1,655 results match your criteria Critical Care Nursing Clinics of North America[Journal]


Human Factors and Technology in the ICU.

Authors:
Shu-Fen Wung

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Jun 7;30(2):xi-xii. Epub 2018 Apr 7.

Biobehavioral Health Science Division, The University of Arizona College of Nursing, 1305 N Martin Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721-0203, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.03.001DOI Listing
June 2018
13 Reads

Improving Cardiovascular Health.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2019 Mar;31(1):ix-x

LSU Health New Orleans School of Nursing, 1900 Gravier Street, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.12.001DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Acute and Chronic Hypertension: What Clinicians Need to Know for Diagnosis and Management.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2019 Mar;31(1):97-108

PCFNP Concentration, LSU Health New Orleans School of Nursing, 1900 Gravier Street, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

Hypertension is the most common primary diagnosis in the United States. Multiple sequelae of disease states are attributable to hypertension. Minimal to modest improvements in blood pressure can result in improved cardiovascular-related health outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.11.008DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Hospital Discharge Teaching for Patients with Peripheral Vascular Disease.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2019 Mar 22;31(1):91-95. Epub 2018 Dec 22.

Louisiana State University Health New Orleans, School of Nursing, 1900 Gravier Street, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

Peripheral disease affects both arteries and veins and encompasses pathophysiologic conditions that affect arterial, venous, and lymphatic circulations. This article discusses disorders of peripheral vascular disease (PVD) that affect the lower extremity. PVD is an obstruction in the arteries known as arteriosclerosis obliterans, a condition that manifests from insufficient tissue perfusion that results in hardening of the arteries. Read More

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Atrial Fibrillation.

Authors:
Monique Young

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2019 Mar;31(1):77-90

Louisiana Heart Center, 901 East Gause Boulevard, Slidell, LA 70458, USA. Electronic address:

The purpose of this article is to educate staff nurses and advanced practice nurses the importance of identifying, diagnosing, and making appropriate clinical decisions when treating patients with atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is a supraventricular arrhythmia characterized by uncoordinated, chaotic electrical activity and deterioration of proper atrial mechanical function, with an irregular ventricular response. Poorly controlled or undiagnosed atrial fibrillation increases the risk of mortality and may decrease quality of life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.11.005DOI Listing
March 2019
9 Reads

Nursing Management for Patients Postoperative Cardiac Implantable Electronic Device Placement.

Authors:
Leanne H Fowler

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2019 Mar 22;31(1):65-76. Epub 2018 Dec 22.

LSU Health New Orleans School of Nursing, 1900 Gravier Street, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. Electronic address:

As cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs) continue to evolve and patients continue to live longer, the use of these devices increases. CIEDs include permanent pacemakers, implanted cardioverter-defibrillators, and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices. Over the last 2 decades, the functionality of these devices has increased and can be complex. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.11.007DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Non-ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction: Medical and Surgical Interventions.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2019 Mar 21;31(1):49-64. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Department of Nursing, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, College of Nursing and Allied Health Professions, 411 East Street Mary Boulevard, Lafayette, LA 70504, USA.

Coronary artery disease is the leading cause of death in both men and women in the United States. Annually, 790,000 Americans will experience a myocardial infarction. Early recognition and appropriate management of myocardial infarction are imperative to improving patient outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.10.002DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Cardiovascular Disease Management in Minority Women: Special Considerations.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2019 Mar;31(1):39-47

School of Nursing, LSU Health New Orleans, 1900 Gravier Street, Office 331, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

There is a need to educate minority women on prevention and management of risk factors that lead to cardiovascular disease (CVD0. Black women have the highest prevalence of CVD. Hypertension, diabetes, overweight/obesity, smoking, and hyperlipidemia have shown some correlation to the prevalence of CVD among minorities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.11.004DOI Listing
March 2019
16 Reads

Comprehensive Nursing Management for Valvular Disease.

Authors:
Susan Lee

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2019 Mar 22;31(1):31-38. Epub 2018 Dec 22.

