27 results match your criteria Drugs of the Future[Journal]

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NRP1 transport of cancer therapeutics mediated by tumor-penetrating peptides.

Drugs Future 2017 Feb;42(2):95-104

Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, 21201, USA.

Whereas uptake of low molecular weight agents is generally inhibited in tumors due to high interstitial pressure, tumor uptake of macromolecules is increased due to enhanced permeability and retention (EPR). Small molecule drugs alone or incorporated in nanoparticles (NP) have largely been dependent on such physical tumor uptake (passive) for therapeutic activity. Although passive targeted NP such as Stealth Liposomal Doxorubicin (Doxil ®) are effective with improved safety, drug delivery to tumors is still significantly limited. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1358/dof.2017.042.02.2564106DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5461880PMC
February 2017
20 Reads

EXPLORING THE ANTITUMOR EFFECT OF VIRUS IN MALIGNANT GLIOMA.

Drugs Future 2015;40(11):739-749

Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Malignant gliomas are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor with no effective treatments. Current conventional therapies (surgical resection, radiation therapy, temozolomide (TMZ), and bevacizumab administration) typically fail to eradicate the tumors resulting in the recurrence of treatment-resistant tumors. Therefore, novel approaches are needed to improve therapeutic outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1358/dof.2015.040.11.2383070DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4743035PMC
January 2015
7 Reads

Letermovir Treatment of Human Cytomegalovirus Infection Antiinfective Agent.

Drugs Future 2013 May;38(5):291-298

University of Minnesota Medical School Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Nephrology, Amplatz Children's Hospital, East Building, MB680, 2414 South 7th Street, Minneapolis, MN 55454, .

Novel therapies are urgently needed for the management of cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease in high-risk patients. Currently licensed agents target the viral DNA polymerase, and although they are effective, they are fraught with toxicities to patients. Moreover, emergence of antiviral resistance is an increasing problem, particularly for patients on long-term suppressive therapy. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3807861PMC
May 2013
6 Reads

SGI-110: DNA Methyltransferase Inhibitor Oncolytic.

Drugs Future 2013 Aug;38(8):535-543

University of Nebraska Medical Center, Eppley Institute, Omaha, Nebraska 68198, USA.

SGI-110 is a second-generation hypomethylating prodrug whose active metabolite is the well-characterized drug decitabine. This novel compound is an oligonucleotide consisting of decitabine linked through a phosphodiester bond to the endogenous nucleoside deoxyguanosine. The dinucleotide configuration provides protection from drug clearance by deamination, while maintaining at least equivalent effects on gene-specific and global hypomethylation both in vitro and in animal model systems. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4503259PMC
August 2013
7 Reads

Rindopepimut: anti-EGFRvIII peptide vaccine, oncolytic.

Drugs Future 2013 Mar;38(3):147-155

Department of Pathology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA. ; The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at Duke, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

Glioblastoma, the most common primary malignant brain tumor, is among the most difficult cancers to treat. Despite the aggressive standard of care, including surgical removal followed by radiotherapy with concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy, the often sudden onset, diffuse infiltrating nature and highly malignant features of the lesion result in a median overall survival of < 15 months. Currently employed standard- of-care therapy for glioblastoma is nonspecific, leading to premature withdrawal of treatment due to off-target toxicity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1358/dof.2013.038.03.1933992DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4317793PMC
March 2013
20 Reads

GAD65 autoantibodies and its role as biomarker of Type 1 diabetes and Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA).

Drugs Future 2011 Nov;36(11):847

Laboratory of Immunogenetics, The Brehm Center for Diabetes Research, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

One of the hallmarks of autoimmune diabetes is the presence of adaptive responses directed to neuroendocrine proteins. One of these proteins is glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD). While GAD is widely distributed in neuroendocrine tissues, its specific significance in diabetes has paralleled the advances in understanding humoral and cellular immunity in Type 1 diabetes (T1D) and in a subset of Type 2 diabetes (T2D), going from the seminal discoveries of islet autoantibodies to the development and standardization of bioassays as diagnostic tools, to studies on the structure of GAD and its antigenic determinants. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3411186PMC
November 2011
17 Reads

Zinc Finger Nucleases: Tailor-made for Gene Therapy.

Drugs Future 2012 Mar;37(3):183-196

Department of Pathology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, MSTF Building, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA ; Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742.

