2,598 results match your criteria Demography[Journal]


Misreporting Month of Birth: Diagnosis and Implications for Research on Nutrition and Early Childhood in Developing Countries.

Demography 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Friedman School of Nutrition and Department of Economics, Tufts University, Boston, MA, 02111, USA.

A large literature has used children's birthdays to identify exposure to shocks and estimate their impacts on later outcomes. Using height-for-age z scores (HAZ) for more than 990,000 children in 62 countries from 163 Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), we show how random errors in birth dates create artifacts in HAZ that can be used to diagnose the extent of age misreporting. The most important artifact is an upward gradient in HAZ by recorded month of birth (MOB) from start to end of calendar years, resulting in a large HAZ differential between December- and January-born children of -0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0753-9DOI Listing
January 2019

Same-Sex Parents and Children's School Progress: An Association That Disappeared Over Time.

Demography 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Department of Political and Social Sciences, European University Institute, Via Roccettini 9, San Domenico, I-50014, Italy.

Research is divided as to whether children living in same-sex parent families achieve different outcomes compared with their peers. In this article, we improve on earlier estimates of such differences and subsequently study whether and why the association between parental union sex composition and children's school progress changed over time. Data from the American Community Survey waves 2008-2015 (N = 1,952,490 including 7,792 children living with a same-sex couple) indicate that children living with same-sex couples were historically more likely to be behind in school but that this association disappeared over time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0759-3DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

A Cohort Comparison of Lifespan After Age 100 in Denmark and Sweden: Are Only the Oldest Getting Older?

Demography 2019 Jan 18. Epub 2019 Jan 18.

Interdisciplinary Center on Population Dynamics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Although Denmark and Sweden have close cultural and historical ties, lifespans for Danes have generally been lower than those of Swedes. Recent improvements in Danish mortality after a period of stagnation have led to the suspicion that there may be positive trends at the very high ages at death within that population and that these trends could be quite different from those observed in Sweden. Although the mean ages at death for Danish and Swedish centenarians have been relatively constant at about 102 years for the cohorts born 1870-1904, the oldest-old in Denmark have been getting older, but no evidence has suggested any increase in lifespan for Swedes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0755-7DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Spatial and Social Distance at the Onset of the Fertility Transition: Sweden, 1880-1900.

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):169-199

Department of Statistical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy.

Most studies on the fertility transition have focused either on macro-level trends or on micro-level patterns with limited geographic scope. Much less attention has been given to the interplay between individual characteristics and contextual conditions, including geographic location. Here we investigate the relevance of geography and socioeconomic status for understanding fertility variation in the initial phase of the Swedish fertility transition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0737-9DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Changes in Household Composition and Children's Educational Attainment.

Demography 2019 Jan 16. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Joint Center for Housing Studies, Harvard University, 1 Bow Street, Suite 400, Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA.

Changes in parental romantic relationships are an important component of family instability, but children are exposed to many other changes in the composition of their households that bear on child well-being. Prior research that focused on parental transitions has thus overlooked a substantial source of instability in children's lives. I argue that the instability in children's residential arrangements is characterized by household instability rather than family instability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0757-5DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Early-Life Assets in Oldest-Old Age: Evidence From Primary Care Reform in Early Twentieth Century Sweden.

Authors:
Volha Lazuka

Demography 2019 Jan 16. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

School of Economics and Management, Centre for Economic Demography and Department of Economic History, Lund University, Box 7083, 220 07, Lund, Sweden.

Do early-life effects of investments in public health persist to the oldest-old ages? This article answers this question by using the primary care reform in rural Sweden that between 1890 and 1917 led to the establishment of local health districts, together with openings of hospitals and recruitments of medical personnel, as a natural experiment in early-life environmental conditions. The initiatives undertaken within these districts targeted control of infectious diseases, including various isolation and disinfection measures. This study applies a difference-in-differences method combined with propensity score matching to register-based individual-level data for Sweden from 1968 to 2012 and to multisource, purposely collected data on the reform implementation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0758-4DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Spacing, Stopping, or Postponing? Fertility Desires in a Sub-Saharan Setting.

