405 results match your criteria Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review[Journal]


Fathers of Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Systematic Review of the Impact of Fathers' Involvement on Youth, Families, and Intervention.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 Mar 30. Epub 2019 Mar 30.

Department of Psychology, The University of Alabama, Box 870348, Tuscaloosa, AL, 35487, USA.

Literature in developmental psychology suggests that mothers and fathers both play unique and important roles in their children's development. However, research investigating the unique contributions and psychological functioning of fathers of youth with developmental disabilities, and the role that fathers play in effective intervention, remains limited. Whereas evidence suggests that parent-mediated interventions for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can lead to increased engagement from parents, and reduced stress and psychopathology commonly experienced by parents of youth with ASD, these interventions often do not specifically address potential benefits of paternal involvement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00294-0DOI Listing
March 2019
4 Reads

A Systematic Review and Evaluation of Clinical Practice Guidelines for Children and Youth with Disruptive Behavior: Rigor of Development and Recommendations for Use.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 Mar 29. Epub 2019 Mar 29.

Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence and Impact (formerly Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics), McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4K1, Canada.

Clinical practice guidelines (CPG) provide a framework for evidence-based practice; however, few studies have assessed the methodological quality of CPGs relevant to child and youth mental health. This study was a systematic review of CPGs for the assessment, prevention and treatment of disruptive behavior, including attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), oppositional defiant disorder (ODD), conduct disorder (CD) and aggression in children and youth. Systematic review identified 29 CPGs meeting inclusion criteria that were appraised using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) validated tool. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00292-2DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Resilience in Children Exposed to Violence: A Meta-analysis of Protective Factors Across Ecological Contexts.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 Mar 18. Epub 2019 Mar 18.

Department of Psychology, Marquette University, 604 North 16th Street, Milwaukee, WI, 53233, USA.

Children who experience violence in their families and communities are at increased risk for a wide range of psychological and behavioral difficulties, but some exhibit resilience, or adaptive functioning following adversity. Understanding what promotes resilience is critical for developing more effective prevention and intervention strategies. Over 100 studies have examined potential protective factors for children exposed to violence in the past 30 years, but there has been no quantitative review of this literature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00293-1DOI Listing

Psychometric Properties of Child (0-5 Years) Outcome Measures as used in Randomized Controlled Trials of Parent Programs: A Systematic Review.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 Feb 26. Epub 2019 Feb 26.

Clinical Trials Research Unit, Leeds Institute of Clinical Trials Research, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.

This systematic review is one of the three which sought to identify measures commonly implemented in parenting program research, and to assess the level of psychometric evidence available for their use with this age group. This review focuses specifically on measures of child social-emotional and behavioral outcomes. Two separate searches of the same databases were conducted; firstly to identify eligible instruments, and secondly to identify studies reporting on the psychometric properties of the identified measures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00277-1DOI Listing
February 2019

Psychometric Properties of Parent Outcome Measures Used in RCTs of Antenatal and Early Years Parent Programs: A Systematic Review.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 Feb 22. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Clinical Trials Research Unit, Leeds Institute of Clinical Trials Research, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.

Parenting programs are effective in the early intervention and treatment of children's social, emotional and behavioural difficulties. However, inconsistency in the use of outcome measures limits the comparability of programs and creates challenges for practitioners seeking to monitor progress of families in their care. A systematic review was conducted to identify measures, appraise their psychometric properties and ease of implementation, with the overall objective of recommending a small battery of measures for use by researchers and practitioners. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00276-2DOI Listing
February 2019

Stand-Alone Social Skills Training for Youth with ADHD: A Systematic Review.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 Feb 22. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Department of Psychology, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.

Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most common childhood disorders, and its symptoms and impairment in multiple domains begin in childhood and can extend into adulthood as well. Many youth with ADHD experience impairment in the social domain, including social skills deficits and difficulties in peer relationships. Social skills interventions, or social skills training (SST), have been developed to target social impairment and improve the social skills and functioning of youth with ADHD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00291-3DOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

The Role of Caregiver Psychopathology in the Treatment of Childhood Trauma with Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: A Systematic Review.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 Feb 22. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

Department of Psychology, 1227 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, 97403, USA.

