12 results match your criteria Clinical Neuroscience Research[Journal]

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Neural network approaches and their reproducibility in the study of verbal working memory and Alzheimer's disease.

Clin Neurosci Res 2007 Nov;6(6):381-390

Cognitive Neuroscience Division of the Taub Institute for Research in Alzheimer's disease and the Aging Brain, 622 West 168 Street, PH-18, New York, New York.

As clinical and cognitive neurosciences mature, the need for sophisticated neuroimaging analysis becomes more apparent. Multivariate analysis techniques have recently received increasing attention because they have attractive features that cannot be easily realized by the more commonly used univariate, voxel-wise, techniques. Multivariate approaches evaluate correlation/covariance of activation across brain regions, rather than proceeding on a voxel-by-voxel basis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnr.2007.05.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2329589PMC
November 2007
11 Reads

Cannabis and endocannabinoid modulators: Therapeutic promises and challenges.

Clin Neurosci Res 2005 ;5(2-4):185-199

Department of Psychiatry, University of California San Diego, Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0680, USA.

The discovery that botanical cannabinoids such as delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol exert some of their effect through binding specific cannabinoid receptor sites has led to the discovery of an endocannabinoid signaling system, which in turn has spurred research into the mechanisms of action and addiction potential of cannabis on the one hand, while opening the possibility of developing novel therapeutic agents on the other. This paper reviews current understanding of CB1, CB2, and other possible cannabinoid receptors, their arachidonic acid derived ligands (e.g. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S156627720500065
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnr.2005.08.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2544377PMC
January 2005
10 Reads

Autism and the development of face processing.

Clin Neurosci Res 2006 Oct;6(3):145-160

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.

Autism is a pervasive developmental condition, characterized by impairments in non-verbal communication, social relationships and stereotypical patterns of behavior. A large body of evidence suggests that several aspects of face processing are impaired in autism, including anomalies in gaze processing, memory for facial identity and recognition of facial expressions of emotion. In search of neural markers of anomalous face processing in autism, much interest has focused on a network of brain regions that are implicated in social cognition and face processing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnr.2006.08.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2174902PMC
October 2006
24 Reads

Effects of cytokines and infections on brain neurochemistry.

Authors:
Adrian J Dunn

Clin Neurosci Res 2006 Aug;6(1-2):52-68

Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 1501 Kings Highway, P.O. Box 33932, Shreveport, LA 71130-3932, USA.

Administration of cytokines to animals can elicit many effects on the brain, particularly neuroendocrine and behavioral effects. Cytokine administration also alters neurotransmission, which may underlie these effects. The most well studied effect is the activation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis, especially that by interleukin-1 (IL-1). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnr.2006.04.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2136407PMC
August 2006
10 Reads

Neuroinflammation, Oxidative Stress and the Pathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease.

Clin Neurosci Res 2006 Dec;6(5):261-281

Neuroinflammatory processes play a significant role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Epidemiologic, animal, human, and therapeutic studies all support the presence of an neuroinflammatory cascade in disease. This is highlighted by the neurotoxic potential of microglia . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnr.2006.09.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1831679PMC
December 2006
17 Reads

Inflammation and Spinal Cord Injury: Infiltrating Leukocytes as Determinants of Injury and Repair Processes.

Clin Neurosci Res 2006 Dec;6(5):283-292

Department of Neurosurgery, University of California San Francisco, CA 94143.

The immune response that accompanies spinal cord injury contributes to both injury and reparative processes. It is this duality that is the focus of this review. Here we consider the complex cellular and molecular immune responses that lead to the infiltration of leukocytes and glial activation, promote oxidative stress and tissue damage, influence wound healing, and subsequently modulate locomotor recovery. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnr.2006.09.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1864937PMC
December 2006
13 Reads

Potentiation of Excitotoxicity in HIV-1 Associated Dementia and the Significance of Glutaminase.

Clin Neurosci Res 2006 Dec;6(5):315-328

The laboratory of Neurotoxicology, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska 68198-5880.

HIV-1 Associated Dementia (HAD) is a significant consequence of HIV infection. Although multiple inflammatory factors contribute to this chronic, progressive dementia, excitotoxic damage appears to be an underlying mechanism in the neurodegenerative process. Excitotoxicity is a cumulative effect of multiple processes occurring in the CNS during HAD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnr.2006.09.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1832112PMC
December 2006
9 Reads

INTRODUCTION: Immune mechanisms of neurodegeneration.

Clin Neurosci Res 2006 Dec;6(5):225

Dept. of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco & the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnr.2006.09.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1857289PMC
December 2006
8 Reads

Inflammation in adult and neonatal stroke.

Clin Neurosci Res 2006 Dec;6(5):293-313

Department of Neurology, University of California, San Francisco.

This chapter will discuss the current knowledge of the contribution of systemic and local inflammation in acute and sub-chronic stages of experimental stroke in both the adult and neonate. It will review the role of specific cell types and interactions among blood cells, endothelium, glia, microglia, the extracellular matrix and neurons - cumulatively called "neurovascular unit" - in stroke induction and evolution. Intracellular inflammatory signaling pathways such as nuclear factor kappa beta and mitogen-activated protein kinases, and mediators produced by inflammatory cells such as cytokines, chemokines, reactive oxygen species and arachidonic acid metabolites, as well as the modifying role of age on these mechanisms, will be reviewed as well as the potential for therapy in stroke and hypoxic-ischemic injury. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2839419PMC
December 2006
8 Reads

The cellular response in neuroinflammation: The role of leukocytes, microglia and astrocytes in neuronal death and survival.

Clin Neurosci Res 2006 Dec;6(5):237-245

Division of Biomedical Sciences, University of California-Riverside, Riverside, CA 92521, USA.

Neuroinflammation is a complex integration of the responses of all cells present within the CNS, including the neurons, macroglia, microglia and the infiltrating leukocytes. The initiating insult, environmental factors, genetic background and age/past experiences all combine to modulate the integrated response of this complex neuroinflammatory circuit. Here, we explore how these factors interact to lead to either neuroprotective versus neurotoxic inflammatory responses. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cnr.2006.09.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2630233PMC
December 2006
12 Reads

Mood stabilizer psychopharmacology.

Clin Neurosci Res 2002 Dec 14;2(3-4):193-212. Epub 2002 Nov 14.

Laboratory of Molecular Pathophysiology, Building 49, Room B1EE16, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.

Mood stabilizers represent a class of drugs that are efficacious in the treatment of bipolar disorder. The most established medications in this class are lithium, valproic acid, and carbamazepine. In addition to their therapeutic effects for treatment of acute manic episodes, these medications often are useful as prophylaxis against future episodes and as adjunctive antidepressant medications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1566-2772(02)00044-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3375057PMC
December 2002
12 Reads

Neural stem cells and the regulation of neurogenesis in the adult hippocampus.

Clin Neurosci Res 2002 May;2(1-2):11-16

Department of Neurosurgery Research, Box 0520, Brain Tumor Research Center, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA.

Neurogenesis continues in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of adult rodents and primates including humans. Neurons are born in the underlying subgranular layer (SGL) and move into the granule cell layer (GCL) to become mature granule neurons. Recent work indicates that the primary precursors for these new neurons correspond to radial astrocytes whose cell body is in the SGL and their processes traverse the GCL. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1566-2772(02)00004-XDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4237014PMC
May 2002
7 Reads
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