5 results match your criteria Clinical Medicine Insights: Geriatrics [Journal]

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Disability and ageing in China and India - decomposing the effects of gender and residence. Results from the WHO study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE).

BMC Geriatr 2017 08 31;17(1):197. Epub 2017 Aug 31.

Unit of Epidemiology and Global Health, Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Umeå University, SE-901 87, Umeå, Sweden.

Background: China and India are the world's two most populous countries. Although their populations are growing in number and life expectancies are extending they have different trajectories of economic growth, epidemiological transition and social change. Cross-country comparisons can allow national and global insights and provide evidence for policy and decision-making. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12877-017-0589-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5579922PMC
August 2017
11 Reads

The effects of an extensive exercise programme on the progression of Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

BMC Geriatr 2017 03 22;17(1):75. Epub 2017 Mar 22.

Institute of Movement and Neurosciences, German Sport University Cologne, Cologne, Germany.

Background: Exercise interventions to prevent dementia and delay cognitive decline have gained considerable attention in recent years. Human and animal studies have demonstrated that regular physical activity targets brain function by increasing cognitive reserve. There is also evidence of structural changes caused by exercise in preventing or delaying the genesis of neurodegeneration. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12877-017-0457-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5361785PMC
March 2017
35 Reads

Cognitive function in a general population of men and women: a cross sectional study in the European Investigation of Cancer-Norfolk cohort (EPIC-Norfolk).

BMC Geriatr 2014 Dec 19;14:142. Epub 2014 Dec 19.

Department of Public Health and Primary Care, Institute of Public Health, University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine, Cambridge, UK.

Background: Although ageing is strongly associated with cognitive decline, a wide range of cognitive ability is observed in older populations with varying rates of change across different cognitive domains.

Methods: Cognitive function was measured as part of the third health examination of the European Prospective Investigation of Cancer in Norfolk (EPIC-Norfolk 3) between 2006 and 2011 (including measures from the pilot phase from 2004 to 2006). This was done using a battery consisting of seven previously validated cognitive function tests assessing both global function and specific domains. Read More

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http://bmcgeriatr.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-23
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2318-14-142DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4349767PMC
December 2014
35 Reads

The autopsy and the elderly patient in the hospital and the nursing home: enhancing the quality of life.

Geriatrics 2008 Dec;63(12):14-8

Department of Geriatrics and Adult Development, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York City, USA.

The autopsy is the ultimate "peer review." Yet the autopsy has nearly disappeared from hospitals in the United States and around the world. It is rarely performed in the nursing home or other long-term care (LTC) setting. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2920045PMC
December 2008
18 Reads

Type 2 diabetes. How new insights, new drugs are changing clinical practice.

Geriatrics 2001 Jun;56(6):20-4, 32-3

Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Diabetes Center, Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.

In 1997, the American Diabetes Association recommended a normal fasting blood glucose of < 126 mg/dL as the criteria for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Since then, new data have suggested that post-prandial glucose may have a stronger correlation with cardiovascular disease than fasting blood glucose. Two trials, the DCCT and UKPDS, provided evidence of the relationship between hyperglycemia and long-term diabetic complications. Read More

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June 2001
11 Reads
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