66 results match your criteria Comprehensive Ophthalmology Update[Journal]


Persistent corneal ulcer.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Sep-Oct;8(5):287-8

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March 2008
10 Reads

Gonioscopy.org: a video Atlas.

Authors:
Matthew B Goren

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Sep-Oct;8(5):285-6

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March 2008
14 Reads

Pay for performance: is it ethical?

Authors:
Susan J Taub

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Sep-Oct;8(5):277-83

Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA.

Since the advent of pay for performance in medicine, there has been an intense debate about its efficacy and enforceability. This article examines some philosophical and psychological aspects of pay for performance. The very concept of pay for performance is inimical to the Hippocratic oath; it operates in direct conflict with powerful ideals such as altruism and concern for community. Read More

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March 2008
6 Reads

Review of sulfonamide-induced acute myopia and acute bilateral angle-closure glaucoma.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Sep-Oct;8(5):271-6

Wilford Hall Medical Center, San Antonio, TX, USA.

Sulfonamide medications can cause an idiosyncratic reaction, resulting in acute transient myopia and acute angle-closure glaucoma. The risk of an adverse reaction to a sulfonamide is approximately 3%, and the exact mechanism of the myopia and angle-closure glaucoma remains controversial. Typical clinical presentation includes bilateral involvement with blurring of vision that generally occurs over minutes to hours, nausea or vomiting, red eye, and headache. Read More

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March 2008
20 Reads

Intravitreal pharmacotherapy: applications in retinal disease.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Sep-Oct;8(5):259-69

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA.

Intravitreal pharmacotherapies have been used with increasing frequency in the treatment of retinal disease. Indications for their use include choroidal neovascular membranes, diabetic macular edema, ischemic neovascularization, inflammatory and infectious processes, and neoplasia. Complications of intravitreal therapies include cataract formation, glaucoma, and endophthalmitis. Read More

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March 2008
5 Reads

Comments on: management of proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

Authors:
Ali M Khorrami

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Sep-Oct;8(5):257-8

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March 2008
7 Reads

Management of proliferative diabetic retinopathy.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Sep-Oct;8(5):245-56

Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey.

Proliferative diabetic retinopathy is characterized by neovascularization originating from the retina and/or optic disk in patients with diabetes mellitus. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor appears to be central in the pathogenesis of proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Advanced glycation end products are important in the development of vitreous abnormalities in proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Read More

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March 2008
11 Reads

Chronic red eyes. Diagnosis: allergic conjunctivitis due to airborne allergen.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Jul-Aug;8(4):237-8

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February 2008
6 Reads

Adamantiades-Behcet disease: diagnosis and current concepts in management of ocular manifestations.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Jul-Aug;8(4):225-33

Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.

Adamantiades-Behcet disease is a relapsing systemic vasculitis that may involve the eyes, skin, and almost all other organ systems. The comprehensive ophthalmologist plays a key role by not only making the diagnosis but also by monitoring inflammatory status to guide systemic therapy. If left untreated, the disease has a high likelihood of causing blindness and death. Read More

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February 2008
8 Reads

Current concepts in the management of concomitant exodeviations.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Jul-Aug;8(4):213-23

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kellogg Eye Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48105, USA.

Intermittent exotropia is the most common form of divergent strabismus. Treatment is indicated with increasing tropia phase to preserve or restore binocular function and restore/reconstruct normal ocular alignment. While medical treatment is sometimes helpful for temporary relief, surgical therapy is the preferred definitive treatment modality by most pediatric ophthalmologists and strabismologists. Read More

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February 2008
7 Reads

Sjögren syndrome.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Jul-Aug;8(4):205-12

Department of Ophthalmology, Toronto Western Hospital, and Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

Sjögren syndrome is a chronic autoimmune disorder of the exocrine glands with associated lymphocytic infiltration of the affected glands. The exocrinopathy can be encountered alone (primary Sjögren syndrome or in association with other autoimmune disorders, the three most common ones being rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and progressive systemic sclerosis (secondary Sjögren syndrome). A revised international consensus has been designed based on symptoms and objective signs. Read More

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February 2008
7 Reads

The white dot syndromes.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Jul-Aug;8(4):179-200; discussion 203-4

Vitreous-Retina-Macula Consultants of New York, New York, NY, USA.

