2,299 results match your criteria Clinics in Perinatology [Journal]


Improving Outcomes Due to Neonatal Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

Authors:
Michael S Caplan

Clin Perinatol 2019 Mar 14;46(1):xvii-xviii. Epub 2018 Dec 14.

Department of Pediatrics, North Shore University Health System, Evanston Hospital, 2650 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, IL 60201, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.12.001DOI Listing

We Need to Stamp Out Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

Authors:
Lucky Jain

Clin Perinatol 2019 Mar 21;46(1):xv-xvi. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, 1760 Haygood Drive, W409, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.12.002DOI Listing

Does Surgical Management Alter Outcome in Necrotizing Enterocolitis?

Clin Perinatol 2019 Mar 12;46(1):89-100. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Section of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, C.S. Mott Children's Hospital, University of Michigan, 1540 East Hospital Drive, SPC 4211, Ann Arbor, MI 48108, USA. Electronic address:

Necrotizing enterocolitis occurs in 14% of infants less than 1000 g. Preoperative management varies widely, and the only absolute indication for surgery is pneumoperitoneum. Multiple biomarkers and scoring systems are under investigation, but clinical practice is still largely driven by surgeon judgment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.09.008DOI Listing

Oropharyngeal Mother's Milk: State of the Science and Influence on Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

Clin Perinatol 2019 Mar 13;46(1):77-88. Epub 2018 Dec 13.

Department of Pediatrics, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston Hospital, 2650 Ridge Avenue, Evanston, IL 60201, USA; Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA.

Oropharyngeal administration of mother's own milk-placing drops of milk directly onto the neonate's oral mucosa-may serve to (ex utero) mimic the protective effects of amniotic fluid for the extremely low birth weight infant; providing protection against necrotizing enterocolitis. This article presents current evidence to support biological plausibility for the use of OroPharyngeal Therapy with Mother's Own Milk (OPT-MOM) as an immunomodulatory therapy; an adjunct to enteral feeds of mother's milk administered via a nasogastric or orogastric tube. Current methods and techniques are reviewed, published evidence to guide clinical practice will be presented, and controversies in practice will be addressed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.09.005DOI Listing

Can Fish Oil Reduce the Incidence of Necrotizing Enterocolitis by Altering the Inflammatory Response?

Clin Perinatol 2019 Mar 12;46(1):65-75. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Department of Pediatrics, NorthShore University HealthSystem, University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, 2650 Ridge Avenue, Walgreen Building Suite 1505, Evanston, IL 60201, USA.

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating bowel necrosis that predominantly affects preterm infants and is characterized by an imbalance toward a proinflammatory state. Fish oil or omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids have the potential to modulate inflammation. In this article, the authors examine the evidence in support of fish oil supplementation to alter the inflammatory response and potentially reduce the risk of NEC. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.09.004DOI Listing

Influence of Growth Factors on the Development of Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

Clin Perinatol 2019 Mar 20;46(1):51-64. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Department of Pediatric Surgery, Nationwide Children's Hospital, FB6135, 700 Children's Drive, Columbus, OH 43205, USA. Electronic address:

Growth factors have important roles in gastrointestinal tract development, maintenance, and response to injury. Various experiments have been used to demonstrate growth factor influence in multiple disease processes. These studies demonstrated enhancement of mucosal proliferation, intestinal motility, immune modulation, and many other beneficial effects. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.10.005DOI Listing

Closing the Gap Between Recommended and Actual Human Milk Use for Fragile Infants: What Will It Take to Overcome Disparities?

Clin Perinatol 2019 Mar 12;46(1):39-50. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

College of Nursing, The University of Tennessee Knoxville, 1200 Volunteer Boulevard #361, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA.

This article describes the components of human milk and their value to reduce risk for necrotizing enterocolitis, disparities in access to human milk, potential relationships to care practices within the neonatal intensive care unit, and ways to overcome the disparity. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.09.003DOI Listing

Necrotizing Enterocolitis Pathophysiology: How Microbiome Data Alter Our Understanding.

