2,913 results match your criteria Clinics in Dermatology[Journal]


Thirteenth World Congress of the International Academy of Cosmetic Dermatology (IACD), Dubrovnik, Croatia, June 28 to July 1, 2018.

Clin Dermatol 2019 Jan - Feb;37(1):80-84. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Department of Dermatology, MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, USA. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.11.001DOI Listing
November 2018
4 Reads

Business administration training for dermatology residents: preparing for the business of medicine.

Clin Dermatol 2019 Jan - Feb;37(1):78-79. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Biology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Previous studies have evidenced the lack of practice management and business training components in the residency curriculum, and that satisfaction with this training, when provided, was low. Whether considered good or bad, medicine has been moving increasingly toward becoming more business centric. Dermatology represents a unique field, because most residents choose to pursue private practice, where competent business skills are helpful to running a successful clinic. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.09.001DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

"But doctor, I googled it!": The "three Rs" of managing patients in the age of information overload.

Clin Dermatol 2019 Jan - Feb;37(1):74-77. Epub 2018 Aug 10.

Department of Neurology, Stanford University Hospitals and Clinics, Palo Alto, California, USA.

Managing patient interactions in the age of the Internet can be particularly difficult due to the vast amount of information available. Dermatologists should be able to identify relevant patient concerns to adequately address them. We discuss the ethical issues involved in interacting with patients who use the Internet for medical knowledge, and we suggest a method, using the "three Rs" (reassure, redirect, refer), to conduct these interactions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.08.002DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

The importance of the history of dermatology: An American viewpoint.

Clin Dermatol 2019 Jan - Feb;37(1):60-70. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Biology and the Jefferson Center for International Dermatology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Electronic address:

The history of dermatology is a significant aspect of the specialty, if only to put into perspective the development of the specialty. Early pioneers recorded the progress made in the specialty, as it became a separate discipline in the latter part of the 19th century. Periodically, dermatologic societies and meetings have shown interest by including sessions and exhibits on the specialty. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.09.012DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Organize to serve: An ecclesiastical approach to medicine and dermatology.

Clin Dermatol 2019 Jan - Feb;37(1):56-59. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Full Member-Elect (Individuo de Número) of the National Academy of Medicine in Venezuela, Emeritus Professor and Chairman of Dermatology and Immunology, Vargas School of Medicine, and Instituto Nacional de Dermatología, Central University of Venezuela, Caracas. Electronic address:

Maintenance and promotion of health are worldwide activities, yet those devoted by their profession to these goals are currently hopelessly fractionated and involved in struggling for territory and self-sustenance. The author proposes the creation of a World Medical Congregation, eventually encompassing all physicians. This integrative endeavor would model itself after the governance of the Roman Catholic Church, without the latter's obvious confessional characteristics. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.09.011DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Open access medical journals: Benefits and challenges.

Clin Dermatol 2019 Jan - Feb;37(1):52-55. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Department of Dermatology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California, USA. Electronic address:

The world of medical science literature is ever increasingly accessible via the Internet. Open access online medical journals, in particular, offer access to a wide variety of useful information at no cost. In addition, they provide avenues for publishing that are available to health care providers of all levels of training and practice. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.09.010DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

Returning: Thoughts about the editorial and publication processes in dermatology and medicine.

Clin Dermatol 2019 Jan - Feb;37(1):47-51. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Full Member-Elect (Individuo de Número) of the National Academy of Medicine in Venezuela, and Emeritus Professor and Chairman of Dermatology and Immunology, Vargas School of Medicine and Instituto Nacional de Dermatología, Central University of Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela. Electronic address:

It is the intention of the author to present his ideas about the ways in which scientific information in dermatology and medicine should be transmitted in writing. There is a brief analysis of practices in the past and of current procedures, along with ideas about what the near future will bring. The approach is conservative, according to the value given to traditional methods and to ethical considerations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.09.009DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

The inevitability of change.

Clin Dermatol 2019 Jan - Feb;37(1):4-11. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Department of Dermatology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science, Rochester, Minnesota, USA. Electronic address:

Change is an absolute so long as time does not stand still. We should expect it, embrace it, and try to predict its direction. Dermatology, as a specialty practice, has been changing rapidly over the past 30 years concurrent with the changes in medicine. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183019
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.09.003DOI Listing
February 2019
8 Reads

Imaging the unimaginable: Medical imaging in the realm of photography.

