26 results match your criteria Diabetes Management [Journal]

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Effects of the dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH) diet on glucose variability in youth with Type 1 diabetes.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2017 ;7(5):383-391

Department of Rehabilitation Exercise, and Nutritional Sciences, University of Cincinnati, USA.

Objective: Glucose variability (GV) independently increases risk for vascular events in patients with diabetes. The Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) dietary pattern emphasizes fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, and low fat dairy and has the potential to reduce postprandial blood glucose (BG) excursions, however, its effect on GV is not known. The purpose of this work was to assess feasibility and collect preliminary data on the efficacy of the DASH diet on GV in adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5763547PMC
January 2017
15 Reads

Healthy lifestyle intervention for adult clinic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2017 ;7(2):197-204

Department of Family Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, GA.

Background: Diet and exercise therapy have been reported to be effective in improving blood glucose control and are an important part of treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Objective: The goal of this study is to examine the efficacy of a healthy lifestyle intervention for adult clinic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, as measured by Hgb-A1c, cardiovascular indicators, physical activity, weight, and BMI. Also of interest are optimal strategies for subject recruitment, the number of intervention sessions attended, and participant use of the Fitbit watch to monitor their physical activity and track food and beverage consumption. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5545882PMC
January 2017
11 Reads

Adherence in adolescents with Type 1 diabetes: strategies and considerations for assessment in research and practice.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2015 Nov;5(6):485-498

Section of Psychology, Department of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine, 1102 Bates Avenue, Suite 940, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Suboptimal adherence remains a significant concern for adolescents with Type 1 diabetes, the treatment regimen for which is complex and includes numerous behaviors. Accurate assessment of adherence is critical for effective healthcare and to measure trial outcomes. Without a valid biomarker of adherence, assessment strategies must rely on measuring management behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.15.41DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4824320PMC
November 2015
7 Reads

Effects of comorbid conditions on health-related quality of life in youth with Type 2 diabetes: the TODAY clinical trial.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2015 Nov;5(6):431-439

Children's Hospital Los Angeles & Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Aim: To explore associations between health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and comorbidities in youth with Type 2 diabetes.

Patients & Methods: Of 699 youth in the TODAY study, 685 (98%) had baseline HRQOL data, 649 (93%) at 6 months and 583 (83%) at 24 months. Comorbidities were defined by sustained abnormal values and treatment regimens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.15.35DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4820314PMC
November 2015
15 Reads

Vitamin A: a missing link in diabetes?

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2015;5(5):359-367

Department of Pharmacology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY 10065, USA.

Vitamin A has a critical role in embryonic development, immunity and the visual cycle. In recent years, evidence has demonstrated that vitamin A can also regulate metabolic pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity and diabetes. This has increased interest in the possible antiobesity and antidiabetic properties of natural and synthetic vitamin A derivatives. Read More

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http://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/10.2217/dmt.15.30
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.15.30DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4623591PMC
January 2015
18 Reads

Th17 cells in Type 1 diabetes: a future perspective.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2015 Jul;5(4):247-250

Department of Pharmacological & Physiological Science, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, 1402 South Grand Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63104, USA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5046833PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/DMT.15.19DOI Listing
July 2015
6 Reads

Effective strategies for encouraging behavior change in people with diabetes.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2015 ;5(6):499-510

Division of Developmental/Behavioral Pediatrics & Psychology, Rainbow Babies & Children's Hospital, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Behavioral management of diabetes leads to better health outcomes. This paper reviews the available literature on facilitators of behavior change in people with diabetes and highlights approaches and strategies diabetes care providers can utilize. The research and clinical evidence points to the critical nature of considering the content and structure of recommendations, and utilizing problem solving and teamwork approaches. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6086609PMC
January 2015
14 Reads

Effective interventions to improve medication adherence in Type 2 diabetes: a systematic review.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2014 Jan;4(1):29-48

Center for Health Disparities Research, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA ; Division of General Internal Medicine & Geriatrics, Department of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA ; Center for Disease Prevention & Health Interventions for Diverse Populations, Charleston VA, REAP, Ralph H Johnson VAMC, Charleston, SC, USA.

Aim: Medication adherence is associated with improved outcomes in diabetes. Interventions have been established to help improve medication adherence; however, the most effective interventions in patients with Type 2 diabetes remain unclear. The goal of this study was to distinguish whether interventions were effective and identify areas for future research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.13.62DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4157681PMC
January 2014
11 Reads

Understanding hypoglycemia in hospitalized patients.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2014 Mar;4(2):165-176

Department of Clinical Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine & Clinical Diabetes Center, Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Montefiore Medical Center, the University Hospital for Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Clinical Diabetes Center, 1825 Eastchester Road, Bronx, NY 10461 USA.

