1,964 results match your criteria Clinics in Sports Medicine [Journal]


Knee Multiligament Injury.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Apr;38(2):xv-xvi

Department of Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address:

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02785919193000
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2019.01.001DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Multiple Ligament Knee Injuries: Expert Insight.

Authors:
Mark D Miller

Clin Sports Med 2019 Apr;38(2):xiii

Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia, James Madison University, 400 Ray C. Hunt Drive, Suite 330, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0159, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2019.01.002DOI Listing

Osteotomies in the Multiple Ligament Injured Knee: When Is It Necessary?

Clin Sports Med 2019 Apr 30;38(2):297-304. Epub 2019 Jan 30.

Mayo Clinic, 201 West Center Street, Rochester, MN 55902, USA.

The multiple ligament-injured knee is a complex injury requiring a comprehensive and thorough evaluation prior to tailoring an appropriate treatment plan. Surgical repair and reconstruction of the involved ligaments are frequently discussed in the literature; however, osteotomy to correct limb malalignment may be just as important to obtaining a good outcome. Limb realignment must be carefully evaluated and treated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.11.003DOI Listing

All-inside Posterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Surgical Technique and Outcome.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Apr;38(2):285-295

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, MN 55905, USA; Department of Sports Medicine, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street Southwest, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. Electronic address:

Several reconstructive techniques exist to treat posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) deficiency. The purpose of this study is to report knee function and clinical stability after PCL reconstruction (PCLR) using an all-inside technique. Thirty-two patients with isolated or combined PCL injuries treated with all-inside PCLR using soft tissue allograft were included. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.11.005DOI Listing

Repair and Augmentation with Internal Brace in the Multiligament Injured Knee.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Apr 19;38(2):275-283. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

The Wellington and Portland Children's Hospitals, Queen Anne Street Medical Centre, 18-22, Queen Anne Street, London W1G 8HU, UK.

The internal brace is a ligament repair bridging concept using braided ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene suture tape and knotless bone anchors to reinforce ligament strength to allow early mobilization during early-phase healing. This concept can be used in the management of anterior cruciate ligament, posterior cruciate ligament, anterolateral ligament, medial collateral ligament, posteromedial corner, and posterolateral corner injuries. Ligament reinforcement is a concept in which a graft is reinforced and can be used in all aspects of knee ligament reconstruction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.11.008DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Fibular Collateral Ligament/ Posterolateral Corner Injury: When to Repair, Reconstruct, or Both.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Apr 19;38(2):261-274. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

The Steadman Clinic, 181 West Meadow Drive, Vail, CO 81657, USA; Complex Knee and Sports Medicine Surgery, Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA; College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA. Electronic address:

The posterolateral corner (PLC) of the knee was regarded as the "dark side" of the knee because of limited understanding of its anatomy and biomechanics and because of poor outcomes after injuries to PLC structures. These injuries rarely occur in isolation, with 28% reported as isolated PLC injuries. Nonoperative treatment of these injuries has led to persistent instability, development of early osteoarthritis, and poor outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.11.002DOI Listing

Knee Dislocation (KD) IV Injuries of the Knee: Presentation, Treatment, and Outcomes.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Apr 19;38(2):247-260. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of New Mexico, MSC10 5600, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001, USA. Electronic address:

"KDIV ligamentous injuries of the knee are frequently high-energy injuries with significant soft tissue disruption, gross knee instability, and rarely are treated nonoperatively. KDIVs frequently require external fixation, but when presenting in an isolated fashion can be reconstructed in one setting. Five presentations of KDIV injury are described: closed with multitrauma/closed head injury requiring external fixation, irreducible KDIV requiring semi-emergent open reduction and repair, isolated KDIV without arterial injury undergoing 4-ligament reconstruction after regaining motion, KDIV with varus and slight thrust undergoing medial opening osteotomy before ligament reconstruction, and KDIV with failed ligaments requiring revision and posterior tibial tendon transfer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.11.007DOI Listing

Multiligament Knee Injury: Injury Patterns, Outcomes, and Gait Analysis.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Apr 19;38(2):235-246. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Sydney Orthopaedic Research Institute (SORI), Level 1, The Gallery 445 Victoria Avenue, Chatswood, New South Wales 2067, Australia.

