47 results match your criteria Developmental Epidemiology [Journal]

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Quality of Maternal Height and Weight Data from the Revised Birth Certificate and Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System.

Epidemiology 2019 01;30(1):154-159

Bureau of Vital Statistics, New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, New York City, NY.

Background: The 2003 revision of the US Standard Certificate of Live Birth (birth certificate) and Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) are important for maternal weight research and surveillance. We examined quality of prepregnancy body mass index (BMI), gestational weight gain, and component variables from these sources.

Methods: Data are from a PRAMS data quality improvement study among a subset of New York City and Vermont respondents in 2009. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000936DOI Listing
January 2019
23 Reads

The Authors Respond.

Epidemiology 2019 01;30(1):e2-e3

Division of Epidemiology, School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, NV, Department of Pediatrics, Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA,

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000935DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Air Pollution Exposure During Pregnancy and Symptoms of Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder in Children in Europe.

Epidemiology 2018 09;29(5):618-626

From the ISGlobal, Barcelona, Spain.

Background: Exposure to air pollution during pregnancy may increase attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms in children, but findings have been inconsistent. We aimed to study this association in a collaborative study of eight European population-based birth/child cohorts, including 29,127 mother-child pairs.

Methods: Air pollution concentrations (nitrogen dioxide [NO2] and particulate matter [PM]) were estimated at the birth address by land-use regression models based on monitoring campaigns performed between 2008 and 2011. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000874DOI Listing
September 2018
22 Reads

Herpesvirus Infection in Infants with Gastroschisis.

Epidemiology 2018 07;29(4):571-573

Department of Pediatrics, Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA.

Background: Gastroschisis is a congenital malformation that has been shown to be more common in younger mothers and appears to be increasing in prevalence in the United States and elsewhere. Epidemiologic data suggest a potential role of infection and recent studies report an association between maternal antibodies to human herpesviruses (HHV) and development of gastroschisis.

Methods: In this study, we examined newborn bloodspots from 50 children with gastroschisis and 50 healthy controls using a highly sensitive digital droplet polymerase chain reaction assay covering eight human herpesviruses [herpes simplex sirus 1/2, Epstein-Barr virus (HHV-4), cytomegalovirus (HHV-5), HHV-6A/B, HHV-7, and HHV-8], to examine the presence of herpesvirus DNA at birth, which would suggest in utero infection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000844DOI Listing
July 2018
5 Reads

Associations of Annual Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Mass and Components with Mitochondrial DNA Abundance.

Epidemiology 2017 11;28(6):763-770

From the aChanning Division of Network Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; bVocational Health College, Canakkale Onsekiz Mart University, Çanakkale, Turkey; cDepartment of Developmental Neurobiology, National Institute of Perinatology, Mexico City, Mexico; dDepartment of Environmental Health, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; eDepartment of Statistics, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO; fDepartment of Environmental Health Sciences, Columbia Mailman School of Public Health, New York, NY; gDepartment of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA; and hNormative Aging Study, Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System and the Department of Medicine, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA.

Background: Fine particulate matter (PM2.5) represents a mixture of components with potentially different toxicities. However, little is known about the relative effects of PM2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000717DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5672826PMC
November 2017
57 Reads

Traffic-related Air Pollution and Attention in Primary School Children: Short-term Association.

Epidemiology 2017 03;28(2):181-189

From the aISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; bPompeu Fabra University, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; cConsortium for Biomedical Research in Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Madrid, Spain; dInstitut Hospital del Mar d'Investigacions Mèdiques-Parc de Salut Mar, Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; eLearning Disabilities Unit (UTAE), Neuropediatrics Department, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Universitat de Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; fInstitute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (IDAEA-CSIC), Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain; and gMRI Research Unit, CRC Mar, Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, Spain.

Background: Although air pollution's short-term effects are well understood to be marked and preventable, its acute neuropsychological effects have, to our knowledge, not yet been studied. We aim to examine the association between daily variation in traffic-related air pollution and attention.