Controlling blood glucose in hospitalized patients is important as both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia are associated with increased cost, length of stay, morbidity and mortality. A limiting factor in stringent control is the concern of iatrogenic hypoglycemia. The association of hypoglycemia with mortality has led to clinical guideline changes recommending more conservative glycemic control than had previously been suggested, with the use of patient specific approaches when appropriate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/DMT.13.73DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4153389PMC
March 2014
14 Reads

Current and future management of diabetic retinopathy: a personalized evidence-based approach.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2013 Nov;3(6):481-494

Kellogg Eye Center, Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, 1000 Wall Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA.

Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is the leading cause of new-onset blindness in working-age individuals in the USA and represents a growing worldwide epidemic. Classic risk factors for onset or progression of DR include poor glycemic control, hypertension and hyperlipidemia; however, these factors account for only a small proportion of the risk of DR. New systemic risk factors are emerging, which may allow for personalized risk profiling and targeted treatment by physicians. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.13.50DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4052979PMC
November 2013
5 Reads

Viruses and Type 1 diabetes: a dynamic labile equilibrium.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2013 May;3(3):217-223

Center for Type 1 Diabetes Research, 9420 Athena Circle, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from the specific immune-mediated destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells of the pancreas. In genetically susceptible individuals, a still undetermined initiating 'hit' triggers a cascade of events that eventually leads to autoreactive CD8 T cells infiltrating the pancreatic islets and, subsequently, destroying them. There is increasing evidence that viruses, especially enteroviruses, are major environmental candidates; however, despite decades of investigation, we still lack certainty with regard to the causation of T1D. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.13.17DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3949992PMC
May 2013
6 Reads

Inducing immune tolerance: a focus on Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2013 Sep;3(5):415-426

Department of Microbiology-Immunology & Interdepartmental Immunobiology Center, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 303 E Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.

Tolerogenic strategies that specifically target diabetogenic immune cells in the absence of complications of immunosuppression are the desired treatment for the prevention or even reversal of Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Antigen (Ag)-based therapies must not only suppress disease-initiating diabetogenic T cells that are already activated, but, more importantly, prevent activation of naive auto-Ag-specific T cells that may become autoreactive through epitope spreading as a result of Ag liberation from damaged islet cells. Therefore, identification of auto-Ags relevant to T1D initiation and progression is critical to the design of effective Ag-specific therapies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.13.36DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3910302PMC
September 2013
15 Reads

Looking forward to transition: perspectives on transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2013 Jul;3(4)

707 SW Gaines Street, Oregon Health & Science University, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Psychology, Child Development & Rehabilitation Center, Portland, OR 97239, USA.

Aim: This study aimed to prospectively investigate transition beliefs, knowledge and needs of pediatric patients with diabetes and their parents.

Patients & Methods: Parallel youth and parent questionnaires evaluating the transition process were distributed over a 6-month time period. Respondents included 123 pediatric patients with diabetes (11-19 years old) and their parents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.13.27DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3883719PMC
July 2013
6 Reads

Phosphatidic acid: a new therapeutic lead to suppress hepatic glucose production.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2014;4(4):323-326

Division of Nutrition & Metabolic Diseases, Center for Human Nutrition, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 5323 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, TX 75390, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.14.29DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4582667PMC
January 2014
6 Reads

Targeting sirtuins for the treatment of diabetes.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2013 May;3(3):245-257

Sarah W Stedman Nutrition & Metabolism Center, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27704, USA ; Department of Pharmacology & Cancer Biology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA ; Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

Sirtuins are a class of NAD-dependent deacetylases, such as deacetylases, that have a wide array of biological functions. Recent studies have suggested that reduced sirtuin action is correlated with Type 2 diabetes. Both overnutrition and aging, which are two major risk factors for diabetes, lead to decreased sirtuin function and result in abnormal glucose and lipid metabolism. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.13.6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4110209PMC
May 2013
10 Reads

β-cell preservation and regeneration for diabetes treatment: where are we now?

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2012 May;2(3):213-222

Section of Islet Cell & Regenerative Biology, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA 02215, USA ; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

Over the last decade, our knowledge of β-cell biology has expanded with the use of new scientific techniques and strategies. Growth factors, hormones and small molecules have been shown to enhance β-cell proliferation and function. Stem cell technology and research into the developmental biology of the pancreas have yielded new methods for in vivo and in vitro regeneration of β cells from stem cells and endogenous progenitors as well as transdifferentiation of non-β cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.12.21DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3462022PMC
May 2012
8 Reads

Sirtuin biology and relevance to diabetes treatment.

Authors:
X Charlie Dong

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2012 May;2(3):243-257

Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine, 635 Barnhill Drive, MS1021D, Indianapolis, IN 46202, USA; Tel.: +1 317 278 1097; ;

Sirtuins are a group of NAD(+)-dependent enzymes that post-translationally modify histones and other proteins. Among seven mammalian sirtuins, SIRT1 has been the most extensively studied and has been demonstrated to play a critical role in all major metabolic organs and tissues. SIRT1 regulates glucose and lipid homeostasis in the liver, modulates insulin secretion in pancreatic islets, controls insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake in skeletal muscle, increases adiponectin expression in white adipose tissue and controls food intake and energy expenditure in the brain. Read More

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http://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/abs/10.2217/dmt.12.16
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.12.16DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3458714PMC
May 2012
6 Reads

Update on diagnosis, pathogenesis and management of ketosis-prone Type 2 diabetes mellitus.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2011 Nov;1(6):589-600

Emory University School of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA.

