23,220 results match your criteria Clinical orthopaedics and related research[Journal]


Erratum to: The 2018 Otto Aufranc Award: How Does Genome-wide Variation Affect Osteolysis Risk After THA?

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):668

S. J. MacInnes, K. Shah, J. M. Wilkinson, Department of Oncology and Metabolism, University of Sheffield, The Medical School, Sheffield, UK K. Hatzikotoulas, I. Tachmazidou, K. Panoutsopoulou, E. Zeggini, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge, UK A. M. Fenstad, H. Dale, The Norwegian Arthroplasty Register, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway L. Southam, Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Oxford, UK G. Hallan, O. Furnes, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway.

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00003086-201903000-0003
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000421DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Erratum to: Does Surgery Reduce the Risk of Complications Among Patients with Multiple Rib Fractures? A Meta-analysis.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):667

Y.-S. Liang, K.-C. Yu, School of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan C.-S. Wong, Department of Emergency, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical, University, Taipei, Taiwan and Emergency Department, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan Y. Kao, Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, College of Health Science, Chang Jung Christian University, Tainan, Taiwan and Department of Emergency Medicine, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan, Taiwan T.-Y. Tiong, Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan K.-W. Tam, Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, New Taipei City, Taiwan, Division of General Surgery, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan, and Cochrane Taiwan, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000607DOI Listing
March 2019
2.765 Impact Factor

Can Patients Forecast Their Postoperative Disability and Pain?

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):635-643

A. Alokozai, S. L. Eppler, L. Y. Lu, N. Sheikholeslami, R. N. Kamal, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Stanford University, Redwood City, CA, USA.

Background: Forecasting is a construct in which experiences and beliefs inform a projection of future outcomes. Current efforts to predict postoperative patient-reported outcome measures such as risk-stratifying models, focus on studying patient, surgeon, or facility variables without considering the mindset of the patient. There is no evidence assessing the association of a patient's forecasted postoperative disability with realized postoperative disability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000627DOI Listing

CORR Insights®: What Pain Levels Do TSA Patients Experience When Given a Long-acting Nerve Block and Multimodal Analgesia?

Authors:
Surena Namdari

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):633-634

S. Namdari, The Rothman Institute-Thomas Jefferson, Departments of Orthopaedic Surgery & Shoulder/Elbow Surgery, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000670DOI Listing

What Pain Levels Do TSA Patients Experience When Given a Long-acting Nerve Block and Multimodal Analgesia?

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):622-632

J. T. YaDeau, S. S. Liu, M. A. Gordon, E. A. Goytizolo, Y. Lin, A. A. Schweitzer, Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Pain Management Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA D. M. Dines, L. V. Gulotta, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Sports Medicine, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA K. G. Fields, Healthcare Research Institute, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA.

Background: The pain experience for total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) patients in the first 2 weeks after surgery has not been well described. Many approaches to pain management have been used, with none emerging as clearly superior; it is important that any approach minimizes postoperative opioid use.

Questions/purposes: (1) With a long-acting nerve block and comprehensive multimodal analgesia, what are the pain levels after TSA from day of surgery until postoperative day (POD) 14? (2) How many opioids do TSA patients take from the day of surgery until POD 14? (3) What are the PainOUT responses at POD 1 and POD 14, focusing on side effects from opioids usage?

Methods: From January 27, 2017 to December 6, 2017, 154 TSA patients were identified as potentially eligible for this prospective, institutional review board-approved observational study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000597DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Are Limb-sparing Surgical Resections Comparable to Amputation for Patients With Pelvic Chondrosarcoma? A Case-control, Propensity Score-matched Analysis of the National Cancer Database.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):596-605

Chang-Yeon Kim MD, MS, Christopher D. Collier MD, Raymond W. Liu MD, Patrick J. Getty MD, Department of Orthopaedics, University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center/Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.

Background: Chondrosarcoma is the second most frequent primary sarcoma of bone and frequently occurs in the pelvis. Surgical resection is the primary treatment with the two main operative modalities being limb-sparing resection and amputation. Contemporary management has trended toward limb-sparing procedures; however, whether this approach has an adverse effect on long-term survival is unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000622DOI Listing

CORR Insights®: Does Patellar Tendon Repair With Gastrocnemius Flap Augmentation Effectively Restore Active Extension After Proximal Tibial Sarcoma Resection?

