17 results match your criteria Current Organic Chemistry[Journal]

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Isoflavones, their Glycosides and Glycoconjugates. Synthesis and Biological Activity.

Curr Org Chem 2017 Jan;21(3):218-235

Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Wybrzeze AK 15, 44-100 Gliwice, Poland.

Glycosylation of small biologically active molecules, either of natural or synthetic origin, has a profound impact on their solubility, stability, and bioactivity, making glycoconjugates attractive compounds as therapeutic agents or nutraceuticals. A large proportion of secondary metabolites, including flavonoids, occur in plants as glycosides, which adds to the molecular diversity that is much valued in medicinal chemistry studies. The subsequent growing market demand for glycosidic natural products has fueled the development of various chemical and biotechnological methods of glycosides preparation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1385272820666160928120822DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5427819PMC
January 2017
18 Reads

Carbon Dioxide Utilization by the Five-Membered Ring Products of Cyclometalation Reactions.

Authors:
Iwao Omae

Curr Org Chem 2016 Apr;20(9):953-962

Omae Research Laboratories, 335-23 Mizuno, Sayama, Saitama, 350-1317, Japan.

In carbon dioxide utilization by cyclometalated five-membered ring products, the following compounds are used in four types of applications: 1. 2-Phenylpyrazole iridium compounds, pincer phosphine iridium compounds and 2-phenylimidazoline iridium compounds are used as catalysts for both formic acid production from CO and H, and hydrogen production from the formic acid. This formic acid can be a useful agent for H production and storage for fuel cell electric vehicles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1385272819666151022220954DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5411996PMC
April 2016
7 Reads

Polyelectrolyte-graphene Nanocomposites for Biosensing Applications.

Curr Org Chem 2015 Sep;19(18):1819-1827

The Institute for Molecular Engineering, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637,USA.

Due to their unique structure, the optical and mechanical properties graphene and its derivatives ( graphene oxide, reduced graphene oxide) have captured the attention of a constantly increasing number of scientists with regards to biomolecule sensing. This mini review focuses on one specific type of sensor, that consisting of graphene and polyelectrolytes. Polyelectrolyte-graphene nanocomposites exhibit outstanding detection capabilities by synergistically combining the characteristics of both components, outperforming traditional sensors in many cases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1385272819666150526005557DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5024728PMC
September 2015
11 Reads

Polymer - Nanoparticle Assemblies for Array Based Sensing.

Curr Org Chem 2015 Jun;109(12):1054-1062

Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA, 01003 (USA), Phone Number - 413-545-2058, Fax Number - 413-545-4490.

Sensing clinically relevant biomolecules is crucial for the detection and prevention of disease. Currently used detection methods tend to be expensive, time intensive, and specific for only one particular biomolecule of interest. Nanoparticle-based arrays using conjugated polymers have emerged as an analytical and potential clinical tool, allowing detection of a wide range of biomolecules using selective, not specific, sensor components. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1385272819666150318221301DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4845962PMC
June 2015
45 Reads

Strategies and Methods for the Synthesis of Anticancer Natural Product Neopeltolide and its Analogs.

Authors:
Yu Bai Mingji Dai

Curr Org Chem 2015;19(10):871-885

Department of Chemistry and Center for Cancer Research, Purdue University, 720 Clinic Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA.

Neopeltolide, isolated in 2007, with its novel structural features and potent anti cancer cell proliferation activity, has attracted a tremendous amount of synthetic efforts. This review briefly and chronologically summarizes each of the synthesis with the main focus on the strategies and methodologies for the construction of its -tetrahydropyran-containing macrolactone core. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1385272819666150119225149DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4863658PMC
January 2015
6 Reads

Quinone Methide Bioactivation Pathway: Contribution to Toxicity and/or Cytoprotection?

Authors:
Judy L Bolton

Curr Org Chem 2014 Jan;18(1):61-69

Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy (M/C 781) College of Pharmacy University of Illinois at Chicago 833 S. Wood Street Chicago, Illinois 60612-7231.

The formation of quinone methides (QMs) from either direct 2-electron oxidation of 2- or 4-alkylphenols, isomerization of -quinones, or elimination of a good leaving group could explain the cytotoxic/cytoprotective effects of several drugs, natural products, as well as endogenous compounds. For example, the antiretroviral drug nevirapine and the antidiabetic agent troglitazone both induce idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity through mechanisms involving quinone methide formation. The anesthetic phencyclidine induces psychological side effects potentially through quinone methide mediated covalent modification of crucial macromolecules in the brain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/138527281801140121123046DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4204646PMC
January 2014
16 Reads

Synthetic Routes to Methylerythritol Phosphate Pathway Intermediates and Downstream Isoprenoids.

