345 results match your criteria Children and Youth Services Review [Journal]


"I missed open arms": The Need for Connectedness among Black Youth Affected by Parental Drug Use.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2020 Jul 8;114. Epub 2020 May 8.

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Department of Population, Family and Reproductive Health, 615 North Wolfe Street, Baltimore MD USA 21215.

Parental drug use has significant impacts on the physical, behavioral and social well-being of adolescents, particularly those from disenfranchised communities. We conducted a qualitative study to understand connectedness among Black adolescents affected by parental drug use in Baltimore, Maryland. In-depth interviews (N=30) were conducted with three groups: parents with a history of drug use, youth (18-24yo) who had a biological parent with a history of drug use and youth providers with experience working with families affected by drug use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.105072DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7326313PMC

A longitudinal examination of African American adolescent females detained for status offense.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2020 Jan 28;108. Epub 2019 Nov 28.

School of Social Work, University of Toronto, 246 Bloor Street West, Toronto, ON M5S 1V4, Canada.

Introduction: Behaviors like truancy, running away, curfew violation, and alcohol possession fall under the status offense category and can have serious consequences for adolescents. The Juvenile Justice and Delinquency and Prevention Act prohibited detaining status offenders. We explored the degree to which African American adolescent girls were being detained for status offenses and the connections to their behavioral health risks and re-confinement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.104648DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7304544PMC
January 2020

Cumulative Adversity Profiles Among Youth Experiencing Housing and Parental Care Instability.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 May 27;100:129-135. Epub 2019 Feb 27.

Prevention Science Institute, University of Oregon.

This study applies cumulative adversity and stress proliferation theories to examine risk and protective resource profiles of youth with three different levels of housing and parental care instability. Data derive from a state representative sample (n=27,087) of school-based adolescent students. ANCOVA analyses identified significant differences in sociodemographic and psychosocial functioning variables for youth with 0, 1, or 2 forms of housing and parental care instability, with more deleterious functioning being observed among youth with greater levels of instability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.02.042DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7297188PMC

Adverse childhood experiences to adult adversity trends among parents: Socioeconomic, health, and developmental implications.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 May 7;100:258-266. Epub 2019 Mar 7.

University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Exposures to adverse childhood experiences compromise the early developmental foundation of people long before they become parents. These exposures partly take place within the family environment - a context tightly shared by parents and children. Despite considerable evidence regarding effects of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), differential patterns of childhood and adulthood adversity accumulation among currently parenting adults is relatively less understood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7282731PMC

Using latent class analysis to identify the complex needs of youth on probation.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2020 Aug 19;115:105087. Epub 2020 May 19.

George Mason University Criminology, Law & Society, Center for Advancing Correctional Excellence!, 4097 University Drive, MSN 6D3, Fairfax, VA 22030, USA.

Youth involved with the juvenile justice system have higher rates of unmet social and psychological service needs than the general population. Yet, scant research has addressed the potentially complex needs of youth on probation. This study is thus a first step in improving our ability to promote positive youth development and improved outcomes from youth on probation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.105087DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7236694PMC

Psychological Difficulties among Custodial Grandchildren.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Sep 25;104. Epub 2019 Jun 25.

College of Education Health and Human Service, Kent State University, Kent OHIO 44242, United States of America.

Although custodial grandchildren (CG) are likely to have more emotional and behavioral problems than children in general, only a handful of studies involving nationally representative data have investigated this important public health issue. The present study is unique in examining informant reports of psychological difficulties and prosocial behavior, obtained via the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) parent version, regarding two samples ( = 509 and = 323) of CG between ages 4-12 and three samples of age peers from the 2004 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) residing in homes with either no birth parent (=184), one parent (n = 1,618), or both parents ( = 3,752). A MANCOVA encompassing the main effects of sample type, child gender, and informant's race across six SDQ subscales (with informant age and education, as well as child age controlled) showed all three main effects to be statistically significant ( < . Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.104390DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7265777PMC
September 2019

Exploring the association between parenting stress and a child's exposure to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs).

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Jul 17;102:186-192. Epub 2019 May 17.

Rural and Minority Health Research Center, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, 220 Stoneridge Drive, Suite 204, Columbia, SC 29210, USA.

