65 results match your criteria Cognitive Development [Journal]


Episodic Memory in Middle Childhood: Age, Brain Electrical Activity, and Self-Reported Attention.

Cogn Dev 2018 Jul-Sep;47:63-70. Epub 2018 Aug 9.

Department of Psychology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 890 Drillfield Drive, 333 Williams Hall Blacksburg, VA 24061, USA.

Middle childhood is a transitional period for episodic memory (EM) performance, as a result of improvements in strategies that are used to encode and retrieve memories. EM is also a skill continually assessed for testing in the school setting. The purpose of this study was to examine EM performance during middle childhood and its relation to individual differences in attentional abilities and in neurophysiological functioning. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08852014163016
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2018.03.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6197814PMC
August 2018
2 Reads

Longitudinal evidence for 4-year-olds' but not 2- and 3-year-olds' false belief-related action anticipation.

Cogn Dev 2018 Apr-Jun;46:58-68

Department of Social Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Leipzig, Germany.

Recently, infants younger than 2 years have been shown to display correct expectations of the actions of an agent with a false belief. The developmental trajectory of these early-developing abilities and their robustness, however, remain a matter of debate. Here, we tested children longitudinally from 2 to 4 years of age with an established anticipatory looking false belief task, and found a significant developmental change between the ages of 3 and 4 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2017.08.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6103291PMC
August 2018
2 Reads

Behavioral Performance and Neural Areas Associated with Memory Processes Contribute to Math and Reading Achievement in 6-year-old Children.

Cogn Dev 2018 Jan-Mar;45:141-151. Epub 2017 Jul 31.

Department of Psychology, Virginia Tech.

Associations between working memory and academic achievement (math and reading) are well documented. Surprisingly, little is known of the contributions of episodic memory, segmented into temporal memory (recollection proxy) and item recognition (familiarity proxy), to academic achievement. This is the first study to observe these associations in typically developing 6-year old children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2017.07.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5978002PMC
July 2017
8 Reads

Preschool Children Transfer Real-World Moral Reasoning into Pretense.

Cogn Dev 2018 Jan-Mar;45:40-47. Epub 2017 Nov 21.

Providence College, Department of Psychology, One Cunningham Square, Providence, RI 02918, United States.

Is it wrong to pretend to kick or pretend to steal? The current experiment examined whether preschoolers extend their moral principles from reality into pretense and whether this transfer depends on the proximity of the pretend world to the real world. Children are known to transfer their knowledge of object properties, causality, and problem solutions between pretend and real worlds. However, do children maintain their real-world moral reasoning in pretense? Preschoolers (N = 63) judged the acceptability of antisocial behaviors in pretend, fantastical, or non-pretend scenarios. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2017.11.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5846713PMC
November 2017
5 Reads

Neurodynamic correlates of response inhibition from emerging to mid adulthood.

Cogn Dev 2017 Jul 21;43:106-118. Epub 2017 Mar 21.

Psychology Department, San Diego State University, San Diego, USA.

Response inhibition, a key executive function, continues to develop in early adulthood in parallel with maturational processes of the underlying prefrontal regions known to support it. The current study examined behavioral and neurophysiological correlates of response inhibition during a visual Go/No-Go task in a large sample (N = 120) comprised of participants in their Early 20s (ages 19-21), Mid 20s (ages 23-27), and Early 30s (ages 28-42). The two younger groups had lower accuracy, shorter reaction times, and made more premature responses compared to Early 30s. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2017.03.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5658138PMC
July 2017
9 Reads

Differentiation of Writing and Drawing by U.S. Two- to Five-Year-Olds.

Cogn Dev 2017 Jul 3;43:119-128. Epub 2017 Apr 3.

Department of Foreign Languages and Literatures, Tsinghua University.

To investigate preschoolers' knowledge about symbol systems, we compared the written and drawn productions of 2-5-year-old U.S. children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2017.03.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5646365PMC
July 2017
13 Reads

Plasticity may change inputs as well as processes, structures, and responses.

Authors:
Lisa M Oakes

Cogn Dev 2017 Apr 1;42:4-14. Epub 2017 Mar 1.

