98 results match your criteria Distal Clavicle Osteolysis


Complications with the clavicle hook plate after fixation of Neer type II clavicle fractures.

Int Orthop 2018 Aug 16. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Shoulder and Elbow Unit, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Clínico San Carlos Hospital, C/Cotoblanco 11, 3° A. Majadahonda, 28222, Madrid, Spain.

Background And Purpose: There is no consensus on the optimal surgical procedure for treating Neer type-2 distal clavicle fractures. Hook plates provide better stability than other fixation methods for small fragments but have been related to multiple complications.

Methods: Retrospective study on patients operated for Neer type-2 fractures using a hook plate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00264-018-4108-3DOI Listing
August 2018
6 Reads

Single coracoclavicular suture fixation with Mersilene tape versus hook plate in the treatment of acute type V acromioclavicular dislocation: a retrospective analysis.

J Orthop Surg Res 2018 May 16;13(1):110. Epub 2018 May 16.

Department of Orthopedics, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, No. 386, Ta-Chung 1st Rd, Kaohsiung, 81346, Taiwan, Republic of China.

Background: Here, we compared the clinical and radiographic outcomes between coracoclavicular (CC) fixation with Mersilene tape and hook plate for acute unstable acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation treatment.

Methods: We enrolled 49 patients with unstable acute AC dislocation who, between January 2010 and January 2014, underwent surgery with single CC suture fixation with Mersilene tape (M group, 25 cases) or clavicle hook plate (H group, 24 cases). In M and H groups, the average age was 43. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13018-018-0831-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5956760PMC
May 2018
7 Reads

Evaluation and management of shoulder pain in skeletally immature athletes.

Transl Pediatr 2017 Jul;6(3):181-189

Western Michigan University Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008, USA.

Shoulder pain in young athletes generally is a result of poor sports technique and overuse. A number intrinsic causes of shoulder pain have been identified. Pain may also be referred to shoulder area from cervical spine, neck and chest pathology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/tp.2017.04.06DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5532194PMC
July 2017
9 Reads

Is the Clavicula Pro Humero Technique of Value for Reconstruction After Resection of the Proximal Humerus in Children?

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2017 Oct 11;475(10):2550-2561. Epub 2017 Jul 11.

Pediatric Orthopedics Department, Children's Hospital, CHU Nancy, Rue du Morvan, 54000, Nancy, France.

Background: There are several options for reconstruction of proximal humerus resections after wide resection for malignant tumors in children. The clavicula pro humero technique is a biologic option that has been used in the past, but there are only scant case reports and small series that comment on the results of the procedure. Because the longevity of children mandates a reconstruction with potential longevity not likely to be achieved by other techniques, the clavicula pro humero technique may be a potential option in selected patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11999-017-5438-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5599409PMC
October 2017
20 Reads

Biomechanical analysis of clavicle hook plate implantation with different hook angles in the acromioclavicular joint.

Int Orthop 2017 08 18;41(8):1663-1669. Epub 2017 Jan 18.

Department of Orthopedics, Taichung Veterans General Hospital, 1650 Taiwan Boulevard Sect. 4, Taichung, Taiwan, 40705, Taiwan.

Purpose: A clavicle hook plate is a simple and effective method for treating acromioclavicular dislocation and distal clavicle fractures. However, subacromial osteolysis and peri-implant fractures are complicated for surgeons to manage. This study uses finite element analysis (FEA) to investigate the post-implantation biomechanics of clavicle hook plates with different hook angles. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00264-016-3384-z
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00264-016-3384-zDOI Listing
August 2017
10 Reads

Diagnosis and Management of Distal Clavicle Osteolysis.

Orthopedics 2017 Mar 7;40(2):119-124. Epub 2016 Dec 7.

Distal clavicle osteolysis is an uncommon condition that most commonly affects weight lifters and other athletes who perform repetitive overhead activity. Although this condition most commonly presents in young active men, it is becoming increasing more common in women with the rise in popularity of body building and extreme athletics. Distal clavicle osteolysis can be debilitating, especially in those with rigorous training regimens, preventing exercise because of pain with activities such as bench presses and chest flies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/01477447-20161128-03DOI Listing
March 2017
13 Reads

Clinical and radiological results on the fixation of Neer type 2 distal clavicle fractures with a hook plate.