Trauma-focused cognitive behavioral therapy (TF-CBT) is regarded as one of the most effective treatments for children who have experienced trauma and is rapidly being disseminated. To best ensure efficacy, even among treatment refractory symptoms, a better understanding of the factors that lead TF-CBT to be more or less effective for some children is warranted. One major factor that has not been systematically considered is the role of caregiver psychopathology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00290-4DOI Listing
February 2019

Applying Self-Regulation Principles in the Delivery of Parenting Interventions.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 03;22(1):24-42

Oregon Research Institute, Eugene, OR, USA.

An individual's capacity to self-regulate their cognitions, emotions and actions is an important life skill and emergent developmental competency for both children and parents. Individuals with better self-regulation achieve more positive life course outcomes and are less likely to develop significant mental health, social, and relationship problems. Parenting support programs that promote positive, nurturing parent-child relationships provide a unique multigenerational context to promote the self-regulatory capacity of both parents and children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00287-zDOI Listing

An Integrated Model of Regulation for Applied Settings.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 03;22(1):2-23

Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA.

A growing body of research explores the ways in which regulatory skills are important contributors to school readiness, school success, and other positive developmental outcomes in childhood and throughout the lifespan. Research and theory suggest that children with strong regulatory skills may be better equipped to manage the complex academic, social, and emotional demands of early learning and school environments; and alternatively, deficits in regulatory skills can lead to problems in school adjustment, academic outcomes, and other measures of well-being. In this paper, we bring together two regulation-related research traditions: executive function (EF) and effortful control (EC). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00288-yDOI Listing
March 2019
10 Reads

Self-Regulation: A Critical Construct in Research and Application with Children and Families.

Authors:
Ronald J Prinz

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 03;22(1)

Department of Psychology, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, 29208, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00289-xDOI Listing

Measuring Young Children's Executive Function and Self-Regulation in Classrooms and Other Real-World Settings.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 03;22(1):63-74

Harvard Graduate School of Education, 704 Larsen Hall 14, Appian Way, Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA.

A number of different approaches are currently used for assessing young children's executive function (EF) and self-regulation (SR) skills. Nevertheless, guidance for stakeholders aiming to assess EF and SR in real-world settings (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00285-1DOI Listing

Is the Concept of Self-Regulation Useful for Supporting Effective Implementation in Community Settings?

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 03;22(1):118-128

Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, The Impact Center at FPG, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.

The literature and utility of self-regulation extends beyond individuals; a critical factor for successful and sustainable implementation of evidence-based programs in a community setting may be the capacity of teams to self-regulate implementation processes. The conceptual foundation of this proposal is explored and definitions of the five dimensions of self-regulation for implementation processes are provided. Practice examples illustrate how the provision of external implementation support to build self-regulatory capacity among implementation teams adopting and scaling-up EBPs in the local community setting has shaped and refined the proposed definitions to better reflect the work on-the-ground. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00286-0DOI Listing

Towards Scalable, Integrative Assessment of Children's Self-Regulatory Capabilities: New Applications of Digital Technology.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 03;22(1):90-103

Griffith Criminology Institute, Griffith University, Mount Gravatt, 4122, QLD, Australia.

The assessment of self-regulation in children is of significant interest to researchers within education, clinical and developmental psychology, and clinical neuroscience, given its importance to adaptive functioning across a wide range of social, educational, interpersonal, educational and health domains. Because self-regulation is a complex, multidimensional construct, a range of assessment approaches have been developed to assess its various components including behavioural, cognitive and emotional domains. In recent years, digital technology has been increasingly used to enhance or supplement existing measurement approaches; however, developments have predominantly focused on translating traditional testing paradigms into digital formats. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00282-4DOI Listing

Self-Regulation Approach to Training Child and Family Practitioners.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 03;22(1):129-145

Parenting and Family Support Centre, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, 4072, Australia.

Evidence-based psychotherapies or programs (EBPs) exist for most mental health disorders that occur in childhood; however, the majority of children with a mental health disorder do not receive such treatments. This research-practice gap has been attributed to a range of factors that complicate the delivery of EBPs in everyday practice. While most suggestions to bridge this gap have focused on how to develop EBPs that will have a better fit for the clinical settings in which they will ultimately be deployed, a useful adjunct is to enhance practitioners' capacity to flexibly deliver EBPs to manage these factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00284-2DOI Listing

Psychometric Properties of Parent-Child (0-5 years) Interaction Outcome Measures as Used in Randomized Controlled Trials of Parent Programs: A Systematic Review.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 Feb 7. Epub 2019 Feb 7.