Multiligament knee injuries remain a challenge for the treating surgeon and little is known about the injury patterns and factors determining clinical and gait outcomes after multiligament knee reconstruction (MLKR). This article aims to identify specificities of this complex injury, in terms of demographics, mechanisms of injury, injury pattern, and associated lesions. The time frame between injury and surgery and distribution of repair versus reconstruction procedures have been analyzed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.11.010DOI Listing

The Biomechanics of Multiligament Knee Injuries: From Trauma to Treatment.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Apr 19;38(2):215-234. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Keck Medical Center of the University of Southern California, 1520 San Pablo Street, Suite 2000, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.

The multiple ligament injured knee is a complex biomechanical environment. When primary stabilizers fail, secondary stabilizers have an increased role. In addition, loss of primary restraints puts undue stress on the remaining intact structures of the knee. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.11.009DOI Listing
April 2019
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Vascular Injury in the Multiligament Injured Knee.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Apr;38(2):199-213

Orthopaedic Surgery, Pan Am Clinic, University of Manitoba, 75 Poseidon Bay, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3M 3E4, Canada.

In this review, we explore the epidemiology and mechanism of multiligament knee injuries (knee dislocation) and their complications, focusing on the morbidity and mortality associated with concomitant vascular injuries. We discuss the various diagnostic and treatment algorithms in use today and finish the report with a brief case example to outline these principles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.11.001DOI Listing
April 2019
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Multiple Ligament Injured Knee: Initial Assessment and Treatment.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Apr 19;38(2):193-198. Epub 2019 Jan 19.

Geisinger Orthopaedics, 115 Woodbine Lane, Danville, PA 17822-5212, USA. Electronic address:

The multiple ligament injured knee (knee dislocation) is oftentimes part of a multisystem injury complex that can include injuries not only to knee ligaments but also to blood vessels, skin, nerves, bones (fractures), head, and other organ system trauma. These additional injuries can affect surgical timing for knee ligament reconstruction and also affect the results of treatment. This article presents the author's approach and experience to the initial assessment and treatment of the multiple ligament injured (dislocated) knee. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.11.004DOI Listing

Multiple Ligament Knee Injuries: Current State and Proposed Classification.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Apr;38(2):183-192

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 6400 Fannin Street, Suite 1700, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

Classification systems should enhance communication between providers, facilitate accurate and consistent reporting in the literature, and guide management. However, current classification systems for MLKIs lack sufficient detail to guide clinical management which limit their prognostic value. The purpose of this chapter is to revisit and consider important features of some of the most impactful classification systems developed in the orthopaedic literature and to propose a classification system for MLKIs that may improve communication among providers, facilitate consistent reporting in the literature, and ultimately foster publication of meaningful clinical data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.11.006DOI Listing

Knee Ligament Instability Patterns: What Is Clinically Important.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Apr;38(2):169-182

Orthopaedic Sports Medicine and Shoulder, Tria Orthopaedic Center, 8100 Northland Drive, Bloomington, MN 55431, USA.

The knee dislocation is a severe, complex injury that can be difficult to treat and is fraught with complications. The first step in a successful reconstruction of a multiple ligamentous knee injury is gaining an accurate and thorough understanding of the pattern of instability imparted by the injury. Evaluation begins with a detailed review of radiographic and advanced imaging studies followed by a thorough physical examination, often done under anesthesia, in conjunction with dynamic fluoroscopy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.12.001DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

OrthoBiologics in Sports Medicine: Real-Time Applications Are Here, and Future Developments Are Promising!

Clin Sports Med 2019 Jan;38(1):xiii-xiv

Sports Medicine and Shoulder Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, 12631 East 17th Avenue, Mail Stop B202, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.09.003DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

OrthoBiologics: Science or Snake Oil?

Authors:
Mark D Miller

Clin Sports Med 2019 Jan;38(1):xi-xii

Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia, James Madison University, 400 Ray C. Hunt Drive, Suite 330, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0159, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.09.004DOI Listing
January 2019
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Ortho-Biologics for Ligament Repair and Reconstruction.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Jan;38(1):97-107

The Steadman Clinic, 181 West Meadow Drive, Suite 400, Vail, CO 81657, USA.