School of Nursing, Louisiana State University Health, 1900 Gravier Street, Room 328, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. Electronic address:

Valvular heart dysfunction (VHD) affects up to 7% of adults up to age 44 year, whereas up to 13% of individuals older than 75 years are affected. The broad term of valvular heart disease includes dysfunction of one or more of the 4 heart valves, including the pulmonary valve, tricuspid valve, mitral valve, or aortic valve. Specifically the more frequent anomalies, implication, assessment, and treatment that will be described more extensively include aortic regurgitation, aortic stenosis, mitral regurgitation, or tricuspid regurgitation. Read More

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March 2019
11 Reads

Cardiovascular Risk Reduction: A Pharmacotherapeutic Update for Antiplatelet Medications.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2019 Mar 21;31(1):15-30. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, William Carey University School of Pharmacy, 19640 MS-67, Biloxi, MS 39532, USA.

This update presents evidence for new antiplatelet therapies including modified P2Y inhibitors and a new class of thromboxane antagonists. Discussed are emerging data on established antihyperlipidemic medications that support an additional antiplatelet effect. Current information about the effectiveness of several bleeding reversal agents is discussed, and the concept of personalized antiplatelet therapy, wherein selection of an antiplatelet therapy is based on genetic factors or laboratory testing that predict response to therapy and risk of adverse effects. Read More

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March 2019
2 Reads

Culinary Medicine: Patient Education for Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2019 Mar 24;31(1):109-123. Epub 2018 Dec 24.

Graduate Program, School of Nursing, LSU Health Sciences Center - New Orleans, 1900 Gravier, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. Electronic address:

There is a well-established body of evidence that connects particular dietary lifestyle choices to good health. Despite this knowledge, rates of obesity, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic disease continue to rise. Culinary medicine uses what is known about the pharmacologic properties of food to treat, manage, and prevent disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.11.009DOI Listing
March 2019
8 Reads

Evidence-based Strategies for Advanced Heart Failure.

Authors:
Sabrina M White

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2019 Mar;31(1):1-13

Department of Cardiology, East Jefferson General Hospital, 4224 Houma Boulevard, Suite 530, Metairie, LA 70006, USA. Electronic address:

Heart failure is a complex disease that interacts with other organ systems, such as the lungs, kidneys, and the liver, in a complex manner. The stages of heart failure often define the acuity and onset of disease symptoms and progression as well as treatment measures, in addition to the patient's functional class. As the neurohormonal and compensatory mechanisms become resistant and fail guideline-directed medical therapy, more advanced therapies are required. Read More

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Neonatal Nursing: Clinical Concepts and Practice Implications.

Authors:
Beth C Diehl

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec;30(4):xv-xvi

The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Maryland Regional Neonatal Transport Program, Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children's Center, 1800 Orleans Street, Room 8547, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. Electronic address:

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December 2018
28 Reads

Erratum.

Authors:

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec;30(4):xiii

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December 2018
2 Reads

Neonatal Transport: Current Trends and Practices.

Authors:
Beth C Diehl

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec;30(4):597-606

Maryland Regional Neonatal Transport Program, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Charlotte Bloomberg Children's Center, Room 8547, 1800 Orleans Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. Electronic address:

Since the inception of organized neonatal transport in the 1940s, advances in clinical care and technology have made the neonatal intensive care unit even more mobile in terms of care delivery. There currently exists an emphasis on quality metrics and simulation-based training for transport team members to achieve high levels of individual and team competence. Emerging therapies such as active cooling for neuroprotective hypothermia and high-frequency ventilation provide evidence-based care in the transport environment to enhance clinical outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.07.012DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome: An Uncontrollable Epidemic.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec;30(4):585-596

Department of Nursing, Governors State University, 1 University Parkway, University Park, IL 60484, USA.

There is an uncontrollable epidemic of drug abuse, with the misuse of opioids the most alarming. Along with the increase in opioid abuse, there exists a concomitant upsurge in the number of neonates experiencing neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) due to the effects of the mother's withdrawal from the drug. Neonates experiencing NAS exhibit various nervous system, gastrointestinal, and respiratory untoward symptoms. Read More

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December 2018
26 Reads

Neuroprotective Care of Extremely Preterm Infants in the First 72 Hours After Birth.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec;30(4):563-583

Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Loma Linda University Children's Hospital, 11175 Campus Street, CP 11121 Loma Linda, CA 92354, USA; Loma Linda University Medical Center-Murrieta, 28062 Baxtor Road, Murrieta, CA 92563, USA.