Authors:
Timothy A Damron

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):594-595

T. A. Damron, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, SUNY Upstate Medical University, East Syracuse, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000628DOI Listing

Does Resection of the Primary Tumor Improve Survival in Patients With Metastatic Chondrosarcoma?

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):573-583

K. Song, J. Song, F. Chen, X. Ma, J. Jiang, Department of Orthopaedics, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China K. Lin, Department of Orthopaedics, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, China The first two authors contributed equally to this manuscript.

Background: Although surgical resection or amputation has been the mainstay of localized chondrosarcoma management for many decades, its efficacy in patients with metastatic chondrosarcoma remains unknown, and likewise we do not know whether there are any tumor- or patient-related factors associated with better survival after surgery for metastatic chondrosarcoma.

Questions/purposes: (1) Is resection of the primary tumor associated with improved survival in patients with metastatic chondrosarcoma? (2) Which subgroups of patients with chondrosarcoma benefit more from resection in terms of survival?

Methods: We identified 200 of 222 patients with metastatic chondrosarcoma in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database between 1988 and 2014 based on the exclusion criteria. Among those patients, 107 (53. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000632DOI Listing

CORR Insights®: What Is the Possible Impact of High Variability of Distal Femoral Geometry on TKA? A CT Data Analysis of 24,042 Knees.

Authors:
Mark J Spangehl

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):571-572

M. J. Spangehl, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Department of Orthopaedics, Phoenix, AZ, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000669DOI Listing

What Is the Possible Impact of High Variability of Distal Femoral Geometry on TKA? A CT Data Analysis of 24,042 Knees.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):561-570

M. Meier, J. Beckmann, Sportklinik Stuttgart, Stuttgart, Germany S. Zingde, Conformis Inc, Billerica, MA, USA A. Steinert, Krankenhaus Agatharied, Hausham, Germany W. Kurtz, Tennessee Orthopaedic Alliance, Nashville, TN, USA F. Koeck, MedArtes, Neutraubling, Germany.

Background: Previous studies analyzing femoral components of TKAs have demonstrated the limited ability of these components to accommodate size variations seen in the patient population, particularly width and femoral offset.

Questions/purposes: The purpose of this study was to use a large data set of knee CT scans (1) to determine the variations in the distal and posterior femoral geometries and to determine whether there is a correlation between distal condylar offset and posterior femoral offset as a potential parameter for symmetry/asymmetry; and (2) to evaluate what proportion of knees would have a substantial mismatch between the implant's size or shape and the patient's anatomy if a femoral component of a modern standard TKA of symmetric (sTKA) or asymmetric (asTKA) designs were to be used.

Methods: A retrospective study was performed on 24,042 data sets that were generated during the design phase for a customized TKA implant. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000611DOI Listing

CORR Insights®: Does Tourniquet Use in TKA Increase Postoperative Pain? A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Authors:
Michael D Ries

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):559-560

M. D. Ries, Fellowship Director, Reno Orthopaedic Clinic, Reno, NV, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000641DOI Listing

CORR Insights®: Individual Patient-reported Activity Levels Before and After Joint Arthroplasty Are Neither Accurate nor Reproducible.

Authors:
Kenneth A Heida

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):545-546

K. A. Heida, William Beaumont Army Medical Center, El Paso, TX, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000672DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

CORR Insights®: Is Obesity Associated With Increased Risk of Deep Vein Thrombosis or Pulmonary Embolism After Hip and Knee Arthroplasty? A Large Database Study.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):533-535

M. Maltenfort, Statistician, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Biomedical Health Informatics, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000647DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

Do Patients Unconsciously Associate Suggestions for More-invasive Treatment with Better Care?

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):514-522

J. T. P. Kortlever, J. S. E. Ottenhoff, T. T. H. Tran, D. Ring, G. A. Vagner, M. D. Driscoll, Department of Surgery and Perioperative Care, Dell Medical School - The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA.

Background: It seems common for patients to conceive of care in physical terms, such as medications, injections, and procedures rather than advice and support. Clinicians often encounter patients who seem to prefer more testing or invasive treatments than expertise supports. We wanted to determine whether patients unconsciously associate suggestions for invasive treatments with better care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000608DOI Listing
March 2019
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ArtiFacts: Dr. James G. Golseth's Electromyograph.