Curr Org Chem 2014 Apr;18(8):1050-1072

Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA.

Isoprenoids constitute the largest class of natural products with greater than 55,000 identified members. They play essential roles in maintaining proper cellular function leading to maintenance of human health, plant defense mechanisms against predators, and are often exploited for their beneficial properties in the pharmaceutical and nutraceutical industries. Most impressively, all known isoprenoids are derived from one of two C-precursors, isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) or dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1385272819666140501001101DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4082188PMC
April 2014
10 Reads
1 Citation
2.160 Impact Factor

The Role of Mass Spectrometry in the "Omics" Era.

Curr Org Chem 2013 Dec;17(23):2891-2905

Parasitology Unit, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, IRCCS, Piazza Sant'Onofrio 4, 00165, Rome, Italy; ; Metagenomics Unit, Bambino Gesù Children's Hospital, IRCCS, Piazza Sant'Onofrio 4, 00165, Rome, Italy.

Mass spectrometry (MS) is one of the key analytical technology on which the emerging ''-omics'' approaches are based. It may provide detection and quantization of thousands of proteins and biologically active metabolites from a tissue, body fluid or cell culture working in a ''global'' or ''targeted'' manner, down to ultra-trace levels. It can be expected that the high performance of MS technology, coupled to routine data handling, will soon bring fruit in the request for a better understanding of human diseases, leading to new molecular biomarkers, hence affecting drug targets and therapies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1385272817888131118162725DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3873040PMC
December 2013
14 Reads

Dual Functional Small Molecule Probes as Fluorophore and Ligand for Misfolding Proteins.

Curr Org Chem 2013 Mar;17(6)

Molecular Imaging Laboratory, MGH/MIT/HMS Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Room 2301, Building 149, Charlestown, Boston, Massachusetts 02129.

Misfolding of a protein is a destructive process for variety of diseases that include neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease, Huntington disease, mad cow disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and frontal temporal dementia (FTD), and other non-CNS diseases such as diabetes, cystic fibrosis, and lysosomal storage diseases. Formation of various misfunctional large assembles of the misfolded protein is the primary consequence. To detect the formation of the aggregated species is very important for not only basic mechanism research but also very crucial for diagnosis of the diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1385272811317060004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3867281PMC
March 2013
17 Reads

Piecing Together Cell-like Systems.

Curr Org Chem 2013 Aug;17(16):1751-1757

CIBIO, University of Trento, via delle Regole 101, 38123 Mattarello (TN), Italy.

Several laboratories are pursuing the synthesis of cellular systems from different directions, including those that begin with simple chemicals to those that exploit existing cells. The methods that begin with nonliving components tend to focus on mimicking specific features of life, such as genomic replication, protein synthesis, sensory systems, and compartment formation, growth, and division. Conversely, the more prevalent synthetic biology approaches begin with something that is already alive and seek to impart new behavior on existing cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/13852728113179990082DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3856425PMC
August 2013
7 Reads

Atmospheric Prebiotic Chemistry and Organic Hazes.

Curr Org Chem 2013 Aug;17:1710-1723

Planetary Environments Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 699, Greenbelt, MD 20771, USA.

Earth's atmospheric composition at the time of the origin of life is not known, but it has often been suggested that chemical transformation of reactive species in the atmosphere was a significant source of prebiotic organic molecules. Experimental and theoretical studies over the past half century have shown that atmospheric synthesis can yield molecules such as amino acids and nucleobases, but these processes are very sensitive to gas composition and energy source. Abiotic synthesis of organic molecules is more productive in reduced atmospheres, yet the primitive Earth may not have been as reducing as earlier workers assumed, and recent research has reflected this shift in thinking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/13852728113179990078DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3796891PMC
August 2013
8 Reads

Quantum Tunnelling to the Origin and Evolution of Life.

Authors:
Frank Trixler

Curr Org Chem 2013 Aug;17(16):1758-1770

Center for NanoScience (CeNS), Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Schellingstraße 4, 80799 München, Germany; ; Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Theresienstrasse 41, 80333, München, Germany; ; TUM School of Education, Technische Universität München, Museumsinsel 1, 80538 München, Germany.

