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    68 results match your criteria Cutaneous Laser Resurfacing Carbon Dioxide

    1 OF 2

    Fractional resurfacing in the Asian patient: Current state of the art.
    Lasers Surg Med 2017 Jan 8;49(1):45-59. Epub 2016 Sep 8.
    Division of Dermatology, Department of Medicine, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, SAR, China.
    Background And Objective: Fractionated photothermolysis (FP) has revolutionized modern laser technology. By creating selective columns of microthermal damage, fractionated devices allows for greater treatment depths to be achieved without the prolonged downtime and risk of complications seen in traditional fully ablative laser resurfacing. Fractional resurfacing is a proven method to treat a variety of cutaneous conditions. Read More

    Laser tratment of traumatic scars: a military perspective.
    Semin Cutan Med Surg 2015 Mar;34(1):17-23
    Chairman, Dermatology, Naval Medical Center, San Diego, California, USA.
    Advancements in medical treatment and transport over more than a decade of conflict have resulted in unprecedented survival rates for service members despite catastrophic injuries. Enhanced survival has created an unprecedented need for comprehensive rehabilitation and transition services. Though far from the exclusive domain of military dermatologists, military medicine has had a prominent role in integrating cutaneous procedural techniques into the rehabilitation of traumatically injured patients for a variety of reasons. Read More

    Laser therapy for the treatment of Hailey-Hailey disease: a systematic review with focus on carbon dioxide laser resurfacing.
    J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol 2015 Jun 21;29(6):1045-52. Epub 2014 Nov 21.
    Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, 33136, USA.
    Benign familial chronic pemphigus, or Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD), is a recurrent bullous dermatitis that tends to have a chronic course with frequent relapses. Long-term treatment options include surgery with skin grafting or dermabrasion. Both are highly invasive and carry significant risks and complications. Read More

    Successful treatment of atrophic facial leishmaniasis scars by co2 fractional laser.
    J Cutan Med Surg 2014 Nov;18(6):379-84
    Background: A permanent, unpleasant atrophic leishmaniasis scar is a potentially disfiguring condition that causes social stigma with limited treatment choices. Fractionated carbon dioxide (CO2) laser resurfacing is expected to be a safe and effective treatment for leishmaniasis scars.

    Objective: To assess the safety and efficacy of ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) with a CO2 laser for facial leishmaniasis atrophic scars. Read More

    Histologic effects of resurfacing lasers.
    Facial Plast Surg 2014 Feb 31;30(1):40-8. Epub 2014 Jan 31.
    Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami, Miami, Florida.
    By utilizing resurfacing lasers, physicians can significantly improve the appearance of sun-damaged skin, scars, and more. The carbon dioxide and erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet lasers were the first ablative resurfacing lasers to offer impressive results although these earlier treatments were associated with significant downtime. Later, nonablative resurfacing lasers such as the neodymium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser proved effective, after a series of treatments with less downtime, but with more modest results. Read More

    The role of transforming growth factor β1 in fractional laser resurfacing with a carbon dioxide laser.
    Lasers Med Sci 2014 Mar 3;29(2):681-7. Epub 2013 Jul 3.
    Institute for Laser Medicine and Bio-Photonics, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240, China.
    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of transforming growth factor β1 in mechanisms of cutaneous remodeling induced by fractional carbon dioxide laser treatment. The dorsal skin of Kunming mice was exposed to a single-pass fractional CO2 laser treatment. Biopsies were taken at 1 h and at 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 56 days after treatment. Read More

    Direct quantitative comparison of molecular responses in photodamaged human skin to fractionated and fully ablative carbon dioxide laser resurfacing.
    Dermatol Surg 2012 Oct 17;38(10):1668-77. Epub 2012 Jul 17.
    Department of Dermatology, School of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.
    Background: Fractionated ablative laser resurfacing has become a widely used treatment modality. Its clinical results are often found to approach those of traditional fully ablative laser resurfacing.