Biologics enhance tissue healing by stimulating the recovery processes for restoration of native or near-native tissue in addition to symptom management. The most popular biological modalities currently used include hyaluronic acid, growth factors therapy, platelet-rich plasma, and bone marrow aspirate concentrate. These treatment protocols are thought to facilitate and signal with cells or bioactive factors to improve ligament interventions by enhanced graft incorporation and strength, gene activation, and other mechanisms. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02785919183007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.08.003DOI Listing
January 2019
18 Reads

Orthobiologics for Bone Healing.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Jan;38(1):79-95

Department of Sports Medicine and Shoulder, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 E 70th Street, New York, NY 10021, USA.

Orthobiologics are a group of biological materials and substrates that promote bone, ligament, muscle, and tendon healing. These substances include bone autograft, bone allograft, demineralized bone matrix, bone graft substitutes, bone marrow aspirate concentrate, platelet-rich plasma, bone morphogenetic proteins, platelet-derived growth factor, parathyroid hormone, and vitamin D and calcium. Properties of orthobiologics in bone healing include osteoconduction, osteoinduction, and osteogenesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.08.005DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Treatments and Formulations.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Jan;38(1):61-78

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Humanitas University, Via Manzoni 113, Rozzano, Milan 20089, Italy; Humanitas Clinical and Research Center, Via Manzoni 56, Rozzano, Milan 20089, Italy.

This article analyzes the current literature on the use of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) to evaluate the available evidence regarding their therapeutic potential in the treatment of cartilage pathology. Seventeen articles were included and analyzed, showing that there is overall a lack of high-quality evidence concerning the use of ASCs. Most trials are case series with short-term evaluation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.08.004DOI Listing
January 2019
13 Reads

Amniotic-Derived Treatments and Formulations.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Jan;38(1):45-59

Department of Orthopedic surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, Weill-Cornell Medical School, 535 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021, USA.

In orthopedic sports medicine, amniotic-derived products have demonstrated promising preclinical and early clinical results for the treatment of tendon/ligament injuries, cartilage defects, and osteoarthritis. The amniotic membrane is a metabolically active tissue that has demonstrated anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antifibrotic, and epithelialization-promoting features that make it uniquely suited for several clinical applications. Although the existing clinical literature is limited, there are several ongoing clinical trials aiming to elucidate the specific applications and benefits of these products. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.08.002DOI Listing
January 2019
14 Reads

Platelet-Rich Plasma.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Jan;38(1):17-44

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, 450 Broadway Street, Redwood City, CA 94063, USA. Electronic address:

Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a promising treatment for musculoskeletal maladies and clinical data to date have shown that PRP is safe. However, evidence of its efficacy has been mixed and highly variable depending on the specific indication. Additional future high-quality large clinical trials will be critical in shaping our perspective of this treatment option. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.08.001DOI Listing
January 2019
14 Reads

Incorporating Ortho-Biologics into Your Clinical Practice.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Jan;38(1):163-168

Center for Orthopaedic Outcomes Research, The Steadman Philippon Research Institute, Vail, CO, USA; The Steadman Clinic, 181 West Meadow Drive Suite 400, Vail, CO 81657, USA. Electronic address:

The decision to incorporate ortho-biologics into a clinical practice will ultimately depend on physicians' preferences and the resources available to their practice. It is important to emphasize that different biologics are used for different pathologies/injuries and in different settings, such as the operating room or in the office. Physicians thinking about using biologics in their practices should consider the time commitment required to learn and use the technique, insurance coverage, and informed consent. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02785919183008
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.08.008DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

Emerging Orthobiologic Techniques and the Future.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Jan;38(1):143-161

Andrews Institute, Andrews Research and Education Foundation, 1040 Gulf Breeze Parkway, Gulf Breeze, FL 32561, USA. Electronic address:

The future of orthopedic surgery appears to be intimately associated with the development of orthobiologics to facilitate healing and the treatment of multiple disease processes. The orthopedic community should understand developmental processes to ensure that products are adequately studied and the effects are fully known before widespread implementation in the clinical setting. Technologies that embrace this paradigm will impact the field the most. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.08.007DOI Listing
January 2019
13 Reads

Ortho-Biologics for Osteoarthritis.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Jan;38(1):123-141

Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Western University, Fowler Kennedy Sports Medicine Clinic, 3M Centre, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7, Canada. Electronic address:

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a debilitation condition that affects millions of North Americans. Aside from weight loss, activity modification, and joint replacement, little else has been effective in delaying the progression of OA or treating the symptoms of OA. Ortho-biologics have become a popular treatment option in a variety of musculoskeletal conditions, including OA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.09.002DOI Listing
January 2019
18 Reads

Orthobiologics for Focal Articular Cartilage Defects.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Jan;38(1):109-122

Sports Medicine and Shoulder Surgery, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, 12631 East 17th Avenue, Mail Stop B202, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address:

Focal chondral defects of the knee are extremely common and often result in pain, dysfunction, joint deterioration, and, ultimately, the development of osteoarthritis. Due to the limitations of conventional treatments for focal chondral defects of the knee, orthobiologics have recently become an area of interest. Orthobiologics used for cartilage defects include (but are not limited to) bone marrow aspirate concentrate, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells, platelet-rich plasma, and micronized allogeneic cartilage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.09.001DOI Listing
January 2019
14 Reads

Corticosteroids and Hyaluronic Acid Injections.

Clin Sports Med 2019 Jan;38(1):1-15

Department of Orthopaedics, Rush University Medical Center, Midwest Orthopaedics at Rush, 1611 West Harrison, 3rd Floor, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. Electronic address:

Osteoarthritis is a common condition that affects many individuals resulting in pain, reduced mobility, and decreased function. Corticosteroids have been a mainstay of osteoarthritis treatment. Studies have shown that they provide short-term pain improvement and can be used for osteoarthritis flares. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.08.006DOI Listing
January 2019
14 Reads

Shoulder Arthritis in the Young and Active Patient.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Oct;37(4):xiii-xiv

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia, 400 Ray C. Hunt Drive, Suite 330, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.07.001DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Foreword.

Authors:
Mark D Miller

Clin Sports Med 2018 Oct;37(4):xi

Division of Sports Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia, James Madison University Director, 400 Ray C. Hunt Drive, Suite 330, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0159, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.07.002DOI Listing
October 2018
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Future Frontiers in Shoulder Arthroplasty and the Management of Shoulder Osteoarthritis.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Oct;37(4):609-630

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Utah, 590 Wakara Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84108, USA.

Shoulder arthroplasty has advanced considerably in recent decades, but the most recently published long-term outcomes continue to have unacceptably high failure rates, especially in young patients. However, there are several future frontiers that offer the promise of improved implant longevity and function including advances in surgical approach, such as subscapularis-sparing approaches and computer-assisted surgical planning; advances in humeral component fixation, such as stemless, short-stem, and convertible implants; advances in bearing surfaces, such as pyrocarbon, ceramic, and metal-on-metal; and advances in glenoid component geometry and fixation, such as augmented components, in-growth pegs, and inlay glenoid components. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02785919183005
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.05.009DOI Listing
October 2018
20 Reads

Outcomes After Shoulder Replacement Surgery in the Young Patient: How Do They Do and How Long Can We Expect Them to Last?

Clin Sports Med 2018 Oct;37(4):593-607

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, 925 Chestnut Street, 5th Floor, Philadelphia, PA 19107, USA. Electronic address:

Glenohumeral arthritis in the young, active patient remains a challenging problem shoulder surgeons face. Anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty has been proven to be a successful operation for patients with end-stage shoulder arthritis; however, concerns over long-term implant survival remain. These concerns are amplified in young patients and largely revolve around the placement of a glenoid component, which is seen as the "weak link" in shoulder arthroplasty. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.05.008DOI Listing
October 2018
11 Reads

Return to Play After Shoulder Replacement Surgery: What Is Realistic and What Does the Evidence Tell Us.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Oct 3;37(4):585-592. Epub 2018 Aug 3.

Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hospital for Special Surgery, 525 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021, USA.

This article analyzes the available literature regarding return to sport following total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA), hemiarthroplasty (HA), and reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RTSA). It examines the quality of the available evidence and areas of future research. Most patients are able to return to preoperative sport activities following TSA, RTSA, and HA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.06.002DOI Listing
October 2018
1 Read

Rehabilitation Strategies After Shoulder Arthroplasty in Young and Active Patients.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Oct;37(4):569-583

The ONS Sports and Shoulder Service, Orthopaedic and Neurosurgery Specialists (ONS), The ONS Foundation for Clinical Research and Education (ONSF), 6 Greenwich Office Park, 40 Valley Drive, Greenwich, CT 06831, USA.

