1,216 results match your criteria Critical Care Nursing Quarterly [Journal]


Prevention of Pressure Injury by Using Silicone Foam Dressings: Experience at a University Hospital in Hong Kong.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2019 Jan/Mar;42(1):117-126

Departments of Surgery (Ms Lee), Adult Intensive Care Unit (Messrs Lai and Chan), Neurosurgery (Ms Boo), Cardiothoracic Surgery (Ms Hui), and Orthopedic & Traumatology (Mr Kwong), Queen Mary Hospital, Pok Fu Lam, Hong Kong; and Department of Medicine, Tung Wah Hospital, Sheung Wan, Hong Kong (Ms Wan).

Pressure injury is a serious problem and is common in critical care units. Over the last decade, there is new evidence suggesting that the use of multilayered silicone foam dressing as preventive measures can decrease the incidence and prevalence rate of hospital-acquired pressure injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical efficacy of this dressing in reducing sacral and coccygeal pressure injury incidence rate as compared with standard preventive interventions in critical care settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000245DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Effect of Interventional Educational Programs on Intensive Care Nurses' Perception, Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice About Physical Restraints: A Pre-/Postclinical Trial.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2019 Jan/Mar;42(1):106-116

Student Research Committee (Mr Ahmadi), Clinical Care Research Center (Mr Bagheri-Saweh and Dr Valiee), Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Health Development (Dr Nouri), and Salahuddin Ayyubi Hospital (Mr Mohamadamini), Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran.

The article reports results of an educational program designed to modify negative attitudes of intensive care nurses regarding the use of physical restraints. Findings revealed that increased knowledge about appropriate utilization of various types of restraints positively impacted perceptions, attitudes, and patient care practices. Authors also explore restraint use in several countries and identify variations in use of restraining methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000244DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Case Study Investigation Decreases Burnout While Improving Interprofessional Teamwork, Nurse Satisfaction, and Patient Safety.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2019 Jan/Mar;42(1):96-105

Jacobs Medical Center Medical/Surgical Intensive Care Unit (Mss Hellyar and Yeaman and Drs Madani and Kerr), Intensive Care Unit (Ms O'Connor), and Education Development and Research (Dr Davidson), University of California San Diego Health.

Prevention of burnout is a national imperative, and blame-free investigations of clinical events are advocated. Reflective inquiry techniques are helpful in processing adverse events while minimizing blame. The purpose of this project was to develop an interprofessional peer review program (Case Study Investigation) to process emotions, improve teamwork, and optimize patient outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000243DOI Listing
December 2018
14 Reads

Effect of Intensive Care Unit Nurses' Empowerment Program on Ability in Visual Differential Diagnosis of Pressure Ulcer Classification.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2019 Jan/Mar;42(1):89-95

School of Nursing & Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran (Ms Okhovati and Dr Shariat); and School of Nursing & Midwifery, Nursing and Midwifery Care Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran (Dr Esmaeili).

Nurses play a vital role in preventing and detecting pressure ulcers within an intensive care unit. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of an empowerment program on nurses' ability to visually determine the stage of a pressure ulcer. This study was a nonrandomized clinical trial involving an intervention group and a control group. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000242DOI Listing
December 2018
5 Reads

Symptom Management and Hospital Readmission in Heart Failure Patients: A Qualitative Study From Portugal.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2019 Jan/Mar;42(1):81-88

Instituto de Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Porto, Portugal and Cardiology Unit/Heart Failure Intensive Care Unit, Centro Hospitalar e Universitário de Coimbra, Portugal (Ms Sousa); and Centro de Investigação Interdisciplinar em Saúde - Instituto Ciências da Saúde, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Porto, Portugal (Dr Santos).