Clin Perinatol 2019 Mar 12;46(1):29-38. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Chicago, 5841 South Maryland Avenue, MC 6060, Chicago, IL 60637, USA.

Necrotizing enterocolitis is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the preterm infant population. The gut microbiome is of particular interest in research surrounding necrotizing enterocolitis, because variations in the intestinal microbiota seem to correlate with the risk of inflammation and disease. Recent advances in non-culture-based genomic sequencing have also allowed for more intricate analyses of the intestinal microbiome. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.10.003DOI Listing

Challenges in Advancing Necrotizing Enterocolitis Research.

Clin Perinatol 2019 Mar 12;46(1):19-27. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Section of Neonatal Medicine, Department of Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital campus, 369 Fulham Road, London SW10 9NH. Electronic address:

Progressing necrotizing enterocolitis research is difficult because the disease is variable in presentation, there are difficulties in making a precise diagnosis, a reliable agreed case-definition is currently lacking, and there is a paucity of preclinical research to identify etiologic targets. The major challenges of the cost of clinical trials and need for long-term outcome ascertainment could be eased through incorporation of novel randomization approaches and data collection into routine care, and collaboration between public-sector and industry funders. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.10.002DOI Listing

Impact of Toll-Like Receptor 4 Signaling in Necrotizing Enterocolitis: The State of the Science.

Clin Perinatol 2019 Mar 20;46(1):145-157. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

Division of Newborn Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8208, St Louis, MO 63110, USA; Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, 660 South Euclid Avenue, Campus Box 8208, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. Electronic address:

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remains a leading cause of preterm infant mortality. NEC is multifactorial and believed a consequence of intestinal immaturity, microbial dysbiosis, and an exuberant inflammatory response. Over the past decade, exaggerated Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activity in the immature intestine of preterm neonates emerged as an inciting event preceding NEC. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.09.007DOI Listing

Modifiable Risk Factors in Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

Authors:
C Michael Cotten

Clin Perinatol 2019 Mar 21;46(1):129-143. Epub 2018 Dec 21.

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Duke University School of Medicine, Box 2739 DUMC, Durham, NC 27710, USA. Electronic address:

Multicenter groups have reported reductions in the incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) among preterm infants over the past 2 decades. These large-scale prevalence studies have coincided with reports from multicenter consortia and single centers of modifications in practice using quality-improvement techniques aimed at either reducing NEC risk specifically or reducing risk of mortality and multiple morbidities associated with extreme prematurity. The modifications in practice have been based on mechanistic studies, epidemiologic association data, and clinical trials. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.10.007DOI Listing

Role of Abdominal US in Diagnosis of NEC.

Authors:
Jae H Kim

Clin Perinatol 2019 Mar 20;46(1):119-127. Epub 2018 Dec 20.

SPIN Program, San Diego Mothers' Milk Bank, Division of Neonatology, UC San Diego, 9300 Campus Point Drive MC7774, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA; Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Rady Children's Hospital-San Diego, 3020 Children's Way, San Diego, CA 92123. Electronic address:

Current assessment for and diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) remain inadequate. The introduction of interrogating bowel with ultrasound when NEC is suspected or when NEC has occurred presents greater opportunity to characterize the physical changes that have occurred in the bowel wall structures. The evaluation of bowel by ultrasound has been shown to have high specificity for bowel necrosis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.10.006DOI Listing

Epidemiology of Necrotizing Enterocolitis: New Considerations Regarding the Influence of Red Blood Cell Transfusions and Anemia.