Methods: We conducted a follow-up study from January 2012 to March 2013 in 2,687 school children from 265 classrooms in 39 schools in Barcelona (Catalonia, Spain). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000603DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5287434PMC
March 2017
56 Reads

Prevention of Developmental Neurotoxicity.

Epidemiology 2017 03;28(2):157-158

From the aDepartment of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark; bDepartment of Environmental Health, Harvard T.H.Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; cCenter for Environmental and Health Sciences, Hokkaido University, and WHO Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health and Prevention of Chemical Hazards, Sapporo, Japan; and dISGlobal, Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology (CREAL), Barcelona, Spain.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000601DOI Listing
March 2017
10 Reads

Soy-based Infant Formula Feeding and Heavy Menstrual Bleeding Among Young African American Women.

Epidemiology 2016 09;27(5):716-25

From the aEpidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC; bDepartments of Obstetrics and Gynecology and Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN; and cBiostatistics & Computational Biology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Research Triangle Park, NC.

Background: Phytoestrogen exposure from soy formula feeding during infancy may disrupt reproductive system development, resulting in altered menstrual bleeding in adulthood.

Methods: We investigated this relationship in a cohort of 1,696 young African American women using enrollment data from the Study of Environment, Lifestyle, & Fibroids (2010-2012). Questionnaire data on soy formula feeding were available for 1,553 participants, 89% based on mother's report. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000508DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5425950PMC
September 2016
4 Reads

Childhood and Adolescent Pesticide Exposure and Breast Cancer Risk.

Epidemiology 2016 May;27(3):326-33

From the aDepartment of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, Chapel Hill, NC; bEpidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC; and cSocial & Scientific Systems, Inc., Durham, NC.

Background: To date, epidemiologic studies have not strongly supported an association between pesticide exposure and breast cancer. However, few previous studies had the ability to assess specific time periods of exposure. Studies that relied on adult serum levels of metabolites of organochlorine pesticides may not accurately reflect exposure during developmental periods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000451DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4862358PMC
May 2016
12 Reads

Prenatal Exposure to Traffic-related Air Pollution and Child Behavioral Development Milestone Delays in Japan.

Epidemiology 2016 Jan;27(1):57-65

From the aDepartment of Human Ecology, Graduate School of Environmental and Life Science, Okayama University, Okayama, Japan; bDepartment of Public Health and Public Policy, Institute of Biomedical and Health Sciences, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima, Japan; cFaculty of Letters, Department of Psychology, Kansai University, Osaka, Japan; dFaculty of Education, Department of Special Education, Okayama University, Okayama, Japan; and eDepartment of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, Okayama, Japan.

Background: Recent studies suggest that prenatal exposure to outdoor air pollution is associated with unfavorable neurodevelopment in children. We examined associations between prenatal exposure to traffic-related air pollution and child behavioral development milestone delays, using data from a nationwide population-based longitudinal survey in Japan, where the participants were recruited in 2001 and followed.

Methods: Particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide concentrations during the 9 months before birth were obtained at the municipality level and assigned to the participants who were born in the corresponding municipality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000361DOI Listing
January 2016
7 Reads

Effects of Prenatal Social Stress and Maternal Dietary Fatty Acid Ratio on Infant Temperament: Does Race Matter?

Epidemiology (Sunnyvale) 2014 ;4(4)

Kravis Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029, USA ; Mindich Child Health and Development Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 1428 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10029, USA.

Background: Infant temperament predicts a range of developmental and behavioral outcomes throughout childhood. Both maternal fatty acid intake and psychosocial stress exposures during pregnancy may influence infant temperament. Furthermore, maternal race may modify prenatal diet and stress effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4172/2161-1165.1000167DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4197958PMC
January 2014
20 Reads

Potential sensitivity of bias analysis results to incorrect assumptions of nondifferential or differential binary exposure misclassification.