A well-designed and sensibly progressed rehabilitation program is vital to successful shoulder arthroplasty outcomes. This article describes the protocol suggested by ONS clinicians to treat the growing young, active patient population undergoing anatomic shoulder arthroplasty. This protocol includes an immediate postoperative phase, early strengthening phase, resistance strengthening and proprioception phase, and advanced sport-specific and goal-specific strengthening and proprioception phase. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.05.007DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Subscapularis-Sparing Approaches to Total Shoulder Arthroplasty: Ready for Prime Time?

Clin Sports Med 2018 Oct;37(4):559-568

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1430 Tulane Avenue, #8632, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.

To minimize the risk of subscapularis failure after shoulder replacement, a method of preserving the subscapularis while allowing access to the glenohumeral joint was developed. Only the inferior 30% to 50% of the subscapularis tendon is detached from the humerus, leaving the superior aspect attached to the lesser tuberosity. This subscapularis-sparing, minimally invasive approach to the glenohumeral joint was evaluated in 43 subjects with a minimum 2-year follow-up and subscapularis strength equal to the opposite side. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02785919183005
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.05.006DOI Listing
October 2018
19 Reads

Total Shoulder Arthroplasty in the Athlete and Active Individual.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Oct;37(4):549-558

Orthopaedic Surgery Department, University of Virginia, 400 Ray C. Hunt Drive, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA. Electronic address:

Shoulder arthroplasty is becoming more commonly performed in the United States. As it increases, the population also becomes younger, and their demands are different from the older population. Earlier studies have suggested that although young patients have functional outcomes similar to older patients, their satisfaction scores were not as high. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.05.005DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Biologic Options for Glenohumeral Arthritis.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Oct 3;37(4):537-548. Epub 2018 Aug 3.

Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. Electronic address:

Biologic options for glenohumeral arthritis include intra-articular injections as well as allograft interposition arthroplasty. The objectives of these treatments are reduction of pain and maintenance/improvement in function, while delaying the need for arthroplasty. This article reviews the current evidence for hyaluronic acid injection, platelet-rich plasma injection, and allograft interposition arthroplasty in the young patient with glenohumeral arthritis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.06.001DOI Listing
October 2018
5 Reads

The Role for Shoulder Hemiarthroplasty in the Young, Active Patient.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Oct;37(4):527-535

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Keck Medical Center at University of Southern California, 1520 San Pablo Street, Suite 2000, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA. Electronic address:

Younger patients with severe glenohumeral (GH) arthritis are a challenge to treat, as they have high physical demands, high expectations, a long lifespan, and often altered anatomy from prior surgery or congenital deformity. Nonoperative management is the cornerstone of treatment; however, when it fails, shoulder arthroplasty can be indicated. Although the literature suggests that total shoulder arthroplasty is the most appropriate for severe GH arthritis, there are a subset of patients in which a hemiarthroplasty can still be successful. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.05.004DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Nonarthroplasty Options for the Athlete or Active Individual with Shoulder Osteoarthritis.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Oct;37(4):517-526

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California Los Angeles, 10833 LeConte Avenue, 76-119 CHS, Los Angeles, CA 90095-6902, USA. Electronic address:

The management of glenohumeral osteoarthritis is difficult in young, active individuals. After nonoperative management fails, arthroscopic debridement with concomitant procedures (eg, loose body removal, capsular release, labral debridement, synovectomy, osteophyte resection, bursectomy, subacromial decompression, microfracture, and biceps tenotomy or tenodesis) to address potential pain generators may be an option in small, contained, unipolar lesions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.05.003DOI Listing
October 2018
16 Reads
2.583 Impact Factor

Etiology of Shoulder Arthritis in Young Patients.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Oct;37(4):505-515

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia, 400 Ray C. Hunt Drive, Suite 300, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA. Electronic address:

