15 results match your criteria Current Medical Literature: Rheumatology[Journal]

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Relapse rates after elective discontinuation of anti-TNF therapy in rheumatoid arthritis: a meta-analysis and review of literature.

BMC Rheumatol 2019 8;3:10. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

6Department of Rheumatology and Rehabilitation, Tanta University Faculty of Medicine, Elgesh Street, Tanta, Gharbeia Egypt.

Background: Inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) are current mainstay of therapies for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The decision when to withdraw TNF-α inhibitors after achieving remission and the incidence of relapse rates with elective discontinuation are both important questions that demand intense survey in these patients. In this meta-analysis we aimed to estimate the magnitude of relapse rate after elective TNF-α inhibitor discontinuation in RA patients with remission. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s41927-019-0058-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6408847PMC
March 2019
1 Read

Simultaneous occurrence of ankylosing spondylitis and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis: a systematic review.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2018 Dec;57(12):2120-2128

Department of Orthopaedics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Objectives: AS and DISH are both spinal ankylosing conditions with a 4-fold increased risk of spinal fractures. The most commonly used criteria for DISH were designed to exclude radiographic signs of spondyloarthritis. However, case reports describing the presence of both conditions exist. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/key211DOI Listing
December 2018
13 Reads

Paraneoplastic systemic sclerosis associated with colorectal carcinoma.

Reumatologia 2018 30;56(3):194-198. Epub 2018 Jun 30.

Department of Dermatology, University of Rzeszow, Poland.

A number of rheumatic disorders may appear as paraneoplastic syndromes, the most common being dermatomyositis or polymyositis. Systemic sclerosis is associated with a slightly increased risk of cancer, although its direct association with malignancies is controversial. We describe a case of a 57-year-old male with rectal adenocarcinoma and systemic sclerosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5114/reum.2018.76907DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6052369PMC
June 2018
4 Reads

What is the evidence for a role for diet and nutrition in osteoarthritis?

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2018 05;57(suppl_4):iv61-iv74

Department of Nutritional Sciences, School of Biosciences and Medicine, University of Surrey, Guildford, UK.

As current treatment options in OA are very limited, OA patients would benefit greatly from some ability to self-manage their condition. Since diet may potentially affect OA, we reviewed the literature on the relationship between nutrition and OA risk or progression, aiming to provide guidance for clinicians. For overweight/obese patients, weight reduction, ideally incorporating exercise, is paramount. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/key011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5905611PMC
May 2018
12 Reads

Twenty-two points to consider for clinical trials in systemic sclerosis, based on EULAR standards.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2015 Jan 13;54(1):144-51. Epub 2014 Aug 13.

Division of Rheumatology, University of Michigan Scleroderma Program, Ann Arbor, MI, Division of Rheumatology, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA, Department of Rheumatology A, Paris Descartes University, Cochin Institut, INSERM U1016, Cochin Hospital, Paris, France, Department of Medicine, Crozer Chester Medical Center, Upland, PA, USA, Research Laboratory and Academic Unit of Clinical Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Genoa, Genoa, Italy, Department of Immunology and Rheumatology, University of Pécs, Pécs, Hungary, Centre for Rheumatology, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK, Department of Rheumatology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Deparment of Rheumatology, Basel University, Basel, Switzerland, Department of Biomedicine, Division of Rheumatology, Azienda Ospedaliero Universitaria Careggi, Department of Medicine, Denothe Centre, University of Florence, Florence, Italy, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Justus-Liebrig University Giessen, Kerckhoff Clinic, Bad Beuheinn, Germany, Scleroderma Research Consultants, Avon, CT and Department of Internal Medicine, Rochester General Health System, Rochester, NY, USA.

Objective: SSc is clinically and aetiopathogenically heterogeneous. Consensus standards for more uniform trial design and selection of outcome measures are needed. The objective of this study was to develop evidence-based points to consider (PTCs) for future clinical trials in SSc. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/keu288DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4269793PMC
January 2015
41 Reads

The lung in ACPA-positive rheumatoid arthritis: an initiating site of injury?

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2014 Nov 15;53(11):1940-50. Epub 2014 May 15.

Department of Rheumatology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Gateshead, Institute of Biomedical and Clinical Science, University of Exeter Medical School, Exeter, UK, Department of Biochemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada, Lung Immunobiology and Transplantation Group, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Sir William Leech Centre, Freeman Hospital, Newcastle and Department of Rheumatology, Royal Cornwall Hospital, Truro, UK.

Recent findings have highlighted the potential initiation of ACPA in sites away from the joint. Periodontitis is an example of this concept. This process in the gums appears to be independent of smoking, the main environmental risk factor for ACPA-positive RA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/keu195DOI Listing
November 2014
15 Reads

Benefits and risks of low-dose glucocorticoid treatment in the patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2014 Oct 10;53(10):1742-51. Epub 2014 Apr 10.

Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA and Department of Rheumatology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA.

Glucocorticosteroids (GCs) have been employed extensively for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other autoimmune and systemic inflammatory disorders. Their use is supported by extensive literature and their utility is reflected in their incorporation into current treatment guidelines for RA and other conditions. Nevertheless, there is still some concern regarding the long-term use of GCs because of their potential for clinically important adverse events, particularly with an extended duration of treatment and the use of high doses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/keu135DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4165844PMC
October 2014
7 Reads

Evaluation and Treatment of Enthesitis-Related Arthritis.