Epidemiology 2014 Nov;25(6):902-9

From the aRollins School of Public Health and Laney Graduate School, Emory University, Atlanta, GA; and bNational Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA.

Background: Results of bias analyses for exposure misclassification are dependent on assumptions made during analysis. We describe how adjustment for misclassification is affected by incorrect assumptions about whether sensitivity and specificity are the same (nondifferential) or different (differential) for cases and noncases.

Methods: We adjusted for exposure misclassification using probabilistic bias analysis, under correct and incorrect assumptions about whether exposure misclassification was differential or not. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000166DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4477528PMC
November 2014
13 Reads

In utero exposure to toxic air pollutants and risk of childhood autism.

Epidemiology 2014 Nov;25(6):851-8

From the aDepartment of Community Health Sciences, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; bDepartment of Biostatistics, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; cDepartment of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA; and dDepartment of Epidemiology, Fielding School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.

Background: Genetic and environmental factors are believed to contribute to the development of autism, but relatively few studies have considered potential environmental risks. Here, we examine risks for autism in children related to in utero exposure to monitored ambient air toxics from urban emissions.

Methods: Among the cohort of children born in Los Angeles County, California, 1995-2006, those whose mothers resided during pregnancy in a 5-km buffer around air toxics monitoring stations were included (n = 148,722). Read More

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http://pdfs.journals.lww.com/epidem/2014/11000/In_Utero_Expo
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000150DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4698150PMC
November 2014
13 Reads

Air pollution during pregnancy and childhood cognitive and psychomotor development: six European birth cohorts.

Epidemiology 2014 Sep;25(5):636-47

From the aCenter for Research in Environmental Epidemiology, Barcelona, Spain; bHospital del Mar Research Institute, Barcelona, Spain; cSpanish Consortium for Research on Epidemiology and Public Health (CIBERESP), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; dInserm, Team of Environmental Epidemiology Applied to Reproduction and Respiratory Health, U823, Grenoble, France; eUniversity Grenoble-Alpes, Institut Albert Bonniot, Grenoble, France; fDepartment of Epidemiology Lazio Regional Health Service, Rome, Italy; gUniversity of Valencia, Valencia, Spain; hCenter for Public Health Research (CSISP)/FISABIO, Valencia, Spain; iInstitute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, The Netherlands; jDepartment of Social Medicine, University of Crete, Heraklion, Greece; kInserm, Centre for research in Epidemiology and Population Health (CESP), U1018, Epidemiology of Diabetes, Obesity and Kidney Disease: Lifelong Approach Team, Paris, France; lUniversity Paris-Sud, UMRS 1018, France; mCentre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College London, United Kingdom; nBiomedical Research Center, University of Granada; Granada, Spain; oLaboratory of Medical Investigations, San Cecilio University Hospital; Granada, Spain; pPreventive Medicine and Public Health, University of Oviedo, Oviedo, Spain; qDepartment of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus Medical Centre-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; rThe Generation R Study, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; sDepartment of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, The Netherlands; tIUF-Leibniz Research Institute for Environmental Medicine, Düsseldorf, Germany; uNational School of Public Health, Athens, Greece; vEpidemiology and clinical research unit, Hopital Beaujon, APHP, Paris, France; wINSERM, UMR S953, Epidemiological Research Unit on Perinatal Health and Women's and Childrens' Health, Paris, France; xDepartment of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Univ

Background: Accumulating evidence from laboratory animal and human studies suggests that air pollution exposure during pregnancy affects cognitive and psychomotor development in childhood.

Methods: We analyzed data from 6 European population-based birth cohorts-GENERATION R (The Netherlands), DUISBURG (Germany), EDEN (France), GASPII (Italy), RHEA (Greece), and INMA (Spain)-that recruited mother-infant pairs from 1997 to 2008. Air pollution levels-nitrogen oxides (NO2, NOx) in all regions and particulate matter (PM) with diameters of <2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0000000000000133DOI Listing
September 2014
106 Reads

Perfluorinated compound levels in cord blood and neurodevelopment at 2 years of age.