Clin Dermatol 2019 Jan - Feb;37(1):38-46. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Biophysics and Biochemistry, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Caracas, Venezuela. Electronic address:

There is an almost innate urge in human beings to represent reality in a visual form. From rock art in the Paleolithic to images of galaxies, the quotidian and the extraordinary have been visually represented through the ages. Medical and scientific disciplines are no exception. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183020
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.09.008DOI Listing
February 2019
9 Reads

Travel as a teaching and learning tool.

Clin Dermatol 2019 Jan - Feb;37(1):29-37. Epub 2018 Sep 17.

Department of Dermatology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Dermatologic SurgiCenter, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Electronic address:

Throughout history, physicians have traveled extensively to acquire new knowledge or to learn the latest therapeutic techniques from colleagues and academicians. This "wanderlust" persists in many who want to understand the world around them and learn from others, physicians or nonphysicians. Before the era of instantaneous online telecommunication, dermatologists would enhance their education by traveling abroad to learn from world-renowned experts in Europe and elsewhere and return with a treasure trove of knowledge and new skills. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183019
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.09.007DOI Listing
February 2019
10 Reads

The CILAD, a model of an international dermatologic society, united by geographic, linguistic, and cultural nexus.

Clin Dermatol 2019 Jan - Feb;37(1):21-28. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Instituto de Medicina Cutánea de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

The Ibero Latin American College of Dermatology, CILAD, the largest dermatologic organization in the region, was established in 1948 during the course of the V International Congress of Leprosy held in Havana, Cuba. Constituted in its beginning with fewer than 100 dermatologists from nine countries, its growth has been exponential, reaching now around 4000 members spread throughout Latin America, the Iberian Peninsula, and other regions of the world. In recent years, academic activity has been intense, such as the development of several institutional programs, like its community health care program, designed for geographic areas lacking dermatologic care in the Latin American region. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.09.006DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Pharmaceutical companies and medical practitioners or "the beast and the beauty"?

Authors:
Luis Villalba

Clin Dermatol 2019 Jan - Feb;37(1):16-20. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Latin American Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries (FIFARMA), Mexico City, Mexico. Electronic address:

There is currently a wealth of information about the pharmaceutical industry and its relations with physicians, with the coverage being overwhelmingly negative. I believe that there are considerable imbalances in the information and perceptions about the pharmaceutical industry and its interactions with health professionals, health care associations, and patient organizations. Increased accuracy and less indiscriminate reporting in this important practitioner/industry interphase are needed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.09.005DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Conceptual issues in dermatology and medicine: Where do nonphysician practitioners rightfully belong-a dermatologist's perspective.

Clin Dermatol 2019 Jan - Feb;37(1):12-15. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Department of Internal Medicine, Baylor University Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas, USA. Electronic address:

The invasion of the turf of medicine by nonphysician practitioners has not spared dermatology. The reasons behind this phenomenon are complex, as so many political issues are; some may be reasonable, others concerning. An undeniable consequence is that patients are being cared for by providers with significantly lower levels of medical education than that of medical doctors. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.09.004DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Commentary.

Clin Dermatol 2019 Jan - Feb;37(1):1-3. Epub 2018 Sep 15.

Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Biology and the Jefferson Center for International Dermatology, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.09.002DOI Listing
September 2018
1 Read

Father Adam Wiśniewski, MD, and his work for lepromatous patients in India.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):779-784. Epub 2018 Jun 10.

Student, Medical Faculty of the University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland.

Father Adam Wiśniewski (1913-1987), who was a Pallottine and a medical doctor with specialization in tropical diseases, devoted his life to helping and curing leprosy patients in India. His life proved difficult and varied. He began his medical studies during World War II in occupied Warsaw. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.06.004DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

How I learned to stop worrying and love machine learning.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):777-778. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Department of Dermatology, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Farmington, Connecticut, USA. Electronic address:

Artificial intelligence and its machine learning (ML) capabilities are very promising technologies for dermatology and other visually oriented fields due to their power in pattern recognition. Understandably, many physicians distrust replacing clinical finesse with unsupervised computer programs. We describe convolutional neural networks and discuss how this method of ML will impact the field of dermatology. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183014
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.06.003DOI Listing
March 2019
9 Reads