    Objective: To directly compare the molecular changes that result from fractionated and fully ablative carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser resurfacing in photodamaged human skin. Read More

    Fractionation: past, present, future.
    Semin Cutan Med Surg 2012 Jun;31(2):105-9
    SkinCare Physicians, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, USA.
    The development of fractional photothermolysis is a milestone in the history of laser technology and cutaneous resurfacing. Based on the concept that skin is treated in a fractional manner, where narrow cylinders of tissue are thermally heated and normal adjacent skin is left unaffected, the fractional devices have shown effectiveness in treating a variety of conditions. Since its development, we are becoming more adept at using optimal parameters to induce near carbon dioxide laser benefits with a much more comfortable postoperative period and fewer complications. Read More

    The role of vascular endothelial growth factor in fractional laser resurfacing with the carbon dioxide laser.
    Lasers Med Sci 2012 May 1;27(3):599-606. Epub 2011 Oct 1.
    Institute for Laser Medicine and Bio-photonics, School of Life Science & Biotechnology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai, 200240, China.
    The aim of this study was to analyze the role of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in mechanisms of cutaneous remodeling induced by fractional CO(2) laser treatment. The dorsal skin of Kunming mice was exposed to a single-pass fractional CO(2) laser treatment. Biopsies were taken 1 h, and 1, 3, 7, 14, 28 and 56 days after treatment. Read More

    Concurrent structural fat grafting and carbon dioxide laser resurfacing for perioral and lower face rejuvenation.
    J Cosmet Laser Ther 2011 Feb 21;13(1):6-12. Epub 2011 Jan 21.
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce St., Philadelphia, PA 19103, USA.
    Objective: To quantitatively evaluate a dual-modality treatment that combines autologous structural fat grafting and carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser resurfacing for perioral and lower face rejuvenation.

    Method: Retrospective review of patients undergoing rejuvenation by a single surgeon between 2005 and 2009. A blinded expert rated photographs on three scales, each with a range of 1 (no abnormality) to 5 (severe abnormality): (i) perioral fine rhytids; (ii) deep folds; and (iii) pigmentary or cutaneous abnormalities. Read More

    A novel explanation for the healing effect of the Er:YAG laser during skin rejuvenation.
    J Cosmet Laser Ther 2010 Dec;12(6):256-7
    Physics and Chemistry Department, Bar-Ilan University, Israel.
    The popularity of cutaneous laser resurfacing has soared in recent years. Ablative laser skin rejuvenation with carbon dioxide (CO₂) and erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) lasers has been popularized and their side effects individually reported. It has been suggested that initial collagen contraction and thermal damage modulate wound healing. Read More

    A prospective study of fractional scanned nonsequential carbon dioxide laser resurfacing: a clinical and histopathologic evaluation.
    Dermatol Surg 2009 Feb;35(2):222-8
    Skin Laser and Surgery Specialists of NY and NJ, New York, New York, USA.
    Background: Although unparalleled in its efficacy, carbon dioxide (CO2) laser resurfacing has a high risk:benefit ratio. A modified device uses a novel handpiece and software to deliver nonsequential fractional ablative CO2 laser exposures.

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of this fractional ablative, scanned, nonsequential CO2 laser in the treatment of photo-damaged skin and to evaluate histologic and ultrastructural changes after the treatment. Read More

    Treatment of chronic lip fissures with carbon dioxide laser.
    Br J Oral Maxillofac Surg 2009 Mar 28;47(2):102-5. Epub 2008 Aug 28.
    Maxillofacial Unit, St George's Hospital, Blackshaw Road, London, SW17 0QT, United Kingdom.
    Resurfacing of cutaneous tissue with carbon dioxide laser increases the amount and quality of collagen and elastin subepithelially. We used this technique to ablate 12 chronic lip fissures in one woman and 10 men. Five patients' fissures had persisted for durations ranging from several months to seven years; the other six had fissures that split between one and five times annually, and took weeks or months to heal. Read More

    A histopathologic evaluation of the Plasma Skin Regeneration System (PSR) versus a standard carbon dioxide resurfacing laser in an animal model.
    Lasers Surg Med 2008 Feb;40(2):93-9
    La Jolla Cosmetic Surgery Centre, San Diego, California, USA.
    Background And Objectives: A variety of high energy, pulsed, and scanned carbon dioxide lasers are available to perform cutaneous resurfacing. Rhytec has developed a device for skin regeneration that utilizes energy delivered via a burst of nitrogen plasma. This study was undertaken to benchmark the energy outputs of the plasma skin regeneration device as compared to an ultra-short pulsed carbon dioxide laser (the control device). Read More