Clin Perinatol 2019 Mar 12;46(1):101-117. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, 2015 Uppergate Drive Northeast, 3rd Floor, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address:

This article summarizes available evidence on the relationship between red blood cell transfusion and anemia, and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC). We review recent studies that highlight the uncertainty of the effect of red blood cell transfusion on NEC and the potential role of anemia. We also discuss potential pathophysiologic effects of both red blood cell transfusion and anemia and highlight strategies to prevent anemia and red blood cell transfusion. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.09.006DOI Listing

Biomarker Discovery and Utility in Necrotizing Enterocolitis.

Clin Perinatol 2019 Mar 12;46(1):1-17. Epub 2018 Dec 12.

Department of Surgery, Division of Pediatric Surgery, 300 Pasteur Drive, Alway Building M116, MC 5733, Stanford, CA 94305. Electronic address:

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is a devastating disease of prematurity, with no current method for early diagnosis. Diagnosis is particularly challenging, frequently occurring after the disease has progressed to the point of significant and often irreversible intestinal damage. Biomarker research has tremendous potential to advance clinical management of NEC and our understanding of its pathogenesis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.10.001DOI Listing

Three-Dimensional Printing and Beyond: What Lies Ahead for Pediatric Otolaryngology.

Authors:
Lucky Jain

Clin Perinatol 2018 12;45(4):xv-xviii

Emory and Childrens Pediatric Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, and Children's Healthcare of Athlanta, 1760 Haygood Drive, W409, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.09.002DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Head and Neck Pathology and Pathophysiology in Neonates and Children from the Otolaryngologist Perspective.

Authors:
Steven L Goudy

Clin Perinatol 2018 12 28;45(4):xix-xx. Epub 2018 Sep 28.

Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Emory University School of Medicine, 2015 Uppergate Drive, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183141
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.09.001DOI Listing
December 2018
8 Reads

Neonatal Stridor: Diagnosis and Management.

Clin Perinatol 2018 12 24;45(4):817-831. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Department of Otolaryngology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, 12631 E. 17th Avenue, B-205, Aurora, CO 80045, USA. Electronic address:

Stridor, a common presenting sign of respiratory distress in a newborn, has many systemic causes. It may arise from the larynx or the tracheobronchial airway. This article presents the most common pathologic conditions in this anatomic region, with highlights on management. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183140
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.07.015DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Neonatal Tracheostomy.

Clin Perinatol 2018 12 18;45(4):805-816. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Box 25, 225 E Chicago Avenue, Chicago, IL 60611, USA.

Neonatal and infant tracheostomies have been valuable in the care and survival of children over the past century. With the implementation of neonatal and pediatric intensive care units, more infants are surviving conditions that were considered fatal. Neonatal tracheostomy plays a vital role in many of these conditions, with significant implications and association with overall mortality, morbidity, and developmental outcomes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183140
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.07.014DOI Listing
December 2018
20 Reads

Subglottic Stenosis.

Clin Perinatol 2018 12 27;45(4):787-804. Epub 2018 Aug 27.

Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, MUSC Children's Hospital, Medical University of South Carolina, 135 Rutledge Avenue, MSC 550, Charleston, SC 29425, USA. Electronic address:

The subglottis is a narrow region of the pediatric airway that is exquisitely susceptible to the development of airway stenosis. The incidence of acquired subglottic stenosis in the setting of prolonged intubation has significantly decreased because of improved endotracheal tube management protocols. Advances in otolaryngology interventions, such as balloon dilation and endoscopic cricoid split techniques, may allow the avoidance of tracheostomy in patients with mild to moderate subglottic stenosis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183139
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.07.013DOI Listing
December 2018
13 Reads

Congenital Neck Masses.

Clin Perinatol 2018 12 18;45(4):769-785. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Department of General Surgery, Greenville Health System, Greenville ENT Associates, 200 Patewood Drive Suite B400, Greenville, SC 29615, USA.

Congenital neck masses can be a developmental anomaly of cystic, solid, or vascular origin. They can also constitute neoplasms, including malignancies, although this is rare in the pediatric population. The history and examination can help quickly narrow the differential diagnosis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183139
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.07.012DOI Listing
December 2018
8 Reads

Choanal Atresia and Other Neonatal Nasal Anomalies.

