1,061 results match your criteria Cognitive Brain Research[Journal]


Robotic movement elicits automatic imitation.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec;25(3):632-40

Department of Psychology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1H OAP, UK.

Recent behavioural and neuroimaging studies have found that observation of human movement, but not of robotic movement, gives rise to visuomotor priming. This implies that the 'mirror neuron' or 'action observation-execution matching' system in the premotor and parietal cortices is entirely unresponsive to robotic movement. The present study investigated this hypothesis using an 'automatic imitation' stimulus-response compatibility procedure. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.020DOI Listing
December 2005
9 Reads

On the neural basis of focused and divided attention.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 5;25(3):760-76. Epub 2005 Dec 5.

Department of Neurology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, 45122 Essen, Germany.

Concepts of higher attention functions distinguish focused and divided attention. The present study investigated whether these mental abilities are mediated by common or distinct neural substrates. In a first experiment, 19 healthy subjects were examined with functional brain imaging (fMRI) while they attended to either one or both of two simultaneously presented visual information streams and responded to repetitive stimuli. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.011DOI Listing
December 2005
11 Reads

Task difficulty in a simultaneous face matching task modulates activity in face fusiform area.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 1;25(3):701-10. Epub 2005 Dec 1.

Alzheimer Memorial Center and Geriatric Psychiatry Branch, Department of Psychiatry, Ludwig-Maximilian University, Nussbaumstr. 7, 80336 Munich, Germany.

The level of difficulty of a task can alter the neural network that activates for performance of the task. Previous studies have shown increased activation with task difficulty in the frontal lobes while the effects in the extrastriate visual areas have been unclear. We hypothesized that the face fusiform area (FFA), an area specialized for face processing, would increase activation as task difficulty increased in a face matching task. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.016DOI Listing
December 2005
5 Reads

The role of the left Brodmann's areas 44 and 45 in reading words and pseudowords.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 28;25(3):982-93. Epub 2005 Nov 28.

Research Centre Jülich, Institute of Medicine, AG Brain Mapping, 52425 Jülich, Germany.

In this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we investigated the influence of two task (lexical decision, LDT; phonological decision, PDT) on activation in Broca's region (left Brodmann's areas [BA] 44 and 45) during the processing of visually presented words and pseudowords. Reaction times were longer for pseudowords than words in LDT but did not differ in PDT. By combining the fMRI data with cytoarchitectonic anatomical probability maps, we demonstrated that the left BA 44 and BA 45 were stronger activated for pseudowords than for words. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.022DOI Listing
December 2005
6 Reads

Event-related potentials to violations of inflectional verb morphology in English.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 22;25(3):963-81. Epub 2005 Nov 22.

School of Cognitive Science, Hampshire College, 893 West Street, Amherst, MA 01002, USA.

Event-related brain potentials were recorded to morphologically correct and incorrect regular and irregular past tense verb forms presented in sentences and in lists. In the sentence context, all incorrect verb forms elicited a broadly distributed late posterior positivity, as well as a left anterior negativity (LAN) that was particularly pronounced for the incorrect irregulars. Using a single-word paradigm, we did not find a LAN for any of the incorrect verb forms but found an N400-like effect for all irregular verbs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.021DOI Listing
December 2005
4 Reads

Individual differences in brain activity during visuo-spatial processing assessed by slow cortical potentials and LORETA.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 21;25(3):900-12. Epub 2005 Nov 21.

Brain Research Laboratory, Department of Psychology, University of Vienna, Liebiggasse 5, A-1010 Vienna, Austria.

Using slow-cortical potentials (SCPs), Vitouch et al. demonstrated that subjects with low ability to solve a complex visuo-spatial imagery task show higher activity in occipital, parietal and frontal cortex during task processing than subjects with high ability. This finding has been interpreted in the sense of the so-called "neural efficiency" hypothesis, which assumes that the central nervous system of individuals with higher intellectual abilities is functioning in a more efficient way than the one of individuals with lower abilities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.025DOI Listing
December 2005
4 Reads

Specific activation of the V5 brain area by auditory motion processing: an fMRI study.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 17;25(3):650-8. Epub 2005 Nov 17.