Birth at extremely low gestational ages presents a significant threat to infants' survival, health, development, and future well-being. After birth, a critical period of brain development must continue outside the womb. Neuro-supportive and neuroprotective family centered developmental care for and standardized care practices for extremely preterm infants have been shown to improve outcomes. Read More

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December 2018
22 Reads

Neonatal Pain: Perceptions and Current Practice.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec;30(4):549-561

Center for Advancement in Managing Pain, School of Nursing, University of Connecticut, 231 Glenbrook Road, Unit 4026, Storrs, CT 06269, USA. Electronic address:

Neonates may experience more than 300 painful procedures throughout their hospitalizations. Prior to 1980, there was a longstanding misconception that neonates do not experience pain. Current studies demonstrate that not only do neonates experience pain but also, due to their immature nervous systems, they are hypersensitive to painful stimuli. Read More

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December 2018
22 Reads

Neonatal Resuscitation: Neonatal Resuscitation Program 7th Edition Practice Integration.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec;30(4):533-547

Positive Pressure, PLLC, Tacoma, WA 98405, USA. Electronic address:

The Neonatal Resuscitation Program meets the education and training needs of health care professionals in the United States who manage newborns in hospitals. The Neonatal Resuscitation Program 7th edition materials were required for use on January 1, 2017. The Neonatal Resuscitation Program focuses on optimal resuscitation readiness and effective communication. Read More

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December 2018
15 Reads

Modes of Neonatal Ventilation: Breathe Deeply!

Authors:
Shawn Hughes

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec;30(4):523-531

NICU Respiratory Care Services, Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children's Center, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Johns Hopkins Hospital, 8th Floor, 1800 Orleans Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA. Electronic address:

The art and science of neonatal ventilation continue to evolve with advances in technology and as a result of evidenced based research. Although some historically administered therapies remain such as nasal continuous positive airway pressure, newer therapies have emerged in the neonatal intensive care unit such as pressure regulated volume control and neurally adjusted ventilatory assist. The challenge for clinicians continues to be which mode will support the patient's medical diagnosis with minimal barotrauma or lung injury. Read More

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December 2018
11 Reads

Neonatal Encephalopathy: Current Management and Future Trends.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec;30(4):509-521

Overland Park Regional Medical Center, NICU, 10500 Quivira Road, Overland Park, KS 66215, USA. Electronic address:

It is well-documented in the literature that infants who suffer from hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy are at high risk for neurologic sequelae or even death. With the addition of therapeutic hypothermia into the treatment regimen for neonatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, newborns afflicted with hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy were given the opportunity for a better outcome. Questions linger as to the most optimal treatment strategy of therapeutic hypothermia for these newborns. Read More

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December 2018
3 Reads

Fetal Surgery and Delayed Cord Clamping: Neonatal Implications.

Authors:
Karen M Frank

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec 16;30(4):499-507. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Department of Nursing, Towson University, LI 322, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252, USA. Electronic address:

Advances made in the last several decades in the care of the fetus and newborn have had a significant impact on morbidity and mortality. Delayed umbilical cord clamping in the preterm newborn results in fewer transfusions for anemia, decreased intraventricular hemorrhage, and decreased necrotizing enterocolitis. Because of advances made in fetal ultrasound diagnosis and technological advances, fetal surgeries to treat congenital diaphragmatic hernia, myelomeningocele, twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, fetal lower urinary tract obstructions, amniotic band syndrome, and congenital cystic adenoid malformation or congenital pulmonary airway malformations have improved the quality of life and survival for these patients. Read More

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December 2018
15 Reads

Big Data in Neonatal Health Care: Big Reach, Big Reward?

Authors:
Lynn E Bayne

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec 16;30(4):481-497. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Christiana Care Health System, 4755 Ogletown-Stanton Road, Newark, DE 19716, USA; Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children, 1600 Rockland Road, Wilmington, DE 19803, USA. Electronic address:

Analog-to-digital data conversion has created massive amounts of historical and real-time health care data. Costs associated with neonatal health issues are high. Big data use in the neonatal intensive care unit has the potential to facilitate earlier detection of clinical deterioration, expedite application of efficient clinical decision-making algorithms based on real-time and historical data mining, and yield significant cost-savings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.07.005DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Neonatal Hypoglycemia: Is There a Sweet Spot?

