169 results match your criteria Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews [Journal]


Health, functioning, and participation of adolescents and adults with cerebral palsy: a review of outcomes research.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;18(1):84-94

Center for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital, JP Kennedy Research Center on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA.

With medical advances, more individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) syndromes who reside in developed countries are surviving to adolescence and adulthood. However, there continues to be a paucity of research examining long-term health, functional activities, and participatory outcomes over their life-course. This article reviews the current literature assessing adult outcomes for individuals with CP within the framework of the International Classification of Functioning (ICF), Disability, and Health model of enablement. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ddrr.1131
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1131DOI Listing
March 2014
5 Reads

Aging in rare intellectual disability syndromes.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;18(1):75-83

Vanderbilt Kennedy Center for Research on Human Development, One Magnolia Circle, Nashville, TN, 37203, USA.

This review highlights several methodological challenges involved in research on aging, health, and mortality in adults with rare intellectual disability syndromes. Few studies have been performed in this area, with research obstacles that include: the ascertainment of older adults with genetic versus clinical diagnoses; likelihood that adults will not receive adequate health care and referrals to genetic specialists; cohort differences related to generational and treatment effects; and increased mortality and selective survival biases. Even so, aging in Prader-Willi and Williams syndromes are reviewed as they reveal new insights into the phenotypic expression and treatment options for older adults with these disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1130DOI Listing
March 2014
8 Reads

Fragile X syndrome: an aging perspective.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;18(1):68-74

MIND Institute, University of California at Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, California, USA.

Cognitive and behavioral correlates of molecular variations related to the FMR1 gene have been studied rather extensively, but research about the long-term outcome in individuals with fragile X spectrum disorders remains sparse. In this review, we present an overview of aging research and recent findings in regard to cellular and clinical manifestations of aging in fragile X syndrome, and the FMR1 premutation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1129DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4959461PMC
March 2014
12 Reads

Atypical aging in Down syndrome.

Authors:
Warren B Zigman

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;18(1):51-67

Department of Psychology, Laboratory of Community Psychology, NYS Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, New York 10341-6399, USA.

At present, there may be over 210,000 people with Down syndrome (DS) over the age of 55 in the United States (US) who have significant needs for augmented services due to circumstances related to ordinary and/or pathological aging. From 1979 through 2003, the birth prevalence of DS rose from 9.0 to 11. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1128DOI Listing
March 2014
4 Reads

Aging and intellectual disability: insights from mouse models of Down syndrome.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;18(1):43-50

Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, UCL Institute of Neurology, London, WC1N 3BG, United Kingdom.

Down syndrome (DS) is one of many causes of intellectual disability (ID), others including but not limited to, fetal alcohol syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Rett syndrome, Williams syndrome, hypoxia, and infection. Down syndrome is characterized by a number of neurobiological problems resulting in learning and memory deficits and early onset Alzheimer's disease. The cognitive impairment in people with DS is virtually universal but varies considerably with respect to expressivity and severity. Read More

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http://fitchlab.com/FitchLabBin/AnimalModelsDownloads/Rupare
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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ddrr.1127
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1127DOI Listing
March 2014
6 Reads

Dementia and mild cognitive impairment in adults with intellectual disability: issues of diagnosis.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;18(1):31-42

Department of Psychology, New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities, Staten Island, New York 10314-6399, USA.

Individuals with intellectual disability (ID) are now living longer with the majority of individuals reaching middle and even "old age." As a consequence of this extended longevity they are vulnerable to the same age-associated health problems as elderly adults in the general population without ID. This includes dementia, a general term referring to a variety of diseases and conditions causing substantial loss of cognitive ability and functional declines; adults with Down syndrome are at especially high risk. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1126DOI Listing
March 2014
12 Reads

Promoting healthy aging in adults with developmental disabilities.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;18(1):22-30

Department of Disability and Human Development (MC 626), University of Illinois at Chicago, 1640 W. Roosevelt Road, Chicago, Illinois 60608, USA.

This article reviews the research on health promotion for adults aging with developmental disabilities. First, it examines barriers to healthy aging, including health behaviors and access to health screenings and services. Second, it reviews the research on health promotion interventions, including physical activity interventions, health education interventions, and health care and screening preventive services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1125DOI Listing
March 2014
3 Reads

Frailty and intellectual disability: a different operationalization?

