6,561 results match your criteria Contraception[Journal]


Implementing best practices for the provision of long-acting reversible contraception: a survey of obstetrician-gynecologists.

Contraception 2019 Apr 11. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health (ANSIRH), Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, Oakland, CA, USA. Electronic address:

Objective: To examine obstetrician-gynecologists' practices regarding provision of long-acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) methods same-day, immediately postpartum, or to women under age 21.

Study Design: Between August 2016 and March 2017, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) sent 2500 of their members an electronic survey questionnaire regarding the provision of LARC methods. ACOG mailed nonresponders paper surveys. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.03.053DOI Listing

Unintentional IUD expulsion with concomitant menstrual cup use: a case series.

Contraception 2019 Apr 11. Epub 2019 Apr 11.

University of Colorado, College of Nursing, Mail Stop C288, 13120 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045. Electronic address:

Although reproductive age women use both menstrual cups and intrauterine devices (IUDs) simultaneously, it is unknown whether concomitant use reduces contraceptive effectiveness. We report seven cases wherein IUD expulsion occurred during concomitant menstrual cup use. Further research is needed to determine mechanisms of expulsion, predictors, and strategies to avoid expulsions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.03.047DOI Listing

Antifertility effectiveness of a novel polymer matrix composite and its influence on the endometrium in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

Contraception 2019 Apr 10. Epub 2019 Apr 10.

Family Planning Research Institute, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430030, PR China; Reproductive Medicine Center, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430030, PR China. Electronic address:

Objective(s): To explored the antifertility effectiveness and influence on the endometrium of a micro-copper/low-density polyethylene/methyl vinyl silicone rubber (Cu/LDPE/MVQ) composite in rhesus macaques.

Study Design: Healthy reproductive aged female rhesus macaques underwent abdominal hysterotomy for surgical placement of either the experimental Cu/LDPE/MVQ composite (Cu/LDPE/MVQ, n=5), bare copper wire (Cu, n=5), or hysterotomy only sham-operation group [(SOI, n=4), (SOII, n=6)]. Females in the Cu/LPDE/MVQ, Cu, and SOI groups were housed with fertile males for approximately 3 menstrual cycles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.03.049DOI Listing

Medical conditions, pregnancy perspectives, and contraceptive decision-making among young people: an exploratory, qualitative analysis.

Contraception 2019 Apr 10. Epub 2019 Apr 10.

Sexual Health and Reproductive Equity Program, School of Social Welfare, University of California, Berkeley, 110 Haviland Hall MC 7400, Berkeley, CA 94720-7400, USA.

Objective: To explore perspectives on family planning among young people who perceive they are infertile or will have difficulty carrying a pregnancy to term owing to medical conditions or procedures.

Methods: This exploratory analysis examined pregnancy plans and contraceptive behavior among 12 young adults with a diagnosed medical condition or who had undergone a medical procedure associated with impaired fertility, and who had discussed fertility with a healthcare provider. We utilized data from a larger study investigating prospective pregnancy intentions and plans among 50 young (ages 18-24) women and their male partners (n=100). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.03.046DOI Listing

Real world data on Nexplanon® procedure-related events: final results from the Nexplanon observational risk assessment study (NORA).

Contraception 2019 Apr 10. Epub 2019 Apr 10.

Berlin Center for Epidemiology and Health Research (ZEG), 10115, Berlin, Germany.

Objectives: We conducted this study to characterize the frequency of insertion-, localization- and removal-related events and their clinically significant consequences among Nexplanon® (etonogestrel radiopaque contraceptive implant) users in the United States during standard clinical practice.

Study Design: The Nexplanon Observational Risk Assessment (NORA) study was a large, prospective cohort study conducted in the United States. A total of 428 Health Care Professionals (HCPs) who had completed the Nexplanon clinical training program recruited women who were newly prescribed Nexplanon. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.03.052DOI Listing

"It's not something you talk about really": information barriers encountered by women who travel long distances for abortion care.

Contraception 2019 Apr 10. Epub 2019 Apr 10.

Guttmacher Institute in New York.