    Ablative laser resurfacing: high-energy pulsed carbon dioxide and erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet.
    Clin Dermatol 2007 Sep-Oct;25(5):462-73
    Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Biology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.
    The development of the short-pulsed high-energy carbon dioxide laser in the mid 1990's led to the emergence of laser skin resurfacing. Used in the continuous mode, the CO(2) laser can cut and coagulate simultaneously. Used in the pulsed mode, the CO(2) laser is a powerful tool for epidermal ablation in many different contexts both therapeutic and cosmetic. Read More

    Laser resurfacing.
    Semin Plast Surg 2007 Aug;21(3):139-46
    Department of Dermatology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas.
    In a society desiring images of beauty and youthfulness, the world of cutaneous surgery offers the gifts of facial rejuvenation for those determined to combat the signs of aging. With the development of novel laser and plasma technology, pigmentary changes, scarring, and wrinkles can be conquered providing smoother, healthier, younger-looking skin. This review highlights five of the most popular resurfacing technologies in practice today including the carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser, the erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser, combination resurfacing, fractional photothermolysis, and plasma resurfacing. Read More

    In vivo effect of carbon dioxide laser-skin resurfacing and mechanical abrasion on the skin's microbial flora in an animal model.
    Dermatol Surg 2006 Mar;32(3):359-64
    Department of Basic Sciences, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Nursing, University of Athens, Athens, Greece.
    Background: Although beam-scanning carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers have provided a highly efficient tool for esthetic skin rejuvenation there has been no comprehensive animal studies looking into microbial skin changes following CO2 laser skin resurfacing.

    Objective: To evaluate the in vivo effects of CO2 laser skin resurfacing in an experimental rat model in comparison with mechanical abrasion on the skin microbial flora.

    Methods: Four separate cutaneous sections of the right dorsal surface of 10 Wistar rats were treated with a CO2 laser, operating at 18 W and delivering a radiant energy of 5. Read More

    Long-term results of ultrapulsed carbon dioxide laser resurfacing of the Mediterranean face.
    Aesthetic Plast Surg 2004 Sep-Oct;28(5):328-33
    Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.
    Background: In Mediterranean countries, increased exposure to sunlight accelerates aging of the skin and the formation of wrinkles. The long-term follow-up results for the patients who underwent resurfacing with ultrapulsed carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser are presented.

    Methods: All 47 patients who underwent ultrapulsed CO(2) laser between 1994 and 1996 were included in the study. Read More

    Tretinoin treatment before carbon-dioxide laser resurfacing: a clinical and biochemical analysis.
    J Am Acad Dermatol 2004 Dec;51(6):940-6
    Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-0314, USA.
    Background: Tretinoin is often prescribed before laser resurfacing in an attempt to enhance results.

    Objective: We sought to assess the clinical and biochemical effects of preoperative tretinoin use before laser resurfacing.

    Methods: Patients were randomized to apply tretinoin to one forearm and placebo to the other for 3 weeks. Read More

    Effect of carbon dioxide laser resurfacing on epidermal p53 immunostaining in photodamaged skin.
    Arch Dermatol 2004 Sep;140(9):1073-7
    Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, USA.
    Objective: To quantitatively examine changes in p53 tumor suppressor gene immunostaining after carbon dioxide (CO(2)) laser resurfacing of photodamaged skin to assess the potential value of this treatment in reducing the risk of progression to cutaneous carcinoma.

    Design: Serial in vivo immunohistochemical analyses after laser therapy.