Authors:
Alan J Hawk

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):512-513

A. J. Hawk, Collections Manager, Historical Collections, National Museum of Health and Medicine, Defense Health Agency, Silver Spring, MD, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000657DOI Listing

Your Best Life: What Motivates You?

Authors:
John D Kelly

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):509-511

J. D. Kelly IV, Professor of Clinical Orthopaedic Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA A note from the Editor-in-Chief: I am pleased to present the next installment of "Your Best Life," a quarterly column written by John D. Kelly, IV MD. Dr. Kelly is a Professor of Clinical Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Pennsylvania. His column explores the many ways that busy professionals-surgeons and scientists-might find peace, happiness, and balance both at work and in their personal lives.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000656DOI Listing

CORR® Curriculum - Orthopaedic Education: Generational Opportunities for Teaching in the Operating Room.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):506-508

S. E. Ames MD, Professor, Residency Program Director, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT, USA P. J. Dougherty MD, Professor and Chairman, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Florida, Jacksonville, FL, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000650DOI Listing

Medicolegal Sidebar: Alcohol Abuse-Patient Safety versus Surgeon Privacy.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):498-500

W. Z. W. Teo, Senior Research and Writing Fellow, BalBrenner Law Center, Chapel Hill, NC L. H. Brenner, Attorney, Chapel Hill, NC B. S. Bal, Chief Executive Officer and President, SINTX Technologies, Salt Lake City, UT.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000661DOI Listing

Clinical Faceoff: A Changing Landscape-Current and Recent Orthopaedic Residents Discuss Gender, Subspecialization, and Accountability.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):494-497

P. N. Ramkumar, Resident, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA E. Urch, Orthopaedic Surgeon, The Center: Orthopedic and Neurosurgical Care, Bend OR, USA S. A. Taylor, Assistant Attending Orthopedic Surgeon, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000640DOI Listing

Cochrane in CORR®: Nutritional Supplementation for Hip Fracture Aftercare in Older People.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):491-493

D. Zeraatkar, Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada B. Petrisor, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000658DOI Listing

Editor's Spotlight/Take 5: Prophylactic Fixation Can Be Cost-effective in Preventing a Contralateral Bisphosphonate-associated Femur Fracture.

Authors:
Seth S Leopold

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):477-479

S. S. Leopold, Editor-In-Chief, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research®, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000655DOI Listing

Editorial: Fears About #MeToo are No Excuse to Deny Mentorship to Women in Orthopaedic Surgery.

Authors:
Seth S Leopold

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):473-476

S. S. Leopold, Editor-In-Chief, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research®, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000654DOI Listing

Risk Adjustment Is Necessary in Value-based Outcomes Models for Infected TKA.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2018 Oct;476(10):1940-1948

P. M. Courtney, Rothman Institute, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA A. J. Boniello, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA C. J. Della Valle, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA G.-C. Lee, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Background: The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 provides the framework to link reimbursement for providers based on outcome metrics. Concerns exist that the lack of risk adjustment for patients undergoing revision TKA for an infection may cause problems with access to care.

Questions/purposes: (1) After controlling for confounding variables, do patients undergoing revision TKA for infection have higher 30-day readmission, reoperation, and mortality rates than those undergoing revision TKA for aseptic causes? (2) Compared with patients undergoing revision TKA who are believed not to have infections, are patients undergoing revision for infected TKAs at increased risk for complications?

Methods: We queried the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database for patients undergoing revision TKA from 2012 to 2015 identified by Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes 27486, 27487, and 27488. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11999.0000000000000134DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

A Single Positive Tissue Culture Increases the Risk of Rerevision of Clinically Aseptic THA: A National Register Study.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

N. R. Milandt, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark P. H. Gundtoft, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Traumatology, Lillebaelt Hospital, Kolding, Denmark S. Overgaard, Department of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark.

Background: The diagnostic and prognostic value of unexpected positive intraoperative cultures remains unclear in diagnosing prosthetic joint infection (PJI) in THA revisions.

Questions/purposes: Therefore, we asked: (1) What is the clinical importance of bacterial growth in intraoperative tissue cultures taken during first-time revision of a clinically aseptic THA in terms of all-cause rerevision and rerevision for PJI specifically? (2) Is there a difference in outpatient antibiotic treatment patterns that is dependent on the number of positive intraoperative cultures?