Objective: For individuals traveling significant distances for time-sensitive abortion care, accurate information about service options and locations is critical, but little is known regarding information barriers that individuals may encounter and strategies for circumventing these barriers.

Study Design: In early 2015, we conducted in-depth interviews with 29 patients who had traveled for abortion care at six facilities in Michigan and New Mexico. We identified information-related barriers that respondents encountered in understanding their pregnancy options and/or where to obtain an abortion between the time of pregnancy discovery, including any contact with a crisis pregnancy center, to the day of the abortion procedure through inductive and deductive analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.03.048DOI Listing

Relationship between patient characteristics and serum etonogestrel concentrations in contraceptive implant users.

Contraception 2019 Apr 10. Epub 2019 Apr 10.

University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Family Planning.

Objective: To determine whether serum etonogestrel concentrations in contraceptive implant users are associated with certain individual patient characteristics.

Study Design: We enrolled reproductive-age women using etonogestrel contraceptive implants between 12-36months duration and measured a single serum etonogestrel concentration. Participants also completed a questionnaire about demographics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.03.045DOI Listing

"Provoked" feto-maternal hemorrhage may represent insensible cell exchange in pregnancies from 6-22weeks gestational age.

Contraception 2019 Apr 10. Epub 2019 Apr 10.

The University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, NY.

Objective: To quantify spontaneous and provoked fetal to maternal cell exchange in the first half of pregnancy. Transfer of fetal red blood cells (FRBCs) into the maternal circulation during the first half of pregnancy is poorly characterized but of clinical relevance for miscarriage management and invasive procedures.

Study Design: Prospective, descriptive cohort study of women presenting for surgical termination of pregnancy with sonographically confirmed gestational age (GA). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.03.051DOI Listing

Intimate partner violence, pregnancy intention and contraceptive use in Honduras.

Contraception 2019 Apr 10. Epub 2019 Apr 10.

Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, Universidad Tecnológica Centroamericana (UNITEC), Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Electronic address:

Objective(s): We explored the relationship between Intimate Partner Violence (IPV), pregnancy intention and contraceptive use in Honduras.

Study Design: We used the most recent Honduras Demographic and Health Survey (DHS 2011-2012) data to examine the relationship between physical IPV, sexual IPV and emotional IPV with pregnancy intention; contraceptive use; and husband's knowledge of contraceptive use among a sample of 6629 women. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate effects of IPV on the outcomes, controlling for empowerment indicators and socio-demographic variables. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.03.050DOI Listing

Response re: a non-inferiority randomized controlled trial to compare transabdominal and transvaginal sonography for eligibility assessment prior to medical abortion.

Contraception 2019 Mar 29. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University Irving Medical Center, PH 16-69, 622 West 168(th) Street, New York, NY 10032, United States; Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, 722 West 168(th) Street, New York, NY 10032, United States.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.016DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Video counseling about emergency contraception, an observational study.

Contraception 2019 Mar 22. Epub 2019 Mar 22.

University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT.

Objective: This study assesses emergency contraception (EC) dispensed before and after a 3-min video counseling intervention on EC.

Methods: We used a quasi-experimental design and two data sources to assess the impact of offering the video counseling intervention. We used electronic health records from six Planned Parenthood Association of Utah health centers with onsite oral EC dispensing to determine pre- and post-intervention EC distribution. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.014DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Impact of the contraceptive implant on maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality in rural Papua New Guinea: a retrospective observational cohort study.

Contraception 2019 Mar 18. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Discipline of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Neonatology, Central Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, 2006; Department of Women's Health, Neonatology and Pediatrics, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Missinden Road, Camperdown, New South Wales, Australia, 2050.

Objectives: Using routinely collected birth data, this study sought to measure changes in maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality after introduction of the levonorgestrel contraceptive implant into a large, rural island population in Papua New Guinea (PNG).

Study Design: We conducted a retrospective observational study of birth records from 4251 births that occurred between January 2010 and December 2016 on Karkar Island, PNG. The primary outcome was the change in Crude Birth Rate (CBR) before (2010-2012) and after (2014-2016) introduction of the implant. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00107824193010
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.03.042DOI Listing
March 2019
6 Reads

Opportunistic salpingectomy during postpartum contraception procedures at elective and unscheduled cesarean delivery.