Clin Perinatol 2018 12 18;45(4):751-767. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 601 North Caroline Street, Room 6161B, Baltimore, MD 21287, USA.

Congenital nasal deformities can cause nasal obstruction with early respiratory distress. Choanal atresia is characterized by no communication between the nasal cavity and nasopharynx. Pyriform aperture stenosis involves more anterior nasal obstruction with limited intranasal space. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183139
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.07.011DOI Listing
December 2018
15 Reads

Vascular Anomalies.

Clin Perinatol 2018 12 18;45(4):737-749. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 1 Children's Way, Slot 836, Little Rock, AR 72201, USA.

Classified by their most prominent vessel type, congenital vascular tumors and malformations are frequently evident neonatally. Although many are identified in the first month of life, management is often delayed due to their slow expansion. Urgent interventions may be necessary in fast-growing, obstructive, destructive, or bleeding anomalies. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183139
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.07.010DOI Listing
December 2018
8 Reads

Peripartum Management of Neonatal Pierre Robin Sequence.

Clin Perinatol 2018 12 28;45(4):717-735. Epub 2018 Aug 28.

Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, Floating Hospital for Children, Tufts Medical Center, 800 Washington Street, Box 850, Boston, MA 02111, USA; Facial Plastic Surgery, Floating Hospital for Children, Tufts Medical Center, 800 Washington Street, Box 850, Boston, MA 02111, USA; Cleft Lip and Palate Team, Floating Hospital for Children, Tufts Medical Center, 800 Washington Street, Box 850, Boston, MA 02111, USA. Electronic address:

Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) is a congenital condition characterized by the presence of micrognathia, glossoptosis, and cleft palate. PRS has varying effects on airway patency and feeding ability and thus has a broad range of management options. The purpose of this article is to describe the nature of the background of the condition and address the previous and current trends in diagnosis and management of PRS. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183139
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.07.009DOI Listing
December 2018
10 Reads

Identification and Management of Cranial Anomalies in Perinatology.

Clin Perinatol 2018 12 18;45(4):699-715. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA; Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3901 Rainbow Boulevard, Kansas City, KS 66160, USA. Electronic address:

Neonatal skull and head shape anomalies are rare. The most common cranial malformations encountered include craniosynostosis, deformational plagiocephaly, cutis aplasia, and encephalocele. Improved prenatal imaging can diagnose morphologic changes as early as the second trimester. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183139
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.07.008DOI Listing
December 2018
13 Reads

Microtia and Related Facial Anomalies.

Clin Perinatol 2018 12 18;45(4):679-697. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Children's ENT and Facial Plastic Surgery, Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, 2530 Chicago Avenue, Suite 450, Minneapolis, MN 55404, USA.

Infants may be born with external ear deformities or malformations that can present a diagnostic clue to an affiliated syndrome while also presenting the possibility of surgical intervention. Microtia is a malformation of the ear that is associated with other craniofacial or systemic anomalies in 50% of cases. Surgical correction of microtia and associated facial anomalies is complex and must be integrated thoughtfully into the overall care plan for children with complex medical needs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183139
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.07.007DOI Listing
December 2018
7 Reads

Cleft Lip and Palate.

Clin Perinatol 2018 12 18;45(4):661-678. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina, 170 Manning Drive, Campus Box #7070, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.

Orofacial clefts are common congenital malformations with genetic and environmental risk factors. In the perinatal period, feeding and nutrition can be a challenge and the need for specialized feeders is common. Lip taping and nasoalveolar molding are early interventions that can be used to preoperatively modify cleft defects to enhance surgical outcomes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183139
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.07.006DOI Listing
December 2018
6 Reads

Aspiration and Dysphagia in the Neonatal Patient.

Clin Perinatol 2018 12 18;45(4):645-660. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, 243 Charles Street, Boston, MA 02143, USA.