The white dot syndromes are a heterogeneous group of rare inflammatory disorders affecting the retina, the retinal pigment epithelium, and the choroid. Not all of these diseases actually cause white dots, but they all have unique lesions in the fundus. We describe acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy, serpiginous choroiditis, birdshot chorioretinopathy, multifocal choroiditis with panuveitis, diffuse subretinal fibrosis syndrome, punctate inner choroidopathy, multiple evanescent white dot syndrome, and diffuse unilateral subacute neuroretinitis as the white dot syndromes in this review. Read More

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February 2008
24 Reads

Bilateral cloudy corneas in an adult.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 May-Jun;8(3):171-2

St. Paul's Eye Unit, Royal Liverpool University Hospital, UK.

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November 2007
6 Reads

Ocular changes during pregnancy.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 May-Jun;8(3):155-67

Department of Ophthalmology, E.S. Harkness Eye Institute, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.

Pregnancy can cause multiple physiologic and non-physiologic changes throughout the body; the eye is no exception. Ocular changes during pregnancy can be physiologic or pathologic, or these changes can be an effect of a pre-existing condition. While many of theses changes are reversible, some may lead to lasting visual impairment. Read More

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November 2007
6 Reads

Detection and management of vascular hypertension.

Authors:
Andrea Grosso

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 May-Jun;8(3):145-51; discussion 153-4

Department of Clinical Physiopathology, Ophthalmology Section, University of Turin, Turin, Italy.

Classic hypertensive retinopathy has been well known since the first categorization of retinal vascular changes with the ophthalmoscope made by Keith-Wagener and Barker. Clinicians were interested in using a noninvasive tool to show that severity of vascular hypertension was predictive of mortality. Recently, a microvascular etiology has been suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of vascular hypertension. Read More

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November 2007
6 Reads

Management of unsuccessful LASIK surgery.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 May-Jun;8(3):125-41; discussion 143-4

Instituto de Olhos Renato Ambrósio, Visare Personal Laser and Refracta-RIO, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Refractive procedures enjoy very high success rates and are among the most commonly performed elective surgeries in medicine. With better insights into preoperative screening, the overwhelming majority of cases have successful outcomes. Unfortunately, however, all refractive surgeons must appropriately manage unsuccessful cases. Read More

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November 2007
7 Reads

Open globe management.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 May-Jun;8(3):111-24

California Retina Consultants and the California Retina Research Foundation, Santa Barbara, CA93103, USA.

The general ophthalmologist is most often the first responder in the care of severe open globe injuries, and in this review, we will outline the current thoughts on assessment and classification of open globe injuries. Basic medical and surgical management issues are reviewed, and relevant controversies and unresolved issues regarding the management of open globe injuries will be discussed. Read More

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November 2007
6 Reads

Transient monocular visual loss.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Mar-Apr;8(2):91-8; discussion 99-100

Department of Neurology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.

Transient monocular visual loss may be caused by a variety of ophthalmic and systemic conditions. Management depends on identifying the cause. Embolic occlusions of arteries supplying the eye are a most important cause. Read More

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July 2007
10 Reads

LASIK and dry eye.

Authors:
Ikuko Toda

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Mar-Apr;8(2):79-85; discussion 87-9

Minamiaoyama Eye Clinic, Tokyo, Japan.

Dry eye is one of the most common complications after laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). The clinical signs of post-LASIK dry eye include positive vital staining of ocular surface, decreased tear film breakup time and Schirmer test, reduced corneal sensitivity, and decreased functional visual acuity. The symptoms and signs last at least 1 month after LASIK. Read More

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July 2007
11 Reads

Optic neuritis.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Mar-Apr;8(2):67-75; discussion 77-8

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35233, USA.