Use of antipsychotic drugs in dermatology.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):765-773. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Antipsychotic drugs can be beneficial in dermatology because of their both central nervous system and peripheral effects. All antipsychotic drugs have a central postsynaptic dopamine D2 receptor blocking effect, which underlies their antipsychotic action. The antipsychotic drugs have varying degrees of histamine H1-receptor, cholinergic muscarinic receptor, and α1-adrenergic receptor blocking effects, which can affect cutaneous perception and the autonomic reactivity of the skin and can be potentially beneficial in the management of certain histamine or sympathetically mediated dermatologic manifestations (eg, urticaria, pruritus, hyperhidrosis). Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183017
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.08.006DOI Listing
March 2019
24 Reads

Use of antiepileptic mood stabilizers in dermatology.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):756-764. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Several antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of bipolar disorder (valproic acid, divalproex, lamotrigine, carbamazepine) and some cutaneous neuropathic pain syndromes (carbamazepine, gabapentin, pregabalin). The AEDs may be effective in the management of (1) chronic pruritus, including pruritus due systemic disease, including uremia, neuropathic pain, neuropathic pruritus, and complex cutaneous sensory syndromes, especially where central nervous system (CNS) sensitization plays a role; (2) management of emotional dysregulation and the resultant repetitive self-excoriation or other cutaneous self-injury in patients who repetitively stimulate or manipulate their integument to regulate emotions (prurigo nodularis, lichen simplex chronicus, skin picking disorder, trichotillomania); (3) management of dermatologic clinical manifestations associated with autonomic nervous system activation (hyperhidrosis, urticaria, flushing; these often occur in conjunction with psychiatric disorders with prominent autonomic activation and dysregulation, eg, social anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder); and (4) when certain anticonvulsants have a direct therapeutic effect (eg, in psoriasis); currently the use of AEDs for such cases is largely experimental. Gabapentin (dosage range 300-3600 mg daily) is the most widely studied AED mood stabilizer in dermatology and is especially effective in situations where CNS sensitization is a mediating factor. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183017
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.08.005DOI Listing
March 2019
23 Reads

Use of psychotropic drugs in the dermatology patient: When to start and stop?

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):748-755. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Department of Psychiatry, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia, USA. Electronic address:

Dermatologists often find themselves treating patients with psychiatric disorders, most commonly anxiety and depression, in the context of skin disease. The psychiatric condition may either be present before the skin condition developed and exacerbate it or, in some cases, even create it (eg, delusions of parasitosis). Alternatively, the psychiatric condition may occur subsequent to the development of the dermatologic condition. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183018
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.08.012DOI Listing
March 2019
17 Reads

The potential role of mindfulness in psychosocial support for dermatology patients.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):743-747. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Department of Psychology, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

While it is widely acknowledged that people living with skin conditions can experience higher levels of psychosocial distress than the general population, access to psychologic support in dermatology is limited. Given the physical and psychosocial consequences of living with skin conditions, interventions used within physical and mental health may be beneficial. Mindfulness, defined as "paying attention in a particular way: on purpose in the present moment and non-judgmentally," has shown promise in improving outcomes in both mental and physical health populations, and studies have implicated a role for mindfulness in improving distress associated with skin conditions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.08.010DOI Listing
March 2019
11 Reads

Psychodermatology: An Indian perspective.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):737-742. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Department of Dermatology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal Academy of Higher Education, Manipal, Karnataka, India. Electronic address:

Psychodermatology, a relatively neglected branch of dermatology in India, refers to a holistic approach to skin diseases involving not only the mind and skin, but also the cutaneous effects of psychologic stress. Among many Indian people, culture, religion, the belief in karma, and the tendency to prefer indigenous medical systems can all have a major impact on lifestyle, as well as the approach to managing various diseases, including dermatologic conditions. The origin of psychodermatology in India can be traced to Buddha's period. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183018
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.08.013DOI Listing
March 2019
9 Reads

Assessment and treatment of trichotillomania (hair pulling disorder) and excoriation (skin picking) disorder.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):728-736. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

The OCD and Related Disorders Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Electronic address:

Recommendations are provided for the assessment and treatment of trichotillomania (hair pulling disorder, or HPD) and excoriation disorder (skin picking disorder, or SPD), two body-focused repetitive behavior (BFRB) disorders, based on their severity, comorbidities, and behavioral style. Habit reversal training (HRT) and stimulus control are first-line behavioral treatments that can be used in cases of all severity levels and may be particularly helpful when pulling or picking is performed with lowered awareness/intention. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) are behavioral treatments that can be employed to augment HRT/stimulus control, especially when negative emotions trigger the pulling or picking. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183017
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.08.008DOI Listing
March 2019
7 Reads

Body-focused repetitive behaviors and the dermatology patient.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):723-727. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Electronic address:

Body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRBs) are psychiatric disorders that involve recurrent pulling and picking one's own body resulting in skin lesions with varying degrees of severity. For that reason, the interface with dermatology is important. Currently, the classified BFRBs are trichotillomania and excoriation disorder. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183017
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.08.004DOI Listing
March 2019
18 Reads

Dermatitis artefacta.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):719-722. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Department of Dermatology, Lewis Katz School of Medicine, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Dermatitis artefacta, also known as factitial dermatitis, is a condition whereby self-induced skin damage is the means used to satisfy a conscious or unconscious desire to assume the sick role. It is particularly common in women and in those with an underlying psychiatric diagnosis or external stress. The diagnosis is one of exclusion, and it is often difficult to confirm, with patients rarely admitting their role in the creation of their lesions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.08.003DOI Listing
March 2019
6 Reads

Delusional infestation versus Morgellons disease.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):714-718. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

Delusional infestation is the conviction that one is infested with pathogens-either animate or inanimate-despite medical or microbiologic evidence to the contrary. Infestation with inanimate pathogens, specifically fibers or filaments, has been controversially termed Morgellons disease by the patients themselves, who believe that this is not a psychiatric disease but rather a new organic condition or a skin manifestation of an infection, such as Lyme disease. A large-scale study by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention on patients presenting with Morgellons clinical manifestations did not find evidence of fibers in the skin nor an association with any infection, including Lyme disease. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.08.007DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Psychosomatic aspects of alopecia areata.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):709-713. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Dermatology, Universidade Federal do Parana, Hospital de Clinicas, Parana, Brazil. Electronic address:

Psychologic and social effects of scalp hair are more important than its biologic significance. Etiology of alopecia areata (AA) suggests a predominantly autoimmune reaction. Correlation between AA and psychologic disorders is reciprocal. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183018
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.08.011DOI Listing
March 2019
20 Reads

Psychosomatic and psychiatric disorders and psychologic factors in pruritus.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):704-708. Epub 2018 Sep 19.

Department of Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Münster, Münster, Germany; Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Münster, Münster, Germany.

Chronic pruritus (CP) is a bothersome symptom of many different diseases and is often associated with psychosomatic and psychiatric comorbidity. This review gives an overview of psychologic factors that influence the perception and modulation of pruritus based on the well-known biopsychosocial model. Not only psychic comorbidities, such as anxiety and depression, play an important role in the etiology and perception of pruritus, but also internal factors, including personality, mentalization, suggestibility, and external factors, as well as stress. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183018
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.08.015DOI Listing
March 2019
10 Reads

Psoriasis: Psychosomatic, somatopsychic, or both?

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):698-703. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Department of Dermatology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York, USA. Electronic address:

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory disorder characterized by substantial psychiatric comorbidity. Historically, anecdotal observations have suggested that psychosocial distress can trigger flares of psoriasis, but over the past several decades, high-quality data from experimental studies support the assertion that stress plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. There may be a subset of patients unable to elicit an appropriate immunosuppressive response to stress through upregulation of cortisol, with resultant exacerbation of their psoriasis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183018
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.08.009DOI Listing
March 2019
13 Reads

Correlating the Dermatology Life Quality Index with psychiatric measures: A systematic review.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):691-697. Epub 2018 Aug 16.

Department of Dermatology and Academic Wound Healing, Division of Infection and Immunity, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.

Skin conditions may have a major impact on the psychologic well-being of patients, ranging from depression to anxiety. The Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) is the most commonly used quality of life tool in dermatology, though it has yet to be correlated with psychiatric measures used in clinical therapeutic trials. We conducted a systematic review to determine whether there is any correlation between the DLQI and psychiatric measure scores, potentially allowing the DLQI to be used as a surrogate measure for depression or psychiatric screening. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183018
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.08.014DOI Listing
March 2019
16 Reads

Psychiatric dermatology: Management.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov - Dec;36(6):687-690. Epub 2018 Sep 27.