Methods: This register-based study included all procedures reported to the Danish Hip Arthroplasty Register (DHR) as first-time aseptic loosening revisions performed during January 2010 to May 2016. DHR data were merged with that of the Danish Microbiology Database, which contains data from all intraoperatively obtained cultures in Denmark. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000609DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

What Is the Reliability and Accuracy of Intraoperative Fluoroscopy in Evaluating Anterior, Lateral, and Posterior Coverage During Periacetabular Osteotomy?

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Jan 22. Epub 2019 Jan 22.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: Periacetabular osteotomy (PAO) is an established treatment for acetabular dysplasia in the skeletally mature individual. Fluoroscopy is used intraoperatively for osteotomy completion and to judge fragment correction. However, a comprehensive study validating fluoroscopy to judge anterior, lateral, and posterior coverage in PAO has not been reported. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000616DOI Listing
January 2019
2.765 Impact Factor

Classifications in Brief: Sanders Classification of Intraarticular Fractures of the Calcaneus.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Feb;477(2):467-471

J. H. Jiménez-Almonte, J. D. King, A. Aneja, E. Moghadamian, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, USA T. D. Luo, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000539DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Are at Higher Risk for Pneumonia, Septic Shock, and Blood Transfusions After Total Shoulder Arthroplasty.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Feb;477(2):416-423

R. Lee, D. Lee, I. S. Mamidi, The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA W. V. Probasco, J. H. Heyer, R. Pandarinath, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, The George Washington University, Washington, DC, USA.

Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been associated with several complications after surgery, including pneumonia, myocardial infarction, septic shock, and mortality. To the authors' knowledge, there has been no work analyzing the impact of COPD on complications after total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA). Although previous work has elucidated the complications COPD has on TKA and THA, extrapolating the results of lower extremity arthroplasty to TSA may prove to be inaccurate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000531DOI Listing
February 2019
6 Reads

2018 John Charnley Award: Analysis of US Hip Replacement Bundled Payments: Physician-initiated Episodes Outperform Hospital-initiated Episodes.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Feb;477(2):271-280

W. S. Murphy, Harvard Medical School, Harvard Business School, Boston, MA, USA A. Siddiqi, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA T. Cheng, B. Lin, D. Terry, Archway Health Advisors LLC, Watertown, MA, USA C. T. Talmo, New England Baptist Hospital, Boston, MA, USA S. B. Murphy, New England Baptist Hospital, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) launched the Bundled Payment for Care Improvement (BPCI) initiative in 2013 to create incentives to improve outcomes and reduce costs in various clinical settings, including total hip arthroplasty (THA). This study seeks to quantify BPCI initiative outcomes for THA and to determine the optimal party (for example, hospital versus physician group practice [PGP]) to manage the program.

Questions/purposes: (1) Is BPCI associated with lower 90-day payments, readmissions, or mortality for elective THA? (2) Is there a difference in 90-day payments, readmissions, or mortality between episodes initiated by PGPs and episodes initiated by hospitals for elective THA? (3) Is BPCI associated with reduced total Elixhauser comorbidity index or age for elective THA?

Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis on the CMS Limited Data Set on all Medicare primary elective THAs without a major comorbidity performed in the United States (except Maryland) between January 2013 and March 2016, totaling more than USD 7. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000532DOI Listing
February 2019
2 Reads

When Do Patients Return to Previous Daily Activity After Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair?

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Feb;477(2):403-413

H. J. Kim, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea J. Y. Kim, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kangnam Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea Y. G. Rhee, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Kyung Hee University, School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Background: One potential advantage of arthroscopic shoulder surgery over open approaches is accelerated recovery; however, the functional recovery period of daily activities for specific movements after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has not yet been reported, to our knowledge.

Questions/purposes: (1) After arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, when are patients able to perform low-level and high-level front-of-body motion, low-level and high-level behind-the-back motion, strength-related activities, and sports/leisure activities? (2) How do tear size, arm dominance, and retear affect performance of these activities? (3) When does the UCLA score cross above 80% in each UCLA score component (28 points)?

Methods: A 2-year prospective study of 135 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was performed (45 in small-sized, 45 in medium-sized, and 45 in large-to-massive-sized groups). The mean age was 60 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000554DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads

Editor's Spotlight/Take 5-2018 John Charnley Award: Analysis of US Hip Replacement Bundled Payments: Physician-initiated Episodes Outperform Hospital-initiated Episodes.