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;18(1):17-21

Erasmus University Medical Center, Intellectual Disability Medicine, Department General Practice, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Frailty is increasingly being recognized as a relevant health measure in older populations, associated with an increased risk of adverse health outcomes and care dependency. Because it is generally perceived that people with intellectual disabilities are "old" from age 50 onwards, frailty research in this group might lead to an understanding of factors, contributing to this perception. The development since the 1990s of conceptual and operational definitions of frailty has resulted in different approaches: biological (phenotype), multidimensional, and non-specific deficit accumulation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1124DOI Listing
March 2014
2 Reads

People with intellectual disability: what do we know about adulthood and life expectancy?

Authors:
A M W Coppus

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;18(1):6-16

Dichterbij, Center for the Intellectually Disabled, Medical Center, Gennep, The Netherlands.

Increases in the life expectancy of people with Intellectual Disability have followed similar trends to those found in the general population. With the exception of people with severe and multiple disabilities or Down syndrome, the life expectancy of this group now closely approximates with that of the general population. Middle and old age, which until 30 years ago were not recognized in this population, are now important parts of the life course of these individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1123DOI Listing
March 2014
4 Reads

Editorial: Special issue on adult development and aging with IDD.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;18(1):1-5

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1122DOI Listing
March 2014
9 Reads

Neuroimaging of lipid storage disorders.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;17(3):269-82

Department of Pediatrics, Children's National Medical Center and the George Washington University of the Health Sciences, Washington, District of Columbia, USA.

Lipid storage diseases, also known as the lipidoses, are a group of inherited metabolic disorders in which there is lipid accumulation in various cell types, including the central nervous system, because of the deficiency of a variety of enzymes. Over time, excessive storage can cause permanent cellular and tissue damage. The brain is particularly sensitive to lipid storage as the contents of the central nervous system must occupy uniform volume, and any increases in fluids or deposits will lead to pressure changes and interference with normal neurological function. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1120DOI Listing
March 2014
21 Reads

Neuropsychological outcomes in fatty acid oxidation disorders: 85 cases detected by newborn screening.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;17(3):260-8

Department of Psychology, Children's Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation disorders include conditions in which the transport of activated acyl-Coenzyme A (CoA) into the mitochondria or utilization of these substrates is disrupted or blocked. This results in a deficit in the conversion of fat into energy. Most patients with fatty acid oxidation defects are now identified through newborn screening by tandem mass spectrometry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1119DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4137760PMC
March 2014
6 Reads

The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;17(3):254-9

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.

The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL's, Batten disease) represent a group of severe neurodegenerative diseases, which mostly present in childhood. The phenotypes are similar and include visual loss, seizures, loss of motor and cognitive function, and early death. At autopsy, there is massive neuronal loss with characteristic storage in remaining neurons. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1118DOI Listing
March 2014
6 Reads

Newborn screening for lysosomal storage disorders and other neuronopathic conditions.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;17(3):247-53

Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Newborn screening (NBS) is a public health program aimed at identifying treatable conditions in presymptomatic newborns to avoid premature mortality, morbidity, and disabilities. Currently, every newborn in the Unites States is screened for at least 29 conditions where evidence suggests that early detection is possible and beneficial. With new or improved treatment options and development of high-throughput screening tests, additional conditions have been proposed for inclusion into NBS programs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1117DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3902890PMC
March 2014
3 Reads

Neuronopathic lysosomal storage diseases: clinical and pathologic findings.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;17(3):226-46

Division of Human Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Ohio, USA.

Background: The lysosomal-autophagocytic system diseases (LASDs) affect multiple body systems including the central nervous system (CNS). The progressive CNS pathology has its onset at different ages, leading to neurodegeneration and early death.

Methods: Literature review provided insight into the current clinical neurological findings, phenotypic spectrum, and pathogenic mechanisms of LASDs with primary neurological involvement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1116DOI Listing
March 2014
5 Reads

Congenital disorders of glycosylation and intellectual disability.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;17(3):211-25

Genetic Nurse Practitioner, Undiagnosed Diseases Program, National Human Genome Research Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

The congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDG) are a rapidly growing group of inborn errors of metabolism that result from defects in the synthesis of glycans. Glycosylation is a major post-translational protein modification and an estimated 2% of the human genome encodes proteins for glycosylation. The molecular bases for the current 60 disorders, affecting approximately 800 individuals, have been identified, many in the last 5 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1115DOI Listing
March 2014
14 Reads

Sterol metabolism disorders and neurodevelopment-an update.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;17(3):197-210

Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pennsylvania, USA.