Department of Psychiatry, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. Electronic address:

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183020
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.09.013DOI Listing
September 2018
9 Reads

Damien de Veuster (1840-1889): A life devoted to lepers.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Sep - Oct;36(5):680-685. Epub 2018 May 17.

Chair of Ophthalmology, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland. Electronic address:

Father Damien de Veuster, or Saint Damien of Molokai (1840-1889), was one of the pioneers of the holistic approach to care provision for leprosy patients and contributed to the overcoming of the patients' social stigmatization. He devoted his life to the lepers living in America's only leper colony, on the Hawaiian island of Molokai, where people with leprosy were required to live under government-sanctioned medical quarantine. Father Damien gained practical skills in caring for the sick, eagerly learning wound cleansing, bandaging techniques, and drug administration from a nurse. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183009
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.05.001DOI Listing
January 2019
7 Reads

Synergistic effect of platelet-rich plasma injections and scalp lifting in androgenetic alopecia.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Sep - Oct;36(5):673-679. Epub 2018 Mar 24.

Department of Medical Research, Research Assistant Center, Show Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan. Electronic address:

Androgenetic alopecia (AGA) is a common hair loss disorder, especially in men and the elderly. In this study, we analyzed the therapeutic effects of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injections and embedded sutures in patients with AGA. In each participant, we administered different treatments in one area of hair loss that was divided into four sections. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183005
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.03.015DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Current concepts in the prevention of atopic dermatitis.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Sep - Oct;36(5):668-671. Epub 2017 Apr 6.

Section of Pediatric Dermatology, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Departments of Pediatrics and Dermatology, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, relapsing inflammatory skin condition with a profound social, economic, and psychologic impact. An effective prevention strategy would have significant socioeconomic implications worldwide. The aim of this review is to evaluate the current evidence for prevention strategies, including early intervention neonatal emollient therapy, antihistamine use, and probiotic supplementation. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2017.03.004DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

Experiences with the first eczema school in the United States.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Sep - Oct;36(5):662-667. Epub 2018 Jun 6.

Department of Dermatology and Cutaneous Surgery and Itch Center, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, USA. Electronic address:

Patient education programs are beneficial in the treatment of chronic diseases. In Germany, France, and other countries worldwide, educating children, adolescents, and adults plus the parents of children with atopic dermatitis (AD) leads to better coping with the skin disease, as well as to a reduction in the severity of the skin symptoms and signs. The results in Europe led to the idea to also establish an eczema school in the United States. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183013
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.05.006DOI Listing
January 2019
18 Reads

Developing an eczema action plan.

Authors:
Moise L Levy

Clin Dermatol 2018 Sep - Oct;36(5):659-661. Epub 2018 Jun 8.

Division of Pediatric/Adolescent Dermatology, Dell Children's Medical Center, Austin, Texas, USA; Department of Pediatrics and Medicine (Dermatology), Dell Medical School, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas, USA. Electronic address:

As physicians, we spend time learning about diseases and their management. The key to successful outcomes is the involvement of patients and their families in the care of the conditions for which they seek our assistance. For atopic dermatitis (AD), all patients require frequent emollients for xerotic skin and care of the inflammation, which comes and goes frequently. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.05.003DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Oral supplements in atopic dermatitis.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Sep - Oct;36(5):653-658. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

Department of Dermatology, Mount Sinai West, New York, New York, USA. Electronic address:

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common chronic inflammatory skin disorder. The disease is typified by chronic pruritus, a series of signs and symptoms associated with immune dysfunction (eg, increased immunoglobulin E mediated allergies), and abnormal skin barrier dysfunction (eg, increased response to irritants). Due to the chronic itch and reactivity, patients and parents of affected children will seek therapy. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183013
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.05.010DOI Listing
January 2019
17 Reads

Atopic dermatitis guidelines: Diagnosis, systemic therapy, and adjunctive care.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Sep - Oct;36(5):648-652. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

University of Hawaii School of Medicine, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA.