Authors:
Paul A Manner

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Feb;477(2):268-270

P. A. Manner Senior Editor, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research®, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000626DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Guest Editorial: Is There Value in Value-based Health Care?

Authors:
Paul A Manner

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Feb;477(2):265-267

P. A. Manner Senior Editor, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research®, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000617DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Editorial: Importance of Validating the Scores We Use to Assess Patients with Musculoskeletal Tumors.

Authors:
Seth S Leopold

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Jan 4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

S. S. Leopold, Editor-In-Chief, Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research®, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000631DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Not the Last Word: Big Data Will Make You Confront Big Ethical Questions-Here's Why.

Authors:
Joseph Bernstein

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Feb;477(2):284-287

J. Bernstein, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000625DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

What Factors Are Associated With Outcomes Scores After Surgical Treatment Of Ankle Fractures With a Posterior Malleolar Fragment?

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Jan 4. Epub 2019 Jan 4.

D. T. Meijer, B. D. J. G. Deynoot, S. A. Stufkens, G. M. M. J. Kerkhoffs, J. N. Doornberg, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands D. T. Meijer, Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands I. N. Sierevelt, Slotervaart Center of Orthopedic Research and Education, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Medical Centre Slotervaart, Amsterdam, The Netherlands J. C. Goslings, Department of Surgery, Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Amsterdam, The Netherlands G. M. M. J. Kerkhoffs, Academic Center for Evidence-based Sports Medicine, Amsterdam Collaboration for Health and Safety in Sports, IOC Research Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands J. N. Doornberg, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia.

Background: Psychosocial factors, such as depression and catastrophic thinking, might account for more disability after various orthopaedic trauma pathologies than range of motion and other impairments. However, little is known about the influence of psychosocial aspects of illness on long-term symptoms and limitations of patients with rotational-type ankle fractures, including a posterior malleolar fragment. Knowledge of the psychosocial factors associated with long-term outcome after operative treatment of trimalleolar ankle fractures might improve recovery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000623DOI Listing
January 2019
6 Reads

No Difference Between Low- and Regular-dose Aspirin for Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis After THA.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Feb;477(2):396-402

M. Faour, N. S. Piuzzi, D. P. Brigati, A. K. Klika, M. M. Mont, W. K. Barsoum, C. Higuera-Rueda, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, OH, USA N. S. Piuzzi, Instituto Universitario del Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Background: Aspirin is established as an effective prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism (VTE) after THA; however, there is no consensus as to whether low- or regular-dose aspirin is more effective at preventing VTE.

Questions/purposes: (1) Is there a difference in the incidence of symptomatic VTE within 90 days of elective THA using low-dose aspirin compared with regular-dose aspirin? (2) Is there a difference in the risk of significant bleeding (gastrointestinal and wound bleeding) and mortality between low- and standard-dose aspirin within 90 days after surgery?

Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 7488 patients in our database who underwent THA between September 2012 and December 2016. A total of 3936 (53%) patients received aspirin alone for VTE prophylaxis after THA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000613DOI Listing
February 2019
10 Reads

Is Obesity Associated With Increased Risk of Deep Vein Thrombosis or Pulmonary Embolism After Hip and Knee Arthroplasty? A Large Database Study.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):523-532

M. Sloan, G.-C. Lee Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA N. Sheth Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Background: Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolus (PE) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality after THA and TKA. Prior recommendations have advocated for more aggressive prophylaxis for patients with obesity, whereas the evidence supporting these recommendations is conflicting and often based on underpowered studies.

Questions/purposes: (1) What is the association between obesity and DVT and PE after primary and revision THA and TKA? (2) Is there a body mass index (BMI) threshold beyond which DVT and PE risk is elevated?

Methods: We reviewed the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database from 2008 to 2016 to evaluate the reported 30-day rates of DVT, PE, and combined venous thromboembolism (VTE) after primary THA, primary TKA, revision THA, and revision TKA according to BMI as a continuous variable and a categorical variable as defined by the World Health Organization cutoffs for underweight, normal weight, overweight, and obesity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000615DOI Listing
March 2019
6 Reads

CORR Insights®: Acetabular Labral Tears Are Common in Asymptomatic Contralateral Hips With Femoroacetabular Impingement.