Cholesterol has numerous quintessential functions in normal cell physiology, as well as in embryonic and postnatal development. It is a major component of cell membranes and myelin, and is a precursor of steroid hormones and bile acids. The development of the blood brain barrier likely around 12-18 weeks of human gestation makes the developing embryonic/fetal brain dependent on endogenous cholesterol synthesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1114DOI Listing
March 2014
2 Reads

Peroxisome biogenesis disorders: Biological, clinical and pathophysiological perspectives.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;17(3):187-96

Department of Human Genetics, McGill University, Quebec, Canada.

The peroxisome biogenesis disorders (PBD) are a heterogeneous group of autosomal recessive disorders in which peroxisome assembly is impaired, leading to multiple peroxisome enzyme deficiencies, complex developmental sequelae and progressive disabilities. Mammalian peroxisome assembly involves the protein products of 16 PEX genes; defects in 14 of these have been shown to cause PBD. Three broad phenotypic groups are described on a spectrum of severity: Zellweger syndrome is the most severe, neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy is intermediate and infantile Refsum disease is less severe. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1113DOI Listing
March 2014
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Introduction: Neurodevelopmental issues in inborn errors of metabolism.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2013 ;17(3):185-6

Division of Medical Genetics, Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1121DOI Listing
March 2014
3 Reads

Developmental delay revisited.

Authors:
Yonata Levy

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(2):180-4

Psychology Department, Haddasah-Hebrew University Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.

This article presents current neurobiological concepts that highlight the critical role of chronological age in determining optimal development. The role of sensitive periods, experience expectancy, gene expression, and gene-age interactions is discussed. The debate between "splitters" and "lumpers" is presented in light of the review articles in this special issue. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1112DOI Listing
March 2013
3 Reads

Early developmental cues for diagnosis of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder in young children.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(2):170-9

Neuro-Cognitive Center, Pediatric Division, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel.

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a childhood-onset disorder that is considered one of the most common neurobehavioral disorders. The symptoms of ADHD should be cast, not as static or fixed neurobehavioral deficits, but rather in terms of underlying developmental processes. Targeting attentional disorders early in life can bring about fundamental alterations in the pathogenesis of ADHD, and thus prevent or moderate the course of the disorder. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1111DOI Listing
March 2013
2 Reads

Early language delay and specific language impairment.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(2):160-9

Department of Communication Disorders, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Early language delay (ELD) is a warning sign that may presage the presence of a later language impairment (LI). In order to allow more targeted identification and earlier intervention for LI, better diagnostic measures for toddlers are needed. Development of accurate predictive/diagnostic models requires consideration of a set of complex interrelated questions around definition, causality, and theories of LIs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1110DOI Listing
March 2013
2 Reads

Identifying early-risk markers and developmental trajectories for language impairment in neurodevelopmental disorders.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(2):151-9

Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Emerson College, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

The effective identification of neurodevelopmental disorders is essential for early diagnosis and provision of intervention services. For many of these conditions, one of the primary domains of abnormality is language development. This review addresses what is known about the earliest indicators of language impairment across a range of neurodevelopmental disorders; consideration is given to both behavioral and neural markers, as well as patterns of change over time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1109DOI Listing
March 2013
8 Reads

Late talkers: do good predictors of outcome exist?

Authors:
Leslie Rescorla

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(2):141-50

Department of Psychology, Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Philadelphia, PA 19010, USA.

Both small-scale and epidemiological longitudinal studies of early language delay indicate that most late talkers attain language scores in the average range by age 5, 6, or 7. However, late talker groups typically obtain significantly lower scores than groups with typical language histories on most language measures into adolescence. These findings support a dimensional account of language delay, whereby late talkers and typically developing peers differ quantitatively on a hypothetical language ability spectrum. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1108DOI Listing
March 2013
4 Reads

Differentiating autism spectrum disorder from other developmental delays in the first two years of life.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(2):130-40

Department of Speech-Language Pathology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Advances in the identification of the early signs of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have occurred despite the heterogeneity of the disorder and its variable onset and presentation. Using various methodologies including retrospective studies, community samples, and sibling cohorts, researchers have identified behavioral markers of the disorder that emerge over the first 2 years of life. However, there are characteristics of ASD that overlap with other types of developmental delay (DD), which may complicate differential diagnosis in young children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1107DOI Listing
March 2013
8 Reads

Cerebral palsy--don't delay.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(2):114-29

Cerebral Palsy Alliance, Research Institute, New South Wales, Australia.