Epidemiology 2013 Nov;24(6):800-8

From the aInstitute of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei, Taiwan; bDepartment of Pediatrics, Cardinal Tien Hospital Yonghe Branch, New Taipei, Taiwan; cDepartment of Preventive Medicine, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea; dSchool and Graduate Institute of Physical Therapy, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; eDepartment of Medical Genetics, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; fInstitute of Clinical Genomics, National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan; gInstitute of Environmental Health, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei, Taiwan; hDepartment of Public Health, National Taiwan University College of Public Health, Taipei, Taiwan; iDepartment of Pediatrics, National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; and jDepartment of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, National Taiwan University College of Medicine and Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.

Background: Epidemiologic data regarding the potential neurotoxicity of perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) are inconclusive. We investigated the associations between in utero exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctyl sulfonate (PFOS) and early childhood neurodevelopment.

Methods: We recruited 239 mother-infant pairs in northern Taiwan from the Taiwan Birth Panel Study, which was established in 2004. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e3182a6dd46DOI Listing
November 2013
7 Reads

Thyroxine levels during pregnancy in healthy women and early child neurodevelopment.

Epidemiology 2013 Jan;24(1):150-7

Centre for Research in Environmental Epidemiology, Barcelona, Spain.

Background: The fetus depends on maternal thyroid hormones during pregnancy for normal brain development. Little is known about the effects of subclinical hypothyroidism and mild hypothyroxinemia during pregnancy on neurodevelopment of the child.

Methods: We evaluated a population-based birth cohort in Spain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e318276ccd3DOI Listing
January 2013
10 Reads
25 Citations
6.200 Impact Factor

In-utero exposure to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and cognitive development among infants and school-aged children.

Epidemiology 2012 Sep;23(5):689-98

Epidemiology Branch, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Durham, NC 27709-2233, USA.

Background: Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) continues to be used for control of infectious diseases in several countries. In-utero exposure to DDT and dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) has been associated with developmental and cognitive impairment among children. We examined this association in an historical cohort in which the level of exposure was greater than in previous studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e31825fb61dDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3415569PMC
September 2012
28 Reads

Estimating bias from loss to follow-up in the Danish National Birth Cohort.

Epidemiology 2011 Nov;22(6):815-22

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

Loss to follow-up in cohort studies may result in biased association estimates. Of 61,895 women entering the Danish National Birth Cohort and completing the first data-collection phase, 37,178 (60%) opted to be in the 7-year follow-up. Using national registry data to obtain end point information on all members of the cohort, we estimated associations in the baseline and the 7-year follow-up participant populations for 5 exposure-outcome associations: (a) size at birth and childhood asthma, (b) assisted reproductive treatment and childhood hospitalizations, (c) prepregnancy body mass index and childhood infections, (d) alcohol drinking in early pregnancy and childhood developmental disorders, and (e) maternal smoking in pregnancy and childhood attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e31822939fdDOI Listing
November 2011
7 Reads

Month of conception and risk of autism.

Epidemiology 2011 Jul;22(4):469-75

Department of Public Health Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.

Background: Studies of season of birth or season of conception can provide clues about etiology. We investigated whether certain months or seasons of conception are associated with increased risk of autism spectrum disorders, for which etiology is particularly obscure.

Methods: The study population comprises 6,604,975 children born from 1990 to 2002 in California. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e31821d0b53DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3296777PMC
July 2011
6 Reads

Perinatal exposure to hazardous air pollutants and autism spectrum disorders at age 8.

Epidemiology 2010 Sep;21(5):631-41

Department of Epidemiology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Background: Hazardous air pollutants are plausible candidate exposures for autism spectrum disorders. They have been explored in recent studies for their role in the development of these disorders.

