33 results match your criteria Current Immunology Reviews[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Inflammatory Cyclooxygenase Activity and PGE Signaling in Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

Curr Immunol Rev 2015 Aug;11(2):125-131

Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.

The inflammatory response is a fundamental driving force in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the setting of accumulating immunogenic Aß peptide assemblies, microglia, the innate immune cells of the brain, generate a non-resolving immune response and fail to adequately clear accumulating Aß peptides, accelerating neuronal and synaptic injury. Pathological, biomarker, and imaging studies point to a prominent role of the innate immune response in AD development, and the molecular components of this response are beginning to be unraveled. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1573395511666150707181414DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5384338PMC
August 2015
15 Reads

Optic Neuritis: A Model for the Immuno-pathogenesis of Central Nervous System Inflammatory Demyelinating Diseases.

Curr Immunol Rev 2015 ;11(2):85-92

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19004, USA.

Evidence for the tenuous regulation between the immune system and central nervous system (CNS) can be found with examples of interaction between these organ systems gone awry. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the prototypical inflammatory disease of the CNS and is characterized by widely distributed inflammatory demyelinating plaques that can involve the brain, spinal cord and/or optic nerves. Optic neuritis (ON), inflammatory injury of the optic nerve that frequently occurs in patients with MS, has been the focus of intense study in part given the readily accessible nature of clinical outcome measures. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1573395511666150707181644DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5791743PMC
January 2015
7 Reads

Type 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells in Allergic Disease.

Curr Immunol Rev 2013 Nov;9(4):214-221

Department of Medicine, University of California, La Jolla, CA, USA.

Type II innate lymphoid cells (ILC2) are a novel population of lineage-negative cells that produce high levels of Th2 cytokines IL-5 and IL-13. ILC2 are found in human respiratory and gastrointestinal tissue as well as in skin. Studies from mouse models of asthma and atopic dermatitis suggest a role for ILC2 in promoting allergic inflammation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.eurekaselect.com/openurl/content.php?genre=articl
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1573395510666140304235916DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4033554PMC
November 2013
9 Reads

Dysfunctional adaptive immunity during parasitic infections.

Curr Immunol Rev 2013 Aug;9(3):179-189

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104 ; Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73104.

Parasite-driven dysfunctional adaptive immunity represents an emerging hypothesis to explain the chronic or persistent nature of parasitic infections, as well as the observation that repeated exposure to most parasitic organisms fails to engender sterilizing immunity. This review discusses recent examples from clinical studies and experimental models of parasitic infection that substantiate the role for immune dysfunction in the inefficient generation and maintenance of potent anti-parasitic immunity. Better understanding of the complex interplay between parasites, host adaptive immunity, and relevant negative regulatory circuits will inform efforts to enhance resistance to chronic parasitic infections through vaccination or immunotherapy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.eurekaselect.com/openurl/content.php?genre=articl
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1573395509666131126230832DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4020283PMC
August 2013
8 Reads

Early Decision: Effector and Effector Memory T Cell Differentiation in Chronic Infection.

Curr Immunol Rev 2013 Aug;9(3):190-206

University of Texas Medical Branch, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, 300 University Avenue, Galveston, TX 77555-0435, USA.

As effector memory T cells (Tem) are the predominant population elicited by chronic parasitic infections, increasing our knowledge of their function, survival and derivation, as phenotypically and functionally distinct from central memory and effector T cells will be critical to vaccine development for these diseases. In some infections, memory T cells maintain increased effector functions, however; this may require the presence of continued antigen, which can also lead to T cell exhaustion. Alternatively, in the absence of antigen, only the increase in the number of memory cells remains, without enhanced functionality as central memory. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1573395509666131126231209DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4000274PMC
August 2013
12 Reads
13 Citations

Alternatively Activated Macrophages Revisited: New Insights into the Regulation of Immunity, Inflammation and Metabolic Function following Parasite Infection.

Curr Immunol Rev 2013 Aug;9(3):147-156

Division of Biomedical Sciences, School of Medicine, University of California Riverside, Riverside, CA.