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec;30(4):467-480

The S.T.A.B.L.E. Program, 3070 Rasmussen Road, Suite 120, Park City, UT 84098, USA; Primary Children's Hospital, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, 100 Mario Capecchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84113, USA.

Hypoglycemia is one of the most common neonatal problems. Despite increasing evidence that hypoglycemia is linked to neurologic impairment, knowledge regarding the specific value or duration of hypoglycemia that results in injury to the brain remains unclear. Current published statements/guidelines focused on preventing clinically significant hypoglycemia are conflicting and continue to be based on low evidence. Read More

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December 2018
20 Reads

Standardized Feeding Protocols to Reduce Risk of Necrotizing Enterocolitis in Fragile Infants Born Premature or with Congenital Heart Disease: Implementation Science Needed.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec 16;30(4):457-466. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Cognitive Medical Systems, 9444 Waples Street, Suite 300, San Diego, CA 92121, USA.

Although a unit-adopted standardized feeding protocol (SFP) for neonates is standard of care, implementation strategies for SFPs vary across neonatal and pediatric intensive care. Besides improving growth and reducing feeding interruptions, SFPs reduce risk for necrotizing enterocolitis in infants with heart disease or born premature. The purpose of this article is to bridge the gap between recommended and actual care using SFPs. Read More

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December 2018
15 Reads

Increased Nursing Participation in Multidisciplinary Rounds to Enhance Communication, Patient Safety, and Parent Satisfaction.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec;30(4):445-455.e4

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Charlotte R. Bloomberg Children's Center, 1800 Orleans Street, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.

Effective communication among health care team members is a mainstay of patient safety, especially in a neonatal ICU (NICU), given small errors can have serious and life-threating consequences. Ineffective communication with families of hospitalized children can lead to decreased satisfaction and trust in the health care team. To enhance communication, the NICU nursing staff at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center spearheaded an initiative to create an enhanced nursing role in multidisciplinary patient rounds. Read More

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December 2018
19 Reads

The Late Preterm: A Population at Risk.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Dec 16;30(4):431-443. Epub 2018 Oct 16.

Department of Pediatrics, Community Neonatal Associates, Holy Cross Hospital, 1500 Forest Glen Road, Silver Spring, MD 20910, USA.

Late preterm infants (LPIs) are born between 34 0/7 and 36 6/7 weeks' gestation and account for 72% of all preterm births in the United States. Born as much as 6 weeks early, the LPI misses the critical growth and development specific to the third trimester. The loss of this critical period leaves the LPI physiologically and metabolically immature and prone to various morbidities. Read More

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December 2018
14 Reads

Etomidate as an Induction Agent in Sepsis.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep 13;30(3):e1-e9. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

Nurse Anesthesia Program, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, School of Nursing, 1900 Gravier Street, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

Sepsis is a life-threatening response to infection often times requiring endotracheal intubation in critically ill patients. Etomidate is routinely used as an intravenous induction agent to provide sedation and amnesia before placing an endotracheal tube. Although etomidate has many favorable qualities, there is a major concern regarding the predictable adrenal insufficiency that follows its use. Read More

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September 2018
12 Reads

Sepsis: Special Considerations, Management, and Treatment for Diverse Patient Populations.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep 13;30(3):ix-x. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

Nurse Anesthesia Program, Louisiana State University, Health New Orleans School of Nursing, 1900 Gravier Street, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. Electronic address:

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September 2018
2 Reads

Sepsis in the Burn Patient.

Authors:
Jennifer Manning

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep 28;30(3):423-430. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, School of Nursing, 1900 Gravier, New Orleans, LA 70003, USA. Electronic address:

Sepsis is the leading cause of death in burn patients. Interventions are challenging owing to a lack of specific guidelines. All burn types involve a risk for complications. Read More

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September 2018
2 Reads

Sepsis in the Obstetric Client.

