13 results match your criteria Clinical Pediatric Emergency Medicine [Journal]

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An Update on Childhood Lead Poisoning.

Clin Pediatr Emerg Med 2017 Sep;18(3):181-192

Pediatric Environmental Health Center, Division of General Pediatrics, Department of Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital.

Childhood lead poisoning is a multi-faceted, complex condition, which affects not only the child's health and well-being, but also the family's housing security, economic status, job security, and stress level. This review updates the emergency department clinician on the management of childhood lead poisoning. Infants and children are at higher risk than adults for lead exposure due to their smaller size and proportionately larger dose of ingested toxins, their proximity to ground dirt and indoor dust, their energy and curiosity, their oral exploratory and pica behaviors, their proportionately larger daily water and milk intake, and dietary preferences that differ markedly from those of adults. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpem.2017.07.010DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5645046PMC
September 2017
11 Reads

ACUTE PELVIC PAIN IN THE ADOLESCENT: A CASE REPORT.

Clin Pediatr Emerg Med 2015 Jun;16(2):119-124

Division of Emergency Medicine, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia PA and Department of Pediatrics, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Diagnosis and treatment of acute pelvic pain in the adolescent female requires differentiating among a broad differential diagnosis that includes potentially serious illness across several organ systems. The case presented provides an illustration of the assessment and management of acute pelvic pain, and key teaching points about important potential causes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpem.2015.04.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4528383PMC
June 2015
9 Reads

PRIORITIZATION OF PEDIATRIC CBRNE DISASTER PREPAREDNESS EDUCATION AND TRAINING NEEDS.

Clin Pediatr Emerg Med 2014 Dec;15(4):309-317

Chief Medical Officer, Healthcare Network of Southwest Florida, Naples, FL, Member, AAP Disaster Preparedness Advisory Council.

Children are the members of our population who are most vulnerable to the effects of a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or explosive (CBRNE) attack. It has been over 12 years since 9/11 and the majority of clinicians who would be providing care to children in the event of another attack still lack the requisite disaster preparedness training. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the recent developments that will enable the affordable creation of key CBRNE educational and just in time material. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpem.2014.10.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4288847PMC
December 2014
11 Reads

Emergency Department Screening for Adolescent Mental Health Disorders: The Who, What, When, Where, Why and How It Could and Should Be Done.

Clin Pediatr Emerg Med 2013 Mar;14(1):3-11

Departments of Emergency Medicine and Pediatrics, The Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island.

Mental health problems are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality among pediatric populations. Screening for these problems can result in earlier identification and increase treatment and improve outcomes for these children and adolescents. The emergency department (ED) is an ideal site for such screening. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpem.2013.01.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3652490PMC
March 2013
13 Reads

Adverse Effects and Toxicity of the Atypical Antipsychotics: What is Important for the Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practitioner.

Clin Pediatr Emerg Med 2012 Dec;13(4):300-310

Staff Clinician, National Institutes of Health; National Institutes of Mental Health Experimental Therapeutics and Pathophysiology Branch; Bethesda, MD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry & Emergency Medicine; Penn State College of Medicine; Pinnacle Health Toxicology Center; Harrisburg, PA.

Medications are being used with greater frequency to address pediatric mental health problems, and in recent years atypical antipsychotic (AAP) prescriptions have increased more than any other class. Acute care practitioners must be aware of the pharmacology of AAPs and the conditions, on- and off-label, for which they are prescribed. This involves identifying and managing side effects that manifest both mentally and physically. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S15228401120007
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpem.2012.09.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3587131PMC
December 2012
15 Reads

"Sickle Cell Disease in the Emergency Department: Atypical Complications and Management"

Clin Pediatr Emerg Med 2011 Sep;12(3):202-212

Section of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States.

Sickle cell disease is the most common inherited blood disorder in the United States. This disorder of hemoglobin structure leads to a chronic hemolytic anemia and complex chronic disease manifested by sudden, severe, and life-threatening complications. These acute complications can occur in any organ system beginning in early childhood and lasting throughout life. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpem.2011.07.003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3172721PMC
September 2011
9 Reads

Emergent Complications in the Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patient.

Clin Pediatr Emerg Med 2011 Sep;12(3):233-244

Division of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD ; Division of Pediatrics, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD.

Hematopoietic cell transplantation is the only potentially curative option for a variety of pediatric malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Despite advances in transplantation biology and immunology as well as in posttransplant management that have contributed to improved survival and decreased transplant-related mortality, hematopoietic cell transplantation does not come without significant risk of complications. When patients who have undergone hematopoietic cell transplantation present to the emergency department, it is important to consider a variety of therapy-related complications to optimize management and outcome. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S152284011100038
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpem.2011.07.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4234095PMC
September 2011
10 Reads

Evaluation and Treatment of Sickle Cell Pain in the Emergency Department: Paths to a Better Future.

Clin Pediatr Emerg Med 2010 Dec;11(4):265-273

Professor of Pediatrics, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Division of Pain Medicine, Connecticut Children's Medical Center, 282 Washington Street, Hartford, CT 06106, 860-545-9041.

Pain is the hallmark of sickle cell disease in children and adolescents. Many children seek relief from their pain in the emergency department. These visits have historically been characterized by undertreatment, bias and distrust. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpem.2010.09.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3076949PMC
December 2010
5 Reads

Evaluation and management of the cyanotic neonate.

Clin Pediatr Emerg Med 2008 Sep;9(3):169-175

Raymond and Hazel Speck Berry Professor of Pediatrics Head, Division of Neonatology, Associate Chair of Pediatrics, Children's Memorial Hospital and Northwestern University, 2300 Children's Plaza #45, Chicago, IL 60614, , , E-mail:

The infant presenting to the emergency department with cyanosis requires rapid assessment, diagnosis, and initiation of therapy. In this article, the potential challenges in recognizing cyanosis are discussed, including the presence of higher concentrations of fetal hemoglobin, and its oxygen binding characteristics. A systematic approach to the diagnosis of cyanosis is presented, based on an understanding of the normal transitional physiology, and how diseases of the airway, lung, and circulatory system may disrupt these processes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpem.2008.06.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2598396PMC
September 2008
12 Reads

Pediatric End-of-Life Issues and Palliative Care.

Clin Pediatr Emerg Med 2007 Sep;8(3):212-219

Assistant Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Attending Physician, Division of Pediatric Critical Care, Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago IL, Associate Physician, Section on Clinical Research, Buehler Center on Aging, Northwestern University, Telephone: 773-880-8319, Facsimile: 773-880-4057.

Optimizing the quality of medical care at the end of life has achieved national status as an important health care goal. Palliative care, a comprehensive approach to treating the physical, psychosocial and spiritual needs of patients and their families facing life-limiting illnesses, requires the coordinated efforts of a multidisciplinary group of caregivers. Understanding the basic principles of palliative care can aid emergency department staff in identifying patients who could benefit from palliative care services and in managing the challenging situations that arise when such patients present to the hospital for care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cpem.2007.06.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2344130PMC
September 2007
24 Reads
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