Department of Psychology, Center for Mind and Brain, University of California, 267 Cousteau Place, Davis, CA 95618, United States.

Significant work has documented neuroplasticity in development, demonstrating that developmental pathways are shaped by experience. Plasticity is often discussed in terms of the of differences in input; differences in brain structures, processes, or responses reflect differences in experience. In this paper, I discuss how developmental plasticity also effectively changes into the system. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5630173PMC
April 2017
12 Reads

Theory of Mind and Resource Allocation in the Context of Hidden Inequality.

Cogn Dev 2017 Jul 24;43:25-36. Epub 2017 Feb 24.

University of Maryland, College Park.

In many situations, children evaluate straightforward resource inequalities as unfair. It remains unclear, however, how children interpret (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2017.02.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5624715PMC
July 2017
11 Reads

The organization and reorganization of audiovisual speech perception in the first year of life.

Cogn Dev 2017 Apr 5;42:37-48. Epub 2017 Mar 5.

Department of Psychology, The University of British Columbia, 2136 West Mall, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z4, Canada.

The period between six and 12 months is a sensitive period for language learning during which infants undergo auditory perceptual attunement, and recent results indicate that this sensitive period may exist across sensory modalities. We tested infants at three stages of perceptual attunement (six, nine, and 11 months) to determine 1) whether they were sensitive to the congruence between heard and seen speech stimuli in an unfamiliar language, and 2) whether familiarization with congruent audiovisual speech could boost subsequent non-native auditory discrimination. Infants at six- and nine-, but not 11-months, detected audiovisual congruence of non-native syllables. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2017.02.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5621752PMC
April 2017
12 Reads

The Drosophila gene human orthologue predicts individual differences in the effects of early adversity on maternal sensitivity.

Cogn Dev 2017 Apr 28;42:62-73. Epub 2016 Dec 28.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 25 Wilcocks St. University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5S 3B2.

There is variation in the extent to which childhood adverse experience affects adult individual differences in maternal behavior. Genetic variation in the animal gene, which encodes a cGMP-dependent protein kinase, contributes to variation in the responses of adult fruit flies, , to early life adversity and is also known to play a role in maternal behavior in social insects. Here we investigate genetic variation in the human foraging gene () as a predictor of individual differences in the effects of early adversity on maternal behavior in two cohorts. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08852014163010
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2016.11.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5562168PMC
April 2017
22 Reads

Developmental Foundations of Children's Fraction Magnitude Knowledge.

Cogn Dev 2016 Jul-Sep;39:141-153. Epub 2016 May 28.

University of Missouri.

The conceptual insight that fractions represent magnitudes is a critical yet daunting step in children's mathematical development, and the knowledge of fraction magnitudes influences children's later mathematics learning including algebra. In this study, longitudinal data were analyzed to identify the mathematical knowledge and domain-general competencies that predicted 8 and 9 graders' (n=122) knowledge of fraction magnitudes and its cross-grade gains. Performance on the fraction magnitude measures predicted 9 grade algebra achievement. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5070804PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2016.05.002DOI Listing
May 2016
10 Reads

Longitudinal development of visual working memory precision in childhood and early adolescence.

Cogn Dev 2016 Jul-Sep;39:36-44

Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, United Kingdom.

Visual working memory (VWM) is the ability to hold in mind visual information for brief periods of time. The current study investigated VWM precision development longitudinally. Participants (N = 40, aged 7-11 years) completed delayed reproduction sequential VWM tasks at baseline and two years later. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2016.03.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4981317PMC
August 2016
8 Reads

Developmental and individual differences in the precision of visuospatial memory.

Cogn Dev 2016 Jul-Sep;39:1-12

Medical Research Council, Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, Cambridge, United Kingdom.

Our ability to retain visuospatial information over brief periods of time is severely limited and develops gradually. In childhood, visuospatial short-term and working memory are typically indexed using span-based measures. However, whilst these standardized measures have been successful in characterizing developmental and individual differences, each individual trial only provides a binary measure of a child's performance-they are either correct or incorrect. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08852014163000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2016.02.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4981316PMC
August 2016
10 Reads

Do children need reminders on the Day-Night task, or simply some way to prevent them from responding too quickly?