Atopic dermatitis is an important and chronic skin condition that has recently been the subject of enormous volumes of basic science, clinical, and epidemiologic research. This field is undergoing rapid expansion, making it vitally important to integrate the emerging data with our current body of knowledge. In 2014, the American Academy of Dermatology published Guidelines of Care for the Management of Atopic Dermatitis, composed of four parts, reflecting the work of 17 experts from North America and the United Kingdom. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183013
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.05.008DOI Listing
January 2019
11 Reads

Bacterial colonization, overgrowth, and superinfection in atopic dermatitis.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Sep - Oct;36(5):641-647. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

Staphylococcus aureus infection is a major burden for individuals with moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis and a known inducer of disease exacerbation. This increased susceptibility to staphylococcal infections has been attributed to abnormalities in the innate immune system of atopic dermatitis (AD) skin, including deficits in barrier proteins and lipids, and a muted response in generating antimicrobial peptides, all of which is further impaired by the activation of Th2 and Th22 immune pathways, which characterizes AD. Skewing of the immune response with a reduced Th1:Th2 ratio and increased adherence of bacteria to AD skin are also thought to contribute. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.05.005DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Skin diseases associated with atopic dermatitis.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Sep - Oct;36(5):631-640. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

Department of Dermatology, Mt Sinai West, Icahn School of Medicine at Mt Sinai, New York, NY. Electronic address:

Atopic dermatitis is a common chronic pruritic inflammatory skin disorder, characterized by an abnormal skin barrier, immune dysfunction, and an altered skin microbiome. Atopic dermatitis may be seen in conjunction with a variety of other skin disorders due to the complex pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis, involving genetic and environmental factors that are associated with immune dysfunction, barrier defects, and altered skin microbiomes. Skin disorders associated with atopic dermatitis include diseases sharing similar genetic origins like ichthyosis vulgaris, infectious diseases such as impetigo, and eczema herpeticum, in addition to the cutaneous autoimmune diseases, alopecia areata, and vitiligo. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.05.004DOI Listing
January 2019
9 Reads

Patient-reported outcomes and quality of life measures in atopic dermatitis.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Sep - Oct;36(5):616-630. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

Departments of Dermatology, Preventive Medicine, and Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA; Northwestern Medicine Multidisciplinary Eczema Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Electronic address:

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a complex and heterogeneous disorder with a profound symptom burden and harmful impact on multiple domains of quality of life (QOL). Many different patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures exist to assess clinical manifestations and QOL impairment in AD, but none comprehensively assess all aspects of the disease. This review addresses the PRO and QOL measures currently used in AD and their properties, strengths, weaknesses, and feasibility for assessing AD in randomized controlled trials and clinical practice. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183014
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.05.011DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Assessing the severity of atopic dermatitis in clinical trials and practice.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Sep - Oct;36(5):606-615. Epub 2018 Jun 1.

Department of Dermatology, Preventive Medicine and Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA; Northwestern Medicine Multidisciplinary Eczema Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Electronic address:

There is a tremendous need for accurate and reproducible scoring systems for the grading of skin disease to further the development of research and standards of care. There are presently greater than 60 measures that have been used to assess the severity of atopic dermatitis. These assessments vary considerably with respect to content, scale, instructions, validity, and concordance. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183014
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.05.012DOI Listing
January 2019
17 Reads

Epidemiology of adult atopic dermatitis.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Sep - Oct;36(5):595-605. Epub 2018 May 31.

Department of Dermatology, Preventive Medicine and Medical Social Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine at Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA; Northwestern Medicine Multidisciplinary AD Center, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Electronic address:

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is driven by a complex gene-environment interaction. Many of the risk factors and genetic underpinning previously observed for pediatric AD may not apply to adult atopic dermatitis, suggesting that these may largely be different disorders. Whereas AD is classically thought of as a pediatric disease, recent studies have shown high rates of disease in adults as well. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.05.007DOI Listing
January 2019
5 Reads

Atopic dermatitis in Indian children: The influence of lower socioeconomic status.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Sep - Oct;36(5):585-594. Epub 2018 Jun 2.

Department of Dermatology, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi, India.

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic inflammatory condition afflicting children and adults. In developing countries like India, the scenario is slightly different from its western counterparts, where the disease has been commonly described. Despite running a milder course, AD still has a significant negative impact on the quality of life. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738081X183013
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.05.009DOI Listing
January 2019
16 Reads

We're all itchy, now what?