Clinical Trials Research Unit, Leeds Institute of Clinical Trials Research, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.

This systematic review sought to identify observational measures of parent-child interactions commonly implemented in parenting program research, and to assess the level of psychometric evidence available for their use with this age group. Two separate searches of the same databases were conducted; firstly, to identify eligible instruments, and secondly to identify studies reporting on the psychometric properties of the identified measures. Five commercial platforms hosting 19 electronic databases were searched from their inception to conducted search dates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00275-3DOI Listing
February 2019

Self-Regulation in Low- and Middle-Income Countries: Challenges and Future Directions.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 03;22(1):104-117

Boston College School of Social Work, Chestnut Hill, MA, USA.

Self-regulation is developed early in life through family and parenting interactions. There has been considerable debate on how to best conceptualize and enhance self-regulation. Many consider self-regulation as the socio-emotional competencies required for healthy and productive living, including the flexibility to regulate emotions, control anger, maintain calm under pressure, and respond adaptively to a variety of situations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00278-0DOI Listing
March 2019
17 Reads

Promoting Children's Healthy Habits Through Self-Regulation Via Parenting.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 03;22(1):52-62

Parenting and Family Support Centre, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.

The prevalence of lifestyle-related disease worldwide is high and increasing. The majority of approaches that aim to prevent and manage these conditions target adults' health behaviors; however, it is important to note that the foundations for long-term health are laid down in early childhood. This paper examines evidence for relationships between children's self-regulation and short-, medium-, and long-term health outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00280-6DOI Listing

The Mediating Effect of Self-Regulation in the Association Between Poverty and Child Weight: A Systematic Review.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

University of Pittsburgh, 210 South Bouquet Street, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

Deficits in self-regulation (SR) have been proposed as a potential contributor to child overweight/obesity, a public health concern that disproportionately affects children living in poverty. Although poverty is known to influence SR, SR has not been considered as a potential mechanism in the association between poverty and child obesity. The aim of the current paper was to systematically review the current literature to determine whether SR is a viable mechanism in the relationship between child exposure to poverty and later risk of overweight/obesity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00279-zDOI Listing
February 2019
1 Read

The Transition of Youth with ADHD into the Workforce: Review and Future Directions.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 Feb 6. Epub 2019 Feb 6.

Department of Counseling, School, and Educational Psychology, University at Buffalo, State University of New York, Buffalo, NY, USA.

Previous research suggests that a majority of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) continue to experience increased impairment across multiple life domains into adulthood. A systematic review of the occupational impairments, and associated educational and financial difficulties, faced by individuals with childhood ADHD was conducted. Systematic searches from PsycINFO and PubMed databases and other sources (i. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10567-019-00274-4
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00274-4DOI Listing
February 2019
11 Reads

The Direct and Indirect Relations Between Self-Regulation and Language Development Among Monolinguals and Dual Language Learners.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 03;22(1):75-89

Harvard Graduate School of Education, 20 University Drive #610, Cambridge, MA, 02138, USA.

In this review, we expand the conversation on the relations between self-regulation and language development in early childhood to include the growing population of dual language learners (DLLs). In the first sections, we highlight similarities in the timing and mechanisms of self-regulation and language development, respectively, and then summarize theoretical and empirical literature on the domains' joint development. We ground this review in a conceptual model of the direct and indirect relations between skills in the two domains. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00283-3DOI Listing
March 2019
3 Reads

Promoting Self-Regulation in Young Children: The Role of Parenting Interventions.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 03;22(1):43-51

Oregon Research Institute, Oregon, US.

Self-regulation is a foundational skill in childhood and underpins various positive and negative outcomes throughout childhood, adolescence and into adulthood. Parents and the way they parent their children play a key role in the development of young children's self-regulatory capacity. However, there is limited evidence for the effectiveness of parenting interventions on child self-regulatory outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-019-00281-5DOI Listing
March 2019
1 Read

Systematic Review of Self-Report Measures of General Mental Health and Wellbeing in Adolescent Mental Health.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

Division of Psychology and Mental Health, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, Manchester Academic Health Sciences, 2nd Floor, Zochonis Building, Brunswick Street, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK.

The assessment of general mental health and wellbeing is important within child and adolescent mental health services (CAMHS) for both clinicians and policy makers. Measurement tools are routinely relied upon to aid assessment and to monitor and evaluate treatment and service effectiveness. We conducted a systematic review using the COSMIN checklist to identify measures of general mental health and wellbeing for an adolescent mental health population. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-00273-xDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

The Role of Irritability in the Treatment of Behavior Disorders: A Review of Theory, Research, and a Proposed Framework.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2019 Jan 7. Epub 2019 Jan 7.