Genome editing with the use of zinc finger nucleases has been successfully applied to variety of a eukaryotic cells. Furthermore, the proof of concept for this approach has been extended to diverse animal models from to mice. Engineered zinc finger nucleases are able to target specifically and manipulate disease-causing genes through site-specific double strand DNA breaks followed by non-homologous end joining or homologous recombination mechanisms. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3801298PMC
March 2012
13 Reads

Carboxyethylpyrrole plasma biomarkers in age-related macular degeneration.

Drugs Future 2011 Sep;36(9):712-718

Immunopathology Section, Laboratory of Immunology National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health.

Age-related macular degeneration causes irreversible central blindness in people over the age of 50 and is increasing in prevalence among elderly populations. There are currently limited treatment options available for the exudative form of the disease and no formal treatments for the geographic atrophy form aside from lifestyle change and incorporation of antioxidant supplements in the diet. As such, it is important to be able to assess high-risk AMD patients as early as possible in order to prescribe preventative measures. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3705766PMC
September 2011
10 Reads

TARGETING THE NS5A PROTEIN OF HCV: AN EMERGING OPTION.

Drugs Future 2011 Sep;36(9):691-711

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects more than 3% of the world's population, leading to an increased risk of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The current standard of care, a combination of pegylated interferon alfa and ribavirin, is poorly tolerated and often ineffective against the most prevalent genotype of the virus, genotype 1. The very recent approval of boceprevir and telaprevir, two HCV protease inhibitors, promises to significantly improve treatment options and outcomes. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3558953PMC
September 2011
5 Reads

Crizotinib (PF02341066) as a ALK /MET inhibitor- Special Emphasis as a Therapeutic Drug Against Lung Cancer.

Drugs Future 2011 Feb;36(2):91-99

Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago.

There are a number of molecular abnormalities that can occur in normal cells to induce a malignant phenotype. Recently, the receptor tyrosine kinase anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) has been shown to have gain-of-function when partnered with different proteins. As an example, on chromosome 2p, with inversion, there is translocation with generation of EML4-ALK tyrosine kinase in lung cancer. Read More

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http://journals.prous.com/journals/servlet/xmlxsl/pk_journal
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1358/dof.2011.036.02.1584112DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4582997PMC
February 2011
8 Reads

MODULATION OF AUTOPHAGY AND ITS POTENTIAL FOR CANCER THERAPY.

Drugs Future 2011 ;36(12)

Department of Systems Biology, The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX.

Autophagy is a process in which cellular contents are captured in specialized, membrane-bounded vesicles and delivered to lysosomes for final degradation. Most studies support an inherent connection between autophagy and survival, but increasing evidence also suggests an association between autophagy and cell death. The therapeutic potential of targeting the autophagy pathway in cancer seems clear, but specific strategies for achieving successful eradication of cancer cells are less obvious. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4239665PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1358/dof.2011.036.12.1711892DOI Listing
January 2011
8 Reads

Fostamatinib Disodium.

Drugs Future 2011 ;36(4):273

Imperial College Kidney and Transplant Institute, London UK.

The non-receptor tyrosine kinase Syk has a diverse range of biological functions, including a critical role in the intracellular signalling cascade for the surface immunoglobulin receptor on B lymphocytes, and the Fc receptor expressed on numerous immune effector cells. It is therefore seen as a potential therapeutic target in a variety of conditions, including autoimmune, allergic and malignant diseases. Fostamatinib disodium is the orally bioavailable prodrug of R406, a relatively selective small molecule inhibitor of Syk, that has accordingly shown activity in numerous cell types in vitro, and efficacy in a remarkable range of animal models in vivo, including rodent models of asthma, inflammatory arthritis, lupus, glomerulonephritis, diabetes and lymphoma. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3533134PMC
January 2011
7 Reads

Anti-GD2 Strategy in the Treatment of Neuroblastoma.

Drugs Future 2010 ;35(8):665

The prognosis for advanced neuroblastoma remains poor with high risk of recurrence after consolidation. Therapies based on monoclonal antibodies that specifically target disialoganglioside GD2 on tumor cells are improving treatment results for high-risk neuroblastoma. This article reviews the use of anti-GD2 antibodies either as monotherapy or as part of a larger and more complex treatment approach for advanced neuroblastoma. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2964668PMC
January 2010
11 Reads

Farnesoid X receptor-Acting through bile acids to treat metabolic disorders.