Neural Rehabilitation Engineering Laboratory, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.

Previous neuroimaging studies devoted to auditory motion processing have shown the involvement of a cerebral network encompassing the temporoparietal and premotor areas. Most of these studies were based on a comparison between moving stimuli and static stimuli placed at a single location. However, moving stimuli vary in spatial location, and therefore motion detection can include both spatial localisation and motion processing. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S092664100500252
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.015DOI Listing
December 2005
7 Reads

On the relationship between interoceptive awareness, emotional experience, and brain processes.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 17;25(3):948-62. Epub 2005 Nov 17.

Department of Psychology, Ludwig-Maximilans-University of Munich, Leopoldstr. 13, 80802 Munich, Germany.

The perception of visceral signals plays a crucial role in many theories of emotions. The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between interoceptive awareness and emotion-related brain activity. 44 participants (16 male, 28 female) first underwent a heartbeat perception task and then were categorised either as good (n = 22) or poor heartbeat perceivers (n = 22). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.019DOI Listing
December 2005
15 Reads

Brain processes associated with target finding.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 16;25(3):926-35. Epub 2005 Nov 16.

University of Würzburg, Department of Psychology, Marcusstr. 9-11, D-97070 Würzburg, Germany.

The response execution stage of cognitive skill consists of several substages, including finding the proper response location among available alternatives and moving the effector to the target location. In order to unravel the brain dynamics associated with the finding process, the present experiments used two experimental conditions. In the number condition, which requires both finding and moving, subjects are presented on each trial with a digit, 0-9, are required to find that digit on a circular clock face, and then to move a cursor to that target's location. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.020DOI Listing
December 2005
5 Reads

Individual differences in extraversion and dopamine genetics predict neural reward responses.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 11;25(3):851-61. Epub 2005 Nov 11.

Department of Epileptology, University of Bonn, 53115 Bonn, Germany; Center for Neuroscience, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.

Psychologists have linked the personality trait extraversion both to differences in reward sensitivity and to dopamine functioning, but little is known about how these differences are reflected in the functioning of the brain's dopaminergic neural reward system. Here, we show that individual differences in extraversion and the presence of the A1 allele on the dopamine D2 receptor gene predict activation magnitudes in the brain's reward system during a gambling task. In two functional MRI experiments, participants probabilistically received rewards either immediately following a behavioral response (Study 1) or after a 7. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.018DOI Listing
December 2005
11 Reads

Attentional load of the primary task influences the frontal but not the temporal generators of mismatch negativity.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 9;25(3):891-9. Epub 2005 Nov 9.

Department of Neurosciences, Catholic University, Policlinico A. Gemelli, L.go A. Gemelli 8, 00168 Rome, Italy.

According to the model hypothesized by Näätänen and Michie, the generation of the mismatch negativity (MMN) requires a mismatch detection, taking place in temporal areas, followed by the activation of frontal generators, underlying attention switching toward the deviant stimulus. We aimed at verifying whether the activation of temporal and frontal regions is dependent on the amount of attentional resources allocable toward the deviant stimulus. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs) in nine healthy subjects while reading and during a demanding visual task (Multiple Features Target Cancellation, MFTC). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.023DOI Listing
December 2005
7 Reads

Event-related theta oscillations during working memory tasks in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 10;25(3):936-47. Epub 2005 Nov 10.

Institute of Psychology and Cognition Research, University of Bremen, Grazer Str. 4, 28359 Bremen, Germany.

Altered frontal lobe activity and executive control associated with working memory (WM) dysfunction are recognized as core deficits in schizophrenia. These impairments have been discussed as being associated with deficits in self-regulated action monitoring and anticipatory action plan generation. To study electrophysiological correlates of executive control -- specifically action monitoring and action rule switching -- under varying WM load, we used a paradigm derived from classic N-back (WM) tasks and requiring monitoring of simple actions. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S092664100500294
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.015DOI Listing
December 2005
6 Reads

Cerebral processes in mental transformations of body parts: recognition prior to rotation.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 8;25(3):722-34. Epub 2005 Nov 8.

Macquarie Centre for Cognitive Science, Macquarie University, Sydney NSW 2109, Australia.