Cogn Dev 2016 Jan-Mar;37:67-72

The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada.

We previously reported better performance on the Day-Night task when a ditty was chanted between stimulus presentation and when children could respond (Diamond, Kirkham, & Amso, 2002). Here we investigated competing hypotheses about why the ditty helps. Does it help because it imposes a brief waiting time (the child waits while the ditty is chanted before responding)? Or, does the ditty help because of its content, providing information helpful to performing the task? One-third of the 72 children (age 4) were tested with the ditty previously used which reminds them: "Think about the answer; don't tell me. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2015.10.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4776648PMC
March 2016
17 Reads

The Rational Adolescent: Strategic Information Processing during Decision Making Revealed by Eye Tracking.

Cogn Dev 2015 Oct-Dec;36:20-30

Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, 27708 ; Duke Center for Interdisciplinary Decision Sciences, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, 27708 ; Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA, 27708.

Adolescence is often viewed as a time of irrational, risky decision-making - despite adolescents' competence in other cognitive domains. In this study, we examined the strategies used by adolescents (N=30) and young adults (N=47) to resolve complex, multi-outcome economic gambles. Compared to adults, adolescents were more likely to make conservative, loss-minimizing choices consistent with economic models. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08852014153000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2015.08.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4571495PMC
September 2015
10 Reads

Improving Low-Income Preschoolers' Theory of Mind: A Training Study.

Cogn Dev 2015 Oct-Dec;36:1-19

Department of Psychology, The Ohio State University at Lima.

This study examined the efficacy of training theory of mind via storybook interactions focused on characters' mental states (i.e., beliefs and emotions) in a sample of 73 low-income preschoolers, and determined if training transferred to social competence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2015.07.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4538699PMC
August 2015
7 Reads

The development of children's concepts of invisibility.

Cogn Dev 2015 Apr-Jun;34:63-75

University of Alabama.

One of the most striking examples of appearance-reality discrepancy is invisibility - when something has no appearance yet still exists. The issue of invisibility sits at the juncture of two foundational ontological distinctions, that between appearance and reality and that between reality and non-reality. We probed the invisibility concepts of 47 3-7-year-olds using two sets of tasks: (1) an entity task, in which children were queried about the visibility and reality status of a variety of both visible and invisible entities, and (2) two standard appearance-reality tasks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2014.12.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4414257PMC
May 2015
9 Reads

The Effect of Realistic Contexts on Ontological Judgments of Novel Entities.

Cogn Dev 2015 Apr-Jun;34:88-98

University of Virginia.

Although a great deal of research has focused on ontological judgments in preschoolers, very little has examined ontological judgments in older children. The present study asked 10-year-olds and adults (N = 94) to judge the reality status of known real, known imagined, and novel entities presented in simple and elaborate contexts and to explain their judgments. Although judgments were generally apt, participants were more likely to endorse imagined and novel entities when the entities were presented in elaborate contexts. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08852014140007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2014.12.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4407999PMC
April 2015
10 Reads

A Longitudinal Assessment of the Relation between Executive Function and Theory of Mind at 3, 4, and 5 Years.

Cogn Dev 2015 January-March;33:40-55

University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

This longitudinal study contributes to the growing literature on the predictive nature of the relation between executive function (EF) and theory of mind (ToM). A latent variable model was fit to the data acquired from 226 socioeconomically and racially diverse children (52% female) at 3, 4, and 5 years of age on a number of age-appropriate tasks designed to assess EF and ToM. After controlling for sex, income-to-needs, and receptive language ability, there was substantial stability within each construct as children aged. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S08852014140004
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2014.07.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4308416PMC
February 2015
14 Reads

Children's Recall of Generic and Specific Labels Regarding Animals and People.

Cogn Dev 2015 January-March;33:84-98

University of Michigan, 530 Church St., Department of Psychology, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1043.

Although children tend to categorize objects at the basic level, we hypothesized that generic sentences would direct children's attention to different levels of categorization. We tested children's and adults' short-term recall (Study 1) and longer-term recall (Study 2) for labels presented in generic sentences (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2014.05.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4292889PMC
January 2015
8 Reads

Why is it Bad to Make a Mess? Preschoolers' Conceptions of Pragmatic Norms.