Acta Orthop Traumatol Turc 2016 Oct 11;50(5):489-493. Epub 2016 Oct 11.

İstanbul Education and Research Hospital, İstanbul, Turkey.

Objective: The aim of this study was to analyze the clinical and functional results of hook plate fixation in Neer type 2 distal clavicle fractures.

Methods: We retrospectively analyzed 16 patients (11 males, 5 females) who were diagnosed with Neer type 2 distal clavicle fractures and treated with hook plate fixation between 2013 and 2014. Mean age was 38 (range: 27-61), and mean follow-up time was 14. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aott.2016.08.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6197475PMC
October 2016
8 Reads

Distal clavicular osteolysis in adults: association with bench pressing intensity.

Skeletal Radiol 2016 Nov 22;45(11):1473-9. Epub 2016 Aug 22.

Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Interventions, Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, 132 South 10th Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19107, USA.

Objectives: To investigate the association between distal clavicular osteolysis (DCO) and bench pressing intensity.

Methods: From a retrospective review of MRI shoulder reports of individuals between 20 and 40 years of age, 262 male patients with DCO and 227 age-matched male patients without DCO were selected. All patients had completed a bench pressing questionnaire. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00256-016-2446-zDOI Listing
November 2016
8 Reads

Gorham's Disease in a Patient with Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

Authors:
B Seidel M Kupfer

Top Spinal Cord Inj Rehabil 2016 ;22(1):79-82

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Magee Rehabilitation Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Gorham's disease is a rare entity that has been sparsely covered in the medical literature, and its pathophysiology remains poorly understood. We present the case of a 22-year-old man who sustained a traumatic T6 American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale B paraplegic injury complicated by a complaint of shoulder pain during his acute rehabilitation stay. He was found to have osteolysis of the distal right clavicle (Gorham's disease). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1310/sci2201-79DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5790032PMC
January 2016
5 Reads

Frequency, imaging findings, risk factors, and long-term sequelae of distal clavicular osteolysis in young patients.

Skeletal Radiol 2015 May 7;44(5):659-66. Epub 2015 Jan 7.

Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Interventions, Department of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Thomas Jefferson University, 132 South 10th Street, Philadelphia, PA, 19107, USA,

Objective: Atraumatic distal clavicular osteolysis (DCO) has been described in adult male weightlifters. Our purpose was to investigate the frequency, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics, risk factors, and long-term sequelae of DCO in young patients.

Materials And Methods: Individuals with atraumatic DCO were identified in a retrospective review of 1,432 consecutive MRI shoulder reports in patients between 13 and 19 years of age. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007%2Fs00256-014-20
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00256-014-2092-2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00256-014-2092-2DOI Listing
May 2015
20 Reads

Distal Clavicle Osteolysis after Modified Weaver-Dunn's Procedure for Chronic Acromioclavicular Dislocation: A Case Report and Review of Complications.

Case Rep Orthop 2014 2;2014:953578. Epub 2014 Dec 2.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Traumatology, Parc de Salut Mar, Hospital del Mar and Hospital de l'Esperança, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), Passeig Maritim 25-27, 08003 Barcelona, Spain.

Distal clavicle osteolysis after acromioclavicular joint stabilization has only been described after the use of hardware for clavicle stabilization or synthetic graft causing a foreign body reaction. This paper reports a very rare case of distal clavicle osteolysis after modified Weaver-Dunn procedure for the treatment of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation. The paper also provides a comprehensive review of complications of this surgical technique and discusses a potential vascular etiology and preventive strategies aimed at avoiding clavicle osteolysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/953578DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4269279PMC
December 2014
10 Reads

Comparison of single coracoclavicular suture fixation and hook plate for the treatment of acute unstable distal clavicle fractures.

J Orthop Surg Res 2014 May 29;9:42. Epub 2014 May 29.

Department of Orthopedics, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, 386 Ta-Chung 1st Road, Kaohsiung 81346, Taiwan.

Background: Surgical managements are recommended for unstable distal clavicle fractures because of a high incidence of nonunion. A variety of methods have been previously reported, but there is no current consensus regarding which method is the most suitable.