Methods: We used a prevalent case-control design to screen perinatal exposure to 35 hazardous air pollutants for further investigation in autism etiology. Read More

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http://www.princeton.edu/~sswang/ASD/kalkbrenner_morrissey10
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e3181e65d76DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2989602PMC
September 2010
5 Reads

Early postnatal blood manganese levels and children's neurodevelopment.

Epidemiology 2010 Jul;21(4):433-9

Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

Background: Recent evidence suggests that low-level environmental exposure to manganese adversely affects child growth and neurodevelopment. Previous studies have addressed the effects of prenatal exposure, but little is known about developmental effects of early postnatal exposure.

Methods: We studied 448 children born in Mexico City from 1997 through 2000, using a longitudinal study to investigate neurotoxic effects of early-life manganese exposure. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3127440PMC
July 2010
6 Reads

Self-reported clothing size as a proxy measure for body size.

Epidemiology 2009 Sep;20(5):673-6

Department of Epidemiology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

Background: Few studies have considered the potential utility of clothing size as a predictor of diseases associated with body weight.

Methods: We used data on weight-stable men and women from a subcohort of the Netherlands Cohort Study to assess the correlation of clothing size with other anthropometric variables. Cox regression using the case-cohort approach was performed to establish whether clothing size can predict cancer risk after 13. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e3181a66eb5DOI Listing
September 2009
10 Reads

The rise in autism and the role of age at diagnosis.

Epidemiology 2009 Jan;20(1):84-90

Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California, Davis, California 95616, USA.

Background: Autism prevalence in California, based on individuals eligible for state-funded services, rose throughout the 1990s. The extent to which this trend is explained by changes in age at diagnosis or inclusion of milder cases has not been previously evaluated.

Methods: Autism cases were identified from 1990 through 2006 in databases of the California Department of Developmental Services, which coordinates services for individuals with specific developmental disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e3181902d15DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4113600PMC
January 2009
5 Reads

Maternal periconceptional illicit drug use and the risk of congenital malformations.

Epidemiology 2009 Jan;20(1):60-6

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA.

Background: In 2004, the Survey on Drug Use and Health showed that 5% of American women reported use of an illicit drug during pregnancy. The results of studies determining the association between periconceptional illicit drug use and birth defects have been inconsistent.

Methods: We analyzed data from the National Birth Defects Prevention Study, a case-control study of major birth defects, and assessed all birth defects categories in which there were at least 250 interviewed case mothers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e31818e5930DOI Listing
January 2009
7 Reads

Occupational exposure to pesticides during pregnancy and neurobehavioral development of infants and toddlers.

Epidemiology 2008 Nov;19(6):851-9

Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Background: Few studies have examined the effects of in utero exposure to organophosphate and carbamate pesticides on neurobehavioral development in infants and young children. This study considers the potential effects of maternal occupation in the cut-flower industry during pregnancy on neurobehavioral development in Ecuadorian children.

Methods: Data were collected during 2003-2004 for 121 children aged 3-23 months and living in the rural highland region of Cayambe, Ecuador. Read More

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https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001648-200811000-000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e318187cc5dDOI Listing
November 2008
5 Reads

Air pollution and pulmonary function in asthmatic children: effects of prenatal and lifetime exposures.

Epidemiology 2008 Jul;19(4):550-7; discussion 561-2

Divisions of aEpidemiology, School of Public Health, University of California, Berkeley, CA 4720-7370, USA.

Background: Prenatal and early life periods represent critical windows for oxidant pollutant-induced lung remodeling. The objective of this study was to examine the association of prenatal and lifetime exposures to air pollutants with pulmonary function in a cohort of children with asthma.

Methods: Prenatal and lifetime exposure to several air pollutants was reconstructed for 232 children with asthma from the San Joaquin Valley of California, USA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e31816a9dcbDOI Listing
July 2008
6 Reads

The developmental origins of health and disease: where do we go from here?