Cogn Dev 2014 Oct-Dec;32:12-22. Epub 2014 Aug 27.

University of California, Berkeley.

A common type of transgression in early childhood involves creating inconvenience, for instance by spilling, playing with breakable objects, or otherwise interfering with people's ongoing activities. Despite the prevalence of such transgressions, little is known about children's conceptions of norms prohibiting these acts. The present study investigated whether 3-to 5-year-olds ( = 58) see pragmatic norms as distinct from first-order (welfare and rights of others), prudential (welfare of agent), and social conventional norms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2014.05.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5283392PMC
August 2014
23 Reads

Infant, Control Thyself: Infants' Integration of Multiple Social Cues to Regulate Their Imitative Behavior.

Cogn Dev 2014 Oct-Dec;32:46-57

Department of Psychology and the Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences.

This study investigated 15-month-old infants' ( = 150) ability to self-regulate based on observing a social interaction between two adults. Infants were bystanders to a social exchange in which an Experimenter performed actions on objects and an Emoter expressed anger, as if they were forbidden acts. Next, the Emoter became neutral and her visual access to the infant was experimentally manipulated. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5036936PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2014.04.004DOI Listing
September 2016
23 Reads

You can't always want what you get: Children's intuitions about ownership and desire.

Cogn Dev 2014 Jul;31:59-68

University of Michigan.

Ownership is a central element of human experience. The present experiments were designed to examine the influence of psychological state on ownership judgments. In three experiments, 4-year-olds were asked to make ownership attributions about owners and non-owners who either desired or did not desire a gift. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2014.02.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4088259PMC
July 2014
11 Reads

Attentional Control in Early and Later Bilingual Children.

Cogn Dev 2013 Jul;28(3):233-246

University of Kansas.

This study examined differences in attentional control among school-age children who were monolingual English speakers, early childhood Spanish-English bilinguals who began speaking both languages by age 3, and later childhood Spanish-English bilingual children who began speaking English after age 3. Children's attentional control was tested using the Attention Network Test (ANT). All language groups performed equally on ANT networks; however, when controlling for age and verbal ability, groups differed significantly on reaction time. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2013.01.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4044912PMC
July 2013
9 Reads

Bottom-up and top-down dynamics in young children's executive function: Labels aid 3-year-olds' performance on the Dimensional Change Card Sort.

Cogn Dev 2013 Jul;28(3):222-232

Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, United States.

Executive function (EF) improves between the ages of 3 and 5 and has been assessed reliably using the Dimensional Change Card Sort (DCCS), a task in which children first sort bivalent cards by one dimension (e.g., shape) and then are instructed to sort by a different dimension (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2012.12.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4039630PMC
July 2013
8 Reads

Culturally-Driven Biases in Preschoolers' Spatial Search Strategies for Ordinal and Non-Ordinal Dimensions.

Cogn Dev 2014 Apr;30:1-14

University of Chicago, USA.

Culturally-driven spatial biases affect the way people interact with and think about the world. We examine the ways in which spatial presentation of stimuli affects learning and memory in preschool-aged children in the USA and Israel. In Experiment 1, preschoolers in both cultures were given a spatial search task in which they were asked to utilize verbal labels (letters of the alphabet) to match the hiding locations of two monkeys. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2013.11.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3998755PMC
April 2014
9 Reads

What do Different Beliefs Tell us? An Examination of Factual, Opinion-Based, and Religious Beliefs.

Cogn Dev 2014 Apr;30(April - June 2014):15-29

Harvard University, Department of Psychology, 33 Kirkland St., Cambridge, MA 02138, United States.

Children and adults differentiate statements of religious belief from statements of fact and opinion, but the basis of that differentiation remains unclear. Across three experiments, adults and 8-10-year-old children heard statements of factual, opinion-based, and religious belief. Adults and children judged that statements of factual belief revealed more about the world, statements of opinion revealed more about individuals, and statements of religious belief provided information about both. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2013.12.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3989146PMC
April 2014
7 Reads

The Role of Search Speed in the Contextual Cueing of Children's Attention.