Methods: Between December 2004 and August 2010, we treated 68 patients with Neer type IIB distal clavicle fractures using single coracoclavicular suture fixation with Mersilene tape (M group) or clavicular hook plate (H group). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1749-799X-9-42DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4049442PMC
May 2014
20 Reads

[Complications of treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation and unstable distal clavicular fracture with clavicular hook plate].

Zhongguo Gu Shang 2013 Nov;26(11):927-31

Department of Orthopaedics, Wuxi Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medcine, Wuxi 214001, Jiangsu, China.

Objective: To investigate the causes and prevention of the complications about treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Tossy III) and unstable distal clavicular fracture (Neer II) with clavicular hook plate.

Methods: From January 2001 to December 2011, 246 patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Tossy III) and 222 patients with unstable distal clavicular fracture (Neer II) were treated with acromioclvicular hook plate fixation,including 348 males and 120 females with an average age of 45.4 years old ranging from 21 to 80 years old. Read More

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November 2013
27 Reads

Surgical treatment of chronic acromioclavicular dislocation with biologic graft vs synthetic ligament: a prospective randomized comparative study.

J Orthop Traumatol 2013 Dec 7;14(4):283-90. Epub 2013 May 7.

Unit of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery, D. Cervesi Hospital, Via L. Van Beethoven 1, 47841, Cattolica, RN, Italy,

Background: Acromioclavicular (AC) dislocation involves complete loss of articular contact; it is defined as chronic when it follows conservative management or unsuccessful surgical treatment.

Materials And Methods: The study compared the clinical and radiographic outcomes of AC joint stabilization performed in 40 patients with chronic dislocation using a biological allograft (group A) or a synthetic ligament (group B). Demographic data included: M/F: 25/15; mean age: 35 ± 3. Read More

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http://www.springerplus.com/content/pdf/2193-1801-3-420.pdf
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10195-013-0242-2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10195-013-0242-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3828501PMC
December 2013
6 Reads

Management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation with a double-button fixation system.

Injury 2013 Mar 24;44(3):288-92. Epub 2013 Jan 24.

Orthopaedic Department, University Hospital of Ioannina, Greece.

Introduction: Numerous static and dynamic techniques have been described for the management of acute acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation. To date, no standard technique has been established and several complications have been described for each of these techniques. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the functional and radiographic outcomes of acute AC joint reconstruction after a mini-open technique using the double-button fixation system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.injury.2013.01.002DOI Listing
March 2013
4 Reads

Distal clavicle osteolysis following fixation with a synthetic ligament.

Int J Shoulder Surg 2011 Oct;5(4):101-4

Department of Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery, Lincoln County Hospital, Greetwell Road, Lincoln, LN2 5QY Lincolnshire, United Kingdom.

We present a case of distal clavicle osteolysis following treatment of a chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation with a synthetic ligament. The relevant literature is reviewed and discussed. Read More

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http://www.internationalshoulderjournal.org/text.asp?2011/5/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0973-6042.91003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3249926PMC
October 2011
6 Reads

Aberrant origin of the long head of the biceps: a case series.

J Shoulder Elbow Surg 2012 Mar 11;21(3):356-60. Epub 2011 Aug 11.

Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Bassett Healthcare Network, Cooperstown, NY 13326, USA.

Background: Variants of the origin of the long head of the biceps have been described intraoperatively. It is unclear whether these variants contribute to shoulder pathology. Our purpose was to describe an anatomic variation of the origin of the long head of the biceps and associated clinical presentations of 2 subjects and to review existing reports of other variants. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jse.2011.05.006DOI Listing
March 2012
2 Reads

Musculoskeletal mnemonics: differentiating features.

Curr Probl Diagn Radiol 2011 Mar-Apr;40(2):45-71

University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792-3252, USA.

Mnemonics are often used in musculoskeletal radiology to help radiologists remember long differential diagnoses. However, unless the specific appearance of each entity on a differential is also recalled, mnemonics become useless. This article presents 8 mnemonics with their corresponding differential diagnoses and distinguishing features. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S036301880900093
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1067/j.cpradiol.2009.11.002DOI Listing
April 2011
9 Reads

Open versus arthroscopic distal clavicle resection.

Arthroscopy 2010 May;26(5):697-704

Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois 60612, USA.

Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review was to critically evaluate the available literature in an attempt to compare the outcome of open versus arthroscopic distal clavicle resection in the treatment of acromioclavicular joint pathology.