The role of macrophages in homeostatic conditions and the immune system range from clearing debris to recognizing and killing pathogens. While classically activated macrophages (CAMacs) are induced by T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokines and exhibit microbicidal properties, Th2 cytokines promote alternative activation of macrophages (AAMacs). AAMacs contribute to the killing of helminth parasites and mediate additional host-protective processes such as regulating inflammation and wound healing. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.eurekaselect.com/openurl/content.php?genre=articl
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1573395509666131210232548DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3998825PMC
August 2013
10 Reads

CD8 T Cell Responses to and Intracellular Parasites.

Curr Immunol Rev 2013 Aug;9(3):169-178

Department of Microbiology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA.

Parasitic protozoa are major threats to human health affecting millions of people around the world. Control of these infections by the host immune system relies on a myriad of immunological mechanisms that includes both humoral and cellular immunity. CD8 T cells contribute to the control of these parasitic infections in both animals and humans. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.eurekaselect.com/openurl/content.php?genre=articl
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1573395509666131126232327DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3983867PMC
August 2013
8 Reads

Parasites: what are they good for?

Curr Immunol Rev 2013 Aug;9(3):120-128

Department of Microbiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10010.

Parasitic diseases caused by helminth and protozoan infections remain one of the largest global public health problems for mankind. While natural immunity in man is rare or slow to develop for many parasites, the immune response is capable of recognizing and responding to infection by utilizing a number of different immunological mechanisms. This special topics journal issue examines many of the key findings in the recent literature regarding the immune response against helminth and protozoan infections, as well as highlighting areas in which our current knowledge falls short. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3969036PMC
August 2013
8 Reads

Do you see what I see: Recognition of protozoan parasites by Toll-like receptors.

Curr Immunol Rev 2013 Aug;9(3):129-140

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205.

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important for recognizing a variety of pathogens, including protozoan parasites, and initiating innate immune responses against them. TLRs are localized on the cell surface as well as in the endosome, and are implicated in innate sensing of these parasites. In this review, we will discuss recent findings on the identification of parasite-derived pathogen associated molecular patterns and the TLRs that bind them. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.eurekaselect.com/openurl/content.php?genre=articl
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1573395509666131203225929DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4223800PMC
August 2013
8 Reads

Possible Mechanisms of Lymphoma Development in Sjögren's Syndrome.

Curr Immunol Rev 2013 Feb;9(1):13-22

Department of Hematology and Immunology, Tongji Hospital, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei, 430030, China.

Primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) is a systemic as well as an organ-specific autoimmune disease characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the glandular epithelial tissue. SS patients have been reported to be at highest risk of developing lymphoproliferative neoplasms, when compared with patients with other rheumatoid diseases. Factors such as cytokine stimulation, environmental factors, viral infection and genetic events as well as vitamin deficiency may contribute to the development of lymphoma. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1573395511309010003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3706954PMC
February 2013
16 Reads

Role of Chemokines and Trafficking of Immune Cells in Parasitic Infections.

Curr Immunol Rev 2013 ;9(3):157-168

School of Medicine, Division of Biomedical Sciences, University of California, Riverside, CA, 92521-0129, USA.

Parasites are diverse eukaryotic pathogens that can have complex life cycles. Their clearance, or control within a mammalian host requires the coordinated effort of the immune system. The cell types recruited to areas of infection can combat the disease, promote parasite replication and survival, or contribute to disease pathology. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.eurekaselect.com/openurl/content.php?genre=articl
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1573395509666131217000000DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4223871PMC
January 2013
11 Reads

Innate Immunity and the Role of Epithelial Barrier During Aspergillus fumigatus Infection.

Curr Immunol Rev 2012 Aug;8(3):254-261

Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, RAS, Moscow, Russian Federation, Russia.

Fungi are the most important eukaryotic infective agents in Europe which largely overpass parasite infections. Total number of people dying of fungal infection is increasing and this trend is likely to continue due to the increase in immunosuppressive treatments. The opportunistic pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus (Af) is a saprophytic filamentous fungus that can cause invasive pulmonary diseases in immuno-compromised hosts. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.eurekaselect.com/openurl/content.php?genre=articl
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339512800671985DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3520052PMC
August 2012
9 Reads

NKT Cell Subsets Can Exert Opposing Effects in Autoimmunity, Tumor Surveillance and Inflammation.