This article reports a study aimed at identifying the factors that result in hospital readmissions for patients with heart failure. The high rates of readmission are often due to a lack of knowledge about symptoms and signs of disease progression, and these Portuguese nurses believed that readmissions could be decreased through disease management programs in which patients assumed a more active role in self-care. A study was designed to identify broad categories of problems that lead Portuguese patients with heart failure to be readmitted to hospital. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000241DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Measurement and Nonpharmacologic Management of Sleep Disturbance in the Intensive Care Units: A Literature Review.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2019 Jan/Mar;42(1):75-80

Princess Aisha Bint Al-Hussein College of Nursing & Health Sciences, Al-Hussein Bin Talal University, Maan, Jordan (Dr Bani Younis); Faculty of Nursing, University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan (Dr Hayajneh); and Philadelphia University, Amman, Jordan (Dr Batiha).

The general goal of this review is to summarize, clarify, and evaluate what is known about patients' sleep in the intensive care units (ICUs) in terms of sleep measurement and management. In addition, this review focuses on the gap in knowledge in this field. A review of online databases for relevant articles in the period between 2000 and 2017 was conducted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000240DOI Listing
December 2018
5 Reads

Lifestyle Modifications in Adults and Older Adults With Chronic Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD).

Crit Care Nurs Q 2019 Jan/Mar;42(1):64-74

NYU Langone Health, Tisch Hospital, New York (Mr Commisso) and NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, New York (Mr Lim).

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic disorder that causes the unwanted backflow of gastric contents into the esophagus, throat, and mouth. Gastroesophageal reflux disease affects roughly 20% of the US population. It is estimated that older adults experience GERD symptoms more commonly and with greater severity because of age-related physiologic changes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000239DOI Listing
December 2018
16 Reads

Teaching Critical Care Nursing Online for RNs.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2019 Jan/Mar;42(1):53-63

Departments of Nursing (Dr Warren) and Educational Studies (Dr Spiegel), University of Tennessee at Martin.

Registered nurses are choosing to further their educational careers by seeking a bachelor's of science degree online (RN-to-BSN). The impetus for choosing the online delivery method is related to the ability to sign into a Learning Management System during times that are advantageous to their hospital work schedules, family, and daily living activities. The RN-to-BSN online option degree requires a Critical Care/Advanced Health Care Course as part of their curriculum plan; therefore, the article presents an overall view of the critical care course, the theoretical underpinnings for progression to the online delivery method, and examples of a module required by the critical care course. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000238DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Horseshoe, Cockpit, and Dragonfly: Nurse Movement in Headwall Patient Rooms.

Authors:
D Kirk Hamilton

Crit Care Nurs Q 2019 Jan/Mar;42(1):47-52

College of Architecture, Texas A&M University, College Station.

An exploratory, qualitative study conducted on 6 units in 4 hospitals featured field observations of 20 experienced nurses during complete 12-hour day and night shifts, followed by semistructured participant interviews. All patient rooms featured conventional headwall-type life support systems in which the head of the bed is against the wall where multiple electrical, gas, and communication utilities are located. Critical care nurses displayed repetitive movement patterns around the patient and the bed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000237DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Spurious Laboratory Values in Patients With Leukocytosis.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2019 Jan/Mar;42(1):44-46

Emergency Department, Bellevue Hospital Center, NYU School of Medicine, New York (Mr Malek); and Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing, New York (Dr Chen).

Physiological derangements such as hypoxemia and hyperkalemia are medical emergencies that warrant prompt interventions to prevent further patient clinical deterioration. However, in patients with myeloproliferative diseases or malignancies that result in extreme leukocytosis, hypoxemia and hyperkalemia demonstrated in laboratory results could be deceiving due to in vitro reactions and may not reflect actual patient condition. Clinicians have to be familiar with these phenomena so as to not cause harm by treating these spurious laboratory values. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000236DOI Listing
December 2018
9 Reads

Clinical Education to Decrease Perceived Barriers to Delirium Screening in Adult Intensive Care Units.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2019 Jan/Mar;42(1):41-43

Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston.