Methods: From January 1966 to December 2008, Medline was searched for the following key words: "acromioclavicular joint arthritis," "acromioclavicular osteolysis," "distal clavicle excision," "acromioclavicular joint excision," "Mumford," and "clavicle." Inclusion criteria included studies that compared the outcome of open versus arthroscopic distal clavicle resection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2009.12.007DOI Listing
May 2010
2 Reads

Subacromial morphometric assessment of the clavicle hook plate.

Injury 2010 Jun 29;41(6):613-9. Epub 2010 Jan 29.

St. Joseph's Health Centre, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Background: Clavicle hook plates are an effective plate fixation alternative for distal clavicle fractures and severe acromioclavicular joint dislocations. However, post-operative complications associated with the subacromial portion of the hook include acromial osteolysis and subacromial impingement. We examine and quantify the three-dimensional position of the subacromial portion of the hook plate relative to surrounding acromial and subacromial structures in a series of cadaveric shoulders to determine if hook positioning predisposes the shoulder to these noted post-operative complications. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00201383090065
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.injury.2009.12.012DOI Listing
June 2010
5 Reads

Open distal clavicle resection: isolated or with adjunctive acromioplasty.

Acta Orthop Belg 2009 Oct;75(5):581-7

Mayo Clinic, Rochester MN 55905, USA.

The purpose of this study was to assess outcomes following open distal clavicle resection for acromioclavicular joint arthritis or distal clavicle osteolysis, with and without associated acromioplasty. Patients with painful clinical findings limited to the acromioclavicular joint had isolated distal clavicle excision (23 shoulders). Patients with acromioclavicular joint abnormalities and rotator cuff tendinopathy also underwent acromioplasty (41 shoulders). Read More

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October 2009
3 Reads

Post-traumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle.

Pediatr Radiol 2010 May 24;40(5):784. Epub 2009 Sep 24.

Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children's Medical Center, 3333 Burnet Ave., Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00247-009-1403-6DOI Listing
May 2010
4 Reads

Distal clavicle fracture as a complication of arthroscopic distal clavicle resection.

Arthroscopy 2009 Aug;25(8):929-33

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rush Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Arthroscopic resection of the distal clavicle has been advocated as a surgical treatment option for acromioclavicular (AC) joint pathology. To our knowledge, iatrogenic fracture of the distal clavicle during distal clavicle resection has never been reported. This report describes distal clavicle fracture as a complication of misidentification of the AC joint and subsequent aggressive burring of the distal clavicle during shoulder arthroscopy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.arthro.2009.02.008DOI Listing
August 2009
1 Read

[Atraumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle].

Radiologia 2009 Sep-Oct;51(5):534-5. Epub 2009 Jun 11.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.rx.2009.03.003DOI Listing
February 2010
3 Reads

Acromioclavicular joint problems in athletes and new methods of management.

Clin Sports Med 2008 Oct;27(4):763-88

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Connecticut Health Center, Medical Arts and Research Building, Room 4017, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT 06030, USA.

The acromioclavicular (AC) complex consists of bony and ligamentous structures that stabilize the upper extremity through the scapula to the axial skeleton. The AC joint pathology in the athlete is generally caused by 1 of 3 processes: trauma (fracture, AC joint separation, or dislocation); AC joint arthrosis (posttraumatic or idiopathic); or distal clavicle osteolysis. This article presents systematically the relevant anatomy, classification, evaluation, and treatment of these disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2008.06.006DOI Listing
October 2008
4 Reads

Distal clavicular osteolysis: a review of the literature.

Bull NYU Hosp Jt Dis 2008 ;66(2):94-101

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, NYU Hospital for Joint Diseases, New York, NY 10003, USA.

Acute distal clavicular osteolysis was first described in 1936. Since then, distal clavicular osteolysis (DCO) has been separated into traumatic and atraumatic pathogeneses. In 1982 the first series of male weight trainers who developed ADCO was reported. Read More

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October 2008
5 Reads

Surgical treatment of symptomatic acromioclavicular joint problems: a systematic review.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2007 Feb;455:30-7

Department of Orthopaedics, CU Sports Medicine, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Boulder, CO 80304, USA.