The term optic neuritis denotes primary inflammation of the optic nerve. When the clinical history and examination suggest optic neuritis and the optic disk appears normal, the term retrobulbar optic neuritis is used. Critical elements in establishing the diagnosis are a detailed history and an accurate examination. Read More

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July 2007
11 Reads

Floppy eyelid syndrome.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Mar-Apr;8(2):59-65

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Washington and Harborview Medical Centers, Seattle, WA 98195, USA.

In this review, we define characteristics of floppy eyelid syndrome, as well as related syndromes, such as lax eyelid syndrome. Presenting symptoms, ocular signs, and important clinical examination techniques are described, and associated ocular and systemic conditions, as well as corresponding pathophysiology are discussed. Significant new histopathologic findings in floppy eyelid syndrome and recent surgical developments are summarized. Read More

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July 2007
6 Reads

Peripapillary Hemorrhage.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Jan-Feb;8(1):53-4

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May 2007
7 Reads

The Low Vision Gateway. (http://www.lowvision.org).

Authors:
Matthew B Goren

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Jan-Feb;8(1):51-2

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May 2007
7 Reads

Multiple sclerosis and the ophthalmologist.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Jan-Feb;8(1):39-49

Department of Neurology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Multiple sclerosis is a common demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, and neuro-ophthalmologic manifestations occur in the majority of patients. This article provides a review of the pathogenesis, epidemiology, and classification of multiple sclerosis. Neuro-ophthalmologic abnormalities associated with multiple sclerosis, including acute demyelinating optic neuritis and internuclear ophthalmoplegia, are described in detail. Read More

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May 2007
8 Reads

Ocular hypotony: a review.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Jan-Feb;8(1):29-37

Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA.

The etiology, diagnosis, sequelae, and management of ocular hypotony are discussed in this review. Hypotony from decreased production of aqueous is often due to inflammation, medications, or proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Hypotony from aqueous loss may be external, such as following surgery or trauma, or internal, as in cyclodialysis cleft or retinal detachment. Read More

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May 2007
39 Reads

Ocular ischemic syndrome: review of clinical presentations, etiology, investigation, and management.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Jan-Feb;8(1):17-28

Department of Neuro-Ophthalmology, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.

The ocular ischemic syndrome is a progressive disorder that results from chronic hypoperfusion to the eye and orbit, occurring most often from ipsilateral internal carotid or ophthalmic artery occlusion, or severe stenosis. It may also result from other causes of reduced blood flow to the eye and orbit, such as systemic vasculitis. As such, it is associated with a significant risk of both cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. Read More

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May 2007
8 Reads

Comments on: basal cell carcinoma of the eyelids.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Jan-Feb;8(1):15-6

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May 2007
8 Reads

Basal cell carcinoma of the eyelids.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2007 Jan-Feb;8(1):1-14

Oculoplastic and Orbital Division, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Adelaide, and South Australian Institute of Ophthalmology, Adelaide, Australia.

Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignancy in humans, and it is also the most frequent periocular malignancy. Although a slow-growing tumor, it can lead to significant morbidity in the periocular region as a result of orbital invasion. As clinical presentation can be very variable, biopsy is recommended for all suspicious lesions. Read More

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May 2007
8 Reads

An unusual cornea disturbance after refractive surgery.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 Nov-Dec;7(6):305-6

Editor.

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March 2007
8 Reads

The impact of new technology on informed consent.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 Nov-Dec;7(6):299-302

Arent Fox PLLC, Washington, DC 20036-5339, USA.

Failure to provide adequate informed consent is the single most common allegation made in malpractice suits filed against ophthalmologists. Adequate informed consent requires not only that the risks and benefits of the proposed procedure be disclosed, but alternative treatment options must be presented as well. With rapidly developing technological advances, alternative treatment options in connection with the correction of refractive errors continue to expand. Read More

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March 2007
5 Reads

Update on thyroid eye disease.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 Nov-Dec;7(6):287-98

Department of Ophthalmology, Johannes-Gutenberg-University, Mainz, Germany.