Demography 2019 Jan 16. Epub 2019 Jan 16.

Department of Sociology, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, 90095-1551, USA.

A growing body of research has argued that the traditional categories of stopping and spacing are insufficient to understand why individuals want to control fertility. In a series of articles, Timæus, Moultrie, and colleagues defined a third type of fertility motivation-postponement-that reflects a desire to avoid childbearing in the short term without clear goals for long-term fertility. Although postponement is fundamentally a description of fertility desires, existing quantitative research has primarily studied fertility behavior in an effort to find evidence for the model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0754-8DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

U.S. Mothers' Long-Term Employment Patterns.

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):285-320

Department of Sociology, Harvard University, 675 William James Hall, 33 Kirkland St., Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA.

Previous research on maternal employment has disproportionately focused on the immediate postpartum period and typically modeled either cross-sectional employment status or time until a specific employment transition. We instead conceptualize maternal employment as a long-term pattern, extending the observation window and embedding employment statuses in temporal context. Using data from NLSY79 and sequence analysis, we document five common employment patterns of American mothers over the first 18 years of maternity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0745-9DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Repartnering Following Gray Divorce: The Roles of Resources and Constraints for Women and Men.

Demography 2019 Jan 10. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Department of Criminology, Sociology, & Geography, Arkansas State University, Jonesboro, AR, 72467, USA.

The doubling of the gray divorce rate (i.e., divorce at age 50 or older) over the past few decades portends growth in later-life repartnering, yet little is known about the mechanisms undergirding decisions to repartner after gray divorce. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0752-xDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

New Evidence of Skin Color Bias and Health Outcomes Using Sibling Difference Models: A Research Note.

Demography 2019 Jan 9. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Department of Sociology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 08544, USA.

In this research note, we use data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) to determine whether darker skin tone predicts hypertension among siblings using a family fixed-effects analytic strategy. We find that even after we account for common family background and home environment, body mass index, age, sex, and outdoor activity, darker skin color significantly predicts hypertension incidence among siblings. In a supplementary analysis using newly released genetic data from Add Health, we find no evidence that our results are biased by genetic pleiotropy, whereby differences in alleles among siblings relate to coloration and directly to cardiovascular health simultaneously. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0756-6DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Job Quality and the Educational Gradient in Entry Into Marriage and Cohabitation.

Demography 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Department of Sociology, University of California, Berkeley, Barrows Hall, Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA.

Men's and women's economic resources are important determinants of marriage timing. Prior demographic and sociological literature has often measured resources in narrow terms, considering employment and earnings and not more fine-grained measures of job quality. Yet, scholarship on work and inequality focuses squarely on declining job quality and rising precarity in employment and suggests that this transformation may matter for the life course. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13524-018-0749-5
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0749-5DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Influences of Material Aspirations on Migration.

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):75-102

Department of Sociology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, 08544, USA.

In this article, we investigate the influences of material aspirations on migration in Nepal, positing that material aspirations may have important influences on decisions to migrate and where to locate. We discuss a theoretical model explaining how these aspirations might be key influences in the migration decision. Using detailed continuous migration histories from the 2008-2012 Chitwan Valley Family Study, we estimate logistic and alternative-specific conditional logit models to examine how material aspirations in Nepal influence migration rates and destinations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0751-yDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Educational Disparities in Adult Mortality Across U.S. States: How Do They Differ, and Have They Changed Since the Mid-1980s?

Demography 2019 Jan 3. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Department of Sociology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.

Adult mortality varies greatly by educational attainment. Explanations have focused on actions and choices made by individuals, neglecting contextual factors such as economic and policy environments. This study takes an important step toward explaining educational disparities in U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0750-zDOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

The Timing of Teenage Births: Estimating the Effect on High School Graduation and Later-Life Outcomes.

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):345-365

Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau, 4600 Silver Hill Road, Washington, DC, 20233, USA.

We examine the long-term outcomes for a population of teenage mothers who give birth to their children around the end of high school. We compare the mothers whose high school education was interrupted by childbirth (because the child was born before her expected graduation date) with mothers who did not experience the same disruption to their education. We find that mothers who gave birth during the school year are 5. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0748-6DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Multiple-Partner Fertility in the United States: A Demographic Portrait.