Dysphagia and aspiration are commonly encountered problems in the neonatal population. It is often multifactorial in nature and management should be tailored to the individual patient. Multiple causes should be considered, including anatomic abnormalities, neurologic/developmental delay, cardiopulmonary disease/infection, and gastroesophageal reflux disease, in addition to those cases where a definitive reason may not be identified. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183139
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.07.005DOI Listing
December 2018
22 Reads

Hearing Loss and Failed Newborn Hearing Screen.

Clin Perinatol 2018 12 24;45(4):629-643. Epub 2018 Sep 24.

Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology, University of Utah, 100 North Mario Capercchi Drive, Salt Lake City, UT 84113, USA.

Hearing loss is the most common congenital defect. With early diagnosis and intervention, we are able to improve speech and language outcomes in this population. In this article, we discuss the implications of the newborn hearing screen, as well as diagnostic interventions, management, and intervention, and the increasing role of congenital cytomegalovirus screening. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183139
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.07.004DOI Listing
December 2018
8 Reads

Fetal Evaluation and Airway Management.

Clin Perinatol 2018 12;45(4):609-628

Cochlear Implant Program, Center for Pediatric Airway Disorders, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, 3401 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Congenital causes of airway obstruction once noted at birth are now diagnosed prenatally. The adoption of ex utero intrapartum treatment has allowed for planned airway stabilization on placental support, dramatically decreasing the incidence of hypoxic injury or peripartum demise related to neonatal airway obstruction. Airway access is gained either through laryngoscopy, bronchoscopy, or a surgical airway. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183138
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.07.003DOI Listing
December 2018
7 Reads

Airway Anomalies.

Clin Perinatol 2018 12 11;45(4):597-607. Epub 2018 Sep 11.

Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati, 3333 Burnet Avenue, Cincinnati, OH 45229, USA.

This article reviews congenital anomalies involving the larynx and trachea, including congenital subglottic stenosis, laryngeal webs, laryngeal cleft, and tracheal stenosis. Presenting signs and symptoms, prevailing surgical repair techniques, and postoperative care are discussed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183138
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.07.002DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Neurodevelopmental Outcomes of the Preterm Infant.

Clin Perinatol 2018 09 29;45(3):xvii-xviii. Epub 2018 Jun 29.

Department of Pediatrics/Division of Neonatology, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Neonatal Follow-up, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 3401 Civic Center Boulevard, Room 2NW15, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.06.001DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

The Business of Predicting Long-Term Neonatal Outcomes.

Authors:
Lucky Jain

Clin Perinatol 2018 09 2;45(3):xv-xvi. Epub 2018 Jul 2.

Emory and Childrens Pediatric Institute, Emory University School of Medicine, and Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, 1760 Haygood Drive, W409, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.06.002DOI Listing
September 2018
10 Reads

Prevention of Prematurity: Advances and Opportunities.

Clin Perinatol 2018 09;45(3):579-595

Division of Neonatology, Pediatrics, Santa Clara Valley Medical Center: Hospital and Clinics, 751 South Bascom Avenue, San Jose, CA 95128, USA.

Preterm birth (PTB) rate varies widely and has significant racial and ethnic disparities. Although causal mechanisms are ill understood, socioenvironment, phenotype, and genotype provide insight into pathways for preventing PTB. Data suggest varied response to current medical interventions is explicable Approved by underlying pharmacogenomics. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183137
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.05.013DOI Listing
September 2018
11 Reads
2.130 Impact Factor

Public Health Implications of Very Preterm Birth.