Contraception 2019 Mar 18. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Brescia, Italy.

Objective: To compare intra- and postoperative surgical complications of opportunistic bilateral total salpingectomy during postpartum permanent contraception procedures in elective and unscheduled cesarean delivery.

Study Design: We conducted a retrospective cohort study (2010-2017) of women who had postpartum permanent contraception procedures during cesarean delivery, and we collected baseline characteristics, scheduling of delivery (elective versus unscheduled), operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL) and surgical complications (bleeding, iatrogenic injury, infection, anemia and relaparotomy). We classified patients according to contraceptive technique: bilateral total salpingectomy, bilateral partial salpingectomy with or without fimbriae, and other methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.03.041DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

The Lactational effects of contraceptive hormones: an evaluation (LECHE) study.

Contraception 2019 Mar 18. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Carolina Global Breastfeeding Institute, Gillings School of Public Health.

Objective: To estimate the proportion of women for whom use of hormonal contraception was associated with reporting a decreased breast milk supply.

Study Design: The Lactational Effects of Contraceptive Hormones: an Evaluation ("LECHE") Study was an anonymous, internet-based, exploratory, cross-sectional survey of postpartum women using approximately 70 questions. Women were eligible to participate in the survey if they were 18years or older, had a singleton infant between 3 and 9months of age, had breastfed this infant for any amount of time, and could read English. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00107824193010
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.03.040DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Letter to the editor re: "A noninferiority randomized controlled trial to compare transabdominal and transvaginal sonography for eligibility assessment prior to medical abortion".

Contraception 2019 Mar 14. Epub 2019 Mar 14.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.015DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

WITHDRAWN: Fighting for access: Research at the National Abortion Federation's 43 Annual Meeting.

Contraception 2019 Mar 13. Epub 2019 Mar 13.

National Abortion Federation, Washington, DC, USA.

This article has been withdrawn at the request of the author(s) and/or editor. The Publisher apologizes for any inconvenience this may cause. The full Elsevier Policy on Article Withdrawal can be found at https://www. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.03.002DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Effect of theory-based contraception comics on subjective contraceptive knowledge: a pilot study.

Contraception 2019 Mar 13. Epub 2019 Mar 13.

University of California Los Angeles.

Objectives: We assessed the effect on subjective knowledge of a pilot educational comic decision aid about contraceptive methods.

Study Design: We designed four comics (www.birthcontroltales. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.010DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

“Repeal and replace”: increased demand for intrauterine devices following the 2016 presidential election.

Contraception 2019 Mar 13. Epub 2019 Mar 13.

Division of Infectious Disease and Global Public Health, UC San Diego, La Jolla, CA. Electronic address:

Objective: To evaluate public's interest in contraceptive options following heightened focus on a repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) since the 2016 United States presidential election.

Study Design: We monitored the fraction of Google searches emerging from the United States for the three most popular reversible contraceptive methods - oral contraceptives, intrauterine devices (IUDs) and condoms - from January 1, 2004, through October 31, 2017 (1 year after the presidential election).

Results: IUD searches were cumulatively 15% (95% CI: 10 to 20) higher than expected the year following the 2016 election, reflecting 10 to 21 million excess searches. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2018.10.012DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Pilot study on functional performance and acceptability of two new synthetic adhesive male condoms (Wondaleaf): a randomized cross-over trial.

Contraception 2019 Mar 11. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Enersol Pty Ltd, 235 Nelson St, Annandale, NSW, 2038, Australia. Electronic address:

Objectives: This study compared the condom failure rate, safety and acceptability of two new synthetic adhesive male condoms, Wondaleaf-Cap® (WLC) and Wondaleaf-On-Man® (WLM), with a marketed latex external condom Durex®-Together (DT).