Despite current advances in critical care medicine, delirium remains a frequent complication of an intensive care unit stay. The consequences can be severe and far reaching, including an increase in mortality, length of stay, and long-term cognitive sequelae. Frequently, delirium can be missed by clinicians who fail to complete a standardized delirium screening tool and, therefore, many cases go unrecognized and untreated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000235DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Nursing Considerations When Using Neuromuscular Blocking Agents to Assist With Intubation: A Review of Literature.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2019 Jan/Mar;42(1):30-40

Department of Baccalaureate Nursing, Indiana State University, Monroeville (Mr Blauvelt); and School of Nursing, Indiana State University, Terre Haute (Drs Burdick and Cannon).

The use of neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs) in acute care settings during intubation is vitally important. The NMBAs increase first pass success rates significantly while protecting patients from gastric aspiration, tracheal injury, and death. During emergent intubations, succinylcholine and rocuronium are commonly used, but each comes with specific risks and individualized interventions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000234DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Recognition, Assessment, and Pharmacotherapeutic Treatment of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome in the Intensive Care Unit.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2019 Jan/Mar;42(1):12-29

Department of Pharmacy Services, UC Health-University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Ohio (Drs Foertsch, Winter, Droege, and Ernst); University of Cincinnati James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy, Ohio (Drs Foertsch, Winter, Rhoades, Martin, Droege, and Ernst); Department of Pharmacy Services, The Christ Hospital Health Network, Cincinnati, Ohio (Dr Rhoades); and Department of Pharmacy Services, St Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood, Kentucky (Dr Martin).

Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is a complex neurologic disorder that develops after an acute reduction in or cessation of chronic alcohol consumption that alters neurotransmitter conduction. The incidence of AWS in the intensive care unit varies, but has been associated with poor outcomes. This is primarily driven by downregulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) leading to autonomic excitability and psychomotor agitation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000233DOI Listing
December 2018
4 Reads

Pharmacologic Approach to Management of Clostridium difficile Infection.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2019 Jan/Mar;42(1):2-11

Department of Pharmacy, St Elizabeth Healthcare, Edgewood, Kentucky (Drs Martin, Vincent, Gillian, Moore, and Ratermann); Department of Pharmacy Services, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, and Division of Pharmacy Practice and Administrative Sciences, James L. Winkle College of Pharmacy, Cincinnati, Ohio (Dr Droege).

Clostridium difficile is a gram-positive, anaerobic, spore-forming bacterium that is the leading cause of nosocomial infections in hospitals in the United States. Critically ill patients are at high risk for C. difficile infection (CDI) and face potentially detrimental effects, including prolonged hospitalization, risk of recurrent disease, complicated surgery, and death. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000232DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Foreword.

Authors:
Carmen Warner

Crit Care Nurs Q 2019 Jan/Mar;42(1)

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000231DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Emergency Airway Response Team (EART) Documentation: Criteria, Feasibility, and Usability.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Oct/Dec;41(4):426-438

Departments of Nursing (Dr Crimlisk) and Otolaryngology (Mr Krisciunas), Boston University Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; MGH Institute of Health Professions, Boston, Massachusetts (Dr Sipe); Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (Mr Winter); and Departments of Anesthesiology (Dr Gonzalez) and Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (Dr Grillone), Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.

Patients in an acute care hospital who experience a difficult airway event outside the operating room need a specialized emergency airway response team (EART) immediately. This designated team manages catastrophic airway events using advanced airway techniques as well as surgical intervention. Nurses respond as part of this team. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002727-201810000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000230DOI Listing
November 2018
8 Reads

Transport of Critically Ill Cardiovascular Patients.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Oct/Dec;41(4):413-425

Sulpizio Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit, University of California San Diego Medical Center (Ms Ignatyeva); and Department of Anesthesiology UC San Diego Medical Center (Drs Nguyen and Barak), Peri-Operative Medicine and Anesthesiology UCSD Medical Center (Dr Schmidt), UCSD-School, volunteer CVC/ICU (Mr Agarwal), and University of California San Diego Health (Dr Davidson), San Diego, California.