Authors:
Lindsay M Monte

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):103-127

Fertility & Family Statistics Branch, U.S. Census Bureau, 4600 Silver Hill Road, Washington, DC, 20233, USA.

Multiple-partner fertility (MPF) occurs when a person has biological children with more than one partner. The 2014 Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP), a nationally representative panel study of individuals and households in the United States, is the first such survey to include a direct question about whether respondents are MPF parents. Understanding the prevalence of such families is important given the known socioeconomic correlates of MPF and the ramifications of entering MPF for both individuals and families. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0743-yDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Dimensions of Reproductive Attitudes and Knowledge Related to Unintended Childbearing Among U.S. Adolescents and Young Adults.

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):201-228

Department of Systems, Populations and Leadership, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, 400 N. Ingalls Street, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.

Measures of attitudes and knowledge predict reproductive behavior, such as unintended fertility among adolescents and young adults. However, there is little consensus as to the underlying dimensions these measures represent, how to compare findings across surveys using different measures, or how to interpret the concepts captured by existing measures. To guide future research on reproductive behavior, we propose an organizing framework for existing measures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0747-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6360941PMC
February 2019
3 Reads

Stepfamily Structure and Transfers Between Generations in U.S. Families.

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):229-260

California Center for Population Research and Department of Sociology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.

Unstable couple relationships and high rates of repartnering have increased the share of U.S. families with stepkin. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13524-018-0740-1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0740-1DOI Listing
February 2019
9 Reads

Immigrant Legal Status and Health: Legal Status Disparities in Chronic Conditions and Musculoskeletal Pain Among Mexican-Born Farm Workers in the United States.

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):1-24

Department of Sociology, University of California, Davis, 1282 SSH, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA, 95616, USA.

Immigrant legal status determines access to the rights and privileges of U.S. society. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13524-018-0746-8
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0746-8DOI Listing
February 2019
10 Reads

Prevalence and Risk Factors for Early Motherhood Among Low-Income, Maltreated, and Foster Youth.

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):261-284

School of Social Work, Institute for Research on Poverty, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1180 Observatory Drive, Madison, WI, 53706, USA.

Early childbearing is associated with a host of educational and economic disruptions for teenage girls and increased risk of adverse outcomes for their children. Low-income, maltreated, and foster youth have a higher risk of teen motherhood than the general population of youth. In this study, we assessed differences in the risk of early motherhood among these groups and investigated whether differences likely reflect selection factors versus effects of involvement with Child Protective Services (CPS) or foster care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0744-xDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Lifespan Dispersion in Times of Life Expectancy Fluctuation: The Case of Central and Eastern Europe.

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2071-2096

Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) have experienced considerable instability in mortality since the 1960s. Long periods of stagnating life expectancy were followed by rapid increases in life expectancy and, in some cases, even more rapid declines, before more recent periods of improvement. These trends have been well documented, but to date, no study has comprehensively explored trends in lifespan variation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0729-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6290692PMC
December 2018
1 Read

The Impact of Forced Migration on Mortality: Evidence From German Pension Insurance Records.

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):25-47

RWI, Hohenzollernstr. 1-3, 45128, Essen, Germany.

We examine the long-run effects of forced migration for individuals who were displaced from Eastern Europe to Germany in the aftermath of World War II. Evidence suggests that displaced individuals were worse off economically, facing a considerably lower income and a higher unemployment risk than comparable nondisplaced Germans, even 20 years after being expelled. We extend this literature by investigating mortality outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0742-zDOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Income-Related Gaps in Early Child Cognitive Development: Why Are They Larger in the United States Than in the United Kingdom, Australia, and Canada?

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):367-390

School of Education, University of Bristol, Bristol, BS8 1JA, UK.

Previous research has documented significantly larger income-related gaps in children's early cognitive development in the United States than in the United Kingdom, Canada, and Australia. In this study, we investigate the extent to which this is a result of a more unequal income distribution in the United States. We show that although incomes are more unequal in the United States than elsewhere, a given difference in real income is associated with larger gaps in child test scores there than in the three other countries. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0738-8DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Nonlabor Income and Age at Marriage: Evidence From China's Heating Policy.