There is growing evidence that the visual processing of human body stimuli is particular and distinct from that of other objects. This is due to implicit knowledge of anatomical and biomechanical constraints of the human body. The question arises whether body stimuli in which biomechanical constraints are violated are processed in the same way as realistic bodies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.024DOI Listing
December 2005
6 Reads

Weights and measures: a new look at bisection behaviour in neglect.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 3;25(3):833-50. Epub 2005 Nov 3.

School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences, University of Edinburgh, 7 George Square, Edinburgh EH8 9JZ, UK.

Horizontal line bisection is a ubiquitous task in the investigation of visual neglect. Patients with left neglect typically make rightward errors that increase with line length and for lines at more leftward positions. For short lines, or for lines presented in right space, these errors may 'cross over' to become leftward. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.008DOI Listing
December 2005
5 Reads

Assessment of the effects of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor rofecoxib on visuospatial learning and hippocampal cell death following kainate-induced seizures in the rat.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 2;25(3):826-32. Epub 2005 Nov 2.

Department of Pharmaceutical Biosciences, Uppsala Biomedical Centre, Uppsala University, SE-751 24 Uppsala, Sweden.

Kainate-induced seizures result in hippocampal neurodegeneration and spatial learning deficits in rodents. Previous studies show that rofecoxib, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor, protects against kainate-induced hippocampal cell death 3 days after seizures. Our aim was to determine whether rofecoxib attenuates visuospatial learning deficits and late neuronal death after kainate-induced seizures. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S092664100500298
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.017DOI Listing
December 2005
6 Reads

Arithmetic ability and parietal alterations: a diffusion tensor imaging study in velocardiofacial syndrome.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 2;25(3):735-40. Epub 2005 Nov 2.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 401 Quarry Rd., Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.

Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS) is a congenital anomaly that causes somatic as well as cognitive and psychiatric impairments. Previous studies have found specific deficits in arithmetic abilities in subjects with VCFS. In this study, we investigated whether abnormalities in white matter pathways are correlated with reduced arithmetic ability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.013DOI Listing
December 2005
5 Reads

Cross-modal plasticity in deaf subjects dependent on the extent of hearing loss.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 2;25(3):884-90. Epub 2005 Nov 2.

Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Neuroradiology, University of Duisburg-Essen, Hufelandstr. 55, D-45127 Essen, Germany.

Cross-modal plasticity in deaf subjects is still discussed controversial. We tried to figure out whether the plasticity is dependent on the extent of hearing loss. Three groups of volunteers, comprising twelve individuals each, were investigated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.010DOI Listing
December 2005
7 Reads

Effects of attention on the neural processing of harmonic syntax in Western music.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 28;25(3):678-87. Epub 2005 Oct 28.

Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708, USA.

The effects of selective attention on the neural response to the violation of musical syntax were investigated in the present study. Musical chord progressions were played to nonmusicians while Event-Related Potentials (ERPs) were recorded. The five-chord progressions included 61% harmonically expected cadences (I-I(6)-IV-V-I), 26% harmonically unexpected cadences (I-I(6)-IV-V-N(6)), and 13% with one of the five chords having an intensity fadeout across its duration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.019DOI Listing
December 2005
7 Reads

Age-related change in neural processing of time-dependent stimulus features.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 27;25(3):913-25. Epub 2005 Oct 27.

Department of Psychology, University of Colorado at Colorado Springs, 1420 Austin Bluffs Parkway, Colorado Springs, CO 80933-7150, USA.

Aging is associated with changes in automatic processing of task-irrelevant stimuli, and this may lead to functional disturbances including repeated orienting to nonnovel events and distraction from task. The effect of age on automatic processing of time-dependent stimulus features was investigated by measurement of the auditory mismatch negativity (MMN) in younger (18-23) and older (55-85) adults. Amplitude of MMN recorded during a paradigm involving low-probability deviation in interstimulus interval (from 500 ms to 250 ms) was found to be reduced in the older group at fronto-central sites. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.014DOI Listing
December 2005
5 Reads

Direction and distance deficits in path integration after unilateral vestibular loss depend on task complexity.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 26;25(3):862-72. Epub 2005 Oct 26.