Study Design: We enrolled healthy married, monogamous, heterosexual condom users in a randomized controlled, cross-over, pilot trial in Malaysia. We randomized participants to six groups with different condom use-orders of the experimental WLC and WLM and control latex condom for four episodes for vaginal sex over onemonth for each condom type. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.013DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Access to contraception in local health departments, four Midwest states, 2017-2018.

Contraception 2019 Mar 11. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

University of Kansas School of Medicine, Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, 3901 Rainbow Blvd, MS: 1008, Kansas City, KS 66160. Electronic address:

Objective: Describe contraception availability at local health departments (LHDs) serving largely rural populations.

Study Design: We invited administrators at LHDs located in four Midwest states to participate in an online survey conducted from September 2017-April 2018. We collected data on clinic staffing, patient population, receipt of Title X funds, and services provided to assess the proportion of LHDs providing any prescription method of contraception; secondary outcomes included healthcare staff training level and other reproductive health services provided. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.009DOI Listing
March 2019
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Bone turnover markers in women participating in a dose-finding trial of a contraceptive vaginal ring releasing Nestorone and estradiol.

Contraception 2019 Mar 11. Epub 2019 Mar 11.

Contraceptive Development Program, NICHD, NIH, Bethesda, MD.

Objective: To evaluate changes in the bone turnover markers CTx and P1NP during 6 months' use of novel continuous contraceptive vaginal rings delivering Nestorone (NES) 200 mcg/day and three doses of estradiol (E2) (10, 20, and 40 mcg/day).

Study Design: This randomized trial enrolled 189 women who used two consecutive vaginal rings over 180 days. Frequent blood sampling permitted analysis of NES, E2, CTx and P1NP concentrations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.012DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Safety of levonorgestrel 52 mg intrauterine system compared to copper intrauterine device: a population-based cohort study.

Contraception 2019 Mar 12. Epub 2019 Mar 12.

Univ. Bordeaux, Inserm, Bordeaux Population Health Research Centre, team PHARMACOEPIDEMIOLOGY, UMR 1219, Bordeaux, France; CHU de Bordeaux, Pôle de Santé Publique, Service de Pharmacologie Médicale, Bordeaux, France.

Objective: To compare the risk of all-cause death, hospitalizations (any cause), ectopic pregnancy, pelvic inflammatory disease or infection, uterine perforation, device removal, neuro-psychiatric drugs initiation, or new psychiatric visit(s) between levonorgestrel (LNG) 52 mg intrauterine system (IUS) and copper intrauterine device (IUD) users in France.

Study Design: We identified a historical cohort of women aged 20-55 years with a first dispensing of either LNG 52 mg IUS or copper-IUD between January 1, 2010, and December 31, 2014, in the French National Claims database, SNDS. We used propensity score matching to balance the two groups on baseline sociodemographic and clinical characteristics to minimize confounding. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.011DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Foregoing Rh testing and anti-D immunoglobulin for women presenting for early abortion: a recommendation from the National Abortion Federation's Clinical Policies Committee.

Contraception 2019 Mar 10. Epub 2019 Mar 10.

National Abortion Federation, Clinical Policies Committee, Washington, DC, USA; Gynuity Health Projects, New York City, NY, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.008DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Neurovascular anatomy of the adult female medial arm in relationship to potential sites for insertion of the etonogestrel contraceptive implant.

Contraception 2019 Mar 8. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Seattle Science Foundation, Seattle, WA.

Objective: Anatomic assessment of the medial upper arm to identify potential sites for insertion of the etonogestrel (ENG) implant.

Study Design: Forty female cadaveric arms were dissected. Two rows of 1 x 2cm dissection windows were created in the inner arm overlying the triceps approximately 2-3 and 4-5cm posterior to the bicipital sulcus (sulcus). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.007DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Challenging unintended pregnancy as an indicator of reproductive autonomy.

Contraception 2019 Mar 7. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

Texas Policy Evaluation Project, 305 E. 23rd Street, Stop G1800, Austin, TX, 78712; Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health (ANSIRH), Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, 1330 Broadway Suite 1100, Oakland, CA, 94612.

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00107824193003
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.005DOI Listing
March 2019
7 Reads

Acceptability of the Woman's Condom in a phase III multicenter open-label study.