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) has been considered a key clinical feature of Type 1 diabetes mellitus; however, increasing evidence indicates that DKA is also a common feature of Type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Many cases of DKA develop under stressful conditions such as trauma or infection but an increasing number of cases without precipitating cause have been reported in children and adults with T2DM. Such patients present with severe hyperglycemia and ketosis as in Type 1 diabetes mellitus but can discontinue insulin after a few months and maintain acceptable glycemic control on diet or oral agents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/DMT.11.57DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3351851PMC
November 2011
7 Reads

Addressing diabetes racial and ethnic disparities: lessons learned from quality improvement collaboratives.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2011 Nov;1(6):653-660

Section of General Internal Medicine at the University of Chicago, 5841 S. Maryland Ave, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

A review of national data confirms that while the quality of healthcare in the USA is slowly improving, disparities in diabetes prevalence, processes of care and outcomes for racial/ethnic minorities are not. Many quality measures can be addressed through system level interventions, referred to as quality improvement (QI), and QI collaboratives have been found to effectively improve processes of care for chronic conditions, including diabetes. However, the impact of QI collaboratives on the reduction of health disparities has been mixed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.11.48DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3339626PMC
November 2011
14 Reads

Personalized medicine in Type 2 diabetes: what does the future hold?

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2012 May;2(3):199-204

Massachusetts General Hospital Diabetes Center, Bulfinch 408a, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

The management of patients with Type 2 diabetes is based on a remarkably robust evidence base. Large clinical trials and lengthy observational cohort studies have clearly established the importance of glycemic, blood pressure and lipid level control. Indeed, most elements of guideline-based diabetes care can be supported by clinical research evidence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.12.15DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3695738PMC
May 2012
6 Reads

Diabetes prevention: global health policy and perspectives from the ground.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2012;2(4):309-321

Global Health & Agriculture Policy, PepsiCo 700 Anderson Hill Rd, Purchase, NY 10577, USA.

Type 2 diabetes and other noncommunicable diseases are a growing public health challenge globally. An estimated 285 million people, corresponding to 6.4% of the world's adult population, has diabetes, which is expected to reach 552 million by the International Diabetes Federation in 2030. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4556601PMC
January 2012
6 Reads

Assessing fear of hypoglycemia in children with Type 1 diabetes and their parents.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2011 ;1(6):627-639

Department of Psychiatry & Neurobehavioral Sciences, University of Virginia, VA, USA.

This article summarizes the literature on fear of hypoglycemia in pediatric Type 1 diabetes and the assessment of this fear in both children with Type 1 diabetes and their parents. The most common instrument for assessing fear of hypoglycemia in this population is the children's and parent's versions of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey (HFS), although studies using other assessment measures are also reviewed. Studies using this survey have identified variables contributing to fear of hypoglycemia in children with Type 1 diabetes and their parents, such as history of frequent or traumatic hypoglycemia, as well as trait anxiety. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/DMT.11.60DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3237051PMC
January 2011
6 Reads

Recurrence of autoimmunity in pancreas transplant patients: research update.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2011 Mar;1(2):229-238

Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 1450 NW 10th Avenue, Miami, FL 33136, USA.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder leading to loss of pancreatic β-cells and insulin secretion, followed by insulin dependence. Islet and whole pancreas transplantation restore insulin secretion. Pancreas transplantation is often performed together with a kidney transplant in patients with end-stage renal disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.10.21DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3171830PMC
March 2011
6 Reads

Health literacy in diabetes care: explanation, evidence and equipment.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2011 Mar;1(2):191-199

Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Division of Nephrology, Department of Medicine, 1161 21st Avenue South, Medical Center North S-3223, Nashville, TN 37232, USA.

The exchange of complex health information among patients, providers, health organizations and the public is often described as health literacy. Low levels of health literacy is common and associated with processes of healthcare and important health outcomes. In diabetes, health literacy is related to diabetes knowledge, self-efficacy and self-care behaviors and glycemic control. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.11.5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3158575PMC
March 2011
53 Reads

Mechanisms in the adaptation of maternal β-cells during pregnancy.

Diabetes Manag (Lond) 2011 Mar;1(2):239-248

Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology & Metabolism, University of Pittsburgh, 200 Lothrop St. BST-E1140, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA.

Pancreatic β-cell mass adapts to changing insulin demands in the body. One of the most amazing reversible β-cell adaptations occurs during pregnancy and postpartum conditions. During pregnancy, the increase in maternal insulin resistance is compensated by maternal β-cell hyperplasia and hyperfunctionality to maintain normal blood glucose. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2217/dmt.10.24DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3155205PMC
March 2011
14 Reads
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