2,968 results match your criteria Dental Clinics of North America [Journal]


Changing Face of Prosthodontics.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 04 2;63(2):xi-xii. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Associate Dean for Education, University of Iowa College of Dentistry and Dental Clinics, 801 Newton Road, DSB N310, Iowa City, IA 52242-1010, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2019.01.001DOI Listing

Digital Workflows in the Management of the Esthetically Discriminating Patient.

Authors:
David L Guichet

Dent Clin North Am 2019 04 2;63(2):331-344. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Private Practice, Providence Prosthodontics Dental Group, 1310 West Stewart Drive #202, Orange, CA 92868, USA. Electronic address:

Traditional methods of designing and creating restorations are being increasingly replaced by digital processes. Software and hardware platforms for esthetic restoration design allow for local computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) production. These systems are becoming ubiquitous and their strengths can be applied to the management of the esthetically discerning patient. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.11.011DOI Listing

Consideration for Contemporary Implant Surgery.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 04 30;63(2):309-329. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department of Prosthodontics, Indiana University School of Dentistry, 1121 West Michigan Street, DS-S408, Indianapolis, IN 46202-5186, USA.

The advancement of technology often provides clinicians and patients better clinical alternatives to achieve optimal treatment outcomes. Computer-guided options allow clinicians to realize the virtual prosthodontically driven surgical plan, facilitating more predictable implant placement. Although the use of technology does not mean the clinicians can forgo the fundamental treatment principles when treating a patient, proper assessment and diagnostic approach from prosthodontic, surgical, and radiographic perspectives are still essential for a successful clinical outcome. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.11.010DOI Listing
April 2019
3 Reads

Obstructive Sleep Apnea: The Role of Gender in Prevalence, Symptoms, and Treatment Success.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 04;63(2):297-308

Department of Pulmonology and Critical Care, Oregon Health and Science University, 3181 Southwest Sam Jackson Park Road, Portland, OR 97239-3098, USA. Electronic address:

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of known similarities and differences between genders relative to presenting symptoms, demographics, and severity of obstructive sleep apnea. There is a relationship of risk of disease occurrence relative to stages of reproductive life of a woman, indicating that chronologic age might not be as important as timing of pregnancy and menopausal transition. The current understanding of gender differences in treatment success and compliance with oral appliance therapy is limited and requires further investigation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.11.009DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Making the Best Clinical Decisions for Patients: The Pros-CAT Protocol.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 04;63(2):279-296

Department of Restorative Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry, 801 South Paulina Street, MC555, Chicago, IL 60612, USA.

The Pros-CAT protocol critical appraisal method uses accepted strategies to identify and summarize best evidence to support patient care through evidence-based analysis that includes assessing the patient; developing a concise clinical question; conducting a literature search to identify pertinent research; critically appraising the identified literature for validity, reliability, and applicability to the patient situation; synthesizing the literature into a meaningful conclusion using an organized method; and applying that synthesis to the patient's need. The Pros-CAT protocol is applicable for practicing clinicians, dental students, postgraduate students, and residents. The Pros-CAT index compares evidence strength for patient applicability. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.11.008DOI Listing

Revisiting the Removable Partial Denture.

Authors:
Jiyeon J Kim

Dent Clin North Am 2019 04 30;63(2):263-278. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Department of Restorative Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, 801 South Paulina Street Room 359., Chicago, IL 60612, USA. Electronic address:

The partial edentulous population is increasing because of an increasing aging population, increased life expectancy, and individuals retaining more teeth at an older age. Therefore, the need for fixed and removable partial denture (RPD) therapy will remain high and will continue into the future. RPDs provide minimally invasive, cost-effective, timely care, and are preferred to fixed dental prostheses using teeth or implant therapy in many clinical scenarios. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.11.007DOI Listing

Management of Edentulous Patients.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 04 30;63(2):249-261. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Division of Restorative and Prosthetic Dentistry, The Ohio State University College of Dentistry, 305 West 12th Avenue, Room 3005Q, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

Edentulism, defined as the complete loss of all dentition, is a worldwide phenomenon. Edentulism occurs because of biologic disease processes, such as dental caries, periodontal diseases, trauma, and oral cancer. Edentulism is accompanied by several comorbidities that can significantly influence an individual. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.11.006DOI Listing

Biomaterials: Ceramic and Adhesive Technologies.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 04 30;63(2):233-248. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Oral Biology, The Ohio State University College of Dentistry, 305 West 12th Avenue, Room 3037D, Columbus, OH 43210-1267, USA.