Authors:
Pamela F Weiss

Curr Med Lit Rheumatol 2013 ;32(2):33-41

The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3882059PMC
January 2013
7 Reads

Global prevalence of ankylosing spondylitis.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2014 Apr 9;53(4):650-7. Epub 2013 Dec 9.

Epidemiology Group, Institute of Applied Health Sciences, School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Aberdeen, Polwarth Building, Foresterhill, Aberdeen AB25 2ZD, UK.

Objectives: For effective health care provision, knowledge of disease prevalence is paramount. There has been no systematic endeavour to establish continent-based AS estimates, however, prevalence is thought to vary by country and background HLA-B27 prevalence. This study aimed to estimate AS prevalence worldwide and to calculate the expected number of cases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/ket387DOI Listing
April 2014
11 Reads

The clinical and functional outcomes of ultrasound-guided vs landmark-guided injections for adults with shoulder pathology--a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2013 Apr 28;52(4):743-51. Epub 2012 Dec 28.

Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK.

Objective: To compare the clinical and functional outcomes of US-guided (USG) vs landmark-guided (LMG) injection for the treatment of adults with shoulder pathology.

Method: MEDLINE, AMED and Embase in addition to unpublished literature databases were searched from 1950 to August 2011. Studies were included if they were randomized or non-randomized controlled trials comparing USG vs LSG injections for the treatment of adults with shoulder pathology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kes302DOI Listing
April 2013
17 Reads

First update of the current evidence for the management of ankylosing spondylitis with non-pharmacological treatment and non-biologic drugs: a systematic literature review for the ASAS/EULAR management recommendations in ankylosing spondylitis.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2012 Aug 17;51(8):1388-96. Epub 2012 Apr 17.

Department of Rheumatology, Leiden University Medical Centre, PO Box 9600, 2300 RC Leiden, The Netherlands.

Objective: To perform a systematic literature review as a basis for the update of the Assessment in SpondyloArthritis International Society and European League Against Reumatism (ASAS/EULAR) recommendations for the management of AS with non-pharmacological interventions and non-biologic drugs.

Methods: The search was performed in PubMed, EMBASE, PEDro and Cochrane between 1 January 2005 and 1 December 2009, and in abstracts of EULAR and ACR meetings (2007-09). Effect sizes for outcomes on pain, disease activity, spinal mobility and physical function and level of evidence were presented. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kes066DOI Listing
August 2012
18 Reads

Perioperative care for patients with rheumatic diseases.

Nat Rev Rheumatol 2011 Nov 15;8(1):32-41. Epub 2011 Nov 15.

Mayo Clinic, 200 1st Street SW, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.

The perioperative care of patients with rheumatic diseases is hampered by a lack of evidence-based recommendations. Rheumatologists are called upon to 'clear' their patients for surgery, yet the evidence upon which to base decisions is fractionated and inconsistent. We have systematically reviewed the current literature and developed suggestions for three key areas that require particular deliberations in patients with rheumatic diseases scheduled for surgery: the management of cardiovascular risk, use of immunosuppressive drugs, and states of altered coagulation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrrheum.2011.171DOI Listing
November 2011
9 Reads

Immunization in rheumatic diseases of childhood: an audit of the clinical practice of British Paediatric Rheumatology Group members and a review of the evidence.

Authors:
K Davies P Woo

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2002 Aug;41(8):937-41

Department of Rheumatology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London WC1N 3EJ, UK.

Objectives: To establish opinion and clinical practice of senior clinicians working with children with rheumatic diseases with regard to immunization and to determine whether or not this is in accordance with current recommendations. To review published guidelines on the subject and examine the evidence base supporting them.

Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all consultant members of the British Paediatric Rheumatology Group. Read More

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August 2002
9 Reads

Survey of arthroscopy performed by rheumatologists.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2002 Feb;41(2):210-5

Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's University Hospital, Dublin 4, Ireland.

Objective: To determine the international distribution and practice of arthroscopy performed by rheumatologists and to evaluate proposed guidelines on minimum standards for training in arthroscopy in the context of current clinical practice.

Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all rheumatology centres identified as practising arthroscopy, by (i) searching Medline from 1966 to 1999, (ii) searching the abstract books of the annual general meetings of ACR, BSR and EULAR from 1980 to 1999, and (iii) correspondence with all the centres identified.

Results: Thirty-six rheumatology centres were confirmed as performing arthroscopy (24 in Europe, 10 in USA and two in Australia) and 33 (92%) centres completed the questionnaire. Read More

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February 2002
7 Reads

Audit of rheumatology services for adolescents and young adults in the UK. British Paediatric Rheumatology Group.

Rheumatology (Oxford) 2000 Jun;39(6):596-602

Great Ormond Street NHS Trust, London, Birmingham, UK.

Background: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is associated with significant morbidity in adulthood with at least one third of children continuing to have active inflammatory disease into their adult years and up to 60% of all patients continuing to have some limitation of their activities of daily living. A survey of service provision for these young people in the transition from paediatric to adult rheumatology care was therefore undertaken.

Methods: A postal questionnaire was sent to all 92 members of the British Paediatric Rheumatology Group, representing 61 units providing a paediatric rheumatology service in the UK and Eire. Read More

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June 2000
18 Reads
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