Nearly half of U.S. children age 0-17 have been exposed to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), accounting for over 34 million of children nationwide. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.05.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7266302PMC

Exploring college student identity among young people with foster care histories and mental health challenges.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2020 Jul 10;114. Epub 2020 Apr 10.

Portland State University, School of Social Work.

Young adults with foster care histories experience unique barriers to success in postsecondary academic settings, including higher rates of mental health challenges. This study reports the perspectives of college students with foster care histories and self-identified mental health concerns (N=18) about how these factors relate to their post-secondary academic experiences. Study participants describe managing their mental health amid other academic and life stressors, share their perspectives on campus-based support and help-seeking experiences, and highlight the need for acknowledgement of their foster care identities in conjunction with their developing college student identities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.104992DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7252951PMC

Reducing Poverty among Children: Evidence from State Policy Simulations.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2020 May 1:105030. Epub 2020 May 1.

Columbia University, 1255 Amsterdam Avenue, New York, NY 10027.

State approaches to reducing child poverty vary considerably. We exploit this state-level variation to estimate what could be achieved in terms of child poverty if all states adopted the most generous or inclusive states' policies. Specifically, we simulate the child poverty reductions that would occur if every state were as generous or inclusive as the most generous or inclusive state in four key policies: Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), state Earned Income Tax Credits (EITC), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and state Child Tax Credits (CTC). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.105030DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7194072PMC

Getting to the table: Agency characteristics and evidence-based intervention adoption in children's mental health care.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2020 Mar 22;110. Epub 2020 Jan 22.

Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.

Scaling evidence-based interventions (EBI) for children and families across healthcare systems can expand public health impact. Research has identified EBI adoption determinants. However, less understood are characteristics of agencies that opt in across the stages of adoption. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.104774DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7079816PMC

Brief Stress Reduction Strategies Associated with Better Behavioral Climate in a Crisis Nursery: A Pilot Study.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2020 Mar 30;110. Epub 2020 Jan 30.

Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota - Twin Cities, 51 E. River Road, Minneapolis, MN 55455, United States.

Approximately 3.5 million children in the United States were reported to Child Protective Services in 2016. Effective, developmentally-informed programs are critically necessary to support under-resourced families at risk of child abuse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2020.104813DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7062364PMC

Underexamined points of vulnerability for black mothers in the child welfare system: The role of number of births, age of first use of substances and criminal justice involvement.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2020 Jan 31;108. Epub 2019 Oct 31.

Northwell Health, Great Neck, NY, United States.

Black mothers and their children continue to interface with the child welfare (CW) system at unacceptably high rates. With research into traditionally understood contributing factors such as poverty, substance use, mental health and intimate partner violence abounding, this study sought to identify underexamined factors that potentially sustain very high rates of CW involvement for Black mothers. A sample of 415 Black mothers who accessed financial assistance through the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program was analyzed for the factors associated with active CW involvement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.104557DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7062308PMC
January 2020

Prevalence of homelessness and co-occurring problems: A comparison of young adults in Victoria, Australia and Washington State, United States.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2020 Feb 17;109. Epub 2019 Dec 17.

Social Development Research Group, School of Social Work, University of Washington.

Homelessness is associated with various co-occurring health and social problems yet; few contemporary international studies have examined these problems in young adulthood. This descriptive study presents cross-state comparison of the prevalence of young adult homelessness in Washington State, USA and Victoria, Australia using state representative samples from the International Youth Development Study (IYDS; n = 1,945, 53% female). Associations between young adult homelessness and a range of co-occurring problems were examined using a modified version of the Communities That Care youth survey. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.104692DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7058145PMC
February 2020

What Village? Opportunities and Supports for Parental Involvement Outside of the Family Context.

Authors:
Robert W Ressler

Child Youth Serv Rev 2020 Jan 4;108. Epub 2019 Dec 4.

The University of Texas at Austin.