Intra-hospital transport (IHT) of intensive care unit (ICU) patients is associated with a 30% to 60% incidence of adverse events (AEs). This prospective observational study collected data from 200 patient transports from a 24-bed cardiovascular intensive care unit (ICU) between July 2017 and December 2017. Phase 1 of the study focused on identifying and correcting deficiencies in nurses' knowledge regarding IHT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000229DOI Listing
November 2018
13 Reads

Operational Excellence in the CTSICU.

Authors:
Kim Bartolowits

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Oct/Dec;41(4):407-412

Allegheny Health Network, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Operational Excellence is about allowing the system to put the correct processes in place to empower all staff members to make change. These processes will evolve into continuous quality improvement, allowing the best outcomes to be achieved. At Allegheny Health Network, Pittsburgh, the right structures are in place to incorporate continuous process improvement by using an Operational Excellence board. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000228DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Blood Glucose Management for Reducing Cardiac Surgery Infections.

Authors:
Susan Leininger

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Oct/Dec;41(4):399-406

Allegheny General Hospital, Allegheny Health Network, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Stress-induced hyperglycemia can occur after cardiac surgery unless the patient is carefully managed. Postoperative hyperglycemia is typically associated with surgical site infections and mediastinitis, resulting in a longer length of stay and escalated costs for the hospitalization. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists recommend keeping the intraoperative and postoperative blood glucose levels below 180 mg/dL to avoid postoperative infections. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000227DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

ECMO: Nursing Care of Adult Patients on ECMO.

Authors:
Alex Calhoun

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Oct/Dec;41(4):394-398

Allegheny Health Network, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is used for both cardiac and pulmonary failure when conventional measures are no longer substantial in supporting life. ECMO is not a permanent device. It is used as a temporary measure to allow the lungs and heart, as well as other organs to recover. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000226DOI Listing
November 2018
3 Reads

Learning to Live Again: The Role of Education in Heart Transplant Recipients.

Authors:
Kari Mohney

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Oct/Dec;41(4):389-393

Allegheny Health Network, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The heart transplant nurse coordinator plays a key role in educating and supporting the postoperative heart transplant patient to achieve the best outcomes for a long and healthy life. The time leading up to transplantation, wait-list candidates will hear vital information regarding life after they have received their life-sustaining heart transplant. Unfortunately, at times, the information is minimally retained. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000225DOI Listing
November 2018
1 Read

Common Postoperative Heart Transplant Complications.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Oct/Dec;41(4):383-388

Allegheny Health Network, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Heart failure or congestive heart failure remains a major public health concern on the global scale. End-stage heart failure is a severe disease where the heart is unable to pump enough oxygen and nutrients to other tissues and organs of the body. When the lines of treatment of heart failure such as lifestyle adjustments, medical management, and device therapy fail, a patient may be deemed a candidate for heart transplantation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000224DOI Listing
November 2018
24 Reads

The Use of Left Ventricular Assist Devices in End-Stage Heart Failure.

Authors:
Ashley Blair

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Oct/Dec;41(4):376-382

Allegheny Health Network, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Heart failure is one of the most common diagnoses in patients requiring multiple hospitalizations. The use of mechanical circulatory support (both temporary and durable), especially left ventricular assist devices (LVADs), in this patient population has evolved over the last decade. There are thousands of durable LVADs implanted in the United States annually as bridge to transplantation, destination therapy, or bridge to recovery. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002727-201810000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000223DOI Listing
November 2018
16 Reads

Managing Patients With Heart Failure All the Way to a Heart Transplant.

Authors:
Rebecca Pirozzi

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Oct/Dec;41(4):369-375

Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Heart transplantation is a viable option for many patients with end-stage heart failure. An extensive evaluation by specialists and in-depth testing are done to determine the risks of advanced therapies including the left ventricular assist device, since most patients need one to safely make it to transplant. A multidisciplinary approach is the most effective approach to successfully progressing a patient to transplant safely and helping him or her prosper after transplant. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000222DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Evolution of a TAVR Program.