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, USA.

Research provides strong evidence that the symptoms of Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) are comprised of at least two dimensions: irritability and defiance. Given that these two dimensions have distinct etiologies and long-term risk profiles, they may also warrant different treatment approaches. In particular, impaired emotion regulation plays a central role in the irritable dimension of ODD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-00272-yDOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

Technology Delivered Interventions for Depression and Anxiety in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 Sep 18. Epub 2018 Sep 18.

Department for Health, University of Bath, 6.19 Wessex House, Bath, BA2 7AY, UK.

Depression and anxiety are common during adolescence. Whilst effective interventions are available treatment services are limited resulting in many adolescents being unable to access effective help. Delivering mental health interventions via technology, such as computers or the internet, offers one potential way to increase access to psychological treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0271-8DOI Listing
September 2018
4 Reads

Early Caregiver-Child Interaction and Children's Development: Lessons from the St. Petersburg-USA Orphanage Intervention Research Project.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 Sep 8. Epub 2018 Sep 8.

Baby Home 13, St. Petersburg, Russian Federation.

We review a series of interrelated studies on the development of children residing in institutions (i.e., orphanages) in the Russian Federation or placed with families in the USA and the Russian Federation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0270-9DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Functioning Among Typically Developing Siblings of Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Meta-Analysis.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 Sep 3. Epub 2018 Sep 3.

Virginia Tech, Human Development and Family Science, Blacksburg, VA, 24061, USA.

The literature on typically developing siblings of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD-Sibs) provides inconsistent results, with some studies reporting ASD-Sibs are more likely to have negative outcomes than comparison groups, and others reporting no significant differences. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to meta-analytically aggregate study effect sizes to more accurately calculate the degree to which ASD-Sibs function similarly or differently compared to siblings of people who do not have ASD. Studies were eligible for inclusion if they had a sample of ASD-Sibs older than 5; reported on emotional, psychological, behavioral, or social functioning; and provided information necessary for calculating relevant effect sizes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0269-2DOI Listing
September 2018
2 Reads

Review of the Evidence for Motivation Deficits in Youth with ADHD and Their Association with Functional Outcomes.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 12;21(4):500-526

Virginia Commonwealth University, 806 W. Franklin St., Box 842018, Richmond, VA, 23284, USA.

Preeminent theories of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) suggest that motivation deficits are core underlying features of the disorder. However, it is currently unclear whether empirical evidence supports the assertion that significant group (ADHD v. comparison) differences in motivation exist or that problems with motivation contribute to the functional impairments that youth with ADHD experience. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10567-018-0268-3
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0268-3DOI Listing
December 2018
24 Reads

(Re)Conceptualizing Sleep Among Children with Anxiety Disorders: Where to Next?

Authors:
Candice A Alfano

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 12;21(4):482-499

Sleep and Anxiety Center of Houston (SACH), Department of Psychology, University of Houston, 126 Heyne Bldg, Houston, TX, 77204, USA.

Children with anxiety disorders (AD) characteristically complain of sleep problems and the extent to which cognitive behavioral treatments (CBT) for childhood anxiety produce sleep-based improvements is a topic of increasing interest. The current paper reviews available evidence for subjective sleep complaints and objective sleep alterations in children and adolescents with AD, including investigations of potential changes in sleep following anxiety-focused CBT. Despite pervasive complaints of poor sleep, the empirical literature provides minimal evidence for actual sleep-wake alterations in this population of youth and evidence for sleep-based changes following treatment for anxiety is minimal. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0267-4DOI Listing
December 2018
3 Reads

A Meta-Analysis of Universal School-Based Prevention Programs for Anxiety and Depression in Children.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 12;21(4):466-481

School of Psychology, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA, 5001, Australia.

Anxiety and depression are among the most common mental health issues experienced in childhood. Implementing school-based prevention programs during childhood, rather than adolescence, is thought to provide better mental health outcomes. The present meta-analysis aimed to investigate the efficacy of universal school-based prevention programs that target both anxiety and depression in children (aged 13 years or below), and examine three moderators (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0266-5DOI Listing
December 2018
14 Reads

A Multilevel Meta-analysis on Academic Achievement Among Maltreated Youth.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 12;21(4):450-465

Department of Psychology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, 16802, USA.