Authors:
Marie Adorno

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep 13;30(3):415-422. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

Department of Nursing, LSU Health New Orleans School of Nursing, 1900 Gravier Street, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. Electronic address:

Maternal sepsis is the third most common direct cause of maternal mortality following maternal hemorrhage and maternal hypertension. Undetected and poorly managed maternal infections can lead to sepsis, death, or disability for the mother and an increased likelihood of early neonatal infection and other adverse outcomes. When caring for obstetric patients, it is important to identify the stages of antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum care. Read More

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September 2018
15 Reads

Early Identification and Management of the Septic Patient in the Emergency Department.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep 18;30(3):407-414. Epub 2018 Jun 18.

Adult/Geron Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Program, LSU Health School of Nursing, 154 Islander Drive, Slidell, LA 70458, USA.

Sepsis and septic shock affect millions of people around the globe and kills more than 1 in 4 patients worldwide. Emergency departments (EDs) nationwide have implemented evidence-based protocols to facilitate the early detection and treatment of patients with sepsis. Despite these efforts, patients present to the ED undifferentiated and can often have an unclear source of infection. Read More

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September 2018
3 Reads

Special Considerations for the Septic Patient Going to the Operating Room.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep 28;30(3):399-406. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Department of Anesthesia, Memorial Hospital at Gulfport, 4500 Thirteenth Street, Gulfport, MS 39501, USA. Electronic address:

Perioperative care of the septic patient presents unique challenges for the nurse. Understanding the physiology of sepsis is important for the nurse to anticipate the physiologic changes associated with the disorder and to prioritize the patient's needs. Ensuring adequate intravenous access by peripheral or central venous access as well as anticipating potential invasive monitoring lines allows the nurse to quickly administer antibiotic therapy, initiate fluid resuscitation, and prepare for potential vasopressor use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.05.008DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Hospital Costs Associated with Sepsis Compared with Other Medical Conditions.

Authors:
Denise M Danna

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep 13;30(3):389-398. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

University Medical Center New Orleans, 2000 Canal Street, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. Electronic address:

Sepsis is a condition that has become a main focus for health care organizations owing to the alarming cost of caring for patients, as well as the disturbing mortality rates, that accompany this condition. Sepsis is one of the costliest conditions billed to all payer groups: Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance, and uninsured patients. Health care organizations have implemented multiple strategies and best practices to improve the outcomes of patients with a diagnosis of sepsis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.05.007DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Cardiogenic Shock in the Septic Patient: Early Identification and Evidence-Based Management.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep 13;30(3):379-387. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

LSU Health New Orleans School of Nursing, 1900 Gravier Street, Office 4A14, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

Sepsis-induced cardiogenic shock is a lethal condition and the management of it is challenging. Cardiogenic shock in the septic patient involves myocardial systolic and diastolic dysfunction. The limited ability of the ventricles to contract effectively results in a decrease in oxygen delivery to the organs and tissues. Read More

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September 2018
2 Reads

Simulation to Manage the Septic Patient in the Intensive Care Unit.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep 7;30(3):363-377. Epub 2018 Jul 7.

Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, School of Nursing, 1900 Gravier Street, Office 504, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

Sepsis and septic shock are complex, clinical conditions associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. There are evidence-based guidelines outlining priority care areas for sepsis, including early screening outside the intensive care unit. Nurses are directly involved with patient care and must be able to provide safe, competent care after graduation. Read More

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September 2018
2 Reads

Hit or Miss? A Review of Early-Onset Sepsis in the Neonate.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep 7;30(3):353-362. Epub 2018 Jul 7.

Delgado Community College-Charity School of Nursing, 450 South Claiborne Avenue, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. Electronic address:

For the bedside nurse identifying at-risk neonates for development of early-onset sepsis is a challenge. The ambiguity of clinical presentation can easily be overlooked, resulting in delayed treatment of this vulnerable population. Adding to this dilemma is inconsistent implementation of screening criteria used by health providers to identify at-risk neonates, resulting in lost opportunities of early identification and treatment. Read More

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September 2018
3 Reads

Emerging Adjunctive Approach for the Treatment of Sepsis: Vitamin C and Thiamine.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep 28;30(3):343-351. Epub 2018 Jun 28.

