277 results match your criteria Cutis Verticis Gyrata


Pachydermoperiostosis.

QJM 2022 Jun 22. Epub 2022 Jun 22.

Department of General Internal Medicine, Hiroshima University Hospital, Hiroshima, Japan.

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Cutis verticis gyrata: Three cases illustrating three different etiologies.

Clin Case Rep 2022 May 18;10(5):e05889. Epub 2022 May 18.

Department of Dermatology Charles Nicolle Hospital Tunis Tunisia.

Cutis Vertcis gyrata is an uncommon neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by excessive growth of the skin of the scalp or the face, forming folds of similar aspect to cerebral cortex gyri. Three categories have been individualized: the primary form, essential or non-essential, and the secondary form. Read More

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Clinico-radiological features of acromegaly-related cutis verticis gyrata.

Hormones (Athens) 2022 Apr 18. Epub 2022 Apr 18.

Endocrinology Department, Hospital de Santa Maria, Centro Hospitalar Universitário de Lisboa Norte, Av. Prof. Egas Moniz, 1649-028, Lisbon, Portugal.

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Cutis verticis gyrata: a cutaneous finding in acromegaly.

An Bras Dermatol 2022 May-Jun;97(3):369-371. Epub 2022 Mar 11.

Neuroendocrinology Center, Complexo Hospitalar Santa Casa de Porto Alegre, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil; Postgraduate Program in Pathology, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil. Electronic address:

Acromegaly is a rare disease characterized by changes in the bone and soft tissue systems, induced by excess growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor type 1. Among the skin lesions associated with acromegaly is cutis verticis gyrata, an hypertrophic, and coarse folding of the skin of the scalp, an association of uncommon incidence and unknown prevalence. This case report describes the case of a patient diagnosed with acromegaly at age 60 with previously unidentified cutis verticis gyrata. Read More

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Whole body diffusion weighted imaging with background suppression in pachydermoperiostosis: a case report.

Clin Imaging 2022 Apr 4;84:38-42. Epub 2022 Jan 4.

Faculty of Medicine, Saint Joseph University, Beirut, Lebanon.

Hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) is a disease characterized by abnormal skin findings and bone deformities related to subperiosteal bone formation. The disease can be associated with major systemic manifestations (secondary form) or present with absent or less prominent systemic signs and symptoms (primary form). The primary form is called pachydermoperiostosis (PDP). Read More

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Primary nonessential cutis verticis gyrata with acne keloidalis nuchae.

Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2021 Sep-Oct;87(5):748

Department of Dermatology, Goa Medical College, Goa, India.

Cutis verticis gyrata is a rare disorder characterized by redundant skin forming deep furrows and convolutions. It has been associated with several systemic and cutaneous disorders. We report a case of primary non-essential cutis verticis gyrata in association with acne keloidalis nuchae in a schizophrenic patient. Read More

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January 2022

Acne keloidalis nuchae: A role for low-dose radiotherapy.

JAAD Case Rep 2021 Jul 26;13:90-93. Epub 2021 May 26.

Harbor-UCLA Radiation Department of Oncology, Torrance, California.

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Cutis verticis gyrata in a paediatric patient with cochlear implants.

BMJ Case Rep 2021 Jun 25;14(6). Epub 2021 Jun 25.

Ear, Nose and Throat Surgery Department, Great Ormond Street Hospital For Children NHS Trust, London, UK.

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A Case of Progressive Thickening and Furrowing of Facial Skin and Scalp with Scarring Alopecia.

Skin Appendage Disord 2021 Apr 11;7(3):237-242. Epub 2021 Mar 11.

Division of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

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A case of cutis verticis gyrata related to pregnancy.

Indian J Dermatol Venereol Leprol 2021 [SEASON];87(4):533-534

Department of Dermatology, Affifiliated Hospital of Southwest Medical University, Luzhou, Sichuan, China.

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January 2022

A rare cutis verticis gyrata secondary to cerebriform intradermal nevus: case report and literature review.

BMC Surg 2021 May 4;21(1):234. Epub 2021 May 4.

Department of Plastic Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, 450052, Zhengzhou, China.