Laboratoire de Neurophysiologie et Neuropsychologie, INSERM and Université de la Méditerranée, Faculté de Médecine de la Timone, 27 Bd Jean Moulin, 13385 Marseille Cedex 5, France.

The effects of peripheral vestibular disorders on the direction and distance components of the internal spatial representation were investigated. The ability of Menière's patients to perform path integration was assessed in different situations aimed at differentiating the level of spatial processing (simple versus complex tasks), the available sensory cues (proprioceptive, vestibular, or visual conditions), and the side of the path (towards the healthy versus the lesioned side). After exploring two legs of a triangle, participants were required either to reproduce the exploration path, to follow the reverse path, or to take a shortcut to the starting point of the path (triangle completion). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.012DOI Listing
December 2005
8 Reads

Visual magnocellular and structure from motion perceptual deficits in a neurodevelopmental model of dorsal stream function.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 26;25(3):788-98. Epub 2005 Oct 26.

Centre for Ophthalmology, IBILI, Faculty of Medicine, Az. de Sta Comba, 3000-354 Coimbra, Portugal.

Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder of genetic origin that has been used as a model to understand visual cognition. We have investigated early deficits in the afferent magnocellular pathway and their relation to abnormal visual dorsal processing in WS. A spatiotemporal contrast sensitivity task that is known to selectively activate that pathway was used in six WS subjects. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S092664100500267
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.005DOI Listing
December 2005
8 Reads

Alcohol consumption impairs stimulus- and error-related processing during a Go/No-Go Task.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 26;25(3):873-83. Epub 2005 Oct 26.

Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre for Care, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Alcohol consumption has been shown to increase the number of errors in tasks that require a high degree of cognitive control, such as a go/no-go task. The alcohol-related decline in performance may be related to difficulties in maintaining attention on the task at hand and/or deficits in inhibiting a prepotent response. To test these two accounts, we investigated the effects of alcohol on stimulus- and response-locked evoked potentials recorded during a go/no-go task that involved the withholding of key presses to rare targets. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.009DOI Listing
December 2005
5 Reads

Paying attention to saccadic intrusions.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 26;25(3):810-25. Epub 2005 Oct 26.

Behavioural Brain Sciences, School of Psychology, Hills Building, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK.

Fixation to a target in primary gaze is invariably interrupted by physiological conjugate saccadic intrusions (SI). These small idiosyncratic eye movements (usually <1 degrees in amplitude) take the form of an initial horizontal fast eye movement away from the desired eye position, followed after a variable duration by a return saccade or drift. As the aetiology of SI is still unclear, it was the aim of this study to investigate whether SI are related to exogenous or endogenous attentional processes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.002DOI Listing
December 2005
5 Reads

Pre-attentive and attentive processing of temporal and frequency characteristics within long sounds.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 25;25(3):711-21. Epub 2005 Oct 25.

Kognitive einschl. Biologische Psychologie, Institut für Psychologie I, Universität Leipzig, Seeburgstr. 14-20, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.

Attention effects on the processing of deviations in the duration and the frequency dimension of a long sound were investigated in three conditions: (1) when auditory stimuli were ignored, (2) when they were attended and frequency dimension was task-relevant, and (3) when they were attended and duration dimension was task-relevant. The mismatch negativity (MMN) of the event-related potential (ERP) to infrequent shortenings of a sound (600 ms vs. 1000 ms) and to infrequent frequency modulations at one of nine possible intervals within the sound (change from 440 Hz to 480 Hz and back to 440 Hz, e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.003DOI Listing
December 2005
5 Reads

Mediofrontal negativities in the absence of responding.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 24;25(3):777-87. Epub 2005 Oct 24.

Department of Psychology, Tilburg University, P.O. box 90153, 5000 LE Tilburg, The Netherlands.

The feedback-related negativity (FRN) is an event-related brain potential component that is elicited by feedback stimuli indicating unfavorable outcomes. Until recently, the FRN has been studied primarily using experimental paradigms in which outcomes appeared to be contingent upon the participants' behavior. The present study further addressed the question whether an FRN can be elicited by outcomes that are not contingent on any preceding choice or action. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.007DOI Listing
December 2005
6 Reads

Attentional shifts towards an expected visual target alter the level of alpha-band oscillatory activity in the human calcarine cortex.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 24;25(3):799-809. Epub 2005 Oct 24.