Quantum tunnelling is a phenomenon which becomes relevant at the nanoscale and below. It is a paradox from the classical point of view as it enables elementary particles and atoms to permeate an energetic barrier without the need for sufficient energy to overcome it. Tunnelling might seem to be an exotic process only important for special physical effects and applications such as the Tunnel Diode, Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (electron tunnelling) or Near-field Optical Microscopy operating in photon tunnelling mode. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/13852728113179990083DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3768233PMC
August 2013
21 Reads

Nucleophilic Participation in the Solvolyses of (Arylthio)methyl Chlorides and Derivatives: Application of Simple and Extended Forms of the Grunwald-Winstein Equations.

Curr Org Chem 2012 Jun;16(12):1502-1511

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115-2862, USA.

The specific rates of solvolysis of chloromethyl phenyl sulfide [(phenylthio)methyl chloride] and its p-chloro-derivative have been determined at 0.0 °C in a wide range of hydroxylic solvents, including several containing a fluroalcohol. Treatment in terms of a two-term Grunwald-Winstein equation, incorporating terms based on solvent ionizing power (Y(Cl)) and solvent nucleophilicity (N(T)) suggest a mechanism similar to that for the solvolyses of tert-butyl chloride, involving in the rate-determining step a nucleophilic solvation of the incipient carbocation in an ionization process. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/138527212800672592DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3375722PMC
June 2012
15 Reads

Use of the Simple and Extended Grunwald-Winstein Equations in the Correlation of the Rates of Solvolysis of Highly Hindered Tertiary Alkyl Derivatives.

Curr Org Chem 2010 Jun;14(10):1037-1049

Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois 60115-2862, USA.

The original Grunwald-Winstein equation (1948) involved the development of a scale of solvent ionizing power (Y). Subsequent work has refined this scale and involved the development of scales of solvent nucleophilicity (N) and a term to correct for deviations when aromatic rings are present, governed by the aromatic ring parameter (I). These three scales, and the sensitivities towards each, can be related to specific rates of solvolysis through linear free energy relationships (LFERs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/138527210791130505DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3020085PMC
June 2010
14 Reads

Determination of Absolute Configuration of Natural Products: Theoretical Calculation of Electronic Circular Dichroism as a Tool.

Curr Org Chem 2010 Oct;14(16):1678-1697

National Center for Natural Products Research, Research Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi, University, Mississippi 38677, USA.

Determination of absolute configuration (AC) is one of the most challenging features in the structure elucidation of chiral natural products, especially those with complex structures. With revolutionary advancements in the area of quantum chemical calculations of chiroptical spectroscopy over the past decade, the time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculation of electronic circular dichroism (ECD) spectra has emerged as a very promising tool. The principle is simply based on the comparison of the calculated and experimental ECD spectra: the more closely they match, the more reliable conclusion for the AC assignment can be drawn. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/138527210792927717DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3983998PMC
October 2010
11 Reads

Cyclization Cascade of Allenyl Azides: Synergy Between Theory and Experiment.

Curr Org Chem 2010 Sep;14(15):1646-1657

Departamento de Quimica Organica, Universidade de Vigo, Lagoas Marcosende, 36200, Vigo, Galicia, Spain.

Collaborative work between experimentalists and computational chemists have demonstrated a stong synergy which allowed the rationalization of allenyl azide chemistry and permited the development of an efficient synthetic tool aimed at the preparation of several alkaloids. Saturated allenyl azides undergo a reaction cascade involving key diradical intermediates that follow the Curtin-Hammett model whereas unsaturated allenyl azides form indolidene intermediates that furnish the final indole products via electrocyclic ring closure events taking place out of the Curtin-Hammett regime. The regiochemistry of the reaction cascade with the latter substrates can be manipulated by Cu(I) addition to the reaction mixture. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3280692PMC
September 2010
9 Reads

Advances in Bioconjugation.

Curr Org Chem 2010 Jan;14(2):138-147

Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 433 Babcock Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1544, USA.

Bioconjugation is a burgeoning field of research. Novel methods for the mild and site-specific derivatization of proteins, DNA, RNA, and carbohydrates have been developed for applications such as ligand discovery, disease diagnosis, and high-throughput screening. These powerful methods owe their existence to the discovery of chemoselective reactions that enable bioconjugation under physiological conditions-a tremendous achievement of modern organic chemistry. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2901115PMC
January 2010
51 Reads
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