Background: Cutis verticis gyrate (CVG) is a rare morphologic syndrome that presents with hypertrophy and folding of the scalp. CVG can be classified into three forms: primary essential, primary non-essential, and secondary. Cerebriform intradermal nevus (CIN) is a rare cause of secondary CVG. Read More

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Monoallelic mutations in SLCO2A1 cause autosomal dominant primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy.

J Bone Miner Res 2021 08 5;36(8):1459-1468. Epub 2021 May 5.

Shanghai Clinical Research Center of Bone Disease, Department of Osteoporosis and Bone Diseases, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People's Hospital, Shanghai, China.

Primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (PHO) is a rare disease inherited as a recessive or irregular dominant trait and characterized by digital clubbing, pachydermia, and periostosis. Biallelic mutations in HPGD and SLCO2A1, disturbing prostaglandin E (PGE ) catabolism and leading to increased circulating PGE level, cause PHO autosomal recessive 1 (PHOAR1) and PHO autosomal recessive 2 (PHOAR2), respectively. However, no causative genes have been reported for PHO autosomal dominant (PHOAD). Read More

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Giant Congenital Blue Nevus Presenting as Cutis Verticis Gyrata: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol 2021 Dec 3;130(12):1407-1411. Epub 2021 Apr 3.

Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA.

Objectives: Cerebriform intradermal nevus and giant congenital blue nevi are rarely reported melanocytic nevi with clinical and histopathologic similarities. Both are known to produce cutis verticis gyrata. We report a significantly large occipital scalp congenital blue nevus with secondary cutis verticis gyrata. Read More

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December 2021

[Neuroendorine paraneoplastic syndromes].

Authors:
M Böhm R Gellner

Hautarzt 2021 Apr 4;72(4):299-306. Epub 2021 Mar 4.

Medizinische Klinik B, Universitätsklinikum Münster, Münster, Deutschland.

Skin is commonly affected by neuroendorine paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS). This is due to the expression of receptors in the skin by which abnormally secreted neuroendocrine hormones and mediators elicit directly, and indirectly, cutaneous key signs and thus facilitate early diagnosis of these diseases. In acromegaly, induction of the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor‑1 axis results in trophic changes of the acral portions of the skin and mucosal membranes including cutis verticis gyrata. Read More

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Cutis verticis gyrata secondary to acute monocytic leukaemia.

Ann Dermatol Venereol 2021 Jun 16;148(2):136-138. Epub 2021 Jan 16.

Department of Dermatology, University Hospital, 2, rue de la Milétrie, 86000 Poitiers, France; Laboratoire inflammation, tissus epithéliaux et cytokines (LITEC), EA4331, université de Poitiers, Poitiers, France. Electronic address:

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Scalp expansion for giant cutis verticis gyrata secondary to cerebriform intradermal nevus.

J Int Med Res 2020 Dec;48(12):300060520974243

The Twelfth Department of Plastic Surgery, Plastic Surgery Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, China.

Cutis verticis gyrata (CVG) is characterized by extensive formation of scalp skin that mirrors the folds of the cerebral gyri. Giant CVG secondary to cerebriform intradermal nevus (CIN) has been rarely reported, and its management mainly involves surgical excision. In certain cases of giant CVG, however, surgical excision is dilemmatic. Read More

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December 2020

Hyaluronidase in Dermatology: Uses Beyond Hyaluronic Acid Fillers.

J Drugs Dermatol 2020 10;19(10):993-998

Hyaluronidase is mostly widely recognized for its off-label use in correction of complications of hyaluronic acid fillers. However, its utility in other aspects of dermatology is less widely acknowledged. We describe the varied uses of hyaluronidase in dermatology and the underlying evidence base for its dermatological indications. Read More

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October 2020

Persistent Plaque on the Scalp With Cutis Verticis Gyrata-Like Features: Answer.

Am J Dermatopathol 2020 Oct;42(10):793-794

Dermatology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.

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October 2020

Cutis verticis gyrata: Two cases associated with drug-resistant epilepsy.

Clin Case Rep 2020 Aug 18;8(8):1365-1368. Epub 2020 May 18.

Department of Pathology & Anatomy Department of Neurology Eastern Virginia Medical School Norfolk VA USA.