Cogn Dev 2014 Jan;29:17-29

Department of Psychology, University of Houston, 126 Heyne Building, Houston, TX 77204, United States.

The contextual cueing effect is a robust phenomenon in which repeated exposure to the same arrangement of random elements guides attention to relevant information by constraining search. The effect is measured using an object search task in which a target (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2013.10.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3909958PMC
January 2014
7 Reads

Interference Suppression vs. Response Inhibition: An Explanation for the Absence of a Bilingual Advantage in Preschoolers' Stroop Task Performance.

Cogn Dev 2013 Oct;28(4):354-363

Michigan Technological University, Department of Cognitive and Learning Sciences, Houghton, MI 49931.

The well-documented advantage that bilingual speakers demonstrate across the lifespan on measures of controlled attention is not observed in preschoolers' performance on Stroop task variations. We examined the role of task demands in explaining this discrepancy. Whereas the Color/Word Stroop used with adult participants requires interference suppression, the Stroop task typically used with preschoolers requires only response inhibition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2013.09.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3894626PMC
October 2013
9 Reads

Evidence for a relation between executive function and pretense representation in preschool children.

Cogn Dev 2014 Jan;29

Department of Psychology, University of Washington, Seattle, United States.

Several theoretical formulations suggest a relation between children's pretense and executive function (EF) skills. However, there is little empirical evidence for a correlation between these constructs in early development. Preschool children ( = 104; age = 4-0) were given batteries of EF and pretense representation measures, as well as verbal, memory, and appearance-reality control tasks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2013.09.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3864685PMC
January 2014
15 Reads

Factors influencing infants' ability to update object representations in memory.

Cogn Dev 2013 Jul;28(3):272-289

Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA.

Remembering persisting objects over occlusion is critical to representing a stable environment. Infants remember hidden objects at multiple locations and can update their representation of a hidden array when an object is added or subtracted. However, the factors influencing these updating abilities have received little systematic exploration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2013.04.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3773368PMC
July 2013
9 Reads

Developmental changes in effects of risk and valence on adolescent decision-making.

Cogn Dev 2013 Jul;28(3):290-299

UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK.

Recent research on risky decision-making in adults has shown that both the risk in potential outcomes and their valence (i.e., whether those outcomes involve gains or losses) exert dissociable influences on decisions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2013.04.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3765945PMC
July 2013
11 Reads

Perspective-Taking Ability in Bilingual Children: Extending Advantages in Executive Control to Spatial Reasoning.

Cogn Dev 2013 Jan;28(1):41-50

University of Alberta.

Monolingual and bilingual 8-year-olds performed a computerized spatial perspective-taking task. Children were asked to decide how an observer saw a four-block array from one of three different positions (90°, 180°, and 270° counter-clockwise from the child's position) by selecting one of four responses -- the correct response, the egocentric error, an incorrect choice in which the array was correct but in the wrong orientation for the viewer, and an incorrect choice in which the array included an internal spatial error. All children performed similarly on background measures, including fluid intelligence, but bilingual children were more accurate than monolingual children in calculating the observer's view across all three positions, with no differences in the pattern of errors committed by the two language groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2012.10.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3593058PMC
January 2013
42 Reads

Generic Language Use Reveals Domain Differences in Children's Expectations about Animal and Artifact Categories.

Cogn Dev 2013 Jan;28(1):63-75

Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015, USA.

The goal of the present study was to explore domain differences in young children's expectations about the structure of animal and artifact categories. We examined 5-year-olds' and adults' use of category-referring generic noun phrases (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2012.09.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3547626PMC
January 2013
12 Reads

Models provide specificity: Testing a proposed mechanism of visual working memory capacity development.

Cogn Dev 2012 Dec 30;27(4):419-439. Epub 2012 Aug 30.

Psychology Department and Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin - Madison ; Eye Research Institute, University of Wisconsin - Madison.

Numerous studies have established that visual working memory has a limited capacity, and that capacity increases during childhood. However, debate continues over the source of capacity limits and its developmental increase. Simmering (2008) adapted a computational model of spatial cognitive development, the Dynamic Field Theory, to explain not only the source of capacity limitations but also the developmental mechanism. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2012.08.001,DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3509784PMC
December 2012
7 Reads

Contributions of Dynamic Systems Theory to Cognitive Development.