Authors:
Wanda D Barfield

Clin Perinatol 2018 09;45(3):565-577

Division of Reproductive Health, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Highway, MS F-74, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA. Electronic address:

With advanced perinatal care and technology, survival among infants born very preterm (<32 weeks gestation) has improved dramatically over the last several decades. However, adverse medical and neurodevelopmental outcomes for those born very preterm remains high, particularly at the lowest gestational ages. Public health plays a critical role in providing data to assess population-based risks associated with very preterm birth, addressing disparities, and identifying opportunities for prevention, including improving the health of reproductive-age women, before, during, and after pregnancy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183136
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.05.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6193262PMC
September 2018
12 Reads

Burdens Beyond Biology for Sick Newborn Infants and Their Families.

Clin Perinatol 2018 09;45(3):557-563

Department of Neonatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, 330 Brookline Avenue, Boston, MA 02215, USA; Division of Newborn Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, 300 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115, USA. Electronic address:

To date, outcomes in neonatology have focused mainly on the biological outcomes of the babies under our care. In this article, we argue that we must move beyond this proband and biological bias, towards a "Slow Medicine" that recognizes the distinction between the remarkable technical capabilities of the modern medical world and how those intersect with our society, and its values, more broadly. Practically speaking, this involves consideration of the impacts of neonatal intensive care and its sequelae on families, as well as non-biological outcomes such as finances and stress. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183137
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.05.012DOI Listing
September 2018
16 Reads

The Impact of Prematurity on Social and Emotional Development.

Clin Perinatol 2018 09 2;45(3):547-555. Epub 2018 Jul 2.

Neonatology Division, Emory University School of Medicine, 49 Jesse Hill Jr drive SE, Atlanta, GA 30030, USA. Electronic address:

Behavioral and emotional problems are one of the most frequent chronic conditions diagnosed among children born prematurely. The high prevalence of these pathologies is a matter of concern because of their impact on family life, school performance, and social interaction, but also because of current limitations in early detection and access to treatment. This is a review of the various mechanisms by which premature birth affects social and emotional development, and a discussion about strategies that may help support emotional and social development in this high-risk population. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183136
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.05.010DOI Listing
September 2018
14 Reads

Behavioral and Socioemotional Development in Preterm Children.

Clin Perinatol 2018 09 18;45(3):529-546. Epub 2018 Jun 18.

International Health Department, John Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Room 5517, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Prematurity is a significant risk factor for impaired neurodevelopmental outcomes. These include motor, cognitive, language, behavioral, and socioemotional competence. Long-term overall function depends on healthy socioemotional functioning. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183136
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.05.003DOI Listing
September 2018
13 Reads

Long-Term Functioning and Participation Across the Life Course for Preterm Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Graduates.

Clin Perinatol 2018 09;45(3):501-527

Department of Pediatrics, Section of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Kennedy Research Center on Intellectual and Neurodevelopmental Disabilities, University of Chicago Comer Children's Hospital, Woodlawn Social Services Center, 950 East 61st Street, Chicago, IL 60637, USA. Electronic address:

To understand the trajectories of risk and resilience in the vulnerable preterm and neonatal brain, clinicians must go beyond survival and critically examine on a population basis the functional outcomes of children, adolescents, and adults across their life course. Evaluations must go well beyond Bayley assessments and counts of neonatal morbidities, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia, retinopathy of prematurity, sonographic brain injury, sepsis, and necrotizing enterocolitis. Proactively providing support to families and developmental and educational supports to children can optimize academic functioning and participation in adult learning, physical and behavioral health activities, community living, relationships, and employment. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.05.009DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Biological and Social Influences on the Neurodevelopmental Outcomes of Preterm Infants.

Clin Perinatol 2018 09;45(3):485-500

Premature Infant Follow-Up Program, The Royal Women's Hospital, 20 Flemington Road, Parkville, Victoria 3052, Australia; Victorian Infant Brain Studies, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Flemington Road, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria 3052, Australia; Department of Pediatrics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia; Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010, Australia; Newborn Research, The Royal Women's Hospital, Level 7, 20 Flemington Road, Parkville, Melbourne, Victoria 3052, Australia.