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2345-2370

NUS Business School, National University of Singapore, 15 Kent Ridge Drive, Singapore, 119245, Singapore.

We exploit China's heating policy to investigate how nonlabor income affects marriage. From the mid-1950s, the policy gave substantial subsidies to urban residents north of the Huai River. Applying geographic regression discontinuity, we find that with the policy, urban men in the north married 15 months earlier than men in the south. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0732-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6290655PMC
December 2018
1 Read

A Research Note on the Prevalence of Housing Eviction Among Children Born in U.S. Cities.

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):391-404

Center for Research on Child Wellbeing and Office of Population Research, Princeton University, 286 Wallace Hall, Princeton, NJ, 08544, USA.

A growing body of research suggests that housing eviction is more common than previously recognized and may play an important role in the reproduction of poverty. The proportion of children affected by housing eviction, however, remains largely unknown. We estimate that one in seven children born in large U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0735-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6358494PMC
February 2019
1 Read

Union Transitions and Fertility Within First Premarital Cohabitations in Canada: Diverging Patterns by Education?

Authors:
Laura Wright

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):151-167

Department of Sociology, University of Saskatchewan, 1019 Arts Building, 9 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5A5, Canada.

Cohabitation has become increasingly accepted and normalized as part of the family system in Canada and has become the most common way to form a first union. The changing role of cohabitation in the family system is often understood as being driven by the ideational changes associated with the second demographic transition, but increasing international evidence indicates that this explanation is incomplete. Using nationally representative retrospective data from Canadians born between 1940 and 1979 from the 2011 General Social Survey, this study examines transitions out of first premarital cohabitation and fertility within these unions as two measures of the changing role of cohabitation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0741-0DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Parental Origins, Mixed Unions, and the Labor Supply of Second-Generation Women in the United States.

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):49-73

Office of Institutional Research, The University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA Circle, San Antonio, TX, 78249, USA.

This study examines the joint impact of parental origins and partner choice on the employment behavior of second-generation women in the United States. We find that endogamy (choosing a first- or second-generation partner from the same national-origin group) is associated with lower labor supply among second-generation women, net of the effects of parental origin culture as proxied using the epidemiological approach to cultural transmission. Parental origin effects are mediated by education, but endogamy curtails economic activity regardless of educational attainment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0736-xDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

From Some to None? Fertility Expectation Dynamics of Permanently Childless Women.

Authors:
Alison Gemmill

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):129-149

Department of Family, Population & Preventive Medicine, Program in Public Health, Stony Brook University, 101 Nicolls Road, Health Sciences Center, Level 3, Room 071, Stony Brook, NY, 11794-8338, USA.

Permanent childlessness is increasingly acknowledged as an outcome of a dynamic, context-dependent process, but few studies have integrated a life course framework to investigate the complex pathways leading to childlessness. This study focuses on an understudied yet revealing dimension of why individuals remain childless: stated fertility expectations over the life course. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort, I use a combination of sequence analysis, data-driven clustering techniques, and multivariable regression models to identify and describe groups of permanently childless women who follow similar trajectories of stated fertility expectations. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13524-018-0739-7
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0739-7DOI Listing
February 2019
11 Reads

Skin Color and Social Mobility: Evidence From Mexico.

Demography 2019 Feb;56(1):321-343

El Colegio de México, Centro de Estudios Económicos, Mexico City, Mexico.

In many Latin American countries, census data on race and skin color are scarce or nonexistent. In this study, we contribute to understanding how skin color affects intergenerational social mobility in Mexico. Using a novel data set, we provide evidence of profound social stratification by skin color, even after controlling for specific individual characteristics that previous work has not been able to include, such as individual cognitive and noncognitive abilities, parental education and wealth, and measures of stress and parenting style in the home of origin. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0734-zDOI Listing
February 2019
15 Reads

Separating the Signal From the Noise: Evidence for Deceleration in Old-Age Death Rates.