Cogn Dev 2012 Oct-Dec;27(4):401-418

Department of Psychology, University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

This paper examines the contributions of dynamic systems theory to the field of cognitive development, focusing on modeling using dynamic neural fields. A brief overview highlights the contributions of dynamic systems theory and the central concepts of dynamic field theory (DFT). We then probe empirical predictions and findings generated by DFT around two examples-the DFT of infant perseverative reaching that explains the Piagetian A-not-B error, and the DFT of spatial memory that explain changes in spatial cognition in early development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2012.07.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4454421PMC
June 2015
7 Reads

Why won't you do what I want? The informative failures of children and models.

Cogn Dev 2012 Oct;27(4):349-366

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder CO, USA.

Computational models are powerful tools - too powerful, according to some. We argue that the idea that models can "do anything" is wrong, and describe how their failures have been informative. We present new work showing surprising diversity in the effects of feedback on children's task-switching, such that some children perseverate despite this feedback, other children switch as instructed, and yet others play an "opposites" game without truly switching to the newly-instructed task. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2012.07.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3894146PMC
October 2012
8 Reads

Generic language facilitates children's cross-classification.

Cogn Dev 2012 Apr;27(2):154-167

Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina Wilmington.

Four studies examined the role of generic language in facilitating 4- and 5-year-old children's ability to cross-classify. Participants were asked to classify an item into a familiar (taxonomic or script) category, then cross-classify it into a novel (script or taxonomic) category with the help of a clue expressed in either generic or specific language. Experiment 1 showed that generics facilitate 5-year-olds' and adults' cross-classification when expressed at an appropriate level of generalization (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2012.01.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3414382PMC
April 2012
5 Reads

Pointing Disrupts Preschoolers' Ability to Discriminate Between Knowledgeable and Ignorant Informants.

Cogn Dev 2012 Jan;27(1):54-63

University of Virginia.

By 4 years of age, children have been reinforced repeatedly for searching where they see someone point. In two studies, we asked whether this history of reinforcement could interfere with young children's ability to discriminate between a knowledgeable and an ignorant informant. Children watched as one informant hid a sticker while another turned around, and then both informants indicated where they though the sticker was, either by pointing or by using a less practiced means of reference. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2011.07.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3256585PMC
January 2012
8 Reads

The Shape Bias is Affected by Differing Similarity Among Objects.

Cogn Dev 2012 Jan;27(1):28-38

University of Connecticut, Department of Psychology, 406 Babbidge Road, Unit 1020, Storrs, CT, 06269-1020, USA.

Previous research has demonstrated that visual properties of objects can affect shape-based categorization in a novel-name extension task; however, we still do not know how a relationship between visual properties of objects affects judgments in a novel-name extension task. We examined effects of increased visual similarity among the target and test objects in a shape bias task in young children and adults. Experiment 1 assessed college students with sets of objects whose similarity between target and test objects was either low or high similarity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2011.09.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3255290PMC
January 2012
6 Reads

Own and Others' Prior Experiences Influence Children's Imitation of Causal Acts.

Cogn Dev 2011 Jul;26(3):260-268

Department of Psychology, Georgia State University, P.O. Box 5010, Atlanta, GA 30302 USA, Telephone: 404-413-6219, ,

Young children learn from others' examples, and they do so selectively. We examine whether the efficacy of prior experiences influences children's imitation. Thirty-six-month-olds had initial experience on a causal learning task either by performing the task themselves or by watching an adult perform it. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2011.04.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3181112PMC
July 2011
10 Reads

Young infants prefer prosocial to antisocial others.

Cogn Dev 2011 Jan;26(1):30-39

University of British Columbia.