Nurse Anesthesia Program, School of Nursing, Louisiana State University Health New Orleans, 1900 Gravier Street, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. Electronic address:

Evidence is emerging that parenteral administration of high-dose vitamin C and thiamine may be a beneficial adjuvant therapy of severe sepsis and septic shock. Despite modern practices in critical care medicine, sepsis and severe sepsis remain a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the critical care unit. Read More

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September 2018
2 Reads

Beyond the Intensive Care Unit: Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Critically Ill Patients.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep;30(3):333-342

Nurse Anesthesia Program, Louisiana State University Health New Orleans, School of Nursing, 1900 Gravier Street, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

Medical care progress has enabled more patients in the intensive care unit to survive critical illnesses and return to daily living. This shift in survival rates has shed new light on the emotional consequences this experience. For patients surviving an ICU stay, posttraumatic stress disorder has been identified in approximately 9% to 27% compared with 7% of the general US population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.05.001DOI Listing
September 2018
3 Reads

Early Administration of Intravenous Fluids in Sepsis: Pros and Cons.

Authors:
Laura S Bonanno

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep 13;30(3):323-332. Epub 2018 Jul 13.

Nurse Anesthesia Program, LSUHSC School of Nursing, 1900 Gravier Street, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. Electronic address:

Fluid resuscitation in the management of patients with sepsis and severe sepsis has been considered the standard of care for almost 2 decades. The rationale for fluid resuscitation is related to improvement in cardiac output and organ perfusion. Recent research evidence challenges the use of fluid resuscitation in patients diagnosed with sepsis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.05.011DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Summary of the 2016 International Surviving Sepsis Campaign: A Clinician's Guide.

Authors:
Kendra M Barrier

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Sep 9;30(3):311-321. Epub 2018 Jul 9.

Nursing, Louisiana State University Health New Orleans, School of Nursing, 1900 Gravier Street, Suite 4C1, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA. Electronic address:

The Surviving Sepsis Campaign: International Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2016 provides updated recommendations, rationales, and evidence tables for best care of patients with sepsis. "Sepsis is a life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a dysregulated host response to infection. Septic shock (sepsis-3) is a subset of sepsis with circulatory and cellular/metabolic dysfunction associated with a higher risk of mortality than with sepsis alone. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.04.001DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads
0.430 Impact Factor

Using Heuristic Evaluation to Improve Sepsis Alert Usability.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Jun;30(2):297-309

Department of Health Systems Science, College of Nursing, University of Illinois at Chicago, 845 South Damen Avenue, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. Electronic address:

Sepsis, life-threatening organ dysfunction in response to infection, is an alarmingly common and aggressive illness in US hospitals, especially for intensive care patients. Preventing sepsis deaths rests on the clinicians' ability to promptly recognize and treat sepsis. To aid early recognition, many organizations have employed clinician-facing electronic sepsis alert systems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.02.011DOI Listing
June 2018
5 Reads

Telemedicine in the Intensive Care Unit: Improved Access to Care at What Cost?

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Jun 21;30(2):289-296. Epub 2018 Mar 21.

University of Arizona College of Medicine, Sarver Heart Center, 1501 North Campbell Avenue, Room 5157-A, PO Box 245046, Tucson, AZ 85718, USA.

Health systems across the United States are adopting intensive care unit telemedicine programs to improve patient outcomes. Research demonstrates the potential for decreased mortality and length of stay for patients of these remotely monitored units. Financial models and studies point to cost-effectiveness and the possibility of cost savings in the face of abundant startup costs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.02.010DOI Listing
June 2018
7 Reads

Advancing Continuous Predictive Analytics Monitoring: Moving from Implementation to Clinical Action in a Learning Health System.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Jun;30(2):273-287

School of Nursing, University of North Carolina, Carrington Hall, South Columbia Street, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

In the intensive care unit, clinicians monitor a diverse array of data inputs to detect early signs of impending clinical demise or improvement. Continuous predictive analytics monitoring synthesizes data from a variety of inputs into a risk estimate that clinicians can observe in a streaming environment. For this to be useful, clinicians must engage with the data in a way that makes sense for their clinical workflow in the context of a learning health system (LHS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.02.009DOI Listing
June 2018
6 Reads

Work System Barriers and Strategies Reported by Tele-Intensive Care Unit Nurses: A Case Study.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Jun;30(2):259-271

Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering, Center for Quality and Productivity Improvement, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 3126 Engineering Centers Building, 1550 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706, USA.