Authors:
Yanqiao Zhang

Drugs Future 2010 Aug;35(8):635-642

Department of Integrative Medical Sciences Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine 4209 State Route 44 Rootstown, OH 44272

Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and plays an important role in maintaining bile acid, lipid and glucose homeostasis. Bile acids are endogenous ligands for FXR. However, bile acids may also activate pathways independent of FXR. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3899934PMC
August 2010
6 Reads

ELIGLUSTAT TARTRATE: Glucosylceramide Synthase Inhibitor Treatment of Type 1 Gaucher Disease.

Authors:
J A Shayman

Drugs Future 2010 Aug;35(8):613-620

Nephrology Division, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, 1150 West Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-0676, USA.

Eliglustat tartrate (Genz-112638) is a novel, orally administered agent currently in development for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders, including type 1 Gaucher disease and Fabry disease. This glucosylceramide analogue acts as an inhibitor of glucosylceramide synthase, a Golgi complex enzyme that catalyzes the formation of glucosylceramide from ceramide and UDP-glucose and is the first step in the formation of glucocerebroside-based glycosphingolipids. Pre-clinical pharmacological studies demonstrate that the agent has a high therapeutic index, excellent oral bioavailability and limited toxicity. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3340614PMC
August 2010
11 Reads

Peptide-based Antifungal Therapies against Emerging Infections.

Drugs Future 2010 Mar;35(3):197

Department of Pathology, University of Maryland Baltimore, MSTF Building, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.

Acquired drug resistance to mycotic infections is rapidly emerging as a major medical problem. Opportunistic fungal infections create therapeutic challenges, particularly in high risk immunocompromised patients with AIDS, cancer, and those undergoing transplantation. Higher mortality and/or morbidity rates due to invasive mycosis have been increasing over the last 20 years, and in light of growing resistance to commonly used antibiotics, novel antifungal drugs and approaches are required. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2873032PMC
March 2010
6 Reads

ANTIVIRAL COMPOUNDS IN THE PIPELINE TO TACKLE H1N1 INFLUENZA INFECTION.

Authors:
J H Beigel

Drugs Future 2010 May;35(5):385-392

Science Applications International in support of the Laboratory of Immunoregulation, Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.

The recent pandemic of H1N1 has demonstrated the potential vulnerability of the human population to novel influenza viruses. While there is recent increased interest and effort in developing effective anti-influenza agents, few new products have entered clinical studies. This review will highlight the limited armamentarium of licensed influenza agents, and discuss novel compounds and strategies that have entered clinical studies and may therefore be imminently available to the treating clinician. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1358/dof.2010.035.05.1487081DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3129656PMC
May 2010
4 Reads

Active immunotherapy for the Treatment of Cocaine Dependence.

Drugs Future 2010 Apr;35(4):301-306

Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Texas.

Although cocaine is illegal in most countries of the world, addiction is common and increasing in many populations, and the effectiveness of current treatment options for those afflicted has been very limited. The availability of an anti-cocaine vaccine could offer help to those who wish to quit their addiction. A number of vaccines differing in their chemical nature have been developed, and one has advanced into clinical trials. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1358/dof.2010.035.04.1474292DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3142961PMC
April 2010
4 Reads

Advances in Systemic siRNA Delivery.

Drugs Future 2009 Sep;34(9):721

Department of Pathology, University of Maryland Baltimore, MSTF Building, 10 South Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.

Sequence-specific gene silencing with small interfering RNA (siRNA) has transformed basic science research, and the efficacy of siRNA therapeutics toward a variety of diseases is now being evaluated in pre-clinical and clinical trials. Despite its potential value, the highly negatively charged siRNA has the classic delivery problem of requiring transport across cell membranes to the cytosol. Consequently, carrier development for siRNA delivery is one of the most important problems to solve before siRNA can achieve widespread clinical use. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2812054PMC
September 2009
9 Reads

High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Modulation Targets.

Drugs Future 2010 Jan;35(1):33-39

Pharmaceutical Research Institute at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Discovery Drive, Rensselaer, New York 12144.