Authors:
Diane Berger

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Oct/Dec;41(4):360-368

Allegheny Health Network, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) is quickly becoming the new standard of care for high- and intermediate-risk patients requiring aortic valve replacement. From May 2012 through April 2018, 1850 patients were evaluated for severe aortic valve stenosis, and over 900 TAVR procedures were performed at the author's institution, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh. Efficient screening processes, comprehensive review of data, and the less invasive delivery of care have made the TAVR program a viable and sustainable treatment option for patients with severe symptomatic aortic valve stenosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000221DOI Listing
November 2018
10 Reads

Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting: A Clinical Overview.

Authors:
Laurie Weatherby

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Oct/Dec;41(4):356-359

Allegheny Health System, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Coronary artery bypass grafting remains a viable and successful option for treating high-grade coronary artery stenosis. The postoperative recovery is individual for each patient, but when following long-standing guidelines and physician orders, outcomes are generally positive. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000220DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

When Transfusion Is Not an Option-the Challenges and Rewards.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Oct/Dec;41(4):347-355

Patient Blood Management, Allegheny Health Network, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Ms Schwab); and Allegheny Health Network, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Mss Kosoglow and Philp and Dr Suydam).

The decision to develop a formal Bloodless Medicine Program to attract and effectively care for patients who decline blood transfusion was made in 1998 by clinical and administrative leaders at our flagship hospital, Allegheny General Hospital, part of the Allegheny Health Network. The Bloodless Medicine Program has more than 20 years of experience in caring for this sometimes challenging patient population and with this experience has provided extensive insight into best practices related to effective, safe, patient blood management. Patient blood management is a patient-centered, evidence-based approach to transfusion that seeks to provide the right care, in the right setting, in the right way, every time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000219DOI Listing
November 2018
15 Reads

Foreword.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Oct/Dec;41(4):345-346

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000218DOI Listing
August 2018
1 Read

Multifactorial Strategies for Sustaining Safe Patient Handling and Mobility.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Jul/Sep;41(3):340-344

Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor.

Reduction in nursing staff injuries has occurred with the use of an evidence-based approach to safe patient handling and mobility. Parts of the evidence-based practice initiative include having the appropriate equipment, such as mechanical patient-lifting devices, a no-lift policy, and the use of peer coaches. The combination of the implementation of a culture of safety can sustain evidence-based, safe patient-handling practices that reduce patient-handling injuries. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002727-201807000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000213DOI Listing
July 2018
18 Reads

A Multidisciplinary Approach to Equipment Use in Pediatric Patient Mobilization.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Jul/Sep;41(3):330-339

Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, C.S. Mott Children's and Von Voigtlander Women's Hospital, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor.

Research has shown that patients who are mechanically ventilated or immobile for greater than 7 days are at increased risk for deconditioning and muscle atrophy. Immobility impacts length of stay as well as patients' ability to return to their prior level of function. As part of the safe patient-handling initiative created at Michigan Medicine, a special team of nurses and therapists was assembled to adapt an adult mobility framework for the pediatric population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000211DOI Listing
July 2018
4 Reads

Development of Medical Criteria for Mobilizing a Pediatric Patient in the PICU.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Jul/Sep;41(3):323-329

Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases (Ms Van Damme and Dr Flori), and Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Department of Nursing (Mss Van Damme and Owens), Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor.

Physical activity in acute and critical care has been recognized as a successful method of improving patient outcomes. Challenges lie, however, in mobilizing pediatric critically ill patients and establishing consensus among health care providers about the safety and feasibility. The challenge of mobilizing pediatric patients is balancing developmental level, functional ability, and level of acuity; therefore, a mobility guideline was developed for use in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002727-201807000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000212DOI Listing
July 2018
18 Reads

Pediatric Mobility: The Development of Standard Assessments and Interventions for Pediatric Patients for Safe Patient Handling and Mobility.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Jul/Sep;41(3):314-322

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor (Ms Owens); and Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, C. S. Mott Children's and Von Voigtlander Women's Hospitals, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor (Mr Tapley).