Tele-intensive care units (ICUs) are an innovation to handle issues such as personnel shortage and improving care. In tele-ICUs, clinical teams monitor ICU patients remotely and support clinicians in multiple ICUs. The tele-ICU and ICU clinicians function as virtual teams. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.02.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5942589PMC
June 2018
4 Reads

Advocating for Greater Usability in Clinical Technologies: The Role of the Practicing Nurse.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Jun;30(2):247-257

Decatur Memorial Hospital, 2300 N. Edward Street, Decatur, IL 62526, USA.

Health care, especially ICUs, rely on multiple types of technology to promote the best patient outcomes. Unfortunately, too often these technologies are poorly designed, causing errors, additional workload, and unnecessary frustration. The purpose of this article is to (1) empower nurses with the needed usability and usability testing vocabulary to identify and articulate clinical technology usability problems and (2) provide ideas on ways nurses can advocate to have an impact on positive change related to technology usability within a health care organization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.02.007DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

Informatics Solutions for Application of Decision-Making Skills.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Jun 4;30(2):237-246. Epub 2018 Apr 4.

University of Arizona, College of Nursing, 1305 North Martin, Tucson, AZ 85721, USA.

Critical care nurses practice in a challenging environment that requires responses to patients with complex, often unstable health conditions. The electronic health record, access to clinical data, and Clinical Decision Support Systems informed by data from clinical databases are informatics tools designed to work together to facilitate decision-making in nursing practice. The complex decision-making environment of critical care requires informatics tools that support nursing practice through integration of current evidence with clinical data. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08995885183000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.02.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5941940PMC
June 2018
7 Reads

Human Factors in Medical Device Design: Methods, Principles, and Guidelines.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Jun 4;30(2):225-236. Epub 2018 Apr 4.

Human Systems Engineering Program, Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering, Arizona State University, 7271 East Sonoran Arroyo Mall, 150 J Santa Catalina Hall, Mesa, AZ 88001, USA. Electronic address:

A total of 400,000 to 500,000 patients die in intensive care units (ICUs) each year, largely because ICUs care for the sickest patients. On the other hand, factors such as workload, shift changes, handoffs, alarm fatigue, inadequate team communication, and difficult-to-use medical devices contribute to the problem. This article focuses on the human factors of those medical devices, a significant cause of adverse events in the ICU. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.02.005DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

Intravenous Smart Pumps: Usability Issues, Intravenous Medication Administration Error, and Patient Safety.

Authors:
Karen K Giuliano

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Jun 7;30(2):215-224. Epub 2018 Apr 7.

Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA; The Center for Nursing Research and Advanced Nursing Practice, Orlando Regional Medical Center, Orlando, FL, USA. Electronic address:

With an estimated 90% of all hospitalized patients receiving intravenous medications via infusion pumps, intravenous infusion pump systems are among the most frequently used technologies in health care. This article reviews important issues regarding clinical usability, intravenous medication administration error, and patient safety related to the use of intravenous smart pumps. Although it is possible to address some of the issues with changes in clinical processes, the most fundamental challenges need to be addressed through innovation and the development of new technologies using a human factors approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.02.004DOI Listing
June 2018
22 Reads

Nurse-Technology Interactions and Patient Safety.

Crit Care Nurs Clin North Am 2018 Jun 4;30(2):203-213. Epub 2018 Apr 4.

Yale School of Nursing, 400 West Campus Drive, Orange, CT 06477, USA.

Nurses are the end-users of most technology in intensive care units, and the ways in which they interact with technology affect quality of care and patient safety. Nurses' interactions include the processes of ensuring proper input of data into the technology as well as extracting and interpreting the output (clinical data, technical data, alarms). Current challenges in nurse-technology interactions for physiologic monitoring include issues regarding alarm management, workflow interruptions, and monitor surveillance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnc.2018.02.003DOI Listing
June 2018
5 Reads