Given the strong genetic determinants of favorable HDL-C levels, the ability to procure the cardiovascular disease and longevity benefits associated with this mediator of the reverse cholesterol transport pathway through pharmaceutical intervention is challenging. Niacin is still the most robust HDL-C raising pharmaceutical agent on the market at its use leads to elevations up to 35%. Cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and endothelial lipase (EL) are two targets involved in the reverse cholesterol transport pathway that have become therapeutic targets of various investigations for raising HDL. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3381456PMC
January 2010
6 Reads

ONCOLYTIC HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS 1 (HSV-1) VECTORS: INCREASING TREATMENT EFFICACY AND RANGE THROUGH STRATEGIC VIRUS DESIGN.

Drugs Future 2010 ;35(3):183-195

Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, USA.

Viruses have long been considered potential anticancer treatments. Wild-type viruses have been tested as anticancer agents in clinical trials since the 1960s. The possibility of viral oncolysis as an alternate cancer therapy was transformed by the emergence of modern genetic engineering. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1358/dof.2010.35.3.1470166DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3266817PMC
January 2010
9 Reads

New Therapeutic Approaches for Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia.

Drugs Future 2010 Jan;35(1):53-58

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02115 USA.

Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia (WM) is a B-cell disorder characterized by the infiltration of the bone marrow (BM) with lymphoplasmacytic cells, as well as detection of an IgM monoclonal gammopathy in the serum. WM is an incurable disease, with an overall medial survival of only 5-6 years. First-line therapy of WM has been based on single-agent or combination therapy with alkylator agents (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1358/dof.2010.35.1.1410182DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3159918PMC
January 2010
4 Reads

Therapeutic prospects for spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 and 3.

Drugs Future 2009 Dec;34(12)

Department of Neurology, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn, Germany.

Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2) and type 3 (SCA3) are autosomal-dominant neurodegenerative disorders. SCA2 primarily affects cerebellar Purkinje neurons. SCA3 primarily affects dentate and pontine nuclei and substantia nigra. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1358/dof.2009.034.12.1443434DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4443849PMC
December 2009
4 Reads

SOLUBLE CD40 LIGAND IN DEMENTIA.

Drugs Future 2009 Apr;34(4):333-340

Departments of Psychiatry & Behavioral Medicine, Institute for Research in Psychiatry Neuroimmunology Laboratory, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, FL 33613, USA.

Some 15-20% of the population over the age of 65 years suffer from dementia, currently one of the leading causes of death behind cardiovascular diseases, cancer and cerebrovascular diseases. The major forms of dementia share in common overactivation of the CD40-CD40-L complex, leading to high levels of proinflammatory cytokine production by immune cells of the central nervous system (CNS), including microglia and astrocytes. Consequently, both neuronal survival and signaling are negatively affected, leading to the characteristic progressive loss of higher cortical functions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1358/dof.2009.034.04.1358595DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2748392PMC
April 2009
6 Reads

PHARMACOLOGICAL TREATMENTS FOR TINNITUS: NEW AND OLD.

Drugs Future 2009 ;34(5):381-400

Center for Hearing and Deafness and Department of Communicative Disorders and Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA.

Subjective tinnitus, the phantom ringing or buzzing sensation that occurs in the absence of sound, affects 12-14% of adults; in some cases the tinnitus is so severe or disabling that patients seek medical treatment. However, although the economic and emotional impact of tinnitus is large, there are currently no FDA-approved drugs to treat this condition. Clinical trials are now underway to evaluate the efficacy of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and dopamine D(2) antagonists, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonists and zinc dietary supplements. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1358/dof.2009.034.05.1362442DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3136369PMC
January 2009
7 Reads

Norepinephrine transporter inhibitors and their therapeutic potential.

Authors:
Jia Zhou

Drugs Future 2004 Dec;29(12):1235-1244

Acenta Discovery, Inc., 9030 S. Rita Road, Suite 300, Tucson, AZ 85747-9101, USA; e-mail:

The norepinephrine transporter (NET) is located in the plasma membrane of noradrenergic neurons, where it functions to take up synaptically released norepinephrine (NE). The NET thus serves as the primary mechanism for the inactivation of noradrenergic signaling. Some potent and selective or mixed NET inhibitors (e. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1518795PMC
December 2004
10 Reads

A-adenosine receptors: design of selective ligands and therapeutic prospects.

Drugs Future 1995 Jul;20(7):689-699

Molecular Recognition Section, Laboratory of Bioorganic Chemistry, National Institute of Diabetes, and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4167349PMC
July 1995
9 Reads
25 Citations
0.253 Impact Factor
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