    Setting: Academic referral center, Department of Dermatology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. Read More

    Treatment of basal cell carcinoma with the pulsed carbon dioxide laser: a retrospective analysis.
    Dermatol Surg 2004 Sep;30(9):1214-8
    Dermatology Associates of San Diego County, Skin and Laser Surgery Center of La Jolla, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.
    Background And Objective: Treatment options for basal cell carcinoma include surgical excision, cryotherapy, radiation, photodynamic therapy, Moh's micrographic surgery, and topical treatment with 5-fluorouracil and immunomodulators such as imiquimod. Resurfacing and ablation with a CO(2) laser (UltraPulse, Coherent Inc.) may present an attractive and effective treatment option in the management of these cutaneous cancers. Read More

    Combination surgical lifting with ablative laser skin resurfacing of facial skin: a retrospective analysis.
    Dermatol Surg 2004 Sep;30(9):1191-5
    Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, Washington, DC 20037, USA.
    Background: Cutaneous aging is manifested by rhytides, dyschromias, and skin laxity. Ablative laser skin resurfacing can effectively improve many signs of skin aging; however, the photoaged patient with facial laxity often requires a surgical lifting procedure in order to obtain optimal results. Concerns with delayed or impaired wound healing has led to reluctance to perform both procedures simultaneously. Read More

    Cutaneous sarcoidosis at sites of previous laser surgery.
    Cutis 2004 Jan;73(1):53-5
    UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California, USA.
    A 33-year-old patient was referred for evaluation and treatment of enlarging scars in areas where full-face carbon dioxide (CO2) laser resurfacing had been performed previously. The patient denied any systemic illness and was in good health at the time of presentation. This is a case report of isolated sarcoidosis limited to the skin associated with CO2 laser resurfacing. Read More

    Lasers for facial rejuvenation: a review.
    Int J Dermatol 2003 Jun;42(6):480-7
    Dermatology Department A. Syggros Hospital, Athens, Greece.
    Background: Different types of laser are used for resurfacing and collagen remodeling in cutaneous laser surgery.

    Methods: A systematic review was performed of the different types of laser currently employed for skin rejuvenation. These systems are either ablative [high-energy pulsed or scanned carbon dioxide (CO2) laser emitting at a wavelength of 10,600 nm, single- or variable-pulse or dual ablative/coagulative mode erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser emitting at a wavelength of 2940 nm, or systems combining both 10,600 nm and 2940 nm wavelengths] or nonablative [Q-switched neodymium:yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser emitting at a wavelength of 1064 nm, Nd:YAG laser emitting at a wavelength of 1320 nm, or diode laser emitting at a wavelength of 1450 nm]. Read More

    Side effects and complications of variable-pulsed erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser skin resurfacing: extended experience with 50 patients.
    Plast Reconstr Surg 2003 Apr;111(4):1524-9; discussion 1530-2
    Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, Washington, DC 20037, USA.
    Recent advances in technology have provided laser surgeons with new options for cutaneous laser resurfacing. Despite its popularity, there is limited information on the short-term and long-term side effects and complications of variable-pulsed erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (erbium:YAG) laser skin resurfacing. The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate postoperative wound healing, side effects, and complications of multiple-pass, variable-pulsed erbium:YAG laser skin resurfacing for facial photodamage, rhytides, and atrophic scarring. Read More

    Maximizing benefits and minimizing risk with CO2 laser resurfacing.
    Dermatol Clin 2002 Jan;20(1):77-86
    Dermatology Associates of San Diego, Inc., Division of Dermatology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, USA.
    Laser resurfacing using the high-energy, pulsed and scanned CO2 laser produces the most dramatic improvement in severe photo-induced facial rhytides and deeply atrophic scars. More recently, the use of short- and long-pulsed erbium lasers in conjunction with CO2 laser resurfacing has been shown to speed healing by removing the upper layer of thermally induced necrotic tissue. The Er:YAG lasers are more superficial ablative tools that inflict less residual thermal damage on the tissue, thus allowing healing to occur without the requisite internal clearance of excessive debris. Read More

    Subdermal carbon dioxide laser cutaneous contraction.
    Arch Facial Plast Surg 2002 Jan-Mar;4(1):37-40; discussion 41
    Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Service, Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, WA 98431, USA.
    Background: Conventional carbon dioxide (CO(2)) skin laser resurfacing reverses the effects of photoaging. A recent clinical series reported the efficacy of performing subdermal CO(2)resurfacing to obtain the same skin contracture as epidermal skin resurfacing.