Thyroid-associated eye disease is an orbital manifestation of autoimmune thyroid disease. Its treatment, despite recent developments, is still challenging, and complete improvement of functional and/or cosmetic impairement is not always possible. This update tries to give an overview of actual concepts for conservative and surgical management. Read More

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March 2007
6 Reads

Minimizing the risk of endophthalmitis following intravitreal injections.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 Nov-Dec;7(6):277-84; discussion 285-6

Chicago Medical School at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL, USA.

Over the last decade, the use of intravitreal injections has gained increasing popularity in the treatment of many intraocular disorders. Intravitreal injections have been employed to deliver antibiotics, antivirals, steroids, gas, and antivascular endothelial growth factor. The specific methods and techniques employed for intravitreal injections differ among various studies. Read More

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March 2007
10 Reads

Branch retinal vein occlusion: clinical findings, natural history, and management.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 Nov-Dec;7(6):265-76

Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA.

Branch retinal vein occlusion is a common retinal vascular condition characterized by sectoral intraretinal hemorrhages, retinal ischemia, retinal exudates, and macular edema. The site of occlusion usually occurs in the vicinity of arteriovenous crossing sites, and is predisposed by various systemic and local factors. Complications of branch retinal vein occlusion include macular edema, capillary nonperfusion, retinal neovascularization, vitreous hemorrhage, and tractional retinal detachments that often result in loss of vision. Read More

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March 2007
7 Reads

The Eye Bank Association of America.

Authors:
Matthew B Goren

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 Sep-Oct;7(5):261-2

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January 2007
9 Reads

Maculopathy in a child.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 Sep-Oct;7(5):257-60

University Eye Institute, University of Houston, Houston, TX, USA.

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January 2007
8 Reads

Refractive power of the cornea.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 Sep-Oct;7(5):243-51; discussion 253-5

Cornea Service, Wills Eye Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA.

Corneal refractive surgeries, such as laser in situ keratomileusis and photorefractive keratectomy, have become some of the most commonly performed elective surgical procedures today. Many of the patients undergoing these surgeries are beginning to show signs of cataract formation and are in need of surgical correction. A common problem in the postrefractive patient is accurate prediction of the corneal power for use in intraocular lens calculation. Read More

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January 2007
10 Reads

The neuro-ophthalmology of pituitary tumors.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 Sep-Oct;7(5):225-40; discussion 241-2

Department of Neurological Surgery, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA, USA.

The management of pituitary tumors requires a multidisciplinary approach involving neurosurgeons, endocrinologists, and ophthalmologists. Patients symptomatic from a pituitary tumor often are first evaluated by an ophthalmologist. This review discusses key issues regarding both the topographic diagnosis as well as the neuro-ophthalmologic manifestations of pituitary disease. Read More

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January 2007
7 Reads

Sixth nerve palsy.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 Sep-Oct;7(5):215-21; discussion 223-4

University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN, USA.

The diagnosis and etiologies of sixth cranial nerve palsies are reviewed along with nonsurgical and surgical treatment approaches. Surgical options depend on the function of the paretic muscle, the field of greatest symptoms, and the likelihood of inducing diplopia in additional fields by a given procedure. Read More

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January 2007
14 Reads

Update on punctal plugs.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 Sep-Oct;7(5):205-12; discussion 213-4

Division of Ophthalmology, Cole Eye Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH 44195, USA.

Punctal plugs have offered a safe and often reversible treatment for aqueous-deficient dry eye for over three decades. However, they represent only one tool in our armamentrarium to help patients with dry eyes, and plugs do have limitations. This article briefly reviews the history of occlusive treatments for aqueous tear deficiency and provides an update of recent advancements in punctal and canalicular occlusive materials and techniques. Read More

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January 2007
6 Reads

Evaluation and treatment of papilledema in pregnancy.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 Jul-Aug;7(4):187-202

University Eye Institute, University of Houston, Houston, Texas, USA.