Parental involvement research and practice has disproportionately focused on the characteristics of families that promote family-school partnerships. This study focuses instead on school and community characteristics that may elicit or support parental involvement for all families, but especially those from racial/ethnic minority groups. Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten Cohort 2011 enhanced with data from the American Community Survey and the IRS, multilevel models reveal that educational organizations in the community are associated with higher levels of school-based parental involvement behaviors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.104575DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7055705PMC
January 2020

Child Maltreatment and Body Mass Index over Time: The Roles of Social Support and Stress Responses.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 May 6;100:214-220. Epub 2019 Mar 6.

Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

An unhealthy body mass index (BMI) trajectory can exacerbate the burdens associated with child maltreatment. However, we have yet to explain why the relationship between maltreatment and BMI trajectories exists and what allows individuals to attain healthy BMI trajectories despite adversity. Guided by the Transactional Model of Stress and Coping, we evaluated (1) if peer friendship and adult mentors moderate, and (2) if impulsivity and depressive symptoms mediate, the relationship between maltreatment experiences and average excess BMI. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.03.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6934376PMC

Important issues in estimating costs of early childhood educational interventions: An example from the REDI Program.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Dec 11;107. Epub 2019 Sep 11.

The Pennsylvania State University.

Early childhood education (ECE) interventions hold great promise for not only improving lives but also for potentially producing an economic return on investment linked to key outcomes from program effectiveness. Assessment of economic impact relies on accurate estimates of program costs that should be derived consistently to enable program comparability across the field. This is challenged by a lack of understanding of the best approach to determine program costs that represent how they will occur in the real world and how they may vary across differing circumstances. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.104498DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6924610PMC
December 2019

Risk and Protective Factors for Substance Use Among Youth Experiencing Homelessness.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Dec 31;107. Epub 2019 Oct 31.

University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Department of Sociology.

Background: Though research finds that youth experiencing homelessness (YEH) have high rates of substance use, which can lead to numerous long-term negative health effects, less is known about both risk and protective factors for substance use. Moreover, even less is known about whether these factors differ for lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) youth compared to non-LGB youth. In the current study, we compared risk and protective factors for binge drinking, marijuana use, and illicit drug use (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.104548DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6905194PMC
December 2019

Harsh physical punishment as a mediator between income, re-reports and out-of-home placement in a child protective services-involved population.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Aug 29;103:70-78. Epub 2019 May 29.

University of Connecticut School of Social Work, 38 Prospect Street, Hartford, CT 06103, 959-200-3625.

Poverty is consistently associated with a higher risk of experiencing child maltreatment, and children from poor families are the majority of children involved in child protective services (CPS). However, the mediators in the relationship from income to CPS involvement are not entirely understood. Using theoretically-informed mediating path models and data from the second National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW II), this study tests the role of harsh physical punishment as a mediator between family income and CPS involvement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.05.032DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6886717PMC

Mothers' homeownership and children's economic success 20 years later among a sample of US citizens.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Apr;99:355-359

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, Mailstop F-64, Atlanta, GA 30341, USA.

Familial economic hardship, an adverse childhood experience (ACE) that increases children's risk for exposure to additional ACEs, can derail optimal child development. A compelling area with potential for reducing economic hardship and promoting healthy child development is housing. In the US, the largest contributor to family wealth is homeownership, which may contribute to a family's ability to provide their children opportunities to do better than previous generations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.02.024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6884082PMC

Parenting Influences on Adolescent Sexual Risk-taking: Differences by Child Welfare Placement Status.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Jan 22;96:134-144. Epub 2018 Nov 22.

Pennsylvania State University.

Positive parenting behaviors and parent-child relationships reduce sexual risk-taking among youth, but these associations may differ for adolescents in the child welfare system. Using two cohorts of a national longitudinal dataset of youth, the authors employed linear probability modeling to investigate associations of caregiver-child closeness, monitoring, and dating communication with youth's sexual initiation, sexual partners, and unprotected intercourse over the subsequent 12 months. Moderation by placement status (non-relative foster care, kinship care, or birth parent care) was then tested. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.11.038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6858058PMC
January 2019

Does adherence to child care nutrition and physical activity best practices differ by child care provider's participation in support programs and training?

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Oct 12;105. Epub 2019 Jul 12.

Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Medical School, University of Minnesota, United States.