    Objective: To assess surface area contraction that occurs with subdermal CO(2) laser resurfacing in the rat model. Read More

    Controlled vaporization of the skin for the treatment of wrinkles.
    Facial Plast Surg 2001 Aug;17(3):165-73
    Instituto Médico Vilafortuny, Cambrils, Spain.
    Resurfacing with CO(2) or Er:YAG lasers is a frequent technique used to achieve skin rejuvenation. The Er:YAG has gained wide acceptance since it can reduce the morbidity associated with CO(2) resurfacing. Laser resurfacing with the CO(2) produces areas of fibroplasia with intense cellular and vascular activity. Read More

    Effect of botulinum toxin pretreatment on laser resurfacing results: a prospective, randomized, blinded trial.
    Arch Facial Plast Surg 2001 Jul-Sep;3(3):165-9
    Division of Facial Plastic Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Beth Israel Medical Center, 10 Union Square E, Suite 4J, New York, NY 10003, USA.
    Background: Facial laser resurfacing and chemodenervation with botulinum toxin type A are used independently as means of nonsurgical facial rejuvenation. Recent reports in the literature have described combining these 2 therapies, claiming improved and longer-lasting laser resurfacing results. To date, no scientific investigation has been undertaken to prove or disprove this theory. Read More

    Laser resurfacing-induced hypopigmentation: histologic alterations and repigmentation with topical photochemotherapy.
    Dermatol Surg 2001 Jun;27(6):515-20
    Vitiligo and Pigmentation Institute of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90004, USA.
    Background: Hypopigmentation is a relatively common side effect of CO2 laser resurfacing. Little is known regarding the histologic features of the areas of pigmentation loss. To date, hypopigmentation is considered a permanent complication of this procedure. Read More

    Laser resurfacing of silicone-injected skin: the "silicone flash" revisited.
    Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2001 Apr;127(4):418-21
    Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Jefferson Medical College, 925 Chestnut St, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.
    Objective: To determine whether prior silicone injection increases the risks associated with carbon dioxide laser resurfacing.

    Design: Laboratory determination of the effect of laser energy on liquid silicone; histologic evaluation of silicone-injected skin after lasing; and histologic demonstration of silicone deposits in all layers of dermis years after injection of silicone as filler fluid.

    Setting: Tertiary care medical center. Read More

    New facial rejuvenation techniques.
    Semin Cutan Med Surg 2000 Dec;19(4):221-31
    Department of Dermatologic Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, USA.
    The popularity of cutaneous laser resurfacing has soared in recent years. For optimal clinical improvement, patients have been limited to the carbon dioxide and erbium:yttrium aluminum garnet lasers. With these systems, tissue can effectively be ablated to induce collagen shrinkage and remodeling that result in an improved clinical appearance. Read More

    Preoperative and postoperative considerations for carbon dioxide laser resurfacing.
    Cutis 1999 Dec;64(6):399-406
    Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, Washington, DC 20037, USA.
    Cutaneous laser resurfacing is a tremendous advance in the treatment of photoaged skin. With the recent developments in laser technology, the procedure has become widely utilized among many physician subspecialists. The latest laser systems permit controlled vaporization of skin so that most novice operators feel comfortable with the technique in a short period of time. Read More

    Cutaneous CO2 laser resurfacing infection rate with and without prophylactic antibiotics.
    Dermatol Surg 1999 Nov;25(11):857-61
    Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, Washington, DC, USA.
    Background: Cutaneous laser resurfacing is a well-accepted modality, with excellent clinical outcomes and low morbidity rates, for the treatment of a variety of epidermal and dermal lesions. The use of antibiotic prophylaxis continues to be an area of controversy, with laser practitioners divided in their approach.

    Objective: To identify the rate of postoperative bacterial infection following full-face carbon dioxide (CO2) laser resurfacing with and without antibiotic prophylaxis. Read More

    Erbium:YAG laser resurfacing of the hands, arms, and neck.
    Dermatol Surg 1999 Nov;25(11):831-4; discussion 834-5
    Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami, Florida, USA.
    Background: Resurfacing procedures to improve photodamage, rhytides, and scars have been developed and refined over the last century. Laser resurfacing is a relatively new procedure in the resurfacing spectrum. It has been appreciated that resurfacing of nonfacial skin by dermabrasion, chemical peels, or carbon dioxide (CO2) laser carries an unacceptably high risk of scarring. Read More

    Histological comparison of postoperative wound care regimens for laser resurfacing in a porcine model.
    Dermatol Surg 1999 May;25(5):387-91; discussion 392-3
    Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida 33136, USA.
    Background: The use of short-pulsed CO2 lasers for skin resurfacing is routinely performed, but few studies have examined postsurgical care.