Maltreatment can influence normative development and negatively impact emotional, behavioral, and social functioning in youth. As a result, it is not surprising that maltreated youth, as compared to non-maltreated youth, tend to underperform academically. Research on the academic performance of maltreated youth has increased over the last decade and several review papers have been published in this area. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0265-6DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Building Schools' Readiness to Implement a Comprehensive Approach to School Safety.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 12;21(4):433-449

Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, Institute of Behavioral Science, University of Colorado Boulder, 1440 15th Street, Boulder, CO, 80302, USA.

Research consistently finds that a comprehensive approach to school safety, which integrates the best scientific evidence and solid implementation strategies, offers the greatest potential for preventing youth violence and promoting mental and behavioral health. However, schools and communities encounter enormous challenges in articulating, synthesizing, and implementing all the complex aspects of a comprehensive approach to school safety. This paper aims to bridge the gap between scientific evidence and the application of that evidence in schools and communities by defining the key components of a comprehensive approach to school safety and describing how schools can assess their readiness to implement a comprehensive approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0264-7DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Correction to: The Abecedarian Approach to Social, Educational, and Health Disparities.

Authors:
Craig T Ramey

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 12;21(4):545

Distinguished Research Scholar, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, Professor of Psychology, Neuroscience, Human Development, and Pediatrics, Virginia Tech, VTCRI, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke, VA, 24016, USA.

In the section "Ages 39-45 Outcomes," an error was made by providing details from my ongoing collaborative research with colleagues on neuroanatomical effects (Farah et al 2017) and social decision-making (Luo et al 2017). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0263-8DOI Listing
December 2018
2 Reads

Understanding Social Anxiety Disorder in Adolescents and Improving Treatment Outcomes: Applying the Cognitive Model of Clark and Wells (1995).

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 09;21(3):388-414

Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.

Social anxiety disorder is a condition characterised by a marked and persistent fear of being humiliated or scrutinised by others. Age-of-onset data point to adolescence as a developmentally sensitive period for the emergence of the condition, at a time when the peer group becomes increasingly important. Social anxiety in adolescence is associated with considerable impairment that persists through to adulthood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0258-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6447508PMC
September 2018
6 Reads

The Abecedarian Approach to Social, Educational, and Health Disparities.

Authors:
Craig T Ramey

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 12;21(4):527-544

Distinguished Research Scholar, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute, Professor of Psychology, Neuroscience, Human Development, and Pediatrics, Virginia Tech, VTCRI, 2 Riverside Circle, Roanoke, VA, 24016, USA.

This paper places the Abecedarian Approach in theoretical and historical context and reviews the results from three randomized controlled trials that have tested an experimental protocol designed to prevent cognitive disabilities and their social consequences. Results affirm that cognitive disabilities can be prevented in early childhood and subsequent academic achievement enhanced via a multipronged comprehensive approach that contains individualized and responsive early childhood education starting in early infancy, coupled with pediatric health care, good nutrition, and family-oriented social services. Additional important findings reveal that the most vulnerable children benefited the most and that cognitive gains were not at the expense of children's socioemotional development or relationship to family. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0260-yDOI Listing
December 2018
4 Reads

Transformation of Adolescent Peer Relations in the Social Media Context: Part 1-A Theoretical Framework and Application to Dyadic Peer Relationships.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 09;21(3):267-294

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB #3270, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA.

Investigators have long recognized that adolescents' peer experiences provide a crucial context for the acquisition of developmental competencies, as well as potential risks for a range of adjustment difficulties. However, recent years have seen an exponential increase in adolescents' adoption of social media tools, fundamentally reshaping the landscape of adolescent peer interactions. Although research has begun to examine social media use among adolescents, researchers have lacked a unifying framework for understanding the impact of social media on adolescents' peer experiences. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0261-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6435354PMC
September 2018
3 Reads

Transformation of Adolescent Peer Relations in the Social Media Context: Part 2-Application to Peer Group Processes and Future Directions for Research.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 09;21(3):295-319

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, CB #3270, Chapel Hill, NC, 27599, USA.

