms.

Diving Hyperb Med 2018 Dec;48(4):259-261

Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Kameda Medical Centre, Kamogawa, Chiba, Japan.

Immersion pulmonary oedema (IPE) is particularly associated with an excessive reaction to exercise and/or cold stress. IPE usually resolves without recompression therapy within a day or two. Herein we report a diver diagnosed with IPE, in whom symptoms persisted for five days. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.28920/dhm48.4.259-261DOI Listing
December 2018
12 Reads

Lobectomy with ECMO Support in an Infant Who Developed Pulmonary Interstitial Emphysema Following Repair of Hypoplastic Aortic Arch.

Braz J Cardiovasc Surg 2018 Sep-Oct;33(5):528-530

Department of Surgery; Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery; Pediatric and Congenital Cardiac Surgery Section Jackson Memorial Hospital - University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, USA.

Pulmonary interstitial emphysema (PIE) is a common problem in premature neonates with respiratory distress syndrome. This condition is often related to barotrauma caused by mechanical ventilation or continuous positive airway pressure applied to low birth weight neonates. The clinical diagnosis can be challenging. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.21470/1678-9741-2018-0135DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6257528PMC
February 2018
2 Reads

Distribution characteristics of combat-related shrapnel and relationship to weapon type and conflict location: Experience of an operational field hospital.

Ulus Travma Acil Cerrahi Derg 2018 Nov;24(6):587-593

Department of Radiology, Dr. Aşkım Tüfekçi State Hospital, Adana-Turkey.

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics of shrapnel distribution in the body and a possible relationship to the type of weapon and type of location of the conflict.

Methods: The records of 246 patients admitted to a level-III trauma center with any kind of firearm injury were examined retrospectively. Ninety patients who had at least 1 radiologically-proven piece of shrapnel in their body were included in the study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5505/tjtes.2018.13402DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Apoptotic mechanisms in rabbits with blast-induced acute lung injury 1.

Acta Cir Bras 2018 Oct;33(10):896-903

Master degree candidate, Department of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation Center, 128th Hangzhou Hospital, Military Hangzhou Clinical College, Anhui Medical University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, China. Sample extraction, analysis of data.

Purpose: To investigate the apoptotic mechanisms in rabbits with blast-induced acute lung injury (ALI).

Methods: A total of 40 rabbits were randomly divided into a blank control group (A, n=10) and an experimental group (EXP, n=30). Explosion-induced chest-ALI models were prepared and sampled at different time points (4, 12, and 24h after modeling, T1-T3) to test the lung dry weight/wet weight ratio (W/D) and arterial oxygen pressure (PaO2), apoptosis of lung tissue by the TUNEL assay, and Caspase-3, Bax, and Bcl-2 levels by immunohistochemical analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/s0102-865020180100000004DOI Listing
October 2018
9 Reads

Bubble Formation in Children and Adolescents after Two Standardised Shallow Dives.

Int J Sports Med 2019 Jan 20;40(1):31-37. Epub 2018 Nov 20.

German Sport University, Institute of Physiology and Anatomy, Cologne, Germany.

Circulating venous bubbles after dives are associated with symptoms of decompression sickness in adults. Up to now it is not known to what extent children and adolescents are subjected to a bubble formation during their shallow dives and if there are possible indications for that. The aim of this pilot study is to investigate whether bubbles and/or symptoms occur after standardised repeated dives performed by young divers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/a-0777-2279DOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads

Recruitment manoeuvres for adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome receiving mechanical ventilation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

J Crit Care 2019 Apr 3;50:1-10. Epub 2018 Nov 3.

Department of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Beijing Institute of Respiratory Medicine, Beijing Chao-Yang Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 100020, China. Electronic address:

Purpose: To determine if recruitment manoeuvres (RMs) would decrease 28-day mortality of patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) compared with standard care.