ATR Computational Neuroscience Laboratories, 2-2-2 Hikaridai, Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto 619-0288, Japan.

Neuronal operations associated with the top-down control process of shifting attention from one locus to another involve a network of cortical regions, and their influence is deemed fundamental to visual perception. However, the extent and nature of these operations within primary visual areas are unknown. In this paper, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) in combination with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine whether, prior to the onset of a visual stimulus, neuronal activity within early visual cortex is affected by covert attentional shifts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.006DOI Listing
December 2005
5 Reads

Attention and selection for predictive smooth pursuit eye movements.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 21;25(3):688-700. Epub 2005 Oct 21.

School of Psychological Sciences, University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK.

Humans cannot typically produce smooth eye movements in the absence of a moving stimulus. However, they can produce predictive smooth eye movements if they expect a target of a known velocity to reappear. Here, we observed that participants could extract velocity information from two simultaneously presented moving targets in order to produce a subsequent predictive smooth eye movement for one of the two targets. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.016DOI Listing
December 2005
5 Reads

Action selectivity in parietal and temporal cortex.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 20;25(3):641-9. Epub 2005 Oct 20.

Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London, 12 Queen Square, London WC1 3N BG, UK.

The sensory-action theory proposes that the neural substrates underlying action representations are related to a visuomotor action system encompassing the left ventral premotor cortex, the anterior intraparietal (AIP) and left posterior middle temporal gyrus (LPMT). Using fMRI, we demonstrate that semantic decisions on action, relative to non-action words, increased activation in the left AIP and LPMT irrespective of whether the words were presented in a written or spoken form. Left AIP and LPMT might thus play the role of amodal semantic regions that can be activated via auditory as well as visual input. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.017DOI Listing
December 2005
4 Reads

Neuroimaging studies of practice-related change: fMRI and meta-analytic evidence of a domain-general control network for learning.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 20;25(3):607-23. Epub 2005 Oct 20.

Department of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA.

Functional magnetic resonance imaging and a meta-analysis of prior neuroimaging studies were used to characterize cortical changes resulting from extensive practice and to evaluate a dual-processing account of the neural mechanisms underlying human learning. Three core predictions of the dual processing theory are evaluated: 1) that practice elicits generalized reductions in regional activity by reducing the load on the cognitive control mechanisms that scaffold early learning; 2) that these control mechanisms are domain-general; and 3) that no separate processing pathway emerges as skill develops. To evaluate these predictions, a meta-analysis of prior neuroimaging studies and a within-subjects fMRI experiment contrasting unpracticed to practiced performance in a paired-associate task were conducted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.013DOI Listing
December 2005
5 Reads

Double dissociation in neural correlates of visual working memory: a PET study.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 20;25(3):747-59. Epub 2005 Oct 20.

INSERM and CNRS-Cognitive Sciences Institute-UMR5015, 67 Bd Pinel, 69500 Bron, France.

Using positron emission tomography (PET), we investigated the organisation of spatial versus object-based visual working memory in 11 normal human subjects. The paradigm involved a conditional colour-response association task embedded within two visual working memory tasks. The subject had to remember a position (spatial) or shape (object-based) and then use this to recover the colour of the matching element for the conditional association. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.004DOI Listing
December 2005
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Imagery of motor actions: differential effects of kinesthetic and visual-motor mode of imagery in single-trial EEG.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 19;25(3):668-77. Epub 2005 Oct 19.

Ludwig Boltzmann-Institute for Medical Informatics and Neuroinformatics, Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria.

Single-trial motor imagery classification is an integral part of a number of brain-computer interface (BCI) systems. The possible significance of the kind of imagery, involving rather kinesthetic or visual representations of actions, was addressed using the following experimental conditions: kinesthetic motor imagery (MIK), visual-motor imagery (MIV), motor execution (ME) and observation of movement (OOM). Based on multi-channel EEG recordings in 14 right-handed participants, we applied a learning classifier, the distinction sensitive learning vector quantization (DSLVQ) to identify relevant features (i. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S092664100500253
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.014DOI Listing
December 2005
7 Reads

Neural mechanism for judging the appropriateness of facial affect.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 13;25(3):659-67. Epub 2005 Oct 13.

Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, Konyang University Hospital, 685 Gasoowon-Dong, Seo-Gu, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.

Questions regarding the appropriateness of facial expressions in particular situations arise ubiquitously in everyday social interactions. To determine the appropriateness of facial affect, first of all, we should represent our own or the other's emotional state as induced by the social situation. Then, based on these representations, we should infer the possible affective response of the other person. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.018DOI Listing
December 2005
7 Reads

Partial unilateral inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus impairs spatial memory in the MWM.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 10;25(3):741-6. Epub 2005 Oct 10.

Department of Neuroscience, University of Almeria, 04120 Almeria, Spain.

The hippocampus is one of the more widely studied structures related with spatial memory. In this study, we assessed the effect of unilateral inactivation of the dorsal hippocampus with tetrodotoxin (TTX) on the performance displayed by Wistar rats in the spatial version of the Morris water maze. In experiment 1, we injected into the dorsal hippocampus in two different groups of rats 1 microl of saline solution or 5 ng of TTX in 1 microl of saline each day immediately after the training during four consecutive days. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.09.001DOI Listing
December 2005
6 Reads

Optic flow dominates visual scene polarity in causing adaptive modification of locomotor trajectory.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 10;25(3):624-31. Epub 2005 Oct 10.

Nihon University School of Medicine, Tokyo 173-8610, Japan.

Locomotion and posture are influenced and controlled by vestibular, visual and somatosensory information. Optic flow and scene polarity are two characteristics of a visual scene that have been identified as being critical in how they affect perceived body orientation and self motion. The goal of this study was to determine the role of optic flow and visual scene polarity on adaptive modification in locomotor trajectory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.012DOI Listing
December 2005
5 Reads

Accessing world knowledge: evidence from N400 and reaction time priming.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Dec 3;25(3):589-606. Epub 2005 Oct 3.

Nijmegen Institute for Cognition and Information, Radboud University, PO Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

How fast are we in accessing world knowledge? In two experiments, we tested for priming for word triplets that described a conceptual script (e.g., DIRECTOR-BRIBE-DISMISSAL) but were not associatively related and did not share a category relationship. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.011DOI Listing
December 2005
5 Reads

Is discrimination training necessary to cause changes in the P2 auditory event-related brain potential to speech sounds?

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Oct 28;25(2):547-53. Epub 2005 Sep 28.

Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, OX1 3UD, UK.

Previous studies have found that the P2 component of the auditory event-related potential (ERP) increases after speech discrimination training. We compared electrophysiological and behavioral outcomes of individuals undergoing speech discrimination training (N = 8) with an untrained control group (N = 9). Significant improvements on the behavioral speech discrimination task were found only in the trained group; however, there were similar increases in P2 amplitude in both groups. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.007DOI Listing
October 2005
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Characteristic functional networks in high- versus low-proficiency second language speakers detected also during native language processing: an explorative EEG coherence study in 6 frequency bands.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Oct 26;25(2):566-78. Epub 2005 Sep 26.

Center for Brain Research, Division of Integrative Neurophysiology, Medical University of Vienna, Austria.

An EEG coherence study was performed with a twofold objective: first, to scrutinize the theoretical concept of "cortical efficiency" in connection with second language (L2) acquisition and, second, to detect cooperations between cortical areas in specific frequency bands indicative for highly proficient L2 processing. Two groups differing only in their level of L2 proficiency were contrasted during presentation of natural language videos in English (L2) and German (native language, L1), with explorative coherence analysis in 6 frequency bands (0.5-31. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S092664100500234
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.010DOI Listing
October 2005
7 Reads

Emotion and consciousness: ends of a continuum.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Oct 23;25(2):387-405. Epub 2005 Sep 23.

Laboratory of Neural Bases of Mind, Institute of Psychology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Yaroslavskaya str., 13, 129366 Moscow, Russia.