Introduction: To date, gaps exist in our understanding of how child care provider participation in various support programs is associated with the reported implementation of nutrition and physical activity best practices by child care providers. Thus, the purpose of the current study was to compare implementation of nutrition and physical activity best practices among child care providers engaged in the Child and Adult Food Care Program (CACFP), Parent AWARE, and other training opportunities, to implementation among providers who do not participate in each of these opportunities.

Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of survey data collected from a stratified-random sample of licensed family-home and center-based child care settings (Family-homes n=394; Centers n= 224) in XXX from Month-Month 20XX. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.104417DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6857643PMC
October 2019

The Moderating Role of Attachment on the Association between Childhood Maltreatment and Adolescent Dating Violence.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2018 Nov 11;94:679-688. Epub 2018 Sep 11.

Yale University School of Medicine Child Study Center.

Approximately twenty percent of female and ten percent of male adolescents report violence in their dating relationships and there is a significant association between dating violence in adolescence and later perpetration of intimate partner violence (IPV) in adulthood. Identification of factors associated with dating violence can inform intervention and prevention efforts. This study was designed to examine the associations of early childhood maltreatment experience and involvement in adolescent dating violence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.09.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6824549PMC
November 2018

Combustible Cigarette Smoking and Alternative Tobacco Use in a Sample of Youth Transitioning from Foster Care.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Jan 29;96:231-236. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Brown University, Center for Alcohol & Addiction Studies, Box G-121S-4, Providence, RI, USA 02912.

Among the struggles faced by youth currently in or recently exiting foster care, tobacco use remains a low priority for practitioners and researchers, alike. Indeed, despite the dramatically altered landscape of tobacco products on the market, there have been no studies evaluating the use of alternative tobacco products among this vulnerable population. The current study aimed to determine the prevalence of lifetime and current combustible and non-combustible tobacco use among youth exiting foster care, and report on the prevalence of nicotine dependence, motivation to quit, and preferred methods of tobacco cessation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.11.054DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6768414PMC
January 2019
1 Read

A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial of a Technology-Based Substance Use Intervention for Youth Exiting Foster Care.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2018 Nov 15;94:466-476. Epub 2018 Aug 15.

Oregon Social Learning Center, 10 Shelton McMurphey Blvd, Eugene, OR 97401,

Youth exiting foster care represent a unique, at-risk population in that they receive supportive health services while under the umbrella of the foster care system, but access to care can drop precipitously upon release from foster custody. Traditional means of substance use treatment may not meet the needs of this vulnerable population. Mobile interventions, however, have demonstrated high acceptability and efficacy across a range of mental and physical health issues. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.08.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6703817PMC
November 2018

Why Does Child Maltreatment Occur? Caregiver Perspectives and Analyses of Neighborhood Structural Factors Across Twenty Years.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Apr 1;99:138-145. Epub 2019 Feb 1.

Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106.

Research on caregivers' views of factors that contribute to child maltreatment and analyses of neighborhood structural factors offer opportunities for enhancing prevention and intervention efforts. This study compared explanations of the factors that contribute to child maltreatment in a neighborhood-based sample of adult caregivers at two-time points: 1995-1996 and 2014-2015 along with analyses of neighborhood structural conditions during the same period. The study sample consisted of two cross-sectional subsamples: 400 adult caregivers in 20 census tracts in Cleveland, Ohio from a 1995-1996 study, and 400 adult caregivers of the same 20 census tracts surveyed in 2014-2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.01.043DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6674984PMC

The Effect of Direct and Vicarious Police Contact on the Educational Achievement of Urban Teens.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Aug 10;103:190-199. Epub 2019 Jun 10.

Jane Addams College of Social Work, University of Illinois At Chicago, 1040 West Harrison Street, 4 Floor, Chicago, IL 60607.

In response to changes in policing practices, scholarship has increasingly begun to explore whether police contact has negative implications for youth. A small subset of scholarship has examined the implications of police contact for educational outcomes. This research has generally focused on serious police contact (arrest, court involvement, and incarceration) and has found that police contact is associated with worse educational outcomes. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01907409193020
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.06.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6662931PMC
August 2019
1 Read

Patterns and predictors of compliance with utilization management guidelines supporting a state policy to improve the quality of youth mental health services.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Jan 16;96:194-203. Epub 2018 Nov 16.

University of Miami.