Although very preterm birth and very low birthweight are recognized risk factors for longer term developmental difficulties, there is a wide spectrum of outcomes for children and adolescents born preterm. Biological and social variables have the potential to explain this variability. Although current understanding of these influences and how they interact is incomplete, perinatal factors are related to permanent neurosensory impairments such as cerebral palsy, blindness, and deafness. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.05.005DOI Listing
September 2018
16 Reads

What Are We Measuring as Outcome? Looking Beyond Neurodevelopmental Impairment.

Clin Perinatol 2018 09 19;45(3):467-484. Epub 2018 Jun 19.

Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Children's Mercy-Kansas City, University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, 2401 Gillham Road, Kansas City, MO 64108, USA.

Outcomes of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) graduates have been categorized by rates of neurodevelopmental impairment at 2 years old. Although useful as metrics for research, these early childhood assessments may underestimate or overestimate later functional capabilities. Often overlooked are less severe but more prevalent neurobehavioral dysfunctions seen later in childhood, and chronic health concerns that may impact the child's quality of life (QoL). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.05.008DOI Listing
September 2018
10 Reads

Necrotizing Enterocolitis and Neurodevelopmental Outcome.

Clin Perinatol 2018 09;45(3):453-466

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Emory University School of Medicine, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, 2015 Uppergate Drive, Atlanta, GA 30303, USA. Electronic address:

Necrotizing enterocolitis is a serious complication of prematurity that is associated with an increased risk for adverse neurodevelopmental outcome secondary to a complex relationship between various morbidities that increase the risk for central nervous system injury. Affected infants are exposed to a variety of circulating cytokines known to be associated with white matter injury. These infants also have an increased risk of secondary blood stream infections and nutritional compromise. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183137
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.05.014DOI Listing
September 2018
13 Reads

The Impact of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia on Childhood Outcomes.

Authors:
Sara B DeMauro

Clin Perinatol 2018 09;45(3):439-452

Division of Neonatology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, 2nd Floor Main Building, 3401 Civic Center Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. Electronic address:

The rate of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in preterm infants is increasing; this trend reflects, in part, improved survival among extremely premature infants. BPD is associated with adverse developmental and medical outcomes in early childhood and at least through school age. Therefore, BPD imposes a significant burden on infants and children, their families, and society. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.05.006DOI Listing
September 2018
18 Reads

Neuroimaging for Neurodevelopmental Prognostication in High-Risk Neonates.

Clin Perinatol 2018 09 18;45(3):421-437. Epub 2018 Jun 18.

Department of Pediatrics, George Washington University, Children's National Medical Center, 111 Michigan Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC 20010, USA.

Predicting neurodevelopmental outcomes in high-risk neonates remains challenging despite advances in neonatal care. Early and accurate characterization of infants at risk for neurodevelopmental delays is necessary to best identify those who may benefit from existing early interventions and novel therapies that become available. Although neuroimaging is a promising biomarker in the prediction of neurodevelopmental outcomes in high-risk infants, it requires additional resources and expertise. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183136
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.05.004DOI Listing
September 2018
19 Reads

Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Cerebral Palsy in Children with a History of Preterm Birth.

Clin Perinatol 2018 09 2;45(3):409-420. Epub 2018 Jul 2.

Physiotherapy, University of Melbourne, 161 Barry Street, Parkville 3052, Australia; Victorian Infant Brain Studies, Murdoch Children's Research Institute, 50 Flemington Road, Parkville 3052, Australia; Neonatal Services, The Royal Women's Hospitals, Cnr Flemington Road and Grattan Street, Parkville 3052, Australia.

Infants born preterm are at increased risk of cerebral palsy (CP), with the risk increasing with decreasing gestational age. Although preterm children are at increased risk of CP compared with their term-born peers, most preterm children do not have CP and thus, it is important to have a standardized process for detecting those children at high risk of CP early. A combination of clinical history, neuroimaging, and physical examination is recommended to ensure early, accurate diagnosis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183137
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.05.011DOI Listing
September 2018
21 Reads

Neurodevelopmental Outcomes of Preterm Children at School Age and Beyond.