Authors:
Benjamin G Domb

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

B. G. Domb Medical Director, American Hip Institute, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Westmont, IL, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000606DOI Listing
January 2019
2 Reads

CORR Insights®: Translation and Validation of the German New Knee Society Scoring System.

Authors:
Tae Kyun Kim

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Feb;477(2):394-395

T. K. Kim TK Orthopedic Surgery, Seongnam-si, Republic of Korea.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000604DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

CORR Insights®: Cam FAI and Smaller Neck Angles Increase Subchondral Bone Stresses During Squatting: A Finite Element Analysis.

Authors:
Moritz Tannast

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

M. Tannast MD University of Bern, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Inselspital, Murtenstrasse, Bern, Switzerland.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000603DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

CORR Insights®: What is the Natural History of the Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tear Without Distal Radioulnar Joint Instability?

Authors:
Michaela Huber

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Feb;477(2):450-451

M. Huber, Associate Professor, Emergency Department & Department of Trauma Surgery, University Medical Center Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000587DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

Pearls: Improving Upon Minimally Invasive Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion.

Authors:
Sheeraz Qureshi

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):501-505

S. Qureshi, Associate Professor, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000596DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Outcome Selection and Methodological Quality of Major and Minor Shoulder Surgery Studies: A Scoping Review.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):606-619

K. El-Boghdadly, Department of Anaesthesia, Guy's & St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust and King's College London, London, UK F. W. Abdallah, Department of Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; and the Department of Anesthesia and the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada A. Short, Department of Anaesthesia, Wrightington, Wigan & Leigh NHS Foundation Trust, Wrightington, Lancashire, UK L. Vorobeichik , V. W. S. Chan, Department of Anesthesia, University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada S. G. Memtsoudis, Department of Anesthesiology, Critical Care and Pain Management and Health Care Policy and Research, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY, USA; and the Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA.

Background: Core outcome sets aim to select and standardize the choice of important outcomes reported in clinical trials to encourage more effective data synthesis, increase the reliability of comparing results, and minimize reporting bias. A core outcome set for elective shoulder surgery has yet to be defined, and therefore a systematic assessment of outcomes and methodology is necessary to inform the development of a core outcome set.

Questions/purposes: The purpose of this study was to examine randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of patients having elective major or minor shoulder surgery to (1) identify the outcome domains reported; (2) determine specific outcome measurement tools that were utilized; and (3) assess the work for methodological quality and risk of bias. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000578DOI Listing
March 2019
5 Reads

Can Machine Learning Methods Produce Accurate and Easy-to-use Prediction Models of 30-day Complications and Mortality After Knee or Hip Arthroplasty?

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Feb;477(2):452-460

A. H. S. Harris, T. Bowe, N. J. Giori Center for Innovation to Implementation, VA Palo Alto Healthcare System, Palo Alto, CA, USA A. C. Kuo San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA A H. S. Harris, Y. Weng, A. W. Trickey Stanford-Surgical Policy Improvement Research and Education Center, Stanford, CA, USA N. J. Giori Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA.

Background: Existing universal and procedure-specific surgical risk prediction models of death and major complications after elective total joint arthroplasty (TJA) have limitations including poor transparency, poor to modest accuracy, and insufficient validation to establish performance across diverse settings. Thus, the need remains for accurate and validated prediction models for use in preoperative management, informed consent, shared decision-making, and risk adjustment for reimbursement.

Questions/purposes: The purpose of this study was to use machine learning methods and large national databases to develop and validate (both internally and externally) parsimonious risk-prediction models for mortality and complications after TJA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000601DOI Listing
February 2019
9 Reads

Differences in Femoral Torsion Among Various Measurement Methods Increase in Hips With Excessive Femoral Torsion.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Inselspital Bern, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

Background: Correct quantification of femoral torsion is crucial to diagnose torsional deformities, make an indication for surgical treatment, or plan the amount of correction. However, no clear evaluation of different femoral torsion measurement methods for hips with excessive torsion has been performed to date.

Questions/purposes: (1) How does CT-based measurement of femoral torsion differ among five commonly used measurement methods? (2) Do differences in femoral torsion among measurement methods increase in hips with excessive femoral torsion? (3) What is the reliability and reproducibility of each of the five torsion measurement methods?