Despite a need to improve community mental health services for youths, little is known about compliance with state policies created to improve the quality of services in these settings. This study examined rates, patterns, and predictors of compliance with utilization management guidelines developed by the state of Texas to support a public health policy based on empirical evidence of effective mental health services (i.e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.11.035DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6658096PMC
January 2019
1 Read

Justice involvement and girls' sexual health: Directions for policy and practice.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Mar 10;98:278-283. Epub 2019 Jan 10.

University of California, San Francisco and UCSF Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital.

Arrested girls in the United States (US) are often diverted from detention through referrals to juvenile specialty courts (e.g., juvenile drug court), community-based diversion programs, or pre-adjudicated probation services. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.01.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6656393PMC

"If the mother does not know, there is no way she can tell the adolescent to go for drugs": Challenges in promoting health and preventing transmission among pregnant and parenting Kenyan adolescents living with HIV.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Aug 30;103:100-106. Epub 2019 May 30.

Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation (PIRE), 101 Conner Dr., Ste 200, Chapel Hill, NC 27514, United States of America.

Adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) who are pregnant, or parenting, are an important but understudied group. This study explores the challenges in promoting the health of these adolescents and preventing onward transmission. We used existing semi-structured interview data from a 2014 study conducted among Kenyan ALHIV (ages 15-19), their family members, and local health staff to examine adolescent HIV-testing, disclosure, and treatment engagement, focusing on participants who were pregnant, had given birth, or had fathered a child. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.05.036DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6628199PMC
August 2019
3 Reads

Barriers and consultation needs regarding implementation of evidence-based treatment in community agencies.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2018 Nov 4;94:368-377. Epub 2018 Oct 4.

Vice President for Mental Health Initiatives, Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, Inc.

There is growing recognition of the gap between research and practice in mental health settings, and community agencies now face significant pressure from multiple stakeholders to engage in evidence-based practices. Unfortunately, little is known about the barriers that exist among agencies involved in formal implementation efforts or their perceptions about how implementation experts can best support change. This study reports the results of a survey of 263 individuals across 32 agencies involved in a state-wide effort to increase access to an evidence-based trauma-focused treatment for children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.10.004DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6615900PMC
November 2018

Parent Mental Health Problems and Motivation as Predictors of Their Engagement in Community-Based Child Mental Health Services.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Sep 5;104. Epub 2019 Jun 5.

San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182-4502, USA.

Parent or caregiver engagement in child mental health treatment is an important element of treatment effectiveness, particularly for children with disruptive behavior problems. Parent or caregiver characteristics, such as their mental health and/or motivation to participate in treatment, may impact engagement and subsequent treatment outcomes. However, a lack of empirical research exists examining these potential links, particularly in community-based treatment settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.06.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6599621PMC
September 2019
1 Read

Risk and Protective Factors for Alcohol, Marijuana, and Cocaine Use Among Child Welfare-Involved Youth.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2018 Dec 26;95:88-94. Epub 2018 Sep 26.

Human Development and Family Studies, Pennsylvania State University.

Youth involved in child welfare services (CWS) are at elevated risk for substance use. CWS involvement may provide an opportunity for intervention to prevent subsequent use; however, little is known about mitigating substance use risk in this population. Using data from the second National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW II), the present study examined individual, psychological, and contextual risk factors (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.09.037DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6588184PMC
December 2018
27 Reads

Child Abuse, Mental Health and Sleeping Arrangements among Homeless Youth: Links to Physical and Sexual Street Victimization.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2018 Dec 9;95:327-333. Epub 2018 Nov 9.

Oklahoma State University, Department of Sociology, Stillwater, OK.

Physical safety is a primary concern among homeless youth because they struggle to secure basic necessities and a permanent place to live. Despite this, studies have not fully examined the numerous linkages that might explain risk for victimization within the context of material insecurity. In this study, we examine multiple levels of both proximal and distal risk factors at the individual (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.11.018DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6586436PMC
December 2018
11 Reads

Supporting Adolescents to Adhere (SATA): Lessons learned from an intervention to achieve medication adherence targets among youth living with HIV in Uganda.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Jul 6;102:56-62. Epub 2019 Apr 6.