This review highlights ceramic material options and their use. The newer high-strength ceramics in monolithic form have gained popularity despite the lack of long-term clinical data to support this paradigm shift. Although there are some encouraging clinical data available, there is a need to develop laboratory simulation models that can help predict long-term clinical performance for ceramic and adhesive cements. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.11.005DOI Listing

Management of Implant/Prosthodontic Complications.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 04 5;63(2):217-231. Epub 2019 Feb 5.

Department of Oral Biology, University of Illinois at Chicago, College of Dentistry, Room 402E, 801 S Paulina Street, Chicago, IL 60612, USA.

Dental implants continue to grow in popularity because they are a predictable treatment to replace missing teeth. They have a high success rate; however, they are still associated with some clinical complications. This article discusses a diverse range of complications related to the restorative and mechanical aspects of dental implants and the management of such complications, as well as potential factors contributing to them. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.11.004DOI Listing

Prosthodontic Management of Implant Therapy: Esthetic Complications.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 04 2;63(2):199-216. Epub 2019 Feb 2.

Department of Restorative Dentistry, West Virginia University, School of Dentistry, PO Box 9495, One Medical Center Drive, Morgantown, WV 26506-9495, USA.

The essential promise of implant dentistry is the ability to imperceptibly replace missing teeth. To achieve this, careful planning, execution, and maintenance is required by the dentist and patient to maintain a long-term esthetic and functional result. Unfortunately, as a result of biological, prosthetic, and iatrogenic factors, unesthetic results can occur. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.11.003DOI Listing

The Current State of Chairside Digital Dentistry and Materials.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 04;63(2):175-197

Department of Preventive and Restorative Sciences, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, 240 South 40th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

This article describes and illustrates the current state of chairside computer-aided design computer-aided manufacturing technologies and materials. It provides a historical background and discusses the different components of the chairside digital workflow: intraoral scanners, design software, milling machines, and sinter furnaces. The material range available for chairside digital dentistry is broad and includes polymethyl methacrylates, composite resins, and a large variety of ceramics. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.11.002DOI Listing
April 2019
4 Reads

Update on Perio-Prosthodontics.

Authors:
Ryan Cook Kevin Lim

Dent Clin North Am 2019 04;63(2):157-174

Department of Restorative Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 335 Brauer Hall CB 7450, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Knowledge of the periodontal-restorative interface is critical in the fabrication of restorations that are functional and esthetic. Understanding biological principles allows the clinician to predict how the periodontium will respond to restorative therapy. Factors that influence the response to therapy in the periodontal-restorative interface are periodontal biotype, gingival architecture, alveolar crest position, gingival margin position, and gingival zenith. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.11.001DOI Listing

Evidence-Based Dentistry: The Foundation for Modern Dental Practice.

Authors:
Robert J Weyant

Dent Clin North Am 2019 01 17;63(1):ix-x. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

Department of Dental Public Health, University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, Room 346 Salk Hall, 3501 Terrace Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.09.001DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Teaching Evidence-Based Practice: Considerations for Dental Education.

Authors:
Robert J Weyant

Dent Clin North Am 2019 01 29;63(1):97-117. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, 3501 Terrace Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. Electronic address:

The motivation for teaching evidence-based practice is that, through the use of high-quality clinically relevant evidence, clinicians will make rationale decision that optimally improve patient health outcomes. Achieving that goal requires clinicians who are able to answer patient care-relevant clinical questions efficiently, which means that they must be able rapidly to retrieve, assess, and apply evidence of direct relevance to their patients. Educational programs designed to accomplish this vary in their effectiveness. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.08.010DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

How Evidence-Based Dentistry Has Shaped the Practice of Oral Medicine.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 01 29;63(1):83-95. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Department of Oral Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, 240 South 40th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA. Electronic address:

Oral medicine is "the discipline of dentistry concerned with the oral health care of medically complex patients, including the diagnosis and primarily nonsurgical treatment and/or management of medically related conditions affecting the oral and maxillofacial region." In each of these areas, evidence-based medicine has shaped theoretic understanding and clinical practice. The available evidence allows for improved patient management. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00118532183005
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.08.006DOI Listing
January 2019
13 Reads

Evidence-Based Update on Diagnosis and Management of Gingivitis and Periodontitis.