Authors:
Dennis M Feehan

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2025-2044

Department of Demography, University of California, Berkeley, 2232 Piedmont Avenue, MC #2120, Berkeley, CA, 94720-2120, USA.

Widespread population aging has made it critical to understand death rates at old ages. However, studying mortality at old ages is challenging because the data are sparse: numbers of survivors and deaths get smaller and smaller with age. I show how to address this challenge by using principled model selection techniques to empirically evaluate theoretical mortality models. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0728-xDOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Revising Infant Mortality Rates for the Early Twentieth Century United States.

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2001-2024

National Bureau of Economic Research, Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA.

Accurate vital statistics are required to understand the evolution of racial disparities in infant health and the causes of rapid secular decline in infant mortality during the early twentieth century. Unfortunately, U.S. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13524-018-0723-2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0723-2DOI Listing
December 2018
10 Reads

Maternal Age and Child Development.

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2229-2255

University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA.

Although the consequences of teen births for both mothers and children have been studied for decades, few studies have taken a broader look at the potential payoffs-and drawbacks-of being born to older mothers. A broader examination is important given the growing gap in maternal ages at birth for children born to mothers with low and high socioeconomic status. Drawing data from the Children of the NLSY79, our examination of this topic distinguishes between the value for children of being born to a mother who delayed her first birth and the value of the additional years between her first birth and the birth of the child whose achievements and behaviors at ages 10-13 are under study. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13524-018-0730-3
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0730-3DOI Listing
December 2018
10 Reads

Subjective Well-being and Partnership Dynamics: Are Same-Sex Relationships Different?

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2299-2320

Erasmus School of Economics, Postbus 1738, Room H12-10, 3000, DR, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.

We analyze Dutch panel data to investigate whether partnership has a causal effect on subjective well-being. As in previous studies, we find that, on average, being in a partnership improves well-being. Well-being gains of marriage are larger than those of cohabitation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0725-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6290656PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Intergenerational Transmission of Multipartner Fertility.

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2205-2228

Demography Unit, Department of Sociology, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden.

Using data from administrative registers for the period 1970-2007 in Norway and Sweden, we investigate the intergenerational transmission of multipartner fertility. We find that men and women with half-siblings are more likely to have children with more than one partner. The differences are greater for those with younger versus older half-siblings, consistent with the additional influence of parental separation that may not arise when one has only older half-siblings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0727-yDOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

"His" and "Hers": Meeting the Economic Bar to Marriage.

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2321-2343

Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, PO Box 90312, Durham, NC, 27708, USA.

Scholars have suggested that low-income parents avoid marriage because they have not met the so-called economic bar to marriage. The economic bar is multidimensional, referring to a bundle of financial achievements that determine whether couples feel ready to wed. Using the Building Strong Families data set of low-income parents (n = 4,444), we operationalized this qualitative concept into a seven-item index and examined whether couples who met the economic bar by achieving the majority of the items were more likely to marry than couples who did not. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13524-018-0726-z
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0726-zDOI Listing
December 2018
9 Reads

Patrilocal Residence and Female Labor Supply: Evidence From Kyrgyzstan.

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2181-2203

Center for Evaluation and Development (C4ED), O7 3, 68161, Mannheim, Germany.

Many people live in patrilocal societies, which prescribe that women move in with their husbands' parents, relieve their in-laws from housework, and care for them in old age. This arrangement is likely to have labor market consequences, in particular for women. We study the effect of coresidence on female labor supply in Kyrgyzstan, a strongly patrilocal setting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0724-1DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

From Privilege to Prevalence: Contextual Effects of Women's Schooling on African Marital Timing.

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2371-2394

Department of Social Sciences, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA, 93407, USA.

In Africa and elsewhere, educated women tend to marry later than their less-educated peers. Beyond being an attribute of individual women, education is also an aggregate phenomenon: the social meaning of a woman's educational attainment depends on the educational attainments of her age-mates. Using data from 30 countries and 246 birth cohorts across sub-Saharan Africa, we investigate the impact of educational context (the percentage of women in a country cohort who ever attended school) on the relationship between a woman's educational attainment and her marital timing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0722-3DOI Listing
December 2018
14 Reads

Has Income Segregation Really Increased? Bias and Bias Correction in Sample-Based Segregation Estimates.