Curr Immunol Rev 2012 Nov;8(4):287-296

Laboratory of Autoimmunity, Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

The innate-like natural killer T (NKT) cells are essential regulators of immunity. These cells comprise at least two distinct subsets and recognize different lipid antigens presented by the MHC class I like molecules CD1d. The CD1d-dependent recognition pathway of NKT cells is highly conserved from mouse to humans. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339512804806224DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4185185PMC
November 2012
8 Reads

Cornea: Window to Ocular Immunology.

Curr Immunol Rev 2011 Aug;7(3):328-335

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA.

The ocular surface is continuously exposed to environmental agents such as allergens, pollutants, and microorganisms, which could provoke inflammation. However, an array of anatomical, physiological, and immunological features of the ocular surface conspire to limit corneal inflammation and endow the eye with immune privilege. A remarkable example of ocular immune privilege is the success of corneal allografts, which unlike all other forms of organ transplantation, survive without the use of systemic immunosuppressive drugs or MHC matching. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339511796196593DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3141214PMC
August 2011
9 Reads

Aging of the Innate Immune System: An Update.

Curr Immunol Rev 2011 Feb;7(1):104-115

The Burn and Shock Trauma Institute, Loyola University Medical Center, 2160 South First Avenue, Maywood, IL 60153, USA.

The relationship between advanced age and immunologic deficits is becoming an area of rapidly advancing research. Many of the clinical hurdles in the elderly population result from dysregulation of the immune system leading to the inability of the elderly to swiftly combat infection and to the increased incidence of chronic disease states and autoimmune conditions. Herein, we address the crucial alterations in the innate immune system that occur with advancing age. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339511794474181DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3066013PMC
February 2011
9 Reads

Immunological regulation of the central nervous system: From physiological to pathological processes.

Curr Immunol Rev 2010 Aug;6(3):149

Neuroscience Laboratory, Psychology School, University of Colima, Colima, Mexico 28040.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339510791823736DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3039174PMC
August 2010
7 Reads

Generation of Regulatory T Cells to Antigen Expressed in the Retina.

Curr Immunol Rev 2011;7(3):344-349

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 USA.

Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are generated to antigens (Ag) found in the retina. Some Tregs are the result of ectopic expression of the retinal Ags in the thymus, where developing T cells are committed to enter the regulatory lineage. However, the generation of retinal Ag-specific Tregs independent of the thymus was uncertain. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339511796196584DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4303907PMC
January 2011
8 Reads

The concept of depression as a dysfunction of the immune system.

Authors:
Brian E Leonard

Curr Immunol Rev 2010 Aug;6(3):205-212

Pharmacology Department, National University of Ireland, Galway and Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Ludwig Maximilian University, Munich, Germany.

Chronic stress, by initiating changes in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the immune system, acts as a trigger for anxiety and depression. Both experimental and clinical evidence shows that a rise in the concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and glucocorticoids, as occurs in chronically stressful situations and in depression, contribute to the behavioural changes associated with depression.A defect in serotonergic function is associated with hypercortisolaemia and the increase in proinflammatory cytokines that accompany depression. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339510791823835DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3002174PMC
August 2010
6 Reads

Immune System and Schizophrenia.

Curr Immunol Rev 2010 Aug;6(3):213-220

Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munchen, Germany.

Although an immune dysfunction and the involvement of infectious agents in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia are discussed since decades, the field never came into the mainstream of research. In schizophrenia a blunted type-1 immune response seems to be associated with a dysbalance in the activation of the enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and in the tryptophan - kynurenine metabolism resulting in increased production of kynurenic acid in schizophrenia. This is associated with an imbalance in the glutamatergic neurotransmission, leading to an NMDA antagonism in schizophrenia. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2971548PMC
August 2010
12 Reads

Immune system modulates the function of adult neural stem cells.

Curr Immunol Rev 2010 Aug;6(3):167-173

Neuroscience Laboratory, Psychology School, University of Colima, Colima, Mexico 28040.

New neurons are continuously produced in most, if not all, mammals. This Neurogenesis occurs only in discrete regions of the adult brain: the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the subgranular zone (SGZ). In these areas, there are neural stem cells (NSCs), multipotent and selfrenewing, which are regulated by a number of molecules and signaling pathways that control their cell fate choices, survival and proliferation rates. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339510791823772DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2964894PMC
August 2010
7 Reads

Responses of glial cells to stress and glucocorticoids.