Materials And Methods: Relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published prior to April 26, 2018 were systematically searched. The primary outcome was mortality. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08839441183096
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jcrc.2018.10.033DOI Listing
April 2019
11 Reads

Modes of Neonatal Ventilation: Breathe Deeply!

Authors:
Shawn Hughes

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec;30(4):523-531

NICU Respiratory Care Services, Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children's Center, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 8th Floor, 1800 Orleans Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. Electronic address:

The art and science of neonatal ventilation continue to evolve with advances in technology and as a result of evidenced based research. Although some historically administered therapies remain such as nasal continuous positive airway pressure, newer therapies have emerged in the neonatal intensive care unit such as pressure regulated volume control and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist. The challenge for clinicians continues to be which mode will support the patient's medical diagnosis with minimal barotrauma or lung injury. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08995885183097
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.07.008DOI Listing
December 2018
8 Reads

Higher PEEP improves outcomes in ARDS patients with clinically objective positive oxygenation response to PEEP: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

BMC Anesthesiol 2018 Nov 17;18(1):172. Epub 2018 Nov 17.

Department of Critical Care Medicine, Zhongda Hospital, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu, China.

Background: Mortality in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) remains high. These patients require mechanical ventilation strategies that include high positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). It remains controversial whether high PEEP can improve outcomes for ARDS patients, especially patients who show improvement in oxygenation in response to PEEP. Read More

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https://bmcanesthesiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12871-018-0631-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6240288PMC
November 2018
10 Reads

Investigation of Brain Impairment Using Diffusion-Weighted and Diffusion Tensor Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Experienced Healthy Divers.

Med Sci Monit 2018 Nov 17;24:8279-8289. Epub 2018 Nov 17.

Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Namik Kemal University, Tekirdag, Turkey.

BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to understand the changes of decompression illness in healthy divers by comparing diffusion-weighted (DWI) and diffusion tensor MRI findings among healthy professional divers and healthy non-divers with no history of diving. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 26 people were recruited in this prospective study: 11 experienced divers with no history of neurological decompression disease (cohort) and 15 healthy non-divers (control). In all study subjects, we evaluated apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and type of diffusion tensor metric fractional anisotropy (FA) values of different brain locations (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12659/MSM.911475DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6252049PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

[Diving and asthma: Literature review].

Authors:
A Muller M Rochoy

Rev Pneumol Clin 2018 Dec 12;74(6):416-426. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

Université de Lille, 59000 Lille, France. Electronic address:

Introduction: Scuba diving has long been contraindicated for asthmatics. Recommendations are evolving towards authorisation under certain conditions. Our objective was to review the literature on the risks associated with scuba diving among asthmatics and about recommendations on this subject. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pneumo.2018.10.002DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Caffeine attenuates brain injury but increases mortality induced by high-intensity blast wave exposure.

Toxicol Lett 2019 Feb 10;301:90-97. Epub 2018 Nov 10.

Molecular Biology Center, Research Institute of Surgery and Daping Hospital, Army Medical University, Chongqing, 400042, China; State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burn and Combined Injury, Army Medical University, Chongqing, 400038, China; Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Army Medical University, Chongqing, 400038, China. Electronic address:

Caffeine is a substance that is consumed worldwide, and it may exert neuroprotective effects against various cerebral insults, including neurotrauma, which is the most prevalent injury among military personnel. To investigate the effects of caffeine on high-intensity blast wave-induced severe blast injury in mice, three different paradigms of caffeine were applied to male C57BL/6 mice with severe whole body blast injury (WBBI). The results demonstrated that chronic caffeine treatment alleviated blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI); however, both chronic and acute caffeine treatments exacerbated blast-induced lung injuries and, more importantly, increased both the cumulative and time-segmented mortalities postinjury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxlet.2018.11.004DOI Listing
February 2019
21 Reads

Hemorrhage within the tympanic membrane without perforation.