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2129-2160

Graduate School of Education, Stanford University, 520 Galvez Mall, CERAS Building, 5th Floor, Stanford, CA, 94305, USA.

Several recent studies have concluded that residential segregation by income in the United States has increased in the decades since 1970, including a significant increase after 2000. Income segregation measures, however, are biased upward when based on sample data. This is a potential concern because the sampling rate of the American Community Survey (ACS)-from which post-2000 income segregation estimates are constructed-was lower than that of the earlier decennial censuses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0721-4DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Longevity and Lifespan Variation by Educational Attainment in Spain: 1960-2015.

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2045-2070

Centre d'Estudis Demogràfics, Carrer de Ca n'Altayó, Edifici E-2, Campus de la UAB, 08193, Cerdanyola del Vallès, Spain.

For a long time, studies of socioeconomic gradients in health have limited their attention to between-group comparisons. Yet, ignoring the differences that might exist within groups and focusing on group-specific life expectancy levels and trends alone, one might arrive at overly simplistic conclusions. Using data from the Spanish Encuesta Sociodemográfica and recently released mortality files by the Spanish Statistical Office (INE), this is the first study to simultaneously document (1) the gradient in life expectancy by educational attainment groups, and (2) the inequality in age-at-death distributions within and across those groups for the period between 1960 and 2015 in Spain. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13524-018-0718-z
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0718-zDOI Listing
December 2018
11 Reads

Saving, Sharing, or Spending? The Wealth Consequences of Raising Children.

Authors:
Michelle Maroto

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2257-2282

Department of Sociology, University of Alberta, 6-23 Tory Building, Edmonton, AB, T6G 2H4, Canada.

This study uses 1986-2012 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 cohort data to investigate the relationship between raising children and net worth among younger Baby Boomer parents. I combine fixed-effects and unconditional quantile regression models to estimate changes in net worth associated with having children in different age groups across the wealth distribution. This allows me to test whether standard economic models for savings and consumption over the life course hold for families at different wealth levels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0716-1DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Interstate Migration and Employer-to-Employer Transitions in the United States: New Evidence From Administrative Records Data.

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2161-2180

The Pew Charitable Trusts, 901 E St NW, Washington, DC, 20004, USA.

Declines in migration across labor markets have prompted concerns that the U.S. economy is becoming less dynamic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0720-5DOI Listing
December 2018
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Beyond the Nuclear Family: Trends in Children Living in Shared Households.

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2283-2297

Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, 734 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.

Using data from the 1996-2008 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation and the 2009-2016 American Community Survey, we examine trends in U.S. children living in shared households (living with adults beyond their nuclear (parent/parent's partner/sibling) family). Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13524-018-0719-y
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0719-yDOI Listing
December 2018
15 Reads

Promises and Pitfalls of Using Digital Traces for Demographic Research.

Demography 2018 10;55(5):1979-1999

Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany.

The digital traces that we leave online are increasingly fruitful sources of data for social scientists, including those interested in demographic research. The collection and use of digital data also presents numerous statistical, computational, and ethical challenges, motivating the development of new research approaches to address these burgeoning issues. In this article, we argue that researchers with formal training in demography-those who have a history of developing innovative approaches to using challenging data-are well positioned to contribute to this area of work. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0715-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6292527PMC
October 2018
2 Reads

Can Public Housing Decrease Segregation? Lessons and Challenges From Non-European Immigration in France : Can Public Housing Decrease Segregation?

Demography 2018 10;55(5):1803-1828

CREST, ENSAE, Université Paris Saclay, Palaiseau, France.

Recent decades have seen a rapid increase in the share of non-European immigrants in public housing in Europe, which has led to concern regarding the rise of ghettos in large cities. Using French census data over three decades, we examine how this increase in public housing participation has affected segregation. While segregation levels have increased moderately, on average, the number of immigrant enclaves has grown. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13524-018-0705-4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0705-4DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

The Sources and Diversity of Immigrant Population Change in Australia, 1981-2011.

Demography 2018 10;55(5):1777-1802

Northern Institute, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Australia.