Authors:
Debbie A Lawlor

Epidemiology 2008 Mar;19(2):206-8

MRC Centre of Causal Analyses in Translational Epidemiology, Department of Social Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.

A large number of studies have shown associations between birth weight and later adult disease, and these studies have ignited an interest in the developmental origins of disease and health. A paper in this volume of Epidemiology finds an overall U-shaped association between birth weight and all-cause mortality in a large Danish cohort. In this commentary, I discuss some of the issues that are important to epidemiologic studies concerned with the developmental origins of disease and health. Read More

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https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00001648-200803000-000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/EDE.0b013e3181635ddcDOI Listing
March 2008
8 Reads

Neurobehavioral development in children with potential exposure to pesticides.

Epidemiology 2007 May;18(3):312-20

Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan School of Public Health, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

Background: Children may be at higher risk than adults from pesticide exposure, due to their rapidly developing physiology, unique behavioral patterns, and interactions with the physical environment. This preliminary study conducted in Ecuador examines the association between household and environmental risk factors for pesticide exposure and neurobehavioral development.

Methods: We collected data over 6 months in the rural highland region of Cayambe, Ecuador (2003-2004). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.ede.0000259983.55716.bbDOI Listing
May 2007
6 Reads

Right or wrong? On the difficult relationship between epidemiologists and handedness.

Authors:
Olga Basso

Epidemiology 2007 Mar;18(2):191-3

Epidemiology Branch, NIEHS, NIH, HHS, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709, USA.

The declining prevalence of left-handers with age has resulted in the hypothesis that sinistrality, being the result of a developmental insult, may be associated with a reduced life span. While it is plausible that some individuals become left-handed as a consequence of neurologic impairment, the literature on handedness itself appears to suffer from a number of problems. These include the ease with which information on handedness can be collected in the absence of prior hypotheses, the failure to address heterogeneity among left-handers, and the selective publication of positive results. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.ede.0000254698.17800.e8DOI Listing
March 2007
4 Reads

Maternal smoking and environmental tobacco smoke exposure and the risk of orofacial clefts.

Epidemiology 2007 Mar;18(2):226-33

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA.

Background: Smoking during pregnancy has been associated with orofacial clefts in numerous studies. However, most previous studies have not been able to assess the relation between maternal smoking and specific phenotypes (eg, bilateral clefts).

Methods: We examined the association between periconceptional maternal smoking, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure, and cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CLP) (n = 933) and cleft palate only (CPO) (n = 528) compared with infants with no major birth defects (n = 3390). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.ede.0000254430.61294.c0DOI Listing
March 2007
9 Reads

Developmental arsenic neurotoxicity in retrospect.

Epidemiology 2007 Jan;18(1):25-6

Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.ede.0000249533.77900.74DOI Listing
January 2007
5 Reads

In utero polychlorinated biphenyl exposures in relation to fetal and early childhood growth.

Epidemiology 2005 Sep;16(5):648-56

Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

Background: Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are industrial chemicals that were used widely for approximately 50 years. Now banned, they are still ubiquitous because of their persistence in the environment, the food chain, and human fatty tissue. High in utero exposures cause developmental deficits accompanied by growth retardation. Read More

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September 2005
8 Reads

Assessing maternal genetic associations: a comparison of the log-linear approach to case-parent triad data and a case-control approach.

Epidemiology 2005 May;16(3):294-303

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Genetics and Developmental Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Background: In utero exposures, including maternal phenotypes, are potential risk factors for both early-onset and adult-onset diseases. Two alternative study designs use maternal genotypes at polymorphic loci as biomarkers of an offspring's in utero exposure: (1) a traditional case-control study with logistic regression analysis, in which cases, controls, and mothers of both types of subjects are genotyped; and (2) a case-parent triad study with log-linear analysis, in which cases and both parents are genotyped.

Methods: We used computer simulations to compare the operating characteristics of the log-linear approach to case-parent triad data and the case-control approach for assessing relative risks (RRs) associated with maternal genotypes. Read More

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May 2005
6 Reads

Circadian disruption and breast cancer: from melatonin to clock genes.