The current study replicates and extends the finding (Hamlin, Wynn & Bloom, 2007) that infants prefer individuals who act prosocially toward unrelated third parties over those who act antisocially. Using different stimuli from those used by Hamlin, Wynn & Bloom (2007), somewhat younger subjects, and 2 additional social scenarios, we replicated the findings that (a) infants prefer those who behave prosocially versus antisocially, and (b) these preferences are based on the social nature of the actions. The generality of infants' responses across multiple examples of prosocial and antisocial actions supports the claim that social evaluation is fundamental to perceiving the world. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2010.09.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3076932PMC
January 2011
13 Reads

Talking about Internal States in Mother-Child Reminiscing Influences Children's Self-Representations: A Cross-Cultural Study.

Cogn Dev 2010 Oct;25(4):380-393

Cornell University.

This study examined the relation of mother-child discussions of internal states during reminiscing to the development of trait and evaluative self-representations in 131 European American and Chinese immigrant 3-year-olds. Mothers and children discussed one positive and one negative event, and children were interviewed for self-descriptions. Euro-American mothers and children made more references to internal states and focused more on causal talk than did Chinese, and Euro-American children were more likely than Chinese children to describe their own traits and evaluative characteristics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2010.08.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2976551PMC
October 2010
8 Reads

When is peer rejection justifiable?: Children's understanding across two cultures.

Cogn Dev 2010 Jul;25(3):290-301

Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

This study investigated how Korean (N = 397) and U.S. (N = 333) children and adolescents (10 and 13 years of age) evaluated personality (aggression, shyness) and group (gender, nationality) characteristics as a basis for peer rejection in three contexts (friendship rejection, group exclusion, victimization). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2009.10.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2976548PMC
July 2010
7 Reads

The Role of Maternal Verbal, Affective, and Behavioral Support in Preschool Children's Independent and Collaborative Autobiographical Memory Reports.

Cogn Dev 2010 Oct;25(4):309-324

Department of Psychology, Emory University.

The authors investigated the individual and relative contributions of different aspects of maternal support (i.e., verbal, affective, and behavioral) in relation to children's collaborative and independent reminiscing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2010.08.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2976545PMC
October 2010
10 Reads

Personal narratives, well-being, and gender in adolescence.

Cogn Dev 2010 Oct-Dec;25(4):368-379

Emory University.

Relations between narratives, especially the inclusion of internal state language within narratives, and well-being have been found in adults. However, research with adolescents has been sparse and the findings inconsistent. We examined gender differences in adolescents' personal autobiographical narratives as well as relations between internal state language and emotional well-being. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2010.08.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4634006PMC
November 2015
7 Reads

Human-centeredness is Not a Universal Feature of Young Children's Reasoning: Culture and Experience Matter When Reasoning About Biological Entities.

Cogn Dev 2010 Jul;25(3):197-207

Northwestern University.

We consider young children's construals of biological phenomena and the forces that shape them, using Carey's (1985) category-based induction task that demonstrated anthropocentric reasoning in young urban children. Follow-up studies (including our own) have questioned the generality of her results, but they have employed quite different procedures and either have not included urban children or, when urban samples were included, have failed to reproduce her original findings. In the present study of 4-10-year-olds from three cultural communities, our procedures followed Carey's more closely and replicated her findings with young urban children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2010.02.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2930830PMC
July 2010
15 Reads

Adolescents' heightened risk-seeking in a probabilistic gambling task.

Cogn Dev 2010 Apr;25(2):183-196

UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, 17 Queen Square, London WC1N 3AR, UK.

This study investigated adolescent males' decision-making under risk, and the emotional response to decision outcomes, using a probabilistic gambling task designed to evoke counterfactually mediated emotions (relief and regret). Participants were 20 adolescents (aged 9-11), 26 young adolescents (aged 12-15), 20 mid-adolescents (aged 15-18) and 17 adults (aged 25-35). All were male. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2009.11.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2896475PMC
April 2010
8 Reads

How do preschoolers express cause in gesture and speech?

Cogn Dev 2010 ;25(1):56-68

Temple University.

Upon witnessing a causal event, do children's gestures encode causal knowledge that a) does not appear in their linguistic descriptions or b) conveys the same information as their sentential expressions? The former use of gesture is considered supplementary; the latter is considered reinforcing. Sixty-four English-speaking children aged 2.5- to 5 years described an action in which the experimenter pushed a ball across a small pool with a stick. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogdev.2009.11.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2834526PMC
January 2010
32 Reads