Authors:
Satish Kumar

Dent Clin North Am 2019 01 29;63(1):69-81. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

A.T. Still University, Arizona School of Dentistry and Oral Health, 5855 E Still Circle, Mesa, AZ 85296, USA. Electronic address:

This article is an overview to update the practicing general dental practitioner about clinically relevant evidence-based topics published in the recent past in the diagnosis, etiopathogenesis, and management of gingivitis and periodontitis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.08.005DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Evidence-Based Dentistry Update on Silver Diamine Fluoride.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 01;63(1):45-68

Department of Epidemiology & Health Promotion, New York University College of Dentistry, 433 1st Avenue, Room 720, New York, NY 10010, USA.

This article reviews current evidence on the effectiveness of silver diamine fluoride (SDF) as a caries arresting and preventive agent. It provides clinical recommendations around SDF's appropriate use as part of a comprehensive caries management program. Systematic reviews confirm that SDF is effective for caries arrest on cavitated lesions in primary teeth and root caries in the elderly. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.08.011DOI Listing
January 2019
3 Reads

Analgesic Therapy in Dentistry: From a Letter to the Editor to an Evidence-Base Review.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 01;63(1):35-44

Department of Oral Surgery and Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, 240 South 40th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6030, USA.

It has been known for centuries that opioids are highly addictive when consumed for prolonged periods of time. Pharmacologic tolerance to the efficacy of opioid analgesic results in a need for increased dosing and drug dependence. One must question the empirical sources of evidence that justified the belief that prescription opioids were safe and effective for treating acute and chronic pain. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.08.004DOI Listing
January 2019
12 Reads

Added Sugar and Dental Caries in Children: A Scientific Update and Future Steps.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 01 29;63(1):17-33. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Research and Graduate Programs, University of Missouri Kansas City, School of Dentistry, 650 E. 25th Street, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA.

Excess added sugars, particularly in the form of sugar-sweetened beverages, is a leading cause of tooth decay in US children. Although added sugar intake is rooted in behavioral and social factors, few evidence-based, theory-driven socio-behavioral strategies are currently available to address added sugar intake. Dental health professionals are in a position to help identify and address problematic sugar-related behaviors in pediatric patients and advocate for broader upstream approaches, including taxes, warning labels, and policy changes, that can help reduce added sugar intake, prevent tooth decay, and improve health outcomes in vulnerable child populations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00118532183005
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.08.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6242348PMC
January 2019
20 Reads

How Should We Evaluate and Use Evidence to Improve Population Oral Health?

Dent Clin North Am 2019 01 29;63(1):145-156. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Main Arts Building, Bangor University, Bangor, UK.

Generating and implementing evidence-based policy is an important aim for many publicly funded health systems. In dentistry, this is based on the assumption that evidence-based health care increases the efficiency and effectiveness of interventions to improve oral health at a population level. This article argues that a linear logic model that links the generation of research evidence with its use is overly simplistic. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00118532183006
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.08.009DOI Listing
January 2019
15 Reads

Translational Research: Bringing Science to the Provider Through Guideline Implementation.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 01 29;63(1):129-144. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

HealthPartners Institute, 3311 East Old Shakopee Road, Bloomington, MN 55425, USA.

Significant variation exists in health care practice patterns that creates concerns regarding the quality of care delivered. Clinical practice based on high-quality evidence provides a rationale for clinical decision making. Resources, such as evidence-based guidelines, provide that evidence to clinicians and improve patient outcomes by decreasing unwanted variation in clinical practice. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.08.008DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Evidence-Based Dentistry Caries Risk Assessment and Disease Management.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 01 29;63(1):119-128. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Department of Cariology, Restorative Sciences and Endodontics, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, 1011 North University, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

The objective of this article was to provide a summary of evidence-based recommendations for the assessment of caries risk and management of dental caries. The goal is to help clinicians manage the caries disease process using personalized interventions supported by the best available evidence, taking into account the clinician's expertise and the patient's needs and preferences, to maintain health and preserve tooth structure. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.08.007DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Simple Approaches for Establishing an Evidence-Based Dental Practice.