As social media use becomes increasingly widespread among adolescents, research in this area has accumulated rapidly. Researchers have shown a growing interest in the impact of social media on adolescents' peer experiences, including the ways that the social media context shapes a variety of peer relations constructs. This paper represents Part 2 of a two-part theoretical review. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0262-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6402323PMC
September 2018
5 Reads

What is the Impact of Placement Type on Educational and Health Outcomes of Unaccompanied Refugee Minors? A Systematic Review of the Evidence.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 09;21(3):354-365

John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Oxford, UK.

Record numbers of unaccompanied refugee minors have been arriving in high-income countries since 2015. Child welfare agencies and non-governmental organisations tasked with providing services have struggled to cope with demands on their services as a result. Despite this, there is little research on how best to meet their needs and in particular what services can mitigate the psychological difficulties they face. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0256-7DOI Listing
September 2018
4 Reads

Psychological Treatments for Mental Disorders in Children and Adolescents: A Review of the Evidence of Leading International Organizations.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 09;21(3):366-387

Department of Psychology, University of Córdoba, Avda. San Alberto Magno S/N, 14071, Córdoba, Spain.

In recent decades, the evidence on psychological treatments for children and adolescents has increased considerably. Several organizations have proposed different criteria to evaluate the evidence of psychological treatment in this age group. The aim of this study was to analyze evidence-based treatments drawn from RCTs, reviews, meta-analyses, guides and lists provided by four leading international organizations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0257-6DOI Listing
September 2018
4 Reads

Enhancing Initial Parental Engagement in Interventions for Parents of Young Children: A Systematic Review of Experimental Studies.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 09;21(3):415-432

Parenting and Family Support Centre, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, 4072, Australia.

Low rates of participation in parenting interventions may undermine their effectiveness. Although a wide range of strategies to engage parents in interventions are described in the literature, little is known about which engagement strategies are most effective in enhancing parental engagement. This systematic review explores effective engagement strategies to encourage initial parental engagement (recruitment, enrolment, and first attendance) in parenting interventions for parents of children aged 2-8 years old. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0259-4DOI Listing
September 2018
6 Reads

Is Clinical Anxiety a Risk or a Protective Factor for Executive Functioning in Youth with ADHD? A Meta-regression Analysis.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 09;21(3):340-353

Research Institute of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Comorbidity rates between ADHD and anxiety disorders (AD) are high, but little is known about the nature of this co-occurrence. A dominant idea is that AD may intensify some (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0255-8DOI Listing
September 2018
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The Interaction Between Child Behavioral Inhibition and Parenting Behaviors: Effects on Internalizing and Externalizing Symptomology.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 09;21(3):320-339

Child Study Center, Department of Psychology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA, 24061, USA.

Both child temperament and parenting have been extensively researched as predictors of child outcomes. However, theoretical models suggest that specific combinations of temperament styles and parenting behaviors are better predictors of certain child outcomes such as internalizing and externalizing symptoms than either temperament or parenting alone. The current qualitative review examines the interaction between one childhood temperamental characteristic (child behavioral inhibition) and parenting behaviors, and their subsequent impact on child psychopathology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0254-9DOI Listing
September 2018
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Impact of Well-being Interventions for Siblings of Children and Young People with a Chronic Physical or Mental Health Condition: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 06;21(2):246-265

UCL Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London, WC1N 1EH, UK.

Siblings of children and young people with a chronic illness are at increased risk of poor psychological functioning. A number of studies have attempted to implement and evaluate interventions targeting the psychological well-being of this at-risk group. This systematic review summarises the evidence regarding psychological functioning of siblings following an intervention targeting their well-being. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-018-0253-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5899110PMC
June 2018
6 Reads

Prenatal Maternal Distress: A Risk Factor for Child Anxiety?

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 06;21(2):203-223

Mater Research Institute, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

The deleterious association between various types of prenatal maternal psychological distress (PNMS, anxiety, depression, psychological distress, stress) and childhood anxiety symptomatology (internalizing behaviors, anxiety symptoms) has been established using both retrospective and prospective longitudinal studies across varied demographic cohorts and throughout development. Yet, the existing literature cannot claim maternal distress during pregnancy to be a specific risk factor for anxiety symptomatology, as studies utilizing such observational designs are unable to adequately account for confounding of potential genetic factors and the postnatal environment. In this review, we examine studies that attempt to minimize such confounding and thus disentangle the unique intrauterine exposure effect of varying types of PNMS on childhood anxiety symptomatology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-017-0251-4DOI Listing
June 2018
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Review of a Parent's Influence on Pediatric Procedural Distress and Recovery.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 06;21(2):224-245

School of Psychology, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD, Australia.