Curr Immunol Rev 2010 Aug;6(3):195-204

Microscopía de Alta Resolución. Departamento de Neurociencias. Universidad de Guadalajara.

A growing body of evidence suggests that glial cells are involved in practically all aspects of neural function. Glial cells regulate the homeostasis of the brain, influence the development of the nervous system, modulate synaptic activity, and carry out the immune response inside the brain. In addition, they play an important role in the restoration of the nervous system after damage, and they also participate in various neurodegenerative disorders. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339510791823790DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2924577PMC
August 2010
28 Reads

The Oncogenic Potential of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Treatment of Cancer: Directions for Future Research.

Curr Immunol Rev 2010 May;6(2):137-148

Department of Neurosurgery and Oncology, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD.

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) represent a promising new approach to the treatment of several diseases that are associated with dismal outcomes. These include myocardial damage, graft versus host disease, and possibly cancer. Although the potential therapeutic aspects of MSCs continue to be well-researched, the possible hazards of MSCs, and in particular their oncogenic capacity are poorly understood. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339510791111718DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2873198PMC
May 2010
8 Reads

Immunobiology of herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus infections of the fetus and newborn.

Curr Immunol Rev 2010 ;6(1):38-55

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Immunologic "immaturity" is often blamed for the increased susceptibility of newborn humans to infection, but the precise mechanisms and details of immunologic development remain somewhat obscure. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV) are two of the more common severe infectious agents of the fetal and newborn periods. HSV infection in the newborn most commonly occurs after exposure to the virus during delivery, and can lead to a spectrum of clinical disease ranging from isolated skin-eye-mucous membrane infection to severe disseminated multiorgan disease, often including encephalitis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339510790231833DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2866044PMC
January 2010
22 Reads
10 Citations

The Biology of Persistent Infection: Inflammation and Demyelination following Murine Coronavirus Infection of the Central Nervous System.

Curr Immunol Rev 2009 May;5(4):267-276

Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-3900 USA.

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an immune-mediated demyelinating disease of humans. Although causes of MS are enigmatic, underlying elements contributing to disease development include both genetic and environmental factors. Recent epidemiological evidence has pointed to viral infection as a trigger to initiating white matter damage in humans. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339509789504005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2782875PMC
May 2009
14 Reads

Beyond Stressed Self: Evidence for NKG2D Ligand Expression on Healthy Cells.

Curr Immunol Rev 2009 Feb;5(1):22-34

University of Cambridge, Department of Pathology, Cambridge Institute for Medical Research, Wellcome Trust/MRC Building, Cambridge, CB2 0XY, UK.

The activity of cytotoxic lymphocytes is regulated by the opposing function of stimulatory and inhibitory cell surface receptors. According to the now classical model of Natural Killer (NK) cell activity, the ligands for inhibitory receptors are constitutively expressed on healthy cells but can be lost on infection and on malignant cells. Loss of inhibitory checks will then allow activating signals to predominate, forming the basis of 'missing self recognition'. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339509787314369DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2713595PMC
February 2009
14 Reads

Host-Cell Survival and Death During Chlamydia Infection.

Curr Immunol Rev 2007 ;3(1):31-40

Institute for Medical Microbiology, Technische Universität München, D-81675 Munich, Germany.

Different Chlamydia trachomatis strains are responsible for prevalent bacterial sexually-transmitted disease and represent the leading cause of preventable blindness worldwide. Factors that predispose individuals to disease and mechanisms by which chlamydiae cause inflammation and tissue damage remain unclear. Results from recent studies indicate that prolonged survival and subsequent death of infected cells and their effect on immune effector cells during chlamydial infection may be important in determining the outcome. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339507779802179DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2562443PMC
January 2007
6 Reads

Leptin and Inflammation.

Curr Immunol Rev 2008 May;4(2):70-79

Department of Medicine, University of California Los Angeles, USA.

The past few years of research on leptin have provided important information on the link between metabolism and immune homeostasis. Adipocytes influence not only the endocrine system but also the immune response through several cytokine-like mediators known as adipokines, which include leptin. It is widely accepted that leptin can directly link nutritional status and pro-inflammatory T helper 1 immune responses, and that a decrease of leptin plasma concentration during food deprivation can lead to an impaired immune function. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.eurekaselect.com/openurl/content.php?genre=articl
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339508784325046DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2829991PMC
May 2008
6 Reads

Heterogeneity in the CD4 T Cell Compartment and the Variability of Neonatal Immune Responsiveness.