The manifestation of glenohumeral arthritis in the young adult is a devastating occurrence that can be difficult to manage. This review details the many underlying etiologies including genetic causes, congenital abnormalities, glenohumeral instability, posttraumatic lesions, postcapsulorraphy arthropathy, osteonecrosis, intraarticular pain pump postoperative use, radiofrequency/thermal capsulorraphy treatments, septic arthritis/infection, and inflammatory arthropathies. Although each of these potential causes have been well-studied, their contributions to the development of glenohumeral arthritis in the young person has not been described extensively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.05.002DOI Listing
October 2018
18 Reads

To MOON and Back: Lessons Learned and Experience Gained Along the Way.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Jul;37(3):495-503

Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, 5555 Transportation Boulevard, Garfield Heights, Cleveland, OH 44125, USA. Electronic address:

This article highlights the Multicenter Orthopedic Outcomes Network (MOON) study of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction, from its inception in 1991 to the follow-on studies in progress currently. Lessons learned throughout the process are emphasized. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.03.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6007882PMC
July 2018
2 Reads

Administrative Databases in Sports Medicine Research.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Jul;37(3):483-494

Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Toronto, MG323 - 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada.

There has been a dramatic rise in the use of large-scale health administrative databases to investigate clinical outcomes within sports medicine over the past few years. Although these data sets identify large numbers of patients, allowing for the investigation of regional trends, health care utilization, and outcomes of surgical intervention, they were not designed with the intention of answering clinical questions. Recognizing the methodological limitations associated with these databases is prudent to avoid propagating spurious conclusions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.03.002DOI Listing
July 2018
6 Reads

Measuring Quality and Outcomes in Sports Medicine.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Jul;37(3):463-482

Department of Sports Medicine, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021, USA. Electronic address:

Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are objective metrics critical to evaluating outcomes throughout orthopedic surgery. New instruments continue to emerge, increasing the breadth of information required for those intending to use these measures for research or clinical care. Although earlier metrics were developed using the principles of classic test theory, newer instruments constructed using item response theory are amenable to computer-adaptive testing and may change the way these instruments are administered. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.03.001DOI Listing
July 2018
3 Reads

A Picture Tells 1000 Words (but Most Results Graphs Do Not): 21 Alternatives to Simple Bar and Line Graphs.

Authors:
Jay Hertel

Clin Sports Med 2018 Jul;37(3):441-462

Department of Kinesiology, University of Virginia, PO Box 400407, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4407, USA; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Virginia, PO Box 800159, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA. Electronic address:

Graphical representation of results are a central component of original research articles in sports medicine. There has been recent criticism in the scientific community of a heavy reliance on simple bar graphs and line graphs to illustrate results because they often fail to clearly represent the measures and changes to interventions of individual participants. This article aims to suggest alternatives to bar and line graphs, including those that emphasize the illustration of (1) individual subject measures and data set distribution, (2) magnitude of group differences, (3) the relationships between multiple variables, and (4) unique ways of displaying time series data. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.04.001DOI Listing
July 2018
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Considerations for Assessment and Applicability of Studies of Intervention.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Jul;37(3):427-440

Department of Physical Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Bridgeside Point 1, 100 Technology Drive, Suite 210, Pittsburgh, PA 15219-3130, USA.

Evidence-based practice changed how health care professionals are taught medical practice. Despite all best intentions, many health care professionals have limited knowledge to assess the validity and usefulness of the medical literature. The goal of this article is to review the following basic considerations while appraising studies of intervention: (1) the hierarchy of evidence and the strengths and weaknesses of clinical studies, (2) the relevant elements of study design that impact validity of study results, and (3) the spectrum of efficacy and effectiveness of clinical studies and how these influence the applicability of study results to individual patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.03.008DOI Listing
July 2018
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Considerations and Interpretation of Sports Injury Prevention Studies.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Jul;37(3):413-425

Amsterdam Collaboration on Health and Safety in Sports, Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, Amsterdam 1081 BT, The Netherlands; Division of Exercise Science and Sports Medicine, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town 7925, South Africa. Electronic address:

Promoting sports participation for health is part of the public health agenda worldwide. The same holds true for preventing sports injury, an unfavorable consequence of sports. In order to transfer research findings to practice, however, clinicians should consider the particulars of design, outcome measures, and data analyses of sports injury prevention studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.03.006DOI Listing
July 2018
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Mixed Methods Designs for Sports Medicine Research.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Jul;37(3):401-412