Methods: Between March and August 2016, we saw 86 new patients (95 hips) with hip pain and physical findings suggestive for femoroacetabular impingement at our outpatient tertiary clinic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000610DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Classifications in Brief: Mayo Classification of Olecranon Fractures.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2018 Dec 27. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

Connor W. Sullivan MD, Khusboo Desai MD, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Albany Medical College, Albany, NY, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000614DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

What Associations Exist Between Comorbidity Indices and Postoperative Adverse Events After Total Shoulder Arthroplasty?

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2018 Dec 27. Epub 2018 Dec 27.

M.C. Fu, N. T. Ondeck, L. V. Gulotta Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA B. U. Nwachukwu, G. H. Garcia, N. N. Verma Rush University Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Chicago, IL, USA J. N. Grauer Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedics & Rehabilitation, New Haven, CT, USA.

Background: Comorbidity indices like the modified Charlson Comorbidity Index (mCCI) and the modified Frailty Index (mFI) are commonly reported in large database outcomes research. It is unclear if they provide greater association and discriminative ability for postoperative adverse events after total shoulder arthroplasty (TSA) than simple variables.

Questions/purposes: Using a large research database to examine postoperative adverse events after anatomic and reverse TSA, we asked: (1) Which demographic/anthropometric variable among age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) has the best discriminative ability as measured by receiver operating characteristics (ROC)? (2) Which comorbidity index, among the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification, the mCCI, or the mFI, has the best ROC? (3) Does a combination of a demographic/anthropometric variable and a comorbidity index provide better ROC than either variable alone?

Methods: Patients who underwent TSA from 2005 to 2015 were identified from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP). Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00003086-900000000-9827
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000624DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

CORR Insights®: Outcome Selection and Methodological Quality of Major and Minor Shoulder Surgery Studies: A Scoping Review.

Authors:
Brian B Gilmer

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):620-621

B. B. Gilmer, Professor of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, Mammoth Orthopedic Institute, Mammoth Lakes, CA, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000618DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

How Often Do Orthopaedic Matched Case-Control Studies Use Matched Methods? A Review of Methodological Quality.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Mar;477(3):655-662

D. G. LeBrun, Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA D. G. LeBrun, T. Tran, D. Wypij , Department of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA T. Tran, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI, USA M. S. Kocher, Division of Sports Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Background: Case-control studies are a common method of analyzing associations between clinical outcomes and potential risk factors. Matching cases to controls based on known confounding variables can decrease bias and allow investigators to assess the association of interest with increased precision. However, the analysis of matched data generally requires matched statistical methods, and failure to use these methods can lead to imprecise or biased results. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00003086-900000000-9826
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000612DOI Listing
March 2019
2 Reads

What Is the Clinical Importance of Incidental Findings on Staging CT Scans in Patients With Sarcoma?

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2018 Feb 21. Epub 2018 Feb 21.

Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA.

Background: Baseline staging CT scans are performed on nearly every patient after the diagnosis of a sarcoma to evaluate for the presence of metastatic disease. These scans often identify abnormalities that may or may not be related to the known malignancy. Despite the high frequency of incidental findings, there is little guidance for clinicians faced with assessing these radiographic abnormalities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11999.0000000000000149DOI Listing
February 2018
1 Read

Humeral Bone Loss in Revision Total Shoulder Arthroplasty: the Proximal Humeral Arthroplasty Revision Osseous inSufficiency (PHAROS) Classification System.

Clin Orthop Relat Res 2019 Feb;477(2):432-441

P. N. Chalmers, R. Z. Tashjian, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, USA A. A. Romeo, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rothman Institute, New York, NY, USA G. P. Nicholson, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA P. Boileau, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, CHU-Nice, Nice, France J. D. Keener, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA J. M. Gregory, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Texas at Houston, Houston, TX, USA D. H. Salazar, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Loyola University, Chicago, IL, USA.

Background: Humeral bone loss is commonly encountered during revision shoulder arthroplasty and anticipating humeral bone defects can help the revision surgeon make appropriate plans to achieve adequate fixation and stability. No validated classification system exists to characterize humeral bone loss in the setting of revision shoulder arthroplasty.

Questions/purposes: The purposes of this study were (1) to create a classification system for humeral bone loss in revision shoulder arthroplasty; (2) to determine the classification system's reliability; and (3) to determine whether humeral bone loss type is associated with intraoperative humeral-related reconstruction characteristics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/CORR.0000000000000590DOI Listing
February 2019
3 Reads