Contraception 2019 Mar 6. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Department of Gynecology & Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University, 4940 Eastern Ave, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA.

Objective: This study aimed to evaluate the acceptability of the Woman's Condom (WC) over 6 months (183 days) and ≥6 menstrual cycles in a US-based multicenter open-label phase III contraceptive efficacy trial.

Study Design: We assessed acceptability via written questionnaire at visit 2 (after the third cycle) and visit 3 (after the sixth cycle or >183 days, or upon early discontinuation). Key domains included ease of use, comfort/lubrication, sexual satisfaction, male partner satisfaction and confidence in pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.006DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Bleeding and spotting with the levonorgestrel 13.5 mg intrauterine system: the impact of insertion timing.

Contraception 2019 Mar 1. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Department of Family Medicine, 183 South Orange Avenue, E1562, Newark, NJ 07103.

Objective: To assess the impact of early versus late menstrual cycle insertion on bleeding/spotting in the 90 days following levonorgestrel (LNG) 13.5 mg intrauterine system (IUS) insertion.

Study Design: In this observational study, participants received a LNG 13. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.004DOI Listing
March 2019
9 Reads

Early abortion with buccal versus sublingual misoprostol alone: a multicenter, randomized trial.

Contraception 2019 Mar 1. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

Gynuity Health Projects, 220 East 42(nd) Street, Suite 710, New York, NY, 10017.

Objective: To compare efficacy, safety/side effects and acceptability of buccal versus sublingual administration of a misoprostol-only regimen commonly used for early medical abortion.

Study Design: We conducted a randomized trial at six clinics in two Latin American countries. We randomized women seeking early abortion to buccal or sublingual administration of three doses of misoprostol 800 mcg repeated every 3 h. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.002DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Segesterone acetate/ethinyl estradiol 12-month contraceptive vaginal system safety evaluation.

Contraception 2019 Mar 1. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Bethesda, MD, USA.

Objectives: To evaluate safety outcomes from clinical studies of a 12-month contraceptive vaginal system (CVS) releasing an average of segesterone acetate (SA) 150 mcg and ethinyl estradiol (EE) 13 mcg daily.

Study Design: We integrated clinical safety data from nine studies in which women used the CVS for 21 consecutive days and removed it for 7 days of each 28-day cycle. Four studies used the final manufactured CVS, including a 1-year pharmacokinetic study, two 1-year phase 3 trials and a second-year treatment extension study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.001DOI Listing
March 2019
6 Reads

Intrauterine mepivacaine instillation for pain relief during intrauterine device insertion in nulliparous women: a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial.

Contraception 2019 Mar 1. Epub 2019 Mar 1.

Karolinska Institutet, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Division of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, WHO-Centre QB:84. Karolinska University Hospital, Karolinska Vägen 37A, SE-17176 Stockholm, Sweden; Danderyd Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Mörbygårdsvägen 88, SE-182 88 Danderyd, Sweden. Electronic address:

Objective: To evaluate whether intrauterine mepivacaine instillation before intrauterine device (IUD) insertion decreases pain compared to placebo.

Study Design: We performed a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial comparing mepivacaine 1% 10 mL versus 0.9% NaCl intrauterine instillation using a hydrosonography catheter 5 min before IUD insertion in women 18 years of age or older. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.02.003DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Study of contraceptive mobile app fails to provide convincing findings.

Contraception 2019 Feb 14. Epub 2019 Feb 14.

GREEN-IVF, Grevenbroich Endocrinology and IVF-Center & Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics University of Cologne, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2018.07.141DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Factors associated with provision of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate to adolescents by US health care providers.

Contraception 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Division of Reproductive Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy NE, Atlanta, GA, United States, 30341. Electronic address:

Objective: Identify factors associated with healthcare providers' frequency of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) provision to adolescents.

Study Design: We analyzed data from surveys mailed to a nationally representative sample of public-sector providers and office-based physicians (n=1984). We estimated adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of factors associated with frequent DMPA provision to adolescents in the past year. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.01.005DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

F5-peptide enhances the efficacy of the non-hormonal male contraceptive adjudin.