    Objective: To determine which postoperative treatments are most beneficial in promoting optimal healing after laser resurfacing.

    Methods: Four pigs received laser resurfacing. Read More

    Cutaneous laser resurfacing.
    J Am Acad Dermatol 1999 Sep;41(3 Pt 1):365-89; quiz 390-2
    Department of Dermatology, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
    Unlabelled: Cutaneous resurfacing with the new generation of carbon dioxide and erbium lasers has recently come into favor for the treatment of facial rhytides, photodamage, and scarring. The precise control of these resurfacing lasers over the extent of tissue vaporization minimizes thermal damage to the skin while maximizing therapeutic efficacy. Proper use of resurfacing lasers is contingent upon a complete understanding of their clinical, histologic, and ultrastructural effects, as well as an appreciation of the principles of laser safety. Read More

    Effect of botulinum toxin type A on movement-associated rhytides following CO2 laser resurfacing.
    Dermatol Surg 1999 Apr;25(4):259-61
    Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, Washington, DC, USA.
    Background: Many patients who undergo CO2 laser resurfacing for correction of rhytides experience recurrence of movement-associated wrinkles within 6 to 12 months following the laser procedure.

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of botulinum toxin type A (Botox) injections on movement-associated rhytides following cutaneous laser resurfacing.

    Methods: Forty patients who had received full face CO2 laser resurfacing for the treatment of facial rhytides were randomized to receive Botox injections to the glabella, forehead or lateral canthal regions or to receive no additional treatment (control group). Read More

    Eyelid healing after carbon dioxide laser skin resurfacing: histological analysis.
    Arch Ophthalmol 1999 Jul;117(7):913-6
    Department of Ophthalmology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY 10029, USA.
    Objective: To clarify in vivo healing of eyelid skin after carbon dioxide (CO2) laser resurfacing.

    Design: Patients requesting upper eyelid blepharoplasty consented to undergo previous CO2 laser skin resurfacing of the upper eyelid skin segments to be excised at various time intervals. After blepharoplasty, the skin specimens were analyzed histopathologically by 2 masked pathologists. Read More

    Famciclovir prophylaxis of herpes simplex virus reactivation after laser skin resurfacing.
    Dermatol Surg 1999 Mar;25(3):242-6
    Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, DC, USA.
    Background: Cutaneous laser resurfacing with carbon dioxide and erbium:YAG lasers has achieved remarkable clinical results with a relatively low risk of morbidity and complications. The incidence of herpes simplex virus (HSV) reactivation after resurfacing can be decreased by prophylaxis with antiviral agents. Famciclovir is effective in the suppression and treatment of HSV infections; however, no studies have examined the optimum dosing regimen for HSV prophylaxis in laser resurfacing. Read More

    Comparison of four carbon dioxide resurfacing lasers. A clinical and histopathologic evaluation.
    Dermatol Surg 1999 Mar;25(3):153-8; discussion 159
    Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, Washington, DC, USA.
    Background: Several high-energy, pulsed and scanned carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers are currently available for cutaneous resurfacing. Although each laser system adheres to the same basic principles of selective photothermolysis, there are significant differences between lasers with respect to tissue dwell time, energy output, and laser beam profile. These differences may result in variable clinical and histologic tissue effects. Read More

    Long-term effectiveness and side effects of carbon dioxide laser resurfacing for photoaged facial skin.
    J Am Acad Dermatol 1999 Mar;40(3):401-11
    Dermatology Associates and Cosmetic Laser Associates of San Diego County, Inc., La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.
    Background: Laser resurfacing has been used for treatment of photoaged facial skin since late 1993. Very few long-term follow-up studies regarding the effectiveness and side effects of this procedure have been reported.