RAND Corporation, Economics, Sociology, and Statistics, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA USA.

Introduction: Youth in Uganda are disproportionately impacted by HIV and report significant barriers to ART adherence. We asked participants how fixed versus flexible adherence target setting for incentive interventions, in combination with other support systems, could help HIV-positive youth in Uganda reach medication adherence targets.

Methods: Four focus groups conducted in Luganda were audiotaped, transcribed, and translated into English; the transcriptions were then coded using Dedoose software. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.04.007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6586245PMC
July 2019
4 Reads

Dosage Effects in the Child-Parent Center PreK-to-3 Grade Program: A Re-Analysis in the Chicago Longitudinal Study.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Jun 12;101:285-298. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

1. Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN.

Although substantial investments in early childhood intervention have continued, whether gains are sustained past kindergarten for routinely implemented programs is a critical research need. Using data from the Chicago Longitudinal Study (CLS; N=1,539; 50.3% female; 92. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.04.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6581462PMC
June 2019
1 Read

Communication Matters: A Long-Term Follow-up Study of Child Savings Account Program Participation.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 May 28;100:136-146. Epub 2019 Feb 28.

University of Michigan School of Social Work, 1080 South University St. Ann Arbor, MI 48104 United States,

As they are a long-term policy instrument, the results of many child savings account (CSA) programs take decades to realize. Because of this, important questions regarding the long-term impacts of the programs, as well as participants' perceptions regarding the programs' long-term impacts, are unanswered. In this study, we present findings from a qualitatively driven complex mixed methods follow-up of the first large CSA demonstration project, the quasi-experimental Michigan Saving for Education, Entrepreneurship, and Downpayment (SEED) program. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.02.016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6550998PMC
May 2019
6 Reads

Understanding and Parenting Children's Noncompliant Behavior: The Efficacy of an Online Training Workshop for Resource Parents.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Apr 4;99:246-256. Epub 2019 Feb 4.

Biostatistics Consulting Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Indiana University Bloomington, PH C101, 1025 East 7 Street, Bloomington, IN 47405, United States.

The current study examined the effectiveness of an online training program on parenting children's noncompliant behavior. Eighty-two resource parents (foster, adoptive, and kinship) were recruited through Foster Parent College-an online training website-and randomly assigned to a treatment or wait-list control group. Parents in the treatment group participated in an online interactive workshop on noncompliant child behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.01.045DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6528673PMC
April 2019
1 Read

School adjustment of first-grade primary school students: Effects of family involvement, externalizing behavior, teacher and peer relations.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Jun 16;101:307-316. Epub 2019 Apr 16.

Hacettepe University, Faculty of Education, Division of Psychological Counseling and Guidance, Turkey.

Adjusting to school contributes to the healthy introduction of all educational activities. For this reason, it is important to determine all facilitating and debilitating factors to the school adjustment process and to develop preventive studies for overcoming school adjustment. The purpose of this study is to determine the factors affecting the school adjustment of first-grade primary school students based on an ecological approach. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.04.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6529191PMC

Community-Based Learning Collaboratives and Participant Reports of Interprofessional Collaboration, Barriers to, and Utilization of Child Trauma Services.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2018 Nov 29;94:306-314. Epub 2018 Sep 29.

Oregon Social Learning Center.

Given the high prevalence and severe consequences of child trauma, effective implementation strategies are needed to increase the availability and utilization of evidence-based child trauma services. One promising strategy, the Community-Based Learning Collaborative (CBLC), augments traditional Learning Collaborative activities with a novel set of community-focused strategies. This prospective, observational study examined pre-to post-changes in CBLC participant reports of interprofessional collaboration (IPC), barriers to, and utilization of evidence-based child trauma treatment in their communities. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S01907409183025
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.09.038DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6516766PMC
November 2018
3 Reads

Pregnancy Attitudes and Contraceptive Use among Young Adults with Histories of Foster Care.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2018 Nov 10;94:284-289. Epub 2018 Oct 10.

Graduate School of Social Work, University of Denver; 2148 S. High Street, Denver, CO 80208.

Introduction: This study examined pregnancy attitudes and contraceptive use among young adults with histories of foster care.