Excision of the distal clavicle has become the mainstay of surgical treatment for acromioclavicular joint arthritis and osteolysis refractory to nonoperative management. Surgical options for symptomatic acromioclavicular joint abnormalities refractory to nonoperative treatment are the classic open distal clavicle excision, direct (superior) arthroscopic excision, and indirect (bursal) arthroscopic distal clavicle excision. We asked whether any of these three procedures provided a better result. Read More

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https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00003086-200702000-000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/BLO.0b013e31802f5450DOI Listing
February 2007
7 Reads

Arthroscopic distal clavicle resection in athletes: a prospective comparison of the direct and indirect approach.

Am J Sports Med 2007 Jan 27;35(1):53-8. Epub 2006 Nov 27.

Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA 02118, USA.

Background: The clinical success of arthroscopic distal clavicle resection for athletes has been well documented. There are, however, no published studies that prospectively compare the recovery rates in athletes as well as the outcomes of the indirect versus direct approaches.

Hypothesis: Both procedures are equally successful; however, the direct approach affords faster return to sports. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0363546506294855
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0363546506294855DOI Listing
January 2007
5 Reads

Distal clavicular osteolysis: MR evidence for subchondral fracture.

Skeletal Radiol 2007 Jan 5;36(1):17-22. Epub 2006 Oct 5.

Department of Radiology, Division of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Yawkey Center, 6th floor Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

Purpose: To investigate the association between distal clavicular osteolysis and subchondral fractures of the distal clavicle at MRI.

Materials And Methods: This study was approved by the hospital human research committee, which waived the need for informed consent. Three radiologists retrospectively analyzed 36 shoulder MR examinations in 36 patients with imaging findings of distal clavicular osteolysis. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00256-006-0209-y
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00256-006-0209-yDOI Listing
January 2007
6 Reads

Nontraumatic disorders of the clavicle.

J Am Acad Orthop Surg 2006 Apr;14(4):205-14

Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR 97239, USA.

Other than those resulting from trauma and arthritis, disorders of the clavicle are uncommon. Some nontraumatic disorders are found only in infancy and childhood, such as birth fracture, infantile cortical hyperostosis, congenital pseudarthrosis, cleidocranial dysplasia, and short clavicle syndrome. Other nontraumatic disorders occur in both children and adults; these include anterior subluxation of the sternoclavicular joint, Friedrich's disease, hypertrophic osteitis, chronic multifocal periosteitis and arthropathy, and osteomyelitis. Read More

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April 2006
2 Reads

Fractures of the distal third of the clavicle treated by hook plating.

Int Orthop 2006 Feb 19;30(1):7-10. Epub 2005 Oct 19.

Royal Orthopaedic Hospital, Birmingham, UK.

We retrospectively assessed the union and shoulder function following hook plate fixation in 18 patients with Neer type 2 fractures of the lateral end of the clavicle. The average age was 40 (range 22-62) years, and the mean follow-up was 25 (range 6-48) months. Fifteen patients had acute fractures and the rest were non-unions. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00264-005-0019-1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00264-005-0019-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2254672PMC
February 2006
2 Reads

Osteolysis of the distal clavicle: serial improvement and normalization of acromioclavicular joint space with conservative care.

J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2004 Sep;27(7):e12

Diagnostic Imaging Resident, Department of Radiology, Logan College of Chiropractic, Chesterfield, Mo 63006-1065, USA.

Objective: To discuss a case of osteolysis of the distal clavicle (ODC) in a 29-year-old male chiropractic student who showed interval radiographic and clinical evidence of healing.

Clinical Features: The patient complained of intermittent left-sided shoulder pain of 8 months' duration that was exacerbated while performing spinal-manipulative procedures. A radiographic examination showed changes consistent with osteolysis involving the distal clavicle. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S016147540400134
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmpt.2004.06.009DOI Listing
September 2004
9 Reads

Case of the month. Atraumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle.

Authors:
Patrick L Gray

JAAPA 2004 Mar;17(3):62

75th Medical Operations Squadron, Hill Air Force Base, Utah, USA.

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March 2004
4 Reads

Post-traumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle, pubis and ischium in 7 patients.

Chin J Traumatol 2004 Aug;7(4):247-52

Department of Orthopedics, Second Affiliated Hospital, Medical College, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009, China.