Dent Clin North Am 2019 01 29;63(1):1-16. Epub 2018 Oct 29.

Private Practice, 805 West Broadway, Suite 306, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1K1, Canada; University of British Columbia, 306-805 West Broadway, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1K1, Canada.

Constructing an evidence-based dental practice requires leadership, commitment, technology support, and time, as well as skill practice in searching, appraising, and organizing evidence. In mastering the skills of evidence-based dentistry, clinicians can implement high-quality science into practice through a variety of opportunities including the development of clinical care guidelines, procedural technique protocols, and electronic dental record auto-note templates, as well as treatment planning, care prioritization, and case presentation. The benefits of building an evidence-based dental practice are many, including improvements in patient care and satisfaction, increased treatment predictability and confidence in care approaches, as well as potential cost savings. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.08.002DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Orofacial Pain: Where We Are and Where We Are Going.

Authors:
Steven D Bender

Dent Clin North Am 2018 10 10;62(4):ix-x. Epub 2018 Aug 10.

Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Facial Pain and Sleep Medicine, Texas A&M College of Dentistry, 3302 Gaston Avenue, Dallas, TX 75246, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00118532183005
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.08.001DOI Listing
October 2018
41 Reads

Mind-Body Considerations in Orofacial Pain.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Oct 14;62(4):683-694. Epub 2018 Aug 14.

Department of Psychology, Orofacial Pain Clinic, University of Kentucky, 209-A Kastle Hall, Lexington, KY 40506, USA. Electronic address:

This article summarizes the cognitive, behavioral, and emotional factors that contribute to the onset and maintenance of orofacial pain. These orofacial pain conditions illustrate the dynamic interplay of the mind and body and the importance of multimodal treatment approaches addressing simultaneously the cognitive, behavioral, and physiologic dimensions of facial pain. Cognitive and behavioral treatments of temporomandibular disorders based on the outcomes of randomized controlled trials are also discussed with an emphasis on using a biopsychosocial perspective when working with the persons who have temporomandibular disorders. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.06.004DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Sex, Gender, and Orofacial Pain.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Oct 2;62(4):665-682. Epub 2018 Aug 2.

Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Pain, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA.

This review examines gender prevalence in orofacial pain to elucidate underlying factors that can explain such differences. This review highlights how gender affects (1) the association of hormonal factors and pain modulation; (2) the genetic aspects influencing pain sensitivity and pain perception; (3) the role of resting blood pressure and pain threshold; and (4) the impact of sociocultural, environmental, and psychological factors on pain. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.06.001DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Sleep Bruxism and Pain.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Oct 14;62(4):657-663. Epub 2018 Aug 14.

Section of Orofacial Pain and Jaw Function, Department of Dentistry and Oral Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark; Scandinavian Center for Orofacial Neurosciences (SCON).

Bruxism is an oral behavior that may lead to repetitive jaw-muscle activity characterized by clenching or grinding of the teeth and/or by bracing or thrusting of the mandible with 2 distinct circadian manifestations: sleep bruxism or awake bruxism. They share common risk factors and lead to similar consequences for the masticatory system but may have different etiology and pathophysiology. This oral behavior has been associated with tooth wear, masticatory muscle tenderness, headaches, and painful temporomandibular disorders. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.06.003DOI Listing
October 2018
8 Reads

Sleep and Orofacial Pain.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Oct 14;62(4):629-656. Epub 2018 Aug 14.

Department of Neurosciences, Reproductive and Odontostomatological Sciences, Federico II University of Naples, Via Pansini, 5, Naples 80131, Italy.

Sleep and pain share a bidirectional relationship. Therefore, it is important for practitioners managing patients experiencing either sleep and/or pain issues to recognize and understand this complex association from a neurobiological perspective involving neuroanatomic and neurochemical processes. Accounting for the influence of pain on the various aspects of sleep and understanding its impact on various orofacial pain disorders assists in developing a prudent management approach. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.06.005DOI Listing
October 2018
16 Reads

Primary Headaches.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Oct 14;62(4):611-628. Epub 2018 Aug 14.

Tufts University School of Dental Medicine, 1 Kneeland Street, Suite 601, Boston, MA 02111, USA.