Cerebral palsy (CP) is the most severe physical disability within the spectrum of developmental delay. CP is an umbrella term describing a group of motor disorders, accompanied by many associated impairments. The disability is a result of injuries to the developing brain occurring any time from the first trimester of pregnancy through to early childhood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1106DOI Listing
March 2013
6 Reads

Preterm birth: neuropsychological profiles and atypical developmental pathways.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(2):102-13

Department of Psychology, University of Bologna, 40127, Bologna, Italy.

Preterm birth is characterized by multiple interacting atypical constraints affecting different aspects of neuropsychological development. In the first years of life, perceptual, motor, and communicative-linguistic abilities, as well as attention, processing speed, and memory are affected by preterm birth resulting in cascading effects on later development. From school age to adolescence, a catch-up of simpler competencies (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1105DOI Listing
March 2013
3 Reads

Fetal and infant spontaneous general movements as predictors of developmental disabilities.

Authors:
Luba Zuk

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(2):93-101

Physical Therapy Department, Stayer School of Health Professions, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.

The challenge of identifying infants who are at risk for developmental delay and possible adverse neurodevelopmental outcome demands methods of evaluation that will lead to early intervention to minimize developmental disability and to maximize the infant's potential. A qualitative assessment of spontaneous general movements (GMs) in the preterm, term, and young infant at risk is a valid and reliable tool for evaluation (Prechtl [1990] Early Hum. Dev. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1104DOI Listing
March 2013
3 Reads

Global developmental delay and mental retardation--a pediatric perspective.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(2):85-92

The Hannah Khoushy Child Development Center and The Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, The Technion, The Israeli Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel.

Pediatricians play a leading role in the detection, diagnosis, and management of children with global developmental delay (GDD) and mental retardation (MR). Assessment, investigation, and consultation with the family are the prime responsibility of the developmental pediatrician, in collaboration with a multidisciplinary team. The model used by the developmental pediatrician depends on the community health framework. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1103DOI Listing
March 2013
2 Reads

Prenatal exposures associated with neurodevelopmental delay and disabilities.

Authors:
Orna Diav-Citrin

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(2):71-84

The Israeli Teratology Information Service, Department of Child Development & Rehabilitation, Medical Administration, The Health Division, Israel Ministry of Health, P.O. Box 1176, Jerusalem, 91010, Israel.

Neurobehavioral teratology refers to the study of the abnormal development of the structure and the behavioral functions of the central nervous system, which result from exposure to exogenous agents during prenatal development. The focus of this review is the effects of various prenatal exposures on human neurodevelopment. Studies that deal with the adverse effects of infectious agents (rubella, cytomegalovirus, and toxoplasma), teratogenic drugs (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1102DOI Listing
March 2013
2 Reads

Perinatal and early postnatal factors underlying developmental delay and disabilities.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(2):59-70

Department of Neonatology, Hebrew University Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem, Israel.

A delay in meeting developmental milestones may be secondary to perinatal events, involving complicated interactions between mother and fetus during delivery. Maternal factors including weight, diet, and morbidities can affect neonatal adaptation and later development. Prematurity, low birth weight, and previous intrauterine insults as well as complications during delivery of a previously normal fetus increase the risk for perinatal stress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1101DOI Listing
March 2013
2 Reads

Special issue on developmental delay.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(2):57-8

A significant percentage of children, ages 0-5 years, present with developmental delays. Delays can be global (GDD), when two or more developmental areas manifest at least 6 months delays, or specific (SDD)when it relates to a single functional area. This special issue reviews etiologies as well as clinical and research uses of the term, focusing on the potential for arriving at earlier specific diagnoses in cases of CP, ADHD, ASD and language impairments (LI). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.1100DOI Listing
March 2013
5 Reads

Do people with intellectual disability require special human subjects research protections? The interplay of history, ethics, and policy.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(1):52-6

Department of Medical Ethics and Policy Lab, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia North, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

People with intellectual disability (ID) have a long history of discrimination and stigmatization, and a more recent history of pride and self-advocacy. The early history suggests that people with ID are a vulnerable population and deserve special research protections as do some other groups; the disability rights movement of the late 20th century aligns people with ID more closely with the principle of autonomy that has guided clinical and research ethics for the last 40 years. In examining the history of people with ID and the prevailing framework of human subjects research protections in the United States, we conclude that people with ID do not require special protection in human subjects research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.139DOI Listing
March 2013
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Health policy and the community safety net for individuals with intellectual disability.