Due to improvements in biomedical sciences and clinical expertise, childhood mortality has decreased. Pediatric patients experience similar complications from inactivity as adults, such as hospital-acquired conditions and delirium. Interdisciplinary collaboration is imperative to improve functional and developmental outcomes of children who suffers from either a chronic illnesses or an acute illness that results in a prolonged hospitalization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000210DOI Listing
July 2018
5 Reads

"Add It to the Parking Lot": Safe Patient Handling and Mobility in the Emergency Department.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Jul/Sep;41(3):302-311

Adult Emergency Services, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor.

Nelson and Baptiste noted that a standard approach to safe patient handling and mobility (SPHM) cannot be generalized to all patient care areas because the unique, high-risk tasks of each area require specific intervention. Matching the SPHM program to the setting, tasks, and roles is important in developing a program that will prevent harm. However, there is little evidence related to the use of SPHM programs in nontraditional care environments, such as emergency departments (EDs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000216DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

Moving the Bariatric Patient.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Jul/Sep;41(3):297-301

University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor.

The health care team must be able to mobilize bariatric patients efficiently and safely. It is challenging to find the proper equipment of sufficient variety to meet the need. Patients can feel self-conscious when staff are struggling to provide care, and staff can be injured when trying to mobilize patients without the proper equipment. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002727-201807000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000209DOI Listing
July 2018
11 Reads

Instituting a Standardized Mobility Aid in the Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Jul/Sep;41(3):289-296

Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit, Samuel and Jean Frankel Cardiovascular Center, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor.

The complexity of ambulation increases when patients are challenged with acute illness in the cardiovascular intensive care unit (CVICU). The difficulties in this setting entailed limited ancillary assistance, proper equipment, and complex medical devices. It was imperative that mobility was made a priority in the CVICU despite multiple barriers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000208DOI Listing
July 2018
25 Reads

A Nurse-Led Mobility Program on an Acute Rehabilitation Unit.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Jul/Sep;41(3):282-288

University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor.

Rehabilitation assists patients with return to baseline activities of daily living after catastrophic events or long hospitalizations. In an effort to increase mobility episodes in the rehabilitation patient, a nurse-led mobility program was suggested. This allows the rehabilitation nurse to participate in the improvement of mobility for rehabilitation patients by mobilizing the patients safely during hours in which physical therapy is not available. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000207DOI Listing
July 2018
2 Reads

Incorporating Safe Patient-Handling Techniques to Mobilize Our Most Complex Patients on Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Jul/Sep;41(3):272-281

Surgical Intensive Care Unit, University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor.

Historically, patients supported on extra corporeal membrane oxygenation were thought to be too unstable to engage in early mobility but are at increased risk for deconditioning from prolonged immobilization due to the nature of illness, numerous cannulas, equipment, and hemodynamic and respiratory instability along with heavy sedation/analgesia or paralysis. This article will discuss the specific considerations that should be employed to keep the patient and the staff safe while providing mobility to patients on extra corporeal membrane oxygenation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000206DOI Listing
July 2018
7 Reads

Reducing Intensive Care Unit Staff Musculoskeletal Injuries With Implementation of a Safe Patient Handling and Mobility Program.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Jul/Sep;41(3):264-271

Critical Care Medicine Unit, Michigan Medicine, Ann Arbor.

The purpose of this safety initiative was to reduce work-related injuries through the implementation of a safe patient handling and mobility (SPHM) program in a medical intensive care unit. An SPHM program was implemented on a critical care medicine unit in February of 2017. Nursing and assistive personnel completed education via hands-on and online educational modules regarding SPHM equipment and techniques and an SPHM policy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000205DOI Listing
July 2018
9 Reads

Safe Patient Handling and Mobility: Development and Implementation of a Large-Scale Education Program.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Jul/Sep;41(3):253-263

Professional Development and Education, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI.

This article addresses the development, implementation, and evaluation of an education program for safe patient handling and mobility at a large academic medical center. The ultimate goal of the program was to increase safety during patient mobility/transfer and reduce nursing staff injury from lifting/pulling. This comprehensive program was designed on the basis of the principles of prework, application, and support at the point of care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000204DOI Listing
July 2018
5 Reads

Integrating a Standardized Mobility Program and Safe Patient Handling.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Jul/Sep;41(3):240-252

Surgical Intensive Care Unit/Rapid Response Team (Ms Dickinson), Trauma Burn Intensive Care Unit (Ms Taylor), and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Wound and Ostomy Team (Ms Anton), University of Michigan Hospital and Health Systems, Ann Arbor.