J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2018 Nov 6;47(1):66. Epub 2018 Nov 6.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Konkuk University Medical Center, 120-1 Neungdong-ro (Hwayang-dong), Gwangjin-gu, Seoul, 143-729, Republic of Korea.

Background: Hemotympanum refers to both the presence of blood in the middle ear cavity and to ecchymosis of the tympanic membrane (TM), and a systematic study of intra-TM (iTM) hemorrhage without bleeding in the middle ear cavity has not been conducted. The goals of our study were to analyze the causes of iTM hemorrhage without TM perforation or bleeding in the middle ear cavity, and to demonstrate the clinical characteristics of the disease.

Methods: This Case series study included five patients with iTM hemorrhage between August 2014 and August 2017. Read More

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https://journalotohns.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40463-018-0300-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6218969PMC
November 2018
7 Reads

Retrospective analyses of high-energy explosive devicerelated injuries of the ear and auricular region: experiences in an operative field hospital emergency room.

Ulus Travma Acil Cerrahi Derg 2018 Sep;24(5):450-455

Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Gülhane Training and Research Hospital, Ankara-Turkey.

Background: With the changing conditions of terrorism, particularly in urban areas, high-energy explosive devices such as improvised explosive devices (IEDs) and projectile missiles (PMs) are frequently used. Traumas caused by these devices particularly affect the maxillofacial region and typically lead to otologic problems. In this study, we aimed to evaluate otologic complaints, otoscopic and auricular examinations, and tuning-fork tests of patients who were exposed to high-energy blast-related injuries and perform a comparison between trauma patients injured by IEDs and PMs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5505/tjtes.2017.60649DOI Listing
September 2018
6 Reads

Air due to Glue: Spontaneous Pneumothorax in a Young Adult with Glue Sniffing.

JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc 2018 Mar-Apr;56(210):621-624

Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care & Sleep Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, B. P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal.

Solvent abuse, as inhalant specially, in the form of low cost adhesives like dendrite is common in low income countries among children and the teens. This habit is often a stepping stone to harder drugs. The neurological and neuropsychological effects of solvent abuse are well explored. Read More

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October 2018
2 Reads

Surfactant, steroids and non-invasive ventilation in the prevention of BPD.

Semin Perinatol 2018 Nov 2;42(7):444-452. Epub 2018 Oct 2.

Section of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, Drexel University College of Medicine, 160 East Erie Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19134, United States. Electronic address:

Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a complex disorder with multiple factors implicated in its etiopathogenesis. Despite the scientific advances in the field of neonatology, the incidence of BPD has remained somewhat constant due to increased survival of extremely premature infants. Surfactant deficiency in the immature lung, exposure to invasive mechanical ventilation leading to volutrauma, barotrauma and lung inflammation are some of the critical contributing factors to the pathogenesis of BPD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.semperi.2018.09.006DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

Bilateral subdural empyemas with meningitis secondary to acute barosinusitis.

Eur Ann Otorhinolaryngol Head Neck Dis 2018 Dec 15;135(6):457-459. Epub 2018 Oct 15.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, 50 Seongan-ro, 05355 Gangdong-gu, Seoul, Korea. Electronic address:

Introduction: Intracranial complications of acute rhinosinusitis are rare, but may turn life-threatening.

Case Summary: We report a healthy 30-year-old male who complained of frontal headache, which developed while on a plane. A brain CT showed a low-density lesion on the left frontal convexity with right maxillary and ethmoid sinusitis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.anorl.2018.03.006DOI Listing
December 2018
9 Reads

Blast-Induced Traumatic Brain Injury Triggered by Moderate Intensity Shock Wave Using a Modified Experimental Model of Injury in Mice.

Chin Med J (Engl) 2018 Oct;131(20):2447-2460

Department of Neurosurgery, Jinling Hospital, Jinling School of Clinical Medicine, Nanjing Medical University, Jiangsu, Nanjing 210002, China.