Cutis verticis gyrata (CVG) is a neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by the formation of folds in the scalp that resembles the cerebral cortex. We present two cases of CVG and intellectual disability with drug-resistant epilepsy. Recognizing CVG is necessary to provide interdisciplinary support for the treatment of comorbidities associated with this entity. Read More

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Touraine-Solente-Gole syndrome: Clinical manifestation with bilateral true eyelid ptosis.

JPRAS Open 2019 Sep 27;21:6-13. Epub 2019 Apr 27.

Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, 2 Wanglang Road, Bangkoknoi, Bangkok 10700, Thailand.

Touraine-Solente-Gole syndrome (pachydermoperiostosis [PDP] or primary idiopathic hypertrophic osteoarthropathy [HOA]) is a rare hereditary disorder that is characterized by a triad of manifestations that consists of skin changes (pachydermia), abnormal bone and joint manifestations (periostosis and/or artritis), and digital clubbing (acropachia). Here, we report the case of 24-year-old male who presented with severe bilateral true eyelid ptosis. Physical examination revealed severe ptosis with poor function of the levator palpabrae superioris muscle, thickening of and deep grooves in facial skin (especially at the frontal region), and abnormal appearance of the scalp with accentuating folds and deep furrows (cutis verticis gyrata). Read More

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September 2019

A Rare Case of Cutis Verticis Gyrata with Underlying Cerebriform Intradermal Nevus.

Cureus 2019 Dec 29;11(12):e6499. Epub 2019 Dec 29.

Dermatology, Hospital Corporation of America/University of South Florida, Morsani College of Medicine, Largo Medical Center Program, Largo, USA.

Cutis verticis gyrata (CVG) is an uncommon condition of the scalp known for redundant, thickened folds, which emulate the cerebral gyri of the brain. This unusual finding is catalogued as primary essential, primary non-essential, and secondary. While primary essential CVG is an isolated and idiopathic condition, primary non-essential CVG is deemed to be related to neurological, ophthalmological, or psychiatric disorders. Read More

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December 2019

Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging-aided Diagnosis of Primary Essential Cutis Verticis Gyrata: A Case Report with 5-year Follow-up and Review of the Literature.

Curr Med Imaging Rev 2019 ;15(9):906-910

Department of Dermatology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.

Background: Cutis Verticis Gyrata (CVG) is a rare skin disease caused by overgrowth of the scalp, presenting as cerebriform folds and wrinkles. CVG can be classified into two forms: primary (essential and non-essential) and secondary. The primary non-essential form is often associated with neurological and ophthalmological abnormalities, while the primary essential form occurs without associated comorbidities. Read More

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October 2020

Persistent Plaque on the Scalp With Cutis Verticis Gyrata-Like Features: Challenge.

Am J Dermatopathol 2020 Oct;42(10):e141-e142

Dermatology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA.

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October 2020

Man of stone: A case of a chronic actinic dermatitis mimicking a cutis verticis gyrata.

J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2020 Mar 1;34(3):e129-e130. Epub 2019 Dec 1.

Dermatology Department, CHU Dupuytren, 2 av. Martin Luther King, Limoges, F-87000, France.

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Inmate carrier of cutis verticis gyrata

Rev Esp Sanid Penit 2019 ;21(2):106-110

Prison Primary Health Care Team of La Roca del Vallès-2. Catalonian Institute of Health. Regional Government of Catalonia. Quatre Camins Prison. La Roca del Vallès. Barcelona.

The cutis verticis gyrata (CVG) is a clinical stigma considered to be very rare that mostly affects males. It consists of characteristic folds in the scalp, similar to cerebral convolutions, which tend to affect the parietal and occipital areas. It is considered a pachyderma of the cranial skin, and can appear at different ages for different reasons. Read More

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Cutis verticis gyrata secondary to acute myelogenous leukaemia.

Clin Exp Dermatol 2020 Apr 1;45(3):342-344. Epub 2019 Oct 1.

Department of, Dermatology, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.

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Primary essential cutis verticis gyrata.

Radiol Bras 2019 Jul-Aug;52(4):276-277

Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.

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Congenital primary cutis verticis gyrata.

Oxf Med Case Reports 2019 Jun 14;2019(6):omz043. Epub 2019 Jun 14.

Division of Neonatology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada.

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Cutis Verticis Gyrata Associated with Acromegaly.

N Engl J Med 2019 May;380(18):e31

Università degli Studi di Padova, Padua, Italy

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