Post-traumatic osteolysis (PTOL) is a very rare disease occurring after acute trauma or repetitive micro-trauma, which is characterized by persistent pain in the injured site. In this study, we reported 7 patients, in whom osteolysis developed in the distal clavicle, pubis and ischium. Read More

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August 2004
7 Reads

Normal osseous variants presenting as cystic or lucent areas on radiography and CT imaging: a pictorial overview.

Eur J Radiol 2004 Jul;51(1):77-84

Department of Radiology, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.

We present a number of commonly encountered pseudolesions. These represent areas of the skeleton that are relatively radiolucent simulating an osteolytic or cystic lesion. Such areas discussed in this article include the superolateral humeral head, rhomboid fossa of the clavicle, scapular defect, supratrochlear foramen, biceps tendon insertion, vascular channel of the ulna, distal condylar area of the knee, 'bone in bone' disturbance, dorsal defect of the patella, metadiaphyseal area, 'Wards' triangle', inframalleolar fossa of the fibula, and anterior lytic defect of the calcaneus. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0720048X0300180
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0720-048X(03)00180-3DOI Listing
July 2004
9 Reads

Isolated acromioclavicular joint pathology in the symptomatic shoulder on magnetic resonance imaging: a pictorial essay.

J Comput Assist Tomogr 2004 Mar-Apr;28(2):215-22

Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC 27157-1088, USA.

The acromioclavicular (AC) joint is a synovial joint that is predisposed to painful syndromes because of mechanical stress or developmental variation. It is often overlooked in the evaluation of patients with shoulder pain, however. Isolated AC joint pathology was studied on magnetic resonance imaging scans of patients with symptoms suggesting rotator cuff pathology. Read More

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May 2004
3 Reads

Long-term results of arthroscopic resection of the distal clavicle with concomitant subacromial decompression.

Arthroscopy 2003 Oct;19(8):805-9

The Shoulder Institute, Century City, California, USA.

Purpose: The goal of the study was to evaluate the long-term outcome of combined arthroscopic distal clavicle excision and subacromial decompression.

Type Of Study: Retrospective, long-term cohort evaluation.

Methods: Twenty patients with an average follow-up of 6 years (range, 3. Read More

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October 2003
5 Reads

Arthroscopic treatment of acromioclavicular joint injuries and results.

Clin Sports Med 2003 Apr;22(2):301-17

Northwestern Orthopaedic Institute, Northwestern University Medical School, 680 N. Lakeshore Drive, Suite 1028, Chicago, IL, USA.

Injuries and conditions that affect the AC joint are common. Low-grade separations, degenerative conditions, and osteolysis of the distal clavicle are frequently dealt with by the treating physician. Proper assessment requires a thorough history, examination, and radiologic work-up. Read More

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April 2003
7 Reads

[Posttraumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle].

Ugeskr Laeger 2003 Feb;165(7):696-7

Ortopaedkirurgisk afdeling og radiologisk afdeling, Amtssygehuset i Herlev.

Posttraumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle (ODC) is a very rare condition that occurs after acute injury or repetitive microtrauma of the shoulder and which is characterized by persistent shoulder pain, restricted shoulder motion, and progressive osteolytic changes at the outer end of the clavicle. A case of posttraumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicleis presented and the aetiology, diagnosis and treatment are discussed. Read More

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February 2003
5 Reads

Radiologic case study. Stress-induced osteolysis of the distal clavicle.

Orthopedics 2003 Feb;26(2):136, 214-6

Department of Radiology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Ill 60153, USA.

Repetitive stress-induced osteolysis of the distal clavicle occurs in athletes who engage in upper extremity weight strengthening exercises and occupational overuse. Repetitive microtrauma is believed to cause microfractures and bone resorption with local pain. Conservative treatment usually is effective. Read More

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February 2003
3 Reads

A case of post-traumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle: histologic lesion of the acromion.

J Shoulder Elbow Surg 2002 Mar-Apr;11(2):182-7

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Japan.

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July 2002
10 Reads

Post-traumatic and stress-induced osteolysis of the distal clavicle.

Authors:
Etsuji Shiota

Skeletal Radiol 2002 May 4;31(5):311. Epub 2002 Apr 4.

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00256-002-0489-9
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00256-002-0489-9DOI Listing
May 2002
5 Reads

Acromioclavicular joint injuries: identifying and treating 'separated shoulder' and other conditions.