The primary headaches are composed of multiple entities that cause episodic and chronic head pain in the absence of an underlying pathologic process, disease, or traumatic injury. The most common of these are migraine, tension-type headache, and the trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias. This article reviews the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, and treatment of each to help in differential diagnosis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00118532183005
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.06.006DOI Listing
October 2018
11 Reads

Painful Oral Lesions.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 10 14;62(4):597-609. Epub 2018 Aug 14.

Naval Postgraduate Dental School, Bethesda, MD, USA. Electronic address:

Painful oral vesiculoerosive diseases (OVD) include lichen planus, pemphigus vulgaris, mucous membrane pemphigoid, erythema multiforme, and recurrent aphthous stomatitis. OVD lesions have an immunopathic cause. Treatment is aimed at reducing the immunologic and the following inflammatory response. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.06.002DOI Listing
October 2018
14 Reads

Burning Mouth Syndrome.

Authors:
Steven D Bender

Dent Clin North Am 2018 10 27;62(4):585-596. Epub 2018 Jul 27.

Facial Pain and Sleep Medicine, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Texas A&M College of Dentistry, 3302 Gaston Avenue, Dallas, TX 75246, USA. Electronic address:

Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is a chronic disorder for which a definitive etiopathology is not known. The BMS patient often experiences a continuous burning pain in the mouth without any clinical signs. This confusing condition can create frustration for both patient and practitioner. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00118532183004
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.05.006DOI Listing
October 2018
15 Reads

Neuropathic Orofacial Pain.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Oct 31;62(4):565-584. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

University of Western Australia, School of Dentistry, 17 Monash Avenue, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009, Australia. Electronic address:

Neuropathic pain of the orofacial region can cause much distress in individuals presenting with this condition. It may be easily mistaken for dental pain, and hence many individuals may undergo unnecessary dental work. Knowledge of the types of neuropathic orofacial pain may assist in timely diagnosis and improvement of a patient's quality of life. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.05.005DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Musculoskeletal Disorders.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Oct 31;62(4):553-564. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Department of Prosthodontics, Bauru School of Dentistry, University of São Paulo, Al Otavio P. Brisola 9-75, Bauru, São Paulo 17012-901, Brazil.

Temporomandibular disorder (TMD), a type of musculoskeletal pain, is a main cause of pain in the orofacial region. It involves the masticatory muscles, temporomandibular joints (TMJs), and associated structures. The most common signs and symptoms are pain, limited range of motion, and TMJ sounds. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.05.004DOI Listing
October 2018
14 Reads

Imaging in Orofacial Pain.

Authors:
Hui Liang

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Oct 27;62(4):533-551. Epub 2018 Jul 27.

Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Texas A&M University College of Dentistry, 3302 Gaston Avenue, Dallas, TX 75246-0677, USA. Electronic address:

Imaging usefulness in the diagnosis of orofacial pain includes all modalities that cover the soft tissue and bony structures in the region of the head and neck. Imaging techniques may include 2-dimensional and/or 3-dimensional imaging modalities. Both dentists and physicians should be aware of orofacial pain associated with a variety of sources and select the appropriate imaging technique based on the patient's medical and dental history and the clinical examination. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.05.003DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Assessment of the Orofacial Pain Patient.

Authors:
Steven D Bender

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Oct 31;62(4):525-532. Epub 2018 Jul 31.

Facial Pain and Sleep Medicine, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Texas A&M College of Dentistry, 3302 Gaston Avenue, Dallas, TX 75246, USA. Electronic address:

The diagnostic process of pain in the oral, facial, and head region is often perceived as more difficult due the numerous, extensively innervated structures located in this area. To successfully manage the patient with these pain presentations, it is critical for the clinician to spend ample time procuring a good medical and dental history. A systematic approach to the physical examination will ensure that sufficient data are acquired without overlooking potentially important contributing factors. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.05.002DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

An Introduction to Orofacial Pain.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 10 27;62(4):511-523. Epub 2018 Jul 27.