Epidemiology 2005 Mar;16(2):254-8

Department of Community Medicine, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06030-6325, USA.

The global impact of breast cancer is large and growing. It seems clear that something about modern life is the culprit, yet there is thus far a lack of satisfactory explanations for most of the increases in risk as societies industrialize. Support has developed for a possible role of "circadian disruption," particularly from an altered-lighted environment (such as light at night). Read More

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March 2005
5 Reads

Fish intake during pregnancy and early cognitive development of offspring.

Epidemiology 2004 Jul;15(4):394-402

National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA. juliedanielsunc.edu

Background: Fish is a source of many nutrients that can be beneficial during pregnancy, as well as a source of neurotoxicant contaminants such as methylmercury. Previous investigations of fish intake in relation to neurodevelopment have focused on possible damage from contaminants, whereas potential benefits of fish consumption have been relatively unexplored

Methods: We evaluated the association between maternal fish intake during pregnancy and offspring's early development of language and communication skills in a cohort of 7421 British children born in 1991-1992. Fish intake by the mother and child was measured by questionnaire. Read More

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July 2004
6 Reads

On the use of population attributable fraction to determine sample size for case-control studies of gene-environment interaction.

Epidemiology 2003 Mar;14(2):161-7

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA.

Most methods for calculating the sample size needed to detect gene-environment interactions use odds ratios to measure the effect size. We show that for any combination of susceptible genotype prevalence and exposure prevalence and their associated risks, the odds ratio measuring strength of interaction corresponds to a population attributable fraction (PAF) because of interaction and vice versa. Simultaneous consideration of odds ratio for interaction and the associated PAF attributable to interaction provides additional insight to investigators evaluating the feasibility and public health relevance of a proposed study. Read More

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March 2003
8 Reads

Maternal fever, multivitamin use, and selected birth defects: evidence of interaction?

Epidemiology 2002 Jul;13(4):485-8

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA.

Background: Multivitamin use has been associated with lower risks for some birth defects. We evaluated whether multivitamin use modified birth defect risks associated with febrile illness, a common and possibly teratogenic exposure.

Methods: From the population-based Atlanta Birth Defects Case-Control Study (1968-1980) we selected seven defects (neural tube defects, cleft lip and palate, cardiac outflow tract defects, ventricular septal defects, atrial septal defects, omphalocele, and limb deficiencies) because of their inverse relation with multivitamin supplement use documented in previous analyses. Read More

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July 2002
4 Reads

Vitamin A and cardiac outflow tract defects.

Epidemiology 2001 Sep;12(5):491-6

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA.

To assess the relationship between maternal intake of vitamin A and cardiac outflow tract defects, we examined data from a population-based case-control study among liveborn infants born from 1987 through 1989 to mothers residing in the Baltimore-Washington area. Case infants (126) had a nonsyndromic cardiac outflow tract defect. Control infants (679) did not have birth defects and were a stratified random sample of liveborn infants from the same area. Read More

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September 2001
4 Reads

Congenital heart defects, maternal febrile illness, and multivitamin use: a population-based study.

Epidemiology 2001 Sep;12(5):485-90

National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway NE, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA.

We assessed the relation between febrile illness during pregnancy and cardiac defects in the offspring in a population-based case-control study in metropolitan Atlanta. Case infants (905) with cardiac defects were actively ascertained from multiple sources. Control infants (3,029) were infants without birth defects who were selected from birth certificates by stratified random sampling. Read More

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September 2001
4 Reads

Case-only design to measure gene-gene interaction.

Epidemiology 1999 Mar;10(2):167-70

Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA.