Background: The increasing frequency of explosive injuries has increased interest in blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI). Various shock tube models have been used to study bTBI. Mild-to-moderate explosions are often overlooked because of the slow onset or mildness of the symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0366-6999.243558DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6202591PMC
October 2018

Effect of Apneic Oxygenation on Tracheal Oxygen Levels, Tracheal Pressure, and Carbon Dioxide Accumulation: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Buccal Oxygen Administration.

Anesth Analg 2018 Oct 8. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

From the Department of Anaesthesia and Pain Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Australia.

Background: Apneic oxygenation via the oral route using a buccal device extends the safe apnea time in most but not all obese patients. Apneic oxygenation techniques are most effective when tracheal oxygen concentrations are maintained >90%. It remains unclear whether buccal oxygen administration consistently achieves this goal and whether significant risks of hypercarbia or barotrauma exist. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0000000000003810DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

[Occupational activity disorders of extremely severe mass burn patients in recovery period after injury: a cross-sectional survey].

Zhonghua Shao Shang Za Zhi 2018 Sep;34(9):624-628

Department of Rehabilitation, Kunshan Rehabilitation Hospital, Kunshan 215300, China.

To observe the distribution of occupational activity disorders of extremely severe mass burn patients in recovery period after injury. From December 2014 to December 2015, 65 extremely severe burn patients conforming to the inclusion criteria involved in August 2 Kunshan factory aluminum dust explosion accident were admitted to Kunshan Rehabilitation Hospital. They received comprehensive rehabilitation treatment after burns, including wearing pressure clothes, ultrasound treatment, semiconductor laser and red light irradiation, motor function training, and so on. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.issn.1009-2587.2018.09.012DOI Listing
September 2018
10 Reads

RESPONSE TO COMMENT ON: "PREVENTION OF OTIC BAROTRAUMA IN AVIATION: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW".

Otol Neurotol 2018 Dec;39(10):1339

Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Royal North Shore Hospital, St Leonards, NSW, Australia Kolling Deafness Research Centre, Macquarie University and University of Sydney, NSW, Australia.

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00129492-900000000-9660
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000001984DOI Listing
December 2018
5 Reads

COMMENT ON "PREVENTION OF OTIC BAROTRAUMA IN AVIATION: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW".

Authors:
Douglas Hetzler

Otol Neurotol 2018 Dec;39(10):1338

Department of Otolaryngology, Palo Alto Medical Foundation - Santa Cruz, Soquel, California.

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00129492-201812000-0005
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MAO.0000000000001983DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Fireworks injuries, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2008-2017.

MSMR 2018 Sep;25(9):25-27

Although fireworks shows are considered patriotic and festive, the use of consumer fireworks also can be dangerous. There were 302 records of fireworks injuries during the 10-year surveillance period (2.4 cases per 100,000 person- years [p-yrs]). Read More

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September 2018
1 Read

Improvised Laparostomy Pack to Manage Laparostomy for Injuries due to Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs).

J Coll Physicians Surg Pak 2018 Oct;28(10):791-793

Department of Surgery, Combined Military Hospital (CMH), Quetta, Pakistan.

Splinters of improvised explosive devices [IEDs] cause multiple intestinal perforations and random pattern visceral injuries causing contamination of peritoneal cavity. This necessitates multiple peritoneal toilets and relook surgeries. Surgical management is to perform laparostomy to avoid life threatening complication, like abdominal compartment syndrome and fulminant sepsis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/3023DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

In Vivo Measurement of Middle Ear Pressure Changes during Balloon Eustachian Tuboplasty.

Biomed Res Int 2018 6;2018:9519204. Epub 2018 Sep 6.

Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Ruhr Universität Bochum, Klinikum Bielefeld, Germany.