Authors:
Becky Adkins

Curr Immunol Rev 2007 Aug;3(3):151-159

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA.

Over the past decade, it has become clear that T cell immune responses in both murine and human neonates are very heterogeneous, running the gamut from poor or deviant responsiveness to mature, adult-like inflammatory function. How this variability arises is not well understood but there is now a great deal of information suggesting that differences in the T cell compartments in neonates vs adults play important roles. A number of cell types or processes are qualitatively or quantitatively different in the neonate. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339507781483496DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2613353PMC
August 2007
6 Reads

Initiation of the Immune Response by Extracellular Hsp72: Chaperokine Activity of Hsp72.

Authors:
Alexzander Asea

Curr Immunol Rev 2006 Aug;2(3):209-215

Division of Investigative Pathology, Scott & White Clinic and Texas A&M University System Health Science Center College of Medicine, 2401 South 31 Street, Temple, TX 76508, USA.

Heat shock proteins exert their beneficial effects via basically two modes of action depending on their relative location within the host. Intracellular heat shock proteins found within cells serve a cytoprotective role by chaperoning naïve, misfolded and/or denatured proteins in response to stressful stimuli by a process known as the stress response. However, stressful stimuli also induce the release of intracellular heat shock proteins into the extracellular milieu and circulation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1868403PMC
August 2006
6 Reads

Regulation of Apoptosis by Gram-Positive Bacteria: Mechanistic Diversity and Consequences for Immunity.

Curr Immunol Rev 2006 May;2(2):119-141

Department of Infectious Diseases, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105-2794, USA.

Apoptosis, or programmed cell death (PCD), is an important physiological mechanism, through which the human immune system regulates homeostasis and responds to diverse forms of cellular damage. PCD may also be involved in immune counteraction to microbial infection. Over the past decade, the amount of research on bacteria-induced PCD has grown tremendously, and the implications of this mechanism on immunity are being elucidated. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/157339506776843033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2600511PMC
May 2006
11 Reads

Interleukin-12: an update on its immunological activities, signaling and regulation of gene expression.

Curr Immunol Rev 2005 Jun;1(2):119-137

Interleukin-12 (IL-12) is a heterodimeric cytokine composed of the p35 and p40 subunits. It is produced by antigen-presenting cells and plays a critical role in host defense against intracellular microbial infection and control of malignancy via its ability to stimulate both innate and adaptive immune effector cells. The potency of IL-12 renders itself to stringent regulation of the timing, locality and magnitude of its production during an immune response. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2965603PMC
June 2005
9 Reads

Peripheral Tolerization of Effector and Memory T Cells: Implications for Autoimmunity and Tumor-Immunity.

Authors:
Adam J Adler

Curr Immunol Rev 2005 Jan;1(1):21-28

Center for Immunotherapy of Cancer and Infectious Diseases, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut 06030, USA.

Due to the random generation of T cell antigen receptors, a large fraction of developing T cells have the potential to recognize self-determinants. To prevent this self-reactive T cell repertoire from mediating autoimmunity, the immune system utilizes several mechanisms to induce tolerance to self. The majority of self-reactive T cells undergo negative selection (i. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2857346PMC
January 2005
7 Reads

Activation and Costimulation of Intestinal T Cells: Independent and Collaborative Involvement of CD43, OX40, and Ly-6C.

Curr Immunol Rev 2005 Jan;1(1):13-20

The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Department of Diagnostic Sciences, Dental Branch, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

T cells are present in large numbers in the epithelial lining of the small and large intestine of humans and mice. Those cells, referred to as intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs), are critical for maintaining an effective mucosal immune response against the onslaught of enteric infectious agents and intestinal neoplasia. However, because intestinal immunity must by necessity occur rapidly and efficiently, it is concomitantly important that the local intestinal immune response be curtailed so as not to result in conditions that lead to a destructive inflammatory environment as occurs in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2600475PMC
January 2005
6 Reads
  • Page 1 of 1