Contraception 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

The Mary M. Wohlford Laboratory for Male Contraceptive Research, Center for Biomedical Research, Population Council, 1230 York Ave, New York, NY 10065. Electronic address:

Objective: The bioavailability of the non-hormonal male contraceptive adjudin is low in rats due to the blood-testis barrier (BTB). This study was designed to examine if F5-peptide, an endogenously produced reversible BTB modifier, could enhance the bioavailability of adjudin to affect spermatogenesis and provide a contraceptive effect in rats while reducing systemic toxicity.

Study Design: We overexpressed F5-peptide in adult male rats (n=10 rats; with 3 or 4 rats for each of the three different experiments noted in the three regimens) by intratesticular injection of a mammalian expression vector pCI-neo (pCI-neo/F5-peptide) vs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.01.007DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads
2.335 Impact Factor

Looking back while moving forward: a justice-based, intersectional approach to research on contraception and disability.

Contraception 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Georgia State University.

For the first time in the 21st century, we have an emerging body of research regarding contraceptive use among adult women with disabilities in the United States. We highlight key findings from population-based analyses that found higher odds of female sterilization and lower odds of long-acting reversible contraception use among women with disabilities compared to their peers without disabilities. We consider potential reasons underlying these differences, including discriminatory attitudes and policies that restrict the sexual and reproductive autonomy of people with disabilities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.01.006DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Claims for contraceptive services among young women filling chronic opioid prescriptions.

Contraception 2019 Feb 11. Epub 2019 Feb 11.

Division of Pharmaceutical Evaluation and Policy, Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR, USA. Electronic address:

Objective: To describe claims for contraceptive services among reproductive-aged women filling chronic opioid prescriptions.

Study Design: Using a large US commercial claims database, IMS Lifelink+, we identified women aged 15-44 years who filled chronic opioid prescriptions (defined as a 90-day supply of opioids without a 30-day gap over a 180-day time period) and had continuous pharmacy and medical enrollment for at least 90 days prior to and 180 days following their index opioid prescription. After excluding women with any claims for pregnancy-related services, we describe claims for contraceptive prescriptions. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00107824193001
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.01.004DOI Listing
February 2019
4 Reads

Patient recommendations for PrEP information dissemination at family planning clinics in Atlanta, Georgia.

Contraception 2019 Apr 31;99(4):233-238. Epub 2019 Jan 31.

Department of Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine.

Objective: Family planning (FP) clinics are an ideal setting to disseminate information about pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), but little is known about women's preferences for learning about PrEP in this setting.

Study Design: We surveyed 500 women seeking care at 4 FP clinics in Atlanta. Before their provider visit, participants completed an HIV-risk screener. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2018.12.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6441368PMC
April 2019
1 Read

Pharmacokinetics of the 1.5 mg levonorgestrel emergency contraceptive in women with normal, obese and extremely obese body mass index.

Contraception 2019 Jan 28. Epub 2019 Jan 28.

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York.

Objective: To assess the pharmacokinetics (PK) of levonorgestrel after 1.5 mg oral doses (LNG-EC) in women with normal, obese and extremely obese body mass index (BMI).

Study Design: The 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.01.003DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

Pregnancy outcomes after removal of osmotic dilators in patients who presented for second-trimester abortion.

Contraception 2019 Jan 25. Epub 2019 Jan 25.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD.

Objective: The objective was to report pregnancy outcomes and potentially related complications among 13 patients who had osmotic dilators placed for second-trimester dilation and evacuation (D&E) followed by subsequent removal with the intention to continue their pregnancies.

Study Design: We reviewed billing and scheduling data between 2005 and 2017 to identify the total number of women seen for D&E and to identify the individuals who had dilators placed without a subsequent scheduled dilation and evacuation. We then performed chart reviews to determine pregnancy outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2018.09.007DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Effect of staff training and cost support on provision of long-acting reversible contraception in community health centers.