Papilledema is defined as optic disk edema that is secondary to increased intracranial pressure. During pregnancy, papilledema poses additional diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. As in the nonpregnant patient, the primary goal is to urgently determine the cause of the papilledema followed by implementing appropriate management for life-threatening conditions in a timely fashion while safeguarding the fetus. Read More

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November 2006
137 Reads

Proliferative vitreoretinopathy: developments in pathogenesis and treatment.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 Jul-Aug;7(4):179-85

Royal Free hospital, London, England; Institute of Ophthalmology, London, England.

Proliferative vitreoretinopathy is an abnormal wound-healing response following retinal detachment and occurs in 5% to 10% of cases. It is now possible to treat this once-blinding condition. However, proliferative vitreoretinopathy still remains the most common cause of failure to reattach the retina. Read More

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November 2006
8 Reads

Vitreous floaters.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 Jul-Aug;7(4):171-7

Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Floaters are a common presenting ophthalmic symptom that may accompany sight-threatening disorders. In most cases, they are often secondary to benign, degenerative changes in the vitreous. In this review, we briefly examine the anatomy of the vitreous and describe how degenerative vitreous change contributes to the development of floaters. Read More

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November 2006
8 Reads

The itching, burning eye: diagnostic algorithm and management options.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 Jul-Aug;7(4):157-67; discussion 169-70

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 3/F Hong Kong Eye Hospital, 147K Argyle Street, Kowloon, HKSAR, PRC.

The healthy ocular surface is a complex, composite unit that is essential for patient comfort and visual function. A number of components need to work in an integrated manner to ensure that this is achieved, and a variety of causes can result in the final common symptom complex that can be termed the itching, burning eye. Many of these causes may be due to relatively common and simple issues related to lid disease, allergies, tear dysfunction, excessive computer use, exposure to polluted environment, and convergence problems. Read More

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November 2006
7 Reads

Recurrent subconjunctival hemorrhage.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 May-Jun;7(3):155-6

MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA.

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October 2006
6 Reads

Comments on: Emmetropization in accommodative esotropia: an update and review.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 May-Jun;7(3):151-2

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October 2006
8 Reads

Emmetropization in accommodative esotropia: an update and review.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 May-Jun;7(3):145-9

Department of Ophthalmology, University of Arkansas, Little Rock, AR, USA.

Many children with accommodative esotropia are able to successfully discontinue spectacle wear, while others require spectacle correction into adulthood. Parents often ask about the likelihood of glasses being required on a long-term basis and whether use of spectacles will cause dependency. Most infants are hyperopic and gradually become emmetropic. Read More

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October 2006
6 Reads

Comments on: Current concepts in the pathogenesis and management of exfoliation syndrome and exfoliative glaucoma.

Authors:
Anne M V Brooks

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 May-Jun;7(3):143-4

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October 2006
10 Reads

Current concepts in the pathogenesis and management of exfoliation syndrome and exfoliative glaucoma.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 May-Jun;7(3):131-41

Glaucoma Unit, A University Department of Ophthalmology, AHEPA Hospital, 1 Kyriakidi Str., Thessaloniki 546 36, Greece.

Exfoliative glaucoma is a common, sight-threatening disease that develops as a consequence of exfoliation syndrome. There are important differences in the clinical appearance, course, and prognosis of exfoliative glaucoma versus primary open-angle glaucoma. At the clinical, biochemical, and cellular levels, exfoliative glaucoma is a distinct entity, with an intriguing mechanism of development and numerous systemic manifestations that require further elucidation. Read More

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October 2006
10 Reads

Comments on: Avoiding and managing the dislocated crystalline lens.

Authors:
Bhavna P Sheth

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 May-Jun;7(3):129-30

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October 2006
6 Reads

Avoiding and managing the dislocated crystalline lens.

Compr Ophthalmol Update 2006 May-Jun;7(3):113-27

Wake Forest University Eye Center, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston Salem, NC 27157, USA.

A major complication of cataract surgery is the posterior dislocation of crystalline lens material, which may lead to poor visual outcomes. Knowledge of preoperative high-risk situations, causes of lens dislocation, and intraoperative warning signs should lead to reduced complications. This update reviews techniques to avoid the dislocated lens, and management options if this complication does occur. Read More

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October 2006
9 Reads