Background: Balloon Eustachian tuboplasty (BET) is known as a treatment for chronic obstructive Eustachian tube dysfunction (OETD). The precise mechanism of action is not fully understood. Observations in sheep cadavers and human cadavers have shown specific middle ear pressure changes related to BET. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2018/9519204DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6146622PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

[The value of MRI in early diagnosis of dysbaric osteonecrosis].

Zhonghua Lao Dong Wei Sheng Zhi Ye Bing Za Zhi 2018 Jun;36(6):454-456

Yangpu Hospital, Tongji University, Shanhai 200090, China.

To investigate the value of MRI in the early diagnosis of diagnosis of dysbaric osteonecrosis. Labor hygiene investigation and occupation health were examined on 52 high pressure operating personnel, were selected for the examination of both shoulders, hips and knees with X-ray and CT scan. The cystic sign in dysbaric osteonecrosis as an important imaging feature, which perform in the MRI examination for T1W I sequence showed low or slightly low signal and T2W I sequence showed high signal, and X-ray and CT have a lower detection rate than MRI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3760/cma.j.issn.1001-9391.2018.06.016DOI Listing
June 2018
13 Reads

Tympanometric evaluation of Eustachian tube function in Polish scuba divers.

Undersea Hyperb Med 2018 Jul-Aug;45(4):437-443

Division of Biochemistry and Clinical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, Centre for Preclinical Research, Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.

Background: Scuba divers are subjected to relatively high ambient pressures while descending. Equalizing maneuvers (e.g. Read More

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September 2018
5 Reads

The ineffectiveness of applying moisture to the ear on the incidence and severity of otic barotrauma for air passengers.

J Laryngol Otol 2018 Sep 20;132(9):790-795. Epub 2018 Sep 20.

ENT Department,University Hospital Birmingham,UK.

Objective: The application of moisture to the ear is anecdotally claimed to relieve the pain from otic barotrauma that can arise during aircraft descent. This claim was tested in a randomised double-blind study on an aircraft with eight participants heavily predisposed to barotrauma.

Methods: On the outward flight, half the participants wore 'active' devices that applied moisture to the external ear; the remainder wore placebo devices that contained no moisture, but were otherwise identical. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0022215118001524DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Blast-induced "PTSD": Evidence from an animal model.

Neuropharmacology 2019 02 15;145(Pt B):220-229. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Department of Neurology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA; Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA; Mount Sinai Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and the Ronald M. Loeb Center for Alzheimer's Disease, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA; Neurology Service, James J. Peters Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 130 West Kingsbridge Road, Bronx, NY 10468, USA. Electronic address:

A striking observation among veterans returning from the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan has been the co-occurrence of blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD and mTBI might coexist due to additive effects of independent psychological and physical traumas experienced in a war zone. Alternatively blast injury might induce PTSD-related traits or damage brain structures that mediate responses to psychological stressors, increasing the likelihood that PTSD will develop following a subsequent psychological stressor. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuropharm.2018.09.023DOI Listing
February 2019
27 Reads

Chemical Contamination Transfer in the Management of War Casualties.

J Spec Oper Med Fall 2018;18(3):67-70

The use of chemical weapons agents (CWAs) was suspected in recent conflicts, during international conflicts, terrorist attacks, or civil wars. Little is known about the prevention needed for caregivers exposed to the risk of contamination transfer. We present a case of chemical contamination of health servicemembers during the management of casualties. Read More

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December 2018
2 Reads

Inner ear barotrauma in divers: an evidence-based tool for evaluation and treatment.

Diving Hyperb Med 2018 Sep;48(3):186-193

Corresponding author: Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, 1 Jarrett White Road, Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii, USA,

Objective: To systematically search the literature for studies evaluating the typical presentation and testing that is performed for divers with inner ear symptoms and then to create a tool for clinicians when evaluating a diver with inner ear symptoms.

Methods: Nine databases, including PubMed/MEDLINE were systematically searched through 31 January 2018. The PRISMA statement was followed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.28920/dhm48.3.186-193DOI Listing
September 2018
15 Reads