Authors:
Harold A Pollack

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(1):44-51

University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration, 969 East 60th Street, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA.

This article explores social policy developments in the arena of intellectual and developmental disabilities. It begins by summarizing the challenges facing persons with intellectual disabilities and their caregivers in 1945. Families depended on a patchwork of over-crowded and under-funded large state institutions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.138DOI Listing
March 2013
2 Reads

How do we assess family supports and fairness in early intervention?

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(1):36-43

Department of Neurology and Developmental Medicine, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, Maryland 21205, USA.

Public Law 99-457 extended the landmark Public Law 94-142 legislation to include early intervention for infants and toddlers with or at-risk for development of developmental disabilities. Currently over 300,000 infants and toddlers and their families in the United States receive services through Part C of the Individuals with Disabilities Education legislation. The law fostered interagency collaborations and included the child's parent or caregiver as an integral part of the intervention team. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.137DOI Listing
March 2013
4 Reads

Health disparities and intellectual disabilities: lessons from individuals with Down syndrome.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(1):32-5

Department of Pediatrics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA.

Individuals with intellectual disabilities experience health disparities and disparities in accessing health care services compared to individuals within the general population. In order to eliminate these disparities the contributors to them must be understood. In this article, we aim to describe a recent reconceptualization of health and disability (Krahn, et al. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.136DOI Listing
March 2013
2 Reads

Prenatal testing for intellectual disability: misperceptions and reality with lessons from Down syndrome.

Authors:
Kruti Acharya

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(1):27-31

Departments of Medicine and Pediatrics, MacLean Center for Clinical Medical Ethics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Down syndrome is the most common cause of intellectual disability. In the United States, it is recommended that prenatal testing for Down syndrome be offered to all women. Because of this policy and consequent public perception, having Down syndrome has become a disadvantage in the prenatal period. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.135DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3597781PMC
March 2013
13 Reads

Responding to requests of families for unproven interventions in neurodevelopmental disorders: hyperbaric oxygen "treatment" and stem cell "therapy" in cerebral palsy.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(1):19-26

Neuroethics Research Unit, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.

Faced with the limitations of currently available mainstream medical treatments and interventions, parents of children with neurodevelopmental disorders often seek information about unproven interventions. These interventions frequently have undetermined efficacy and uncertain safety profiles. In this article, we present a general background and case vignettes that highlight the use of hyperbaric oxygen chambers and stem cells in cerebral palsy, the leading cause of pediatric physical disability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.134DOI Listing
March 2013
5 Reads

Dangerous and expensive screening and treatment for rare childhood diseases: the case of Krabbe disease.

Authors:
John D Lantos

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(1):15-8

Department of Pediatrics, University of Missouri, Kansas City, Missouri; Children's Mercy Bioethics Center, Children's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City 64108, Missouri.

Public policy surrounding newborn screening is in flux. New technology allows more screening for more diseases at lower cost. Traditional criteria for target diseases have been criticized by leading health policymakers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.133DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4014301PMC
March 2013
2 Reads

Expanding newborn screening for lysosomal disorders: opportunities and challenges.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(1):9-14

Department of Human Genetics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

Newborn screening (NBS), since its implementation in the 1960s, has traditionally been successful in reducing mortality and disability in children with a range of different conditions. Lysosomal storage disorders (LSD) are a heterogeneous group of inherited metabolic diseases that result from lysosomal dysfunction. Based on available treatment and suitable screening methods, the LSDs that are considered for NBS generally include Fabry, Gaucher, Krabbe, MPSI, MPSII, MPSV, Metachromatic leukodystrophy, Niemann-Pick, and Pompe. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.132DOI Listing
March 2013
2 Reads

Genetic testing for autism spectrum disorders.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2011 ;17(1):3-8

Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois 60614, USA.

Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have unique developmental and behavioral phenotypes, and they have specific challenges with communication, social skills, and repetitive behaviors. At this time, no single etiology for ASD has been identified. However, evidence from family studies and linkage analyses suggests that genetic factors play a pivotal role in the etiology of ASD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.131DOI Listing
March 2013
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Review of pharmacotherapy options for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and ADHD-like symptoms in children and adolescents with developmental disorders.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2010 ;16(3):273-82

Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.

Developmental disorders such as subaverage intelligence, pervasive developmental disorders, and genetic syndromes are frequently associated with comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or ADHD-like symptoms. While there are not pharmacological cures for these developmental disorders, coinciding ADHD and ADHD-like symptoms that contribute to difficulties in psychosocial functioning are frequently able to be addressed by pharmacotherapy. This article reviews what is known about the efficacy and tolerability of pharmacological interventions for the treatment of children and adolescents suffering from developmental disorders and comorbid ADHD/ADHD-like symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.120DOI Listing
March 2011
2 Reads

Pharmacotherapy of disruptive behavior in mentally retarded subjects: A review of the current literature.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2010 ;16(3):265-72

Department of Child and Adolescent Neuropsychiatry, University of Rostock, Rostock, Germany.

The review presented here describes the state of the art of pharmacological treatment of aggression in subjects with mental retardation (MR) summing up results for both, children and adults. In general, psychopharmacological treatment of disruptive behavior in individuals with MR is similar to the treatment in subjects without MR. Compared to individuals without MR medication should "start lower and go slower. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.119DOI Listing
March 2011
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Managing irritability and aggression in autism spectrum disorders in children and adolescents.

Authors:
Adelaide S Robb

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2010 ;16(3):258-64

Department of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, George Washington University Medical Center, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.

Children with autism and autism spectrum disorders have a high rate of irritability and aggressive symptoms. In one study up to 20% of children with autism have symptoms of irritability and aggression including aggression, severe tantrums, and deliberate self injurious behavior (Lecavalier [2006] J. Autism Dev. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.118DOI Listing
March 2011
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Pain management in intellectually disabled children: Assessment, treatment, and translational research.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2010 ;16(3):248-57

Department of Pediatric Surgery and Pain Expertise Center, Erasmus University Medical Center-Sophia Children's Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

The primary focus of pain research in intellectually disabled individuals is still on pain assessment. Several observational pain assessment scales are available, each with its own characteristics, its own target group and its own validated use. Observational studies report differences in the treatment of intra- and postoperative pain of intellectually disabled children and almost all children with intellectual disability have comorbidities that need to be addressed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.117DOI Listing
March 2011
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Treatment of epilepsy in children with developmental disabilities.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2010 ;16(3):239-47

Neurology and Pediatrics, George Washington University Medical Center, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, USA.

Children with developmental disabilities are at increased risk for epilepsy with a prevalence rate higher than the general population. Some of the more common developmental disorders in childhood and the features of epilepsy in these conditions are discussed. Specifically, autism, cerebral palsy, mental retardation, and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder are reviewed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.116DOI Listing
March 2011
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Developmental pharmacology.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2010 ;16(3):233-8

Division of Pediatric Clinical Pharmacology, George Washington University Medical Center, Children's National Medical Center, Washington DC, USA.

Understanding the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs used in psychopharmacology across the pediatric age spectrum from infants to adolescents represents a major challenge for clinicians. In pediatrics, treatment protocols use either standard dose reductions for these drugs for children below a certain age or use less conventional parameters such as weight for allometric dosing. The rationale behind this, however, is often lacking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.122DOI Listing
March 2011
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Introduction: psychopharmacology.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2010 ;16(3):231-2

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.121DOI Listing
March 2011
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Emerging therapeutic approaches to mitochondrial diseases.

Dev Disabil Res Rev 2010 ;16(2):219-29

Department of Neurology, University of Miami School of Medicine, 1095 NW 14th Terrace, Miami, FL 33136, USA.

Mitochondrial diseases are very heterogeneous and can affect different tissues and organs. Moreover, they can be caused by genetic defects in either nuclear or mitochondrial DNA as well as by environmental factors. All of these factors have made the development of therapies difficult. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ddrr.109DOI Listing
January 2011
5 Reads