Department of Exercise and Sport Science, Matthew Gfeller Sport-Related Traumatic Brain Injury Research Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 209 Fetzer Hall, CB #8700, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Mixed methods research is a relatively new approach in the field of sports medicine, where the benefits of qualitative and quantitative research are combined while offsetting the other's flaws. Despite its known and successful use in other populations, it has been used minimally in sports medicine, including studies of the clinician perspective, concussion, and patient outcomes. Therefore, there is a need for this approach to be applied in other topic areas not easily addressed by one type of research approach in isolation, such as the retirement from sport, effects of and return from injury, and catastrophic injury. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.03.005DOI Listing
July 2018
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Fundamentals of Sports Analytics.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Jul;37(3):387-400

Department of Epidemiology, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Injury Prevention Research Center, Suite 500, Bank of America Building 7505, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Recently, the importance of statistics and analytics in sports has increased. This review describes measures of sports injury and fundamentals of sports injury research with a brief overview of some of the emerging measures of sports performance. We describe research study designs that can be used to identify risk factors for injury, injury surveillance programs, and common measures of injury risk and association. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S02785919183003
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.03.007DOI Listing
July 2018
11 Reads

Principles of Statistics: What the Sports Medicine Professional Needs to Know.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Jul;37(3):375-386

Physical Therapy and Athletic Training, Athletic Training Education Program, Northern Arizona University, PO Box 15094, Flagstaff, AZ 86011, USA.

Understanding the results and statistics reported in original research remains a large challenge for many sports medicine practitioners and, in turn, may be among one of the biggest barriers to integrating research into sports medicine practice. The purpose of this article is to provide minimal essentials a sports medicine practitioner needs to know about interpreting statistics and research results to facilitate the incorporation of the latest evidence into practice. Topics covered include the difference between statistical significance and clinical meaningfulness; effect sizes and confidence intervals; reliability statistics, including the minimal detectable difference and minimal important difference; and statistical power. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.03.004DOI Listing
July 2018
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Common Procedures-Common Problems: It's Complicated.

Authors:
Mark D Miller

Clin Sports Med 2018 Apr;37(2):xiii-xiv

Division of Sports Medicine, University of Virginia, James Madison University, UVA Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 400 Ray C. Hunt Drive, Suite 330, Charlottesville, VA 22903, USA. Electronic address:

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2018.01.001DOI Listing
April 2018
5 Reads

Rehabilitation: Common Problems and Solutions.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Apr;37(2):363-374

Advanced Rehabilitation, 4539 South Dale Mabry, Suite 100, Tampa, FL 33611, USA; MedStar Sports Medicine, MedStar Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine at Lafayette Centre, 1120 20th Street, NW, Building 1 South, Washington, DC 20036, USA. Electronic address:

There are numerous complications that can occur following a musculoskeletal injury or surgery in the sporting population. Prevention of the most frequent complications is the key in any successful rehabilitation program, but occasionally problems do occur. A thorough well-designed postoperative or postinjury rehabilitation program may prevent these problems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2017.12.010DOI Listing
April 2018
6 Reads

Pediatric Sports Medicine Injuries: Common Problems and Solutions.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Apr;37(2):351-362

Division of Sports Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address:

The treatment of sports injuries in the skeletally immature has a unique set of complications. Growth deformity may occur after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction; therefore, skeletal age is used to help guide the choice between physeal sparing and transphyseal techniques. Arthrofibrosis after tibial spine fracture fixation can be reduced by initiating immediate range of motion, and should be treated early and cautiously to avoid iatrogenic fracture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2017.12.012DOI Listing
April 2018
9 Reads

Foot and Ankle Surgery: Common Problems and Solutions.

Clin Sports Med 2018 Apr;37(2):331-350

Division of Sports Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Duke Sports Science Institute, 3475 Erwin Road, Durham, NC 27705, USA.

Participation in sports activity has increased significantly during the last several decades. This phenomenon has exposed orthopedic sports medicine surgeons to new challenges regarding the diagnosis and management of common sport-related injuries. Arthroscopy is becoming more commonly used in many of the surgical procedures for these injuries and carries the risk of complications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.csm.2017.12.009DOI Listing
April 2018
3 Reads