Early, routine mobilization of critically ill patients is safe and reduces hospital length of stay, shortens the duration of mechanical ventilation, and improves muscle strength and functional independence. At the University of Michigan, we have turned the tides by creating a structured process to get our patients moving while keeping them and our staff safe through the use of a standardized mobility protocol that incorporates the components of safe patient handling. Our protocol is simple and can easily be adapted for all patient populations by simply modifying some of the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000202DOI Listing
July 2018
3 Reads

Changing the Perceptions of a Culture of Safety for the Patient and the Caregiver: Integrating Improvement Initiatives to Create Sustainable Change.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Jul/Sep;41(3):226-239

University of Nebraska, Lincoln (Dr Black); Safe Patient Handling and Mobility, OhioHealth, Columbus (Ms Salsbury); and Advancing Nursing LLC, Northville, Michigan (Ms Vollman).

Evidence indicates that chances for a successful patient mobility program, prevention of pressure injury and falls, and safe patient handling are enhanced when an organization possesses an appropriate culture for safety. Frequently, these improvement initiatives are managed within silos often creating a solution for one and a problem for the others. A model of prevention integrating early patient mobility, preventing pressure injuries and falls while ensuring caregiver safety, is introduced. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002727-201807000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000203DOI Listing
July 2018
13 Reads

The Stay S.A.F.E. Strategy for Managing Interruptions Reduces Distraction Time in the Simulated Clinical Setting.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Apr/Jun;41(2):215-223

College of Nursing (Dr E. Henneman and Ms Scott), and Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, College of Engineering (Drs Marquard and Nicholas and Mss Martinez and DeSotto), University of Massachusetts Amherst; Department of Nursing, Westfield State University, Westfield, Massachusetts (Ms Scott); and Department of Emergency Medicine, Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, Massachusetts (Drs Soares and P. Henneman).

Interruptions occurring during the delivery of health care are frequent and create a serious threat to patient safety. It is important to test strategies directed at decreasing the negative effects of interruptions. The purpose of this pilot study was to test the Stay S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000201DOI Listing
May 2018
8 Reads

Perceptual Effects of Physical and Visual Accessibilities in Intensive Care Units: A Quasi-experimental Study.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Apr/Jun;41(2):197-214

Department of Architecture, School of Architecture & Design, University of Kansas, Lawrence (Dr Rashid); Department of Architecture, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology, Dhaka, Bangladesh (Dr Khan); and JMD Architects, Inc, Greenville, South Carolina (Ms Jones).

This article reports the findings of a 2-phase quasi-experimental study looking at the perceptual effects of physical and visual accessibilities on clinical staff in intensive care units (ICUs). In a previous CCNQ article by Rashid et al, the first phase of the study was reported comparing, among other things, physical and visual accessibilities and their associations with staff perception in 2 ICUs with the open-plan and racetrack-type layouts. The data for that phase of the study were collected in December 2014, which included the data on physical and visual accessibilities collected using the spatial analysis techniques of Space Syntax, and the data on staff perception collected using a questionnaire survey. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002727-201804000-0001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000200DOI Listing
May 2018
6 Reads

Stress Reduction in Postcardiac Surgery Family Members: Implementation of a Postcardiac Surgery Tool Kit.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Apr/Jun;41(2):186-196

UPMC Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Center for Thoracic Aortic Disease, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Dr Breisinger); Robert Morris University, Moon, Pennsylvania (Dr Macci Bires); and Saint Vincent College, Latrobe, Pennsylvania (Dr Cline).