Australia has one of the largest percentages of immigrant populations in the developed world with a highly regulated system of immigration control and regular censuses to track their changes over time. However, the ability to explain the population change through the demographic components of immigration, emigration, and death by age and sex is complicated because of differences in measurement and sources of information. In this article, we explore three methods for reconciling the demographic accounts from 1981 to 2011 for the Australia-born and 18 foreign-born population groups. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s13524-018-0704-5
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0704-5DOI Listing
October 2018
22 Reads

Poor Health Reporting? Using Anchoring Vignettes to Uncover Health Disparities by Wealth and Race.

Demography 2018 10;55(5):1935-1956

Research on Socio-Economic Policy, Economics Department, Stellenbosch University, Stellenbosch, South Africa.

In spite of the wide disparities in wealth and in objective health measures like mortality, observed inequality by wealth in self-reported health appears to be nearly nonexistent in low- to middle-income settings. To determine the extent to which this is driven by reporting tendencies, we use anchoring vignettes to test and correct for reporting heterogeneity in health among elderly South Africans. Significant reporting differences across wealth groups are detected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0709-0DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Trends in the Motherhood Wage Penalty and Fatherhood Wage Premium for Low, Middle, and High Earners.

Authors:
Rebecca Glauber

Demography 2018 10;55(5):1663-1680

Department of Sociology, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH, 03824, USA.

Many studies have shown that women pay a wage penalty for motherhood, whereas men earn a wage premium for fatherhood. A few recent studies have used quantile regression to explore differences in the penalties across the wage distribution. The current study builds on this research and explores trends in the parenthood penalties and premiums from 1980 to 2014 for those at the bottom, middle, and top of the wage distribution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0712-5DOI Listing
October 2018
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Looking at Population Health Beyond "Male" and "Female": Implications of Transgender Identity and Gender Nonconformity for Population Health.

Authors:
Danya Lagos

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2097-2117

Department of Sociology, University of Chicago, 1126 E. 59th Street, Chicago, IL, 60637, USA.

Looking beyond binary measurements of "male" or "female" can illuminate health inequality patterns that correspond to gender identity rather than biological sex. This study examines disparities in overall health among transgender men, transgender women, gender-nonconforming adults, and cisgender (nontransgender) men and women in the U.S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0714-3DOI Listing
December 2018
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Individual Uncertainty About Longevity.

Demography 2018 10;55(5):1829-1854

Department of Economics, KU Leuven, Naamsestraat 69 - bus 3565, 3000, Leuven, Belgium.

This article presents an assessment of individual uncertainty about longevity. A survey performed on 3,331 French people enables us to record several survival probabilities per individual. On this basis, we compute subjective life expectancies (SLE) and subjective uncertainty regarding longevity (SUL), the standard deviation of each individual's subjective distribution of her or his own longevity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0713-4DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Lifetime Prevalence of Homelessness in the United States.

Demography 2018 Dec;55(6):2119-2128

School of Social Work & Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, University of Michigan, 1080 South University Avenue, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.

Homelessness in the United States is often examined using cross-sectional, point-in-time samples. Any experience of homelessness is a risk factor for adverse outcomes, so it is also useful to understand the incidence of homelessness over longer periods. We estimate the lifetime prevalence of homelessness among members of the Baby Boom cohort (n = 6,545) using the 2012 and 2014 waves of the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), a nationally representative survey of older Americans. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0717-0DOI Listing
December 2018
20 Reads

Cigarette Smoking and All-Cause and Cause-Specific Adult Mortality in the United States.

Demography 2018 10;55(5):1855-1885

Population Program, IBS, and Department of Sociology, University of Colorado-Boulder, 483 UCB, Boulder, CO, 80309, USA.

This study illuminates the association between cigarette smoking and adult mortality in the contemporary United States. Recent studies have estimated smoking-attributable mortality using indirect approaches or with sample data that are not nationally representative and that lack key confounders. We use the 1990-2011 National Health Interview Survey Linked Mortality Files to estimate relative risks of all-cause and cause-specific mortality for current and former smokers compared with never smokers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13524-018-0707-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6219821PMC
October 2018
1 Read