    Method: Patients who received carbon dioxide laser resurfacing for facial photoaging and wrinkling from Dec 17, 1993, to Nov 30, 1996, were followed up with clinical evaluation and patient questionnaires. Read More

    Cutaneous resurfacing with CO2 and erbium: YAG lasers: preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative considerations.
    Plast Reconstr Surg 1999 Feb;103(2):619-32; discussion 633-4
    Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery and Georgetown University Medical Center, DC, USA.
    The development and integration of pulsed and scanned CO2 and erbium:YAG laser systems into mainstream surgical practice over the past years has revolutionized cutaneous resurfacing. These lasers are capable of delivering to skin high peak fluences to effect controlled tissue vaporization, while leaving an acceptably narrow zone of residual thermal damage. The inherent technological differences that exist between the two distant laser systems in terms of ablation depths, degree of thermal coagulation, and postoperative side-effects and complications guide patient selection and management. Read More

    Effect of pretreatment on the incidence of hyperpigmentation following cutaneous CO2 laser resurfacing.
    Dermatol Surg 1999 Jan;25(1):15-7
    Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery, Washington, DC, USA.
    Background: Transient hyperpigmentation is the most common complication seen following cutaneous carbon dioxide (CO2) laser resurfacing.

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the use of a topical skin lightening regimen prior to cutaneous laser resurfacing reduces the incidence of post-laser resurfacing hyperpigmentation.

    Methods: One hundred consecutive CO2 laser resurfacing patients (skin types I-III) were randomized to receive preoperative treatment with 10% glycolic acid cream twice daily (n=25), hydroquinone 4% cream qHS and tretinoin 0. Read More

    Erbium:YAG laser resurfacing in Asians.
    Dermatol Surg 1998 Dec;24(12):1303-7
    Ramathibodi Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand.
    Background: Although laser resurfacing has become increasingly popular in the treatment of Caucasian skin, concerns about healing and postinflammatory pigmentary changes have limited its use in Asian skin.

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of the Erbium(ER):YAG laser used in the treatment of Asian skin.

    Methods: Fifty Asian individuals with Rhytids, scars, pigmentary alteration, and a variety of cutaneous growth were treated with the Erbium:YAG laser. Read More

    Imaging of the irradiation of skin with a clinical CO2 laser system: implications for laser skin resurfacing.
    Lasers Surg Med 1998 ;23(4):185-93
    The University of Texas at Austin Biomedical Engineering Laser Laboratory, 78712, USA.
    Background And Objective: Several published reports describe the benefits of using the carbon dioxide laser for cutaneous resurfacing. The mechanisms on which skin resurfacing work are still not completely understood. This study was performed to obtain quantitative and qualitative information describing the thermal response of skin during high-energy, short-pulsed CO2 laser irradiation. Read More

    Optimizing fluence and debridement effects on cutaneous resurfacing carbon dioxide laser surgery.
    Arch Dermatol 1998 Oct;134(10):1223-8
    Department of Otolaryngology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tenn., USA.
    Objective: To develop methods to compare carbon dioxide (CO2) resurfacing lasers, fluence, and debridement effects on tissue shrinkage and histological thermal denaturation.

    Design: In vitro human or in vivo porcine skin samples received up to 5 passes with scanner or short-pulsed CO2 resurfacing lasers. Fluences ranging from 2. Read More

    A side-by-side comparison of carbon dioxide resurfacing lasers for the treatment of rhytides.
    J Am Acad Dermatol 1998 Oct;39(4 Pt 1):547-53
    Department of Surgery, Boston University School of Medicine, Massachusetts, USA.
    Background: The use of cutaneous resurfacing lasers to treat rhytides is widely accepted. Several carbon dioxide lasers, many using fundamentally different technologies, are available.

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the results obtained and side effects after treating rhytides with 3 different carbon dioxide resurfacing lasers. Read More

    Review of cutaneous lasers and their applications.
    South Med J 1998 Sep;91(9):806-14
    Washington Institute of Dermatologic Laser Surgery and Georgetown University Medical Center, DC, USA.
    Background: The use of lasers has assumed an increasingly important role in the treatment of a variety of cutaneous lesions over the past few decades. Because of their effectiveness, physicians from a variety of specialties have incorporated lasers into their practices. Unfortunately, widespread availability of lasers and the public's fascination with their potential uses have created extraordinary, often unrealistic, expectations. Read More

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