The intensive care unit (ICU) can be a place of stress, anxiety, and emotional instability for both patients and families. Medical and nursing care during this acute time is patient focused, and family members are often left in the dark. Unintentional exclusion from information results in high levels of stress, anxiety, and uncertainty for families. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000198DOI Listing
May 2018
3 Reads

Incorporation of Daily Goals in Daily Care Planning Does Not Shorten Length of Stay in the Intensive Care Unit.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Apr/Jun;41(2):178-185

Departments of Intensive Care (Drs Binnekade, Horn, van der Sloot, Schultz, and Vroom), Epidemiology and Biostatistics (Dr Dijkgraaf), and Medical Informatics (Dr Brinkman), Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, the Netherlands; Departments of Intensive Care (Drs Brunsveld-Reinders, Arbous, and Balzereit) and Clinical Epidemiology (Dr Arbous), Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands; and NICE Foundation, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (Drs Arbous and Brinkman).

A strategy of defining and checking explicitly formulated patient-specific treatments targets or "daily goals" in the intensive care unit has been associated with improved communication. We investigated the effect of incorporation of daily goals into daily care planning on length of stay in the intensive care unit. Furthermore, the type of daily goals and deviations from daily goals in daily care with or without documented reason were evaluated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000197DOI Listing
May 2018
7 Reads

Quality of Sleep Among Intensive Care Unit Patients: A Literature Review.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Apr/Jun;41(2):170-177

Princess Aisha Bint Al-Hussein College of Nursing & Health Sciences, Al-Hussein Bin Talal University, Ma'an, Jordan (Dr Bani Younis); and Faculty of Nursing, The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan (Dr Hayajneh).

Investigating sleep disturbances among intensive care unit (ICU) patients and its serious consequences is considered a crucial issue for nurses. The need of sleep increases during hospitalization time to preserve energy for the healing process. Previous studies have demonstrated that sleep disturbance is one of the most common complaints of patients in the ICUs, with a prevalence of more than 50%. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000196DOI Listing
May 2018
3 Reads

Effects of Nurse-Led Intervention on Patients' Anxiety and Sleep Before Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Apr/Jun;41(2):161-169

School of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran (Mss Mousavi Malek and Zakerimoghadam); School of Nursing and Midwifery, Nursing and Midwifery Care Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran (Ms Esmaeili); and Department of Biostatics, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran (Mr Kazemnejad).

The aim of this study to examine the effects of supportive-educational nurse-led intervention on the patients' anxiety and sleep before the coronary artery bypass grafting.The current clinical trial recruited 160 patients (N = 160) waiting for the coronary artery bypass grafting by random block sampling and divided them into two 80-people experimental and control groups. Spielberger's State Anxiety Inventory was completed on the first day. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000195DOI Listing
May 2018
5 Reads

Evaluation of an Educational Video: What to Expect on the First Day of Chemotherapy.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Apr/Jun;41(2):142-160

Allegheny Health Network Cancer Institute, Kittanning, Pennsylvania (Dr Koss); Department of Health Sciences, Robert Morris University, Moon Township, Pennsylvania (Dr Macci Bires and Ms Mason) and Alex G. Mckenna School of Business, Economics and Government, St. Vincent College, Latrobe, Pennsylvania (Dr Cline).

According to the American Cancer Society, more than 1.6 million new cases of cancer were diagnosed in 2015. Anxiety levels in individuals diagnosed with cancer are high, with the highest levels occurring at the time of diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000194DOI Listing
May 2018
4 Reads

Effects of Multimethod Intervention on Bedside Report Compliance and Patient Satisfaction.

Crit Care Nurs Q 2018 Apr/Jun;41(2):129-141

School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Robert Morris University, Moon Township, Pennsylvania (Drs Faloon and Hampe); and Alex G. McKenna School of Business, Saint Vincent College, Latrobe, Pennsylvania (Dr Cline).

Miscommunication is a large contributing factor to hospital sentinel events. Communication with nurses is a component of the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey. The HCAHPS survey not only assesses patient satisfaction but also impacts how hospitals are reimbursed. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00002727-201804000-0000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CNQ.0000000000000191DOI Listing
May 2018
6 Reads