Contraception 2019 Apr 24;99(4):222-227. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Divisions of Clinical Research & Family Planning, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University in St. Louis School of Medicine, 4901 Forest Park Avenue, Mailstop: 8064-37-1005St. Louis, Missouri 63108. Electronic address:

Objective: To compare the proportion of women receiving same-day long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) between two different models of contraceptive provision adapted from the Contraceptive CHOICE Project.

Study Design: We used a controlled time-trend study design to compare 502 women receiving structured contraceptive counseling in addition to usual care ("Enhanced Care") to 506 women receiving counseling plus healthcare provider education and cost support for LARC ("Complete CHOICE") at three federally qualified health centers. We provided funds to health centers to ensure an "on-the-shelf" supply and no-cost LARC for uninsured women. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00107824193000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2018.12.005DOI Listing
April 2019
16 Reads

Uptake of permanent contraception among women in sub-Saharan Africa: a literature review of barriers and facilitators.

Contraception 2019 Apr 24;99(4):205-211. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, College of Medicine, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Enugu, Nigeria; HealthySunrise Foundation, Las Vegas, NV, USA.

Objective: Uptake of permanent contraception among women remains low in sub-Saharan Africa compared to other regions. We aimed to synthesize available evidence on barriers to, and facilitators of permanent contraception with regards to tubal ligation among women in sub-Saharan Africa.

Study Design: We reviewed literature on tubal ligation among African women published between January 1, 2000 and October 30, 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2018.12.007DOI Listing
April 2019
9 Reads
2.335 Impact Factor

A sensitive and robust UPLC-MS/MS method for quantitation of estrogens and progestogens in human serum.

Contraception 2019 Apr 24;99(4):244-250. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. Electronic address:

Objective: With the widespread use of sex-steroid hormones in contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy, there is an increasing need for reliable analytical methods. We report the development of a sensitive and robust UPLC-MS/MS method for quantitation of both endogenous and synthetic sex-steroid hormones in human serum.

Study Design: We developed and validated a UPLC-MS/MS method to quantify progestogens (etonogestrel, levonorgestrel, medroxyprogesterone acetate, norethindrone, progesterone) and estrogens (estradiol and ethinyl estradiol) with good accuracy, high sensitivity, and excellent robustness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2018.12.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6441366PMC
April 2019
13 Reads

Shared negative experiences of long-acting reversible contraception and their influence on contraceptive decision-making: a multi-methods study.

Contraception 2019 Apr 24;99(4):228-232. Epub 2019 Jan 24.

University of Chicago Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Section of Family Planning and Contraceptive Research, 5841 S. Maryland Ave. - MC2050, Chicago, IL 60637.. Electronic address:

Objectives: We explored how negative stories about long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) - defined as a firsthand negative experience with LARC shared directly with the study participant - were involved in participants' decisions about whether to use LARC following abortion, and how counseling affected the influence of negative LARC stories on contraceptive choices.

Study Design: We performed a multi-methods study, embedded within a trial examining the impact of a theory-based counseling intervention on LARC uptake post-abortion. Participants completed a baseline survey to determine the influence of negative LARC stories. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.01.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6441367PMC
April 2019
2 Reads

Altered pharmacokinetics of combined oral contraceptives in obesity - multistudy assessment.

Contraception 2019 Apr 23;99(4):256-263. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY 14214, USA. Electronic address:

Objective: The objective was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of levonorgestrel (LNG)-containing combined oral contraceptives (COCs) in obese women.

Study Design: We pooled and reanalyzed data from 89 women with different body mass index (BMI) categories from four clinical studies. The LNG and ethinyl estradiol (EE) PKs were analyzed utilizing a zero-order absorption (K), two-compartment PK model to evaluate key PK parameters in relation to a range of weights, BMI and body surface area (BSA). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2018.12.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6441376PMC
April 2019
9 Reads

Rebound of medication abortion in Texas following updated mifepristone label.

Contraception 2019 Jan 23. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Texas Policy Evaluation Project, Austin, TX; Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health (ANSIRH), Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of California, San Francisco, Oakland, CA.

Background: In 2013, Texas House Bill 2 (HB 2) placed restrictions on the use of medication abortion, which later were nullified with the 2016 FDA-approved mifepristone label.