We suggest a united concept of consciousness and emotion, based on the systemic cognitive neuroscience perspective regarding organisms as active and goal-directed. We criticize the idea that consciousness and emotion are psychological phenomena having quite different neurophysiological mechanisms. We argue that both characterize a unified systemic organization of behavior, but at different levels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.006DOI Listing
October 2005
10 Reads

Sound lateralization in subjects with callosotomy, callosal agenesis, or hemispherectomy.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Oct 16;25(2):537-46. Epub 2005 Sep 16.

Department of Biopsychology, Institute for Cognitive Neuroscience, Ruhr University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany.

The question of whether there is a right-hemisphere dominance in the processing of auditory spatial information in human cortex as well as the role of the corpus callosum in spatial hearing functions is still a matter of debate. Here, we approached this issue by investigating two late-callosotomized subjects and one subject with agenesis of the corpus callosum, using a task of sound lateralization with variable interaural time differences. For comparison, three subjects with left or right hemispherectomy were also tested by employing identical methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.008DOI Listing
October 2005
6 Reads

A neurophysiological study of the detrimental effects of alprazolam on human action monitoring.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Oct 15;25(2):554-65. Epub 2005 Sep 15.

Centre d'Investigació de Medicaments, Institut de Recerca, Servei de Farmacologia Clínica, Hospital de la Santa Creu i Sant Pau (HSCSP), Departament de Farmacologia i Terapèutica, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain.

In order to adapt their behavior to different unexpected situations, humans need to be able to monitor their performance and detect and correct errors. Benzodiazepines have long been shown to impair performance in humans, but the performance-related neurophysiological processes targeted by these drugs remain largely unknown. In the present article, we assessed the impact of alprazolam administration on relevant aspects of action monitoring, i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.009DOI Listing
October 2005
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The role of spatial frequency information for ERP components sensitive to faces and emotional facial expression.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Oct 15;25(2):508-20. Epub 2005 Sep 15.

School of Human and Life Sciences, Roehampton University, London, UK.

To investigate the impact of spatial frequency on emotional facial expression analysis, ERPs were recorded in response to low spatial frequency (LSF), high spatial frequency (HSF), and unfiltered broad spatial frequency (BSF) faces with fearful or neutral expressions, houses, and chairs. In line with previous findings, BSF fearful facial expressions elicited a greater frontal positivity than BSF neutral facial expressions, starting at about 150 ms after stimulus onset. In contrast, this emotional expression effect was absent for HSF and LSF faces. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.003DOI Listing
October 2005
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Inhibiting change: effects of memory on auditory selective attention.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Oct 12;25(2):431-42. Epub 2005 Sep 12.

Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, 703 Third Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA.

Two experiments investigated the behavioral and electrophysiological effects on human auditory selection of the psychophysical discriminability of a distractor channel in memory. Participants performed a set of baseline (single distractor) and filtering (multiple distractors) tasks, classifying the pitch of targets, while ignoring pitch variation in temporally distinct distractors, which differed from targets in timbre (Experiment 1) or loudness (Experiment 2). Increased distractor change progressively disrupted target accuracy and reaction time, and fostered confusion in distinguishing target from distractor channels. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.07.002DOI Listing
October 2005
5 Reads

Neurophysiological markers of contextual processing: the relationship between P3b and Gamma synchrony and their modulation by arousal, performance and individual differences.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Oct 9;25(2):472-83. Epub 2005 Sep 9.

The Brain Dynamics Centre, Westmead Hospital, NSW, Australia.

The ability to identify and respond to significant events in the environment is a vital aspect of human cognition and yet is poorly understood as a dynamic neural process. While the response to a contextually-relevant stimulus involves a number of complimentary processes, including selective attention and neural binding, it is also subject to modulation by factors like arousal, age and sex. Adopting an integrative approach, we investigated contextual processing (as indexed by P3b and Gamma phase synchrony) in 120 healthy subjects performing an auditory oddball task while controlling for these other modulating factors. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S092664100500218
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.07.008DOI Listing
October 2005
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Now you see it, now you don't: variable hemineglect in a commissurotomized man.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Oct 9;25(2):521-30. Epub 2005 Sep 9.

Research Centre for Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.

We describe the case of a callosotomized man, D.D.V. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.002DOI Listing
October 2005
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Foveal splitting causes differential processing of Chinese orthography in the male and female brain.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Oct 8;25(2):531-6. Epub 2005 Sep 8.