Clin Perinatol 2018 09;45(3):393-408

Department of Pediatrics, Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, University of Alberta, 5027 Diagnosis and Treatment Centre, Royal Alexander Hospital, 10240 Kingsway Northwest, Edmonton, Alberta T5H 3V9, Canada.

Despite improved survival of preterm infants, there has not been an equivalent improvement in long-term neurodevelopmental outcomes. Adverse neurodevelopmental outcome rates and severity are inversely related to the degree of prematurity, but only 1.6% are born very preterm and the motor, cognitive, behavioral, and psychiatric disabilities in the large moderate and late preterm population have a greater impact. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.05.002DOI Listing
September 2018
11 Reads

Neurodevelopmental Outcomes in Early Childhood.

Clin Perinatol 2018 09;45(3):377-392

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, 6431 Fannin Street, MSB 3.242, Houston, TX 77030, USA.

Technological advances in neonatal-perinatal medicine have led to a steady increase in the survival of preterm infants. Although the increase in survival is a remarkable success, children born preterm remain at high risk for brain injury and long-term neurodevelopmental deficits. Children born preterm may have abnormal muscle tone or movements, cognitive deficits, language impairments, and behavioral problems. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00955108183136
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.05.001DOI Listing
September 2018
12 Reads

Unfinished Business: Prematurity, Birth Asphyxia, and Stillbirths.

Authors:
Lucky Jain

Clin Perinatol 2018 06;45(2):xv-xviii

Department of Pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, 1760 Haygood Drive, Atlanta, GA 30322, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.03.001DOI Listing
June 2018
2 Reads

Collaboratively Understanding and Improving Outcomes for the Mother, Fetus, and Infant.

Clin Perinatol 2018 06 14;45(2):xix-xx. Epub 2018 Feb 14.

University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, UNC Prematurity Prevention Program, 3010 Old Clinic Building CB#7516, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7516, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.01.016DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

Perinatal Brain Injury: Mechanisms, Prevention, and Outcomes.

Clin Perinatol 2018 06 21;45(2):357-375. Epub 2018 Mar 21.

Integrated Research Center for Fetal Medicine, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 North Wolfe Street, Phipps 228, Baltimore, MD 21287-4922, USA; Neuroscience Intensive Care Nursery Program, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1800 Orleans Street, Baltimore, MD 21287-4922, USA; Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 1800 Orleans Street, Baltimore, MD 21287-4922, USA. Electronic address:

Perinatal brain injury may lead to long-term morbidity and neurodevelopmental impairment. Improvements in perinatal care have resulted in the survival of more infants with perinatal brain injury. The effects of hypoxia-ischemia, inflammation, and infection during critical periods of development can lead to a common pathway of perinatal brain injury marked by neuronal excitotoxicity, cellular apoptosis, and microglial activation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.01.015DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads

Relationships Between Perinatal Interventions, Maternal-Infant Microbiomes, and Neonatal Outcomes.

Clin Perinatol 2018 06 23;45(2):339-355. Epub 2018 Feb 23.

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Texas Children's Hospital, 1 Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77401, USA; Translational Biology and Molecular Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, 1 Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Medical Scientist Training Program, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; Alkek Center for Metagenomics and Microbiome Research, Baylor College of Medicine, 1 Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, 1 Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA; Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, 1 Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030, USA. Electronic address:

The human microbiome acquires its vastness and diversity over a relatively short time period during development. Much is unknown, however, about the precise prenatal versus postnatal timing or its sources and determinants. Given early evidence of a role for influences during pregnancy and early neonatal and infant life on the microbiome and subsequent metabolic health, research investigating the development and shaping of the microbiome in the fetus and neonate is an important arena for study. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clp.2018.01.008DOI Listing
June 2018
3 Reads