Clin Dermatol 2018 Sep - Oct;36(5):583-584. Epub 2018 May 31.

Departments of Dermatology, Preventive Medicine, and Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, USA.

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.05.013DOI Listing
May 2018
1 Read

Surgery at the BEST Medical Center-Clyde's Adventures in BEST Land: Down the Rabbit Hole.

Authors:
Philip R Cohen

Clin Dermatol 2018 Jul - Aug;36(4):576-580. Epub 2018 Feb 6.

Department of Dermatology, University of California-San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, California, USA. Electronic address:

Dr. Ida Lystic is an assistant professor in the Division of Gastroenterology at the Byron Edwards & Samuel Thompson (BEST) Medical Center. Before becoming one of the BEST doctors, she completed her fellowship training at the Owen T. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.02.001DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Frederic E. Mohs, MD, and the history of zinc chloride.

Authors:
Charles DePaolo

Clin Dermatol 2018 Jul - Aug;36(4):568-575. Epub 2017 Dec 28.

Department of Writing & Literature, Manhattan Community College, The City University of New York, New York, USA. Electronic address:

The history of zinc chloride therapy before and including Frederic E. Mohs' (1910-2002) early contributions to dermatologic oncology is presented. In 1932, Mohs devised a method of cutaneous surgery that employed zinc-chloride paste to devitalize basal or squamous cell carcinoma. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2017.12.001DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Cutaneous vasculitis in rheumatologic disease: Current concepts of skin and systemic manifestations.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Jul - Aug;36(4):561-566. Epub 2018 Apr 10.

Departments of Dermatology and Medicine, Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. Electronic address:

Cutaneous vasculitis may be limited to the skin, a manifestation of systemic vasculitis, or a sign of an important underlying disease state. A thorough and systematic approach is required for accurate diagnosis and evaluation of such patients to enable appropriate management of the vasculitis and any associated condition. Occasionally, cutaneous vasculitis is a manifestation or presenting sign of connective tissue disease, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome, or another condition. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.04.012DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Psoriatic arthritis and the dermatologist: An approach to screening and clinical evaluation.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Jul - Aug;36(4):551-560. Epub 2018 Apr 21.

Department of Dermatology, Division of Rheumatology, and Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Psoriatic arthritis is a common form of inflammatory arthritis that frequently accompanies psoriasis of the skin-up to 30% of patients with psoriasis are affected. Recognition of the clinical features of psoriatic arthritis is critical, as delayed detection and untreated disease may result in irreparable joint injury, impaired physical function, and a significantly reduced quality of life. Recent epidemiologic studies have also supported that psoriatic arthritis is associated with cardiometabolic and cerebrovascular comorbidities, including coronary heart disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and cerebrovascular accidents, further highlighting the importance of identifying affected patients. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.04.011DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Inflammatory arthritis and crystal arthropathy: Current concepts of skin and systemic manifestations.

Clin Dermatol 2018 Jul - Aug;36(4):533-550. Epub 2018 Apr 10.

Division of Dermatology, The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona, USA. Electronic address:

Systemic inflammatory disorders frequently involve the skin, and when cutaneous disease develops, such dermatologic manifestations may represent the initial sign of disease and may also provide valuable prognostic information about the underlying disorder. Familiarity with the various skin manifestations of systemic disease is therefore paramount and increases the likelihood of accurate diagnosis, which may facilitate the implementation of an appropriate treatment strategy. An improvement in quality of life and a reduction in the degree of morbidity may also be a realized benefit of accurate recognition of these skin signs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.04.010DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

Less common rheumatologic disorders: Current concepts of skin and systemic manifestations.

Authors:
Taraneh Paravar

Clin Dermatol 2018 Jul - Aug;36(4):525-532. Epub 2018 Apr 10.

Department of Dermatology, University of California-San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, California, USA. Electronic address:

The cutaneous manifestations of the common rheumatologic disorders, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis, and systemic sclerosis, are well known. In contrast, the dermatologic findings of less common rheumatologic disorders, including Sjögren syndrome, mixed connective tissue disease, and relapsing polychondritis, are less widely known. The cutaneous manifestations of these connective tissue disorders are reviewed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clindermatol.2018.04.009DOI Listing
December 2018
4 Reads