The case-only design is an efficient and valid approach to screening for gene-environment interaction under the assumption of the independence between exposure and genotype in the population. In this paper, we show that the case-only design is also a valid and efficient approach to measuring gene-gene interaction under the assumption that the frequencies of genes are independent in the population. Just as the case-only design requires fewer cases than the case-control design to measure gene-environment interaction, it also requires fewer cases to measure gene-gene interactions. Read More

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March 1999
5 Reads

Is maternal obesity a risk factor for anencephaly and spina bifida?

Epidemiology 1996 Sep;7(5):507-12

Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA 30341-3724, USA.

To determine whether the risk of having an infant with anencephaly or spina bifida is greater among obese women than among average-weight women, we compared 307 Atlanta-area women who gave birth to a liveborn or stillborn infant with anencephaly or spina bifida (case group) with 2,755 Atlanta-area women who gave birth to an infant without birth defects (control group). The infants of control women were randomly selected from birth certificates and frequency-matched to the case group by race, birth hospital, and birth period from 1968 through 1980. After adjusting for maternal age, education, smoking status, alcohol use, chronic illness, and vitamin use, we found that, compared with average-weight women, obese women (pregravid body mass index greater than 29) had almost twice the risk of having an infant with spina bifida or anencephaly (odds ratio = 1. Read More

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September 1996
4 Reads

Male-mediated developmental toxicity.

Authors:
L E Sever

Epidemiology 1995 Nov;6(6):573-4

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November 1995
4 Reads

Exposure to environmental lead and visual-motor integration at age 7 years: the Port Pirie Cohort Study.

Epidemiology 1995 Mar;6(2):104-9

Division of Human Nutrition, Commonwealth Scientific Industrial Research Organisation, Adelaide, Australia.

Early childhood exposure to environmental lead may result in subtle deficits in neuropsychological development. Most studies, however, have reported global measures of development, and the findings have not been consistent. In this report, we examine the association between blood lead concentration and a specific aspect of neuropsychological development, visual-motor integration. Read More

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March 1995
5 Reads

Validity of the ten questions screened for childhood disability: results from population-based studies in Bangladesh, Jamaica, and Pakistan.

Epidemiology 1994 May;5(3):283-9

Gertrude H. Sergievsky Center, Faculty of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032.

An international study to validate the Ten Questions screen for serious childhood disability was undertaken in communities in Bangladesh, Jamaica, and Pakistan, where community workers screened more than 22,000 children ages 2-9 years. All children who screened positive, as well as random samples of those who screened negative, were referred for clinical evaluations. Applying comparable diagnostic criteria, the sensitivity of the screen for serious cognitive, motor, and seizure disabilities is acceptable (80-100%) in all three populations, whereas the positive predictive values range from 3 to 15%. Read More

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May 1994
5 Reads

Can childhood disability be ascertained simply in surveys?

Authors:
M Chamie

Epidemiology 1994 May;5(3):273-5

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May 1994
5 Reads

The relation of computer-based measures of sperm morphology and motility to male infertility.

Epidemiology 1992 May;3(3):239-46

Division of Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333.

We investigated the relation between various sperm characteristics, including morphometric parameters, and impaired fertility among 596 men who participated in a national study. Semen was collected and processed by using a standardized protocol, and sperm measurements were made using a computer-aided sperm analysis instrument. We defined infertility in two ways: (1) the inability to father a child after trying for a year or longer, and (2) the number of children fathered. Read More

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May 1992
4 Reads

Caffeine and spontaneous abortion of known karyotype.

Epidemiology 1991 Nov;2(6):409-17

Epidemiology of Developmental Brain Disorders Research Unit, New York State Psychiatric Institute, N.Y.

We tested associations of caffeine from beverages with spontaneous abortions of known karyotype. Spontaneous abortions (cases) were classified as chromosomally normal (n = 510) or chromosomally aberrant (n = 389) and, within the latter category, by type of aberration (237 trisomies, 54 monosomies X, 49 triploidies, 49 others). Controls registered for prenatal care before 22 weeks gestation and delivered at 28 weeks or later (n = 1,423). Read More

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November 1991
5 Reads
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