Understanding how parents influence their child's medical procedures can inform future work to reduce pediatric procedural distress and improve recovery outcomes. Following a pediatric injury or illness diagnosis, the associated medical procedures can be potentially traumatic events that are often painful and distressing and can lead to the child experiencing long-term physical and psychological problems. Children under 6 years old are particularly at risk of illness or injury, yet their pain-related distress during medical procedures is often difficult to manage because of their young developmental level. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-017-0252-3DOI Listing
June 2018
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Alliance and Treatment Outcome in Family-Involved Treatment for Youth Problems: A Three-Level Meta-analysis.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 06;21(2):146-170

Research Group Social Work, Saxion University of Applied Sciences, Postbus 70.000, 7500 KB, Enschede, The Netherlands.

Alliance has been shown to predict treatment outcome in family-involved treatment for youth problems in several studies. However, meta-analytic research on alliance in family-involved treatment is scarce, and to date, no meta-analytic study on the alliance-outcome association in this field has paid attention to moderating variables. We included 28 studies reporting on the alliance-outcome association in 21 independent study samples of families receiving family-involved treatment for youth problems (N = 2126 families, M age youth ranging from 10. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-017-0249-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5899120PMC
June 2018
4 Reads

Identifying Effective Components of Child Maltreatment Interventions: A Meta-analysis.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 06;21(2):171-202

Research Institute of Child Development and Education, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 15780, 1001 NG, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

There is a lack of knowledge about specific components that make interventions effective in preventing or reducing child maltreatment. The aim of the present meta-analysis was to increase this knowledge by summarizing findings on effects of interventions for child maltreatment and by examining potential moderators of this effect, such as intervention components and study characteristics. Identifying effective components is essential for developing or improving child maltreatment interventions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-017-0250-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5899109PMC
June 2018
9 Reads

Methodological Challenges to the Evaluation of Interventions for Foster/Kinship Carers and Children: A Systematic Review.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 06;21(2):109-145

Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, University of Technology Sydney, Level 4 Building 7, 67 Thomas St, Ultimo, NSW, 2007, Australia.

Caregivers of children in alternative care face a complex range of challenges that can result in placement disruption and poor long-term outcomes. Interventions designed to help carers meet these challenges report positive outcomes. Nevertheless, several reviewers have reported these positive results may be mitigated by limitations in trial methodology. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-017-0248-zDOI Listing
June 2018
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Program Components of Psychosocial Interventions in Foster and Kinship Care: A Systematic Review.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 03;21(1):13-40

Centre for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, University of Technology Sydney, Level 4 Building 7, 67 Thomas St, Ultimo, NSW, 2007, Australia.

Foster children frequently experience early trauma that significantly impacts their neurobiological, psychological and social development. This systematic review examines the comparative effectiveness of foster and kinship care interventions. It examines the components within each intervention, exploring their potential to benefit child and carer well-being, particularly focussing on child behaviour problems, and relational functioning. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-017-0247-0DOI Listing
March 2018
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Perceptions of ADHD Among Diagnosed Children and Their Parents: A Systematic Review Using the Common-Sense Model of Illness Representations.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 03;21(1):57-93

School of Psychology, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, 2006, Australia.

Research on children and parents' experiences of ADHD has grown in recent years, attracting attention to their subjective perception of ADHD as a disorder. Theoretical accounts of illness perception suggest that it is multi-dimensional, consisting of at least five core constructs (see the common-sense model of illness representations or CSM: Leventhal et al., in: Rachman (ed) Medical psychology, Pergamon, New York, vol 2, pp 7-30, 1980, in: Baum, Taylor, Singer (eds) Handbook of psychology and health: social psychological aspects of health, Earlbaum, Hillsdale, vol 4, pp 219-252, 1984). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-017-0245-2DOI Listing
March 2018
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The Needs of Foster Children and How to Satisfy Them: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev 2018 03;21(1):1-12

Centre for Special Needs Education and Youth Care, University of Groningen, Grote Rozenstraat 38, 9712 TJ, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Family foster care deeply influences the needs of children and how these are satisfied. To increase our knowledge of foster children's needs and how these are conceptualized, this paper presents a systematic literature review. Sixty-four empirical articles from six databases were reviewed and categorized (inter-rater agreement K = . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10567-017-0246-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5797187PMC
March 2018
5 Reads