School of Informatics, University of Edinburgh, 2 Buccleuch Place, Edinburgh, UK.

Chinese characters contain separate phonetic and semantic radicals. A dominant character type exists in which the semantic radical is on the left and the phonetic radical on the right; an opposite, minority structure also exists, with the semantic radical on the right and the phonetic radical on the left. We show that, when asked to pronounce isolated tokens of these two character types, males responded significantly faster when the phonetic information was on the right, whereas females showed a non-significant tendency in the opposite direction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.005DOI Listing
October 2005
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Mathematically gifted male adolescents activate a unique brain network during mental rotation.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Oct 16;25(2):583-7. Epub 2005 Sep 16.

Department of Human Development and Family Studies, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 74909-1162, USA.

Mental rotation involves the creation and manipulation of internal images, with the later being particularly useful cognitive capacities when applied to high-level mathematical thinking and reasoning. Many neuroimaging studies have demonstrated mental rotation to be mediated primarily by the parietal lobes, particularly on the right side. Here, we use fMRI to show for the first time that when performing 3-dimensional mental rotations, mathematically gifted male adolescents engage a qualitatively different brain network than those of average math ability, one that involves bilateral activation of the parietal lobes and frontal cortex, along with heightened activation of the anterior cingulate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.004DOI Listing
October 2005
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Cortical activation during Pavlovian fear conditioning depends on heart rate response patterns: an MEG study.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Oct 2;25(2):459-71. Epub 2005 Sep 2.

Department of Psychology, University of Konstanz, P.O. Box D25, D-78457 Konstanz, Germany.

In the present study, we examined stimulus-driven neuromagnetic activity in a delayed Pavlovian aversive conditioning paradigm using steady state visual evoked fields (SSVEF). Subjects showing an accelerative heart rate (HR) component to the CS+ during learning trials exhibited an increased activation in sensory and parietal cortex due to CS+ depiction in the extinction block. This was accompanied by a selective orientation response (OR) to the CS+ during extinction as indexed by HR deceleration. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S092664100500199
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.07.006DOI Listing
October 2005
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The resolution of case conflicts from a neurophysiological perspective.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Oct 1;25(2):484-98. Epub 2005 Sep 1.

Day-Care Clinic of Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany.

We present two ERP experiments examining the resolution of language processing conflicts involving the multidimensional linguistic feature case, which determines processing in both syntactic and interpretive respects. Ungrammatical German structures with two identically case-marked arguments (double subject or double object constructions) were tested. In earlier studies, double subject constructions have been shown to elicit a biphasic pattern consisting of an N400 effect (a marker of thematic integration problems) followed by a P600 effect (a marker of syntactic ill-formedness). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.07.010DOI Listing
October 2005
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Relation between saccade trajectories and spatial distractor locations.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Oct 30;25(2):579-82. Epub 2005 Aug 30.

Department of Cognitive Psychology, Vrije Universiteit, Van der Boechorststraat 1, 1081 BT Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

This study shows that the exact spatial location of a distractor can have a modulatory influence on saccade trajectories. Distractors close to the target evoke saccade trajectories that are directed towards the distractor, while distractors close to fixation result in saccades that are directed away from the distractor. This finding questions the idea that target positions are coarsely coded in the superior colliculus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.08.001DOI Listing
October 2005
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Exposure to asynchronous audiovisual speech extends the temporal window for audiovisual integration.

Brain Res Cogn Brain Res 2005 Oct 31;25(2):499-507. Epub 2005 Aug 31.

Grup de Recerca Neurociència Cognitiva, Parc Científic de Barcelona, Spain.

We examined whether monitoring asynchronous audiovisual speech induces a general temporal recalibration of auditory and visual sensory processing. Participants monitored a videotape featuring a speaker pronouncing a list of words (Experiments 1 and 3) or a hand playing a musical pattern on a piano (Experiment 2). The auditory and visual channels were either presented in synchrony, or else asynchronously (with the visual signal leading the auditory signal by 300 ms; Experiments 1 and 2). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cogbrainres.2005.07.009DOI Listing
October 2005
6 Reads