Methods: Using data collected directly from Texas abortion facilities, we evaluated changes in the provision and use of medication abortion during three 6-month time periods corresponding to the policy changes: before HB 2, after HB 2 and after the label change.

Results: Medication abortion constituted 28% of all abortions before HB 2, 10% after implementation of the restrictions and 33% after the label change. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2019.01.001DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Contraceptive use at first intercourse is associated with subsequent sexual behaviors.

Contraception 2019 Apr 23;99(4):217-221. Epub 2019 Jan 23.

Unit of Virus, Lifestyle and Genes, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Gynecology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Electronic address:

Objective: Women's contraceptive use at first sexual intercourse (FSI) may be associated with subsequent sexual behaviors. We examined associations between contraceptive methods used at FSI and subsequent number of lifetime partners, induced abortions and sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Study Design: During 2011-2012, we collected questionnaire data from a random sample of women aged 18-45 years from Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2018.12.006DOI Listing
April 2019
8 Reads

Could second-trimester medical abortion be offered as a day service? Assessing the feasibility of a 1-day outpatient procedure using pooled data from six clinical studies.

Contraception 2019 Jan 10. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

Gynuity Health Projects, 220 East 42nd St., Suite 710, New York, NY 10017.

Objectives: Current service delivery models for second-trimester medical abortion typically include routine inpatient admission and overnight stays. To assess the feasibility of a day-service model, we evaluated outpatient administration of abortion medications and analyzed the proportion of clients who could avoid an overnight stay. We also examined additional key elements of medical abortion care to evaluate the practicality of this model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2018.12.004DOI Listing
January 2019
4 Reads

One-year continuation of postpartum intrauterine contraceptive device: findings from a retrospective cohort study in India.

Contraception 2019 Apr 18;99(4):212-216. Epub 2018 Dec 18.

Jhpiego, an affiliate of Johns Hopkins University.

Objective: To evaluate outcomes of a national postpartum (within 48 h of delivery) copper intrauterine device placement (PPCuIUD) program in six "high-focus states" with high unmet family planning need in India.

Study Design: We identified high-volume district hospitals that provided PPCuIUD in six (Bihar, Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Madhya Pradesh and Chhattisgarh) Indian states (two per state). Each selected hospital maintained a list of PPCuIUD acceptors with contact phone numbers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2018.12.003DOI Listing
April 2019
5 Reads
2.335 Impact Factor

Pharmacokinetic, biologic and epidemiologic differences in MPA- and NET-based progestin-only injectable contraceptives relative to the potential impact on HIV acquisition in women.

Contraception 2019 Apr 18;99(4):199-204. Epub 2018 Dec 18.

Department of Reproductive Health and Research, World Health Organization (WHO), Geneva, Switzerland. Electronic address:

Access to safe and effective contraceptive choices is a reproductive right and contributes tremendously to improvements in maternal and child health. Progestin-only injectables, particularly intramuscularly injected depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA-IM), have received increased attention given findings suggesting a potential association with increased HIV risk. For women at high risk of HIV, the World Health Organization's Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use currently aggregate recommendations for all progestin-only injectables, including DMPA-IM, subcutaneously injected DMPA (DMPA-SC) and intramuscularly injected norethindrone/ norethisterone enanthate (NET-EN), except in the case of some drug interactions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2018.12.001DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Characterizing pharmacist-prescribed hormonal contraception services and users in California and Oregon pharmacies.

Contraception 2019 Apr 16;99(4):239-243. Epub 2018 Dec 16.

UCSF School of Pharmacy, Department of Clinical Pharmacy, 533 Parnassus Ave., U-503, Box 0622, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. Electronic address:

Objectives: This study describes hormonal contraception services provided by pharmacists and characterizes patient populations utilizing the service at one supermarket-based pharmacy chain in California and Oregon.

Study Design: This is a descriptive study of 391 pharmacies in California and Oregon within a supermarket-based pharmacy chain providing hormonal contraception services and the patients who utilized those services in a 6.5-month period between August 2016 and February 2017. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.contraception.2018.12.002DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read