Surgery Health Care Service, University of Vermont Medical Center, 111 Colchester Avenue, Burlington, VT 05401, USA. Electronic address:

The assessment, diagnosis, and management of orofacial pain (OFP) disorders is often a complex, multifactorial, and multidisciplinary process. Nociception leads to the perception of pain, causing the personal experience of suffering, which results in pain behavior. Many patients present with various comorbidities that may influence these conditions in a multitude of ways. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00118532183004
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.05.001DOI Listing
October 2018
19 Reads

Emerging Imaging Technologies in Dentomaxillofacial Radiology.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 07 3;62(3):xi-xii. Epub 2018 May 3.

Department of Comprehensive Dentistry, University of Texas Health San Antonio, School of Dentistry, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.04.001DOI Listing
July 2018
3 Reads

Nuclear Medicine Imaging in the Dentomaxillofacial Region.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Jul;62(3):491-509

Department of Radiology, Keck School of Medicine of USC, GNH 3549, Off Campus, Los Angeles, CA 90089-9311, USA.

Nuclear medicine studies evaluate physiology on a molecular level providing earlier detection of lesions before morphologic change is evident. Tc-MDP and F-fluoride bone scans detect osteomyelitis earlier than radiographs and computed tomography (CT); aid in diagnosis of temporomandibular joint disorder; and evaluate activity of condylar hyperplasia, extent of Paget disease, and viability of bone grafts. F-FDG PET/CT distinguish between soft tissue and bone infections and diagnose osteomyelitis complicated by fracture or surgery. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.03.008DOI Listing
July 2018
25 Reads

Ultrasound in Dentistry: Toward a Future of Radiation-Free Imaging.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Jul;62(3):481-489

Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece and Columbia University, College of Dental Medicine, Greece.

Ultrasonography (US) is a noninvasive, nonionizing, inexpensive, and painless imaging tool proven to be a valuable diagnostic tool in soft tissue assessment that also shows promise for hard tissue evaluation in dentistry. US has been investigated for its capability to identify carious lesions, tooth fractures or cracks, periodontal bony defects, maxillofacial fractures, and more. It has been used as a diagnostic aid in temporomandibular disorders, implant dentistry, and to measure muscle and soft tissue thickness. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.03.007DOI Listing
July 2018
4 Reads

MRI for Dental Applications.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Jul;62(3):467-480

Division of TMD and Orofacial Pain, Department of Diagnostic and Biological Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Minnesota, 6-320 Moos Tower, 515 Delaware Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.

Imaging of hard and soft tissue of the oral cavity is important for dentistry. However, medical computed tomography, cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), nor MRI enables soft and hard tissue imaging simultaneously. Some MRI sequences were shown to provide fast soft and hard tissue imaging of hydrogen, which increased the interest in dental MRI. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00118532183002
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.03.006DOI Listing
July 2018
6 Reads

Multidetector Row Computed Tomography in Maxillofacial Imaging.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Jul;62(3):453-465

Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118, USA; Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118, USA; Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, 820 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02118, USA.

Multidetector row CT (MDCT) offers superior soft tissue characterization and is useful for diagnosis of odontogenic and nonodontogenic cysts and tumors, fibro-osseous lesions, inflammatory, malignancy, metastatic lesions, developmental abnormalities, and maxillofacial trauma. The rapid advances in MDCT technology, including perfusion CT, dual-energy CT, and texture analysis, will be an integrated anatomic and functional high-resolution scan, which will help in diagnosis of maxillofacial lesions and overall patient care. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.03.005DOI Listing
July 2018
5 Reads

Fluorescence and Near-Infrared Light Transillumination.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Jul;62(3):435-452

Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, 707 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143-0758, USA.

This article describes the current applications of various technologies based on either autofluorescence or near-infrared light illumination, tailored to aid practitioners in detecting and quantitatively monitoring oral diseases such as dental caries and oral cancer at the earliest stage of their formation, or in the conservative surgical excision of necrotic bones in diseases such as chronic osteomyelitis, osteoradionecrosis, and medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw. The data discussed are primarily based on published scientific studies and reviews from case reports, clinical trials, and in vitro and in vivo studies. References have been traced manually, by MEDLINE, or through manufacturer's websites. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00118532183002
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.03.010DOI Listing
July 2018
10 Reads

Optical Coherence Tomography.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Jul;62(3):421-434

Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, 707 Parnassus Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94143-0758, USA.

Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a noninvasive diagnostic technique providing cross-sectional images of biologic structures based on the differences in tissue optical properties. OCT has been widely used in numerous clinical applications and is becoming popular as a promising technology in dentistry. Today, dental hard (tooth) and soft (hard palate mucosa and gingiva mucosa) tissues are visualized with OCT. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.03.004DOI Listing
July 2018
4 Reads

Computer-Assisted Surgery: Applications in Dentistry and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 07;62(3):403-420

UT Dentistry-Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, 8210 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229, USA.

Computer-assisted surgery (CAS) has evolved over time from its earliest introduction with utility in the Neurosurgical field. Within the past twenty years, optical navigation systems have emerged and developed into a great tool for the fields of dentistry and craniomaxillofacial surgery (CMF). Currently, CAS is useful for orthognathic and temporomandibular joint surgery, facial trauma, maxillomandibular reconstruction, implantology, and restorative dentistry. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.03.009DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

3D Volume Rendering and 3D Printing (Additive Manufacturing).

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Jul;62(3):393-402

Oral Health and Rehabilitation, University of Louisville School of Dentistry, 501 South Preston Street, Room 311, Louisville, KY 40202, USA.

Three-dimensional (3D) volume-rendered images allow 3D insight into the anatomy, facilitating surgical treatment planning and teaching. 3D printing, additive manufacturing, and rapid prototyping techniques are being used with satisfactory accuracy, mostly for diagnosis and surgical planning, followed by direct manufacture of implantable devices. The major limitation is the time and money spent generating 3D objects. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.03.003DOI Listing
July 2018
18 Reads

Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Jul;62(3):361-391

Private Practice, Horizon Dental, 742 Broadway, El Cajon, CA 92021, USA.

In the last several decades, the need for 3D images in dentistry have developed. Computerized tomography was first introduced mainly with the advent of implantology, but its use remained limited to a small number of specialists, due to its indications, access and dose radiation. In the late 90's, a new technology using a cone-shaped beam and a reciprocating detector, which rotates around the patient 360 degrees and acquires projected data in a single rotation, namely the cone beam computerized tomography (CBCT), invaded dentistry, making the perception of 3D easily acceptable to dentists and their patients. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.03.002DOI Listing
July 2018
1 Read

Digital Radiographic Image Processing and Analysis.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 Jul;62(3):341-359

Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine, University of Michigan School of Dentistry, 2029F, 1011 North University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI 49109-1078, USA.

This article describes digital radiographic imaging and analysis from the basics of image capture to examples of some of the most advanced digital technologies currently available. The principles underlying the imaging technologies are described to provide a better understanding of their strengths and limitations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.03.001DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

The Intersection of Clinical Practice and Dental Public Health.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 04;62(2):xi-xiii

Department of Health Policy and Health Services Research, Boston University Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine, 560 Harrison Avenue #342, Boston, MA 02118, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2018.01.001DOI Listing
April 2018
3 Reads

A Public Health Perspective on Paying for Dentistry, the Affordable Care Act, and Looking to the Future.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 04;62(2):327-340

Population Oral Health, Columbia University College of Dental Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, 622 West 168th Street, PH7-311, Box 20, New York, NY 10032, USA; Children's Dental Health Project, Washington, DC, USA. Electronic address:

Health care costs have traditionally been provider generated whereas payment has been split between public and private sources. There has been little pressure on health care providers to demonstrate value. The quest for value in health care financing is now widely evident as demonstrated by governmental and private sector pursuits of a 3-part aim: better health outcomes at lower cost with improved patient and population experience. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2017.12.002DOI Listing
April 2018
3 Reads

Innovative Models of Dental Care Delivery and Coverage: Patient-Centric Dental Benefits Based on Digital Oral Health Risk Assessment.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 04;62(2):319-325

Medicaid, Medicare, CHIP Services Dental Association, 4411 Connecticut Avenue NorthWest, Suite 401, Washington, DC 20008, USA. Electronic address:

Innovative models of dental care delivery and coverage are emerging across oral health care systems causing changes to treatment and benefit plans. A novel addition to these models is digital risk assessment, which offers a promising new approach that incorporates the use of a cloud-based technology platform to assess an individual patient's risk for oral disease. Risk assessment changes treatment by including risk as a modifier of treatment and as a determinant of preventive services. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2017.11.009DOI Listing
April 2018
8 Reads