Authors:
R J Johnson

Phys Sportsmed 2001 Nov;29(11):31-5

Department of Family Practice, Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN, 55408, USA.

The acromioclavicular (AC) joint is vulnerable to injury in collision sports and in activities requiring repetitive overhead motions. The spectrum of injury includes sprains and osteoarthritis of the AC joint and osteolysis and fracture of the distal clavicle. With the exception of severe sprains and fractures, most conditions can be managed nonoperatively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3810/psm.2001.11.1036DOI Listing
November 2001
4 Reads

Shoulder imaging abnormalities in individuals with paraplegia.

J Rehabil Res Dev 2001 Jul-Aug;38(4):401-8

Human Engineering Research Laboratories, VA Center of Excellence, VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, PA 15206, USA.

Shoulder pain and rotator cuff tears are highly prevalent in individuals with paraplegia (PP). The purpose of this study was to use magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), plain radiographs, questionnaires, and physical examination to gain insight into the prevalence of shoulder disorders in individuals with PP. A total of 28 individuals with PP was recruited (mean age=35; mean year from injury=11. Read More

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January 2002
2 Reads

Posttraumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle: analysis of 7 cases and a review of the literature.

J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2001 Jun;24(5):356-61

Department of Radiology, Parker College of Chiropractic, Dallas, Tex. 75229-5668, USA.

Objective: To discuss the clinical manifestation, radiographic features, and treatment of 7 cases of posttraumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle. Also, to furnish evidence indicating that the current terminology for this disorder is ambiguous and to propose a new classification system.

Clinical Features: Three cases resulted from acute trauma, and 4 cases were caused by sports-related repetitive microtrauma. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S016147540150786
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1067/mmt.2001.115260DOI Listing
June 2001
4 Reads

Increased T2 signal intensity in the distal clavicle: incidence and clinical implications.

Skeletal Radiol 2000 Dec;29(12):697-702

Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27705, USA.

Objective: The objectives of the current study were (1) to quantify the incidence of increased T2 signal in the distal clavicle and (2) to assess the clinical significance of this finding in patients with chronic acromioclavicular (AC) joint pain.

Design And Patients: Eight patients (five male and three female, 15-41 years of age) with disabling shoulder pain localized to the AC joint and marked increased T2 signal in the distal clavicle are presented. These eight patients underwent MR examination over a 25 month period (August 1996 to September 1998). Read More

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December 2000
5 Reads

Stress-induced osteolysis of distal clavicle: imaging patterns and treatment using CT-guided injection.

Eur Radiol 2001 ;11(2):270-2

Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bnai-Zion Medical Center, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

Osteolysis of distal clavicle (ODC) may occur in patients who experience repeated stress or microtrauma to the shoulder. This entity has clinical and radiological findings similar to post-traumatic ODC. We describe a case of successful treatment of stress-induced ODC with CT-guided injection of corticosteroid and anesthetic drug into the acromioclavicular joint. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s003300000529
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s003300000529DOI Listing
May 2001
8 Reads

[Post-traumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle. A case report and review of the literature]].

Unfallchirurg 2000 Dec;103(12):1121-3

Unfallchirurgische Klinik, Medizinische Hochschule Hannover.

The post-traumatic osteolysis of the distal clavicle is very infrequent and the etiology and pathology is poorly understood. It is important to consider this possibility for differential diagnosis when continued pain in the acromio-clavicular joint (AC joint) follows blunt shoulder trauma. The course of the disease may result in a 3 cm loss of length of the distal clavicle. Read More

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December 2000
2 Reads

Osteolysis of the distal clavicle: readily detected and treated shoulder pain.

Phys Sportsmed 2000 Dec;28(12):35-44

Bone and Joing Care of West Michigan, Grand Rapids, MI, 49506, USA.

Osteolysis of the distal clavicle is a pathologic process involving resorption of the distal clavicle and is usually posttraumatic or caused by the repetitive microtrauma of weight lifting. Pain localized to the acromioclavicular joint and radiographs or bone scans showing pathology in the distal clavicle are diagnostic. Modification of activities, such as curtailment of weight lifting, often alleviates symptoms, but surgery is an option when conservative measures fail or for patients who cannot limit their activities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3810/psm.2000.12.1334DOI Listing
December 2000
6 Reads