Methods: 209 female and male young adults, aged 18-22, with histories of foster care were interviewed about their intentions and feelings towards pregnancy. Respondents were then categorized as having pro-pregnancy (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.10.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6519940PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

A Short-Term Evaluation of a Hospital No Hit Zone Policy to Increase Bystander Intervention in Cases of Parent-to-Child Violence.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2018 Nov 30;94:155-162. Epub 2018 Sep 30.

St. Louis Children's Hospital, One Children's Place, St. Louis, Missouri, 63110; and Washington University School of Medicine, Campus Box 9999, St. Louis, Missouri, 63130;

This study used a pre/post design to evaluate the implementation of a hospital-wide No Hit Zone (NHZ) bystander intervention around parent-to-child hitting. A total of 2,326 staff completed the pre-NHZ survey and received training about the NHZ policy; 623 staff completed the post-test survey 10 months later. A group of 225 parents participated in the pre-NHZ survey and a second group of 180 participated in the post-NHZ survey, also 10 months later. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.09.040DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6516772PMC
November 2018
2 Reads

Mental Health Symptoms and Delinquency among Court-Involved Youth Referred for Treatment.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Mar 9;98:312-318. Epub 2019 Jan 9.

Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and Director of Research, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Rhode Island Hospital.

Youth involved in the justice system meet criteria for psychiatric disorders at much higher rates than youth in the general population and a large body of research has established a relationship between mental health problems and delinquency or recidivism. However, only limited research has examined the relationship between specific types of psychopathology and specific patterns or types of delinquency for justice-involved youth and only a single study has explored the relationship between psychopathology and delinquency among youth with psychiatric diagnoses receiving mental health treatment. We examined the relationship between severity of offending and internalizing and externalizing symptoms among court-involved, non-incarcerated youth referred for mental health treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.01.008DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6407702PMC
March 2019
18 Reads

Understanding support network capacity during the transition from foster care: Youth-identified barriers, facilitators, and enhancement strategies.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Jan 29;96:220-230. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Portland State University.

This study explores how foster care experiences can impact support network functionality as young people exit the foster care system. This can be conceptualized as a function of both network member capacity to provide adequate support to address young adult needs, and network stability, which reflects cohesion within and across relationships to facilitate consistent support over time. We conducted support network mapping and semi-structured interviews with youth in foster care aged 16-20 (N=22) and used theoretical thematic analysis to explore support barriers and facilitators in relation to the organizing concepts of support capacity and network stability. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.11.049DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6370300PMC
January 2019
2 Reads

Relationship between Child Maltreatment and Adolescent Body Mass Index Trajectories.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2018 Oct 20;93:196-202. Epub 2018 Jul 20.

Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill.

This study examines the relationship between childhood maltreatment experiences and body mass index (BMI) over time. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, we use latent profile analysis to create child maltreatment experience classes and latent growth modeling to understand how classes relate to BMI trajectories from adolescence to early adulthood. The best-fitting model suggests four child maltreatment experience classes: 1) (n=607); 2) (n=1,578); 3) (n=345); and 4) (n=4,188). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.07.024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6368259PMC
October 2018
15 Reads

Impact of the United States federal child tax credit on childhood injuries and behavior problems.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Feb;107

Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 4770 Buford Hwy, Atlanta, GA, 30341, United States.

Children who grow up in poverty are at risk for various poor outcomes. Socioeconomic policies can shape the conditions in which families are raising children and may be effective at reducing financial strain and helping families obtain economic sufficiency, thereby reducing risk for poor health outcomes. This study used data from two surveys conducted in the US, the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979 (NLSY79) and the NLSY79 Young Adult survey to determine whether the U. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2019.104718DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7176404PMC
February 2019

Measurement and Correlates of Foster Care Placement Moves.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2018 Aug 20;91:248-258. Epub 2018 Jun 20.

Placement stability is a major priority in the foster care system. However, the measurement of placement stability and the reasons children move are complex issues that warrant considerable attention. In this study, we used a two-year Texas foster care entry cohort to examine the extent to which children experience "progress moves", such as moving to a sibling placement or to live with a relative, versus non-progress moves, such as moving due to risk of abuse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.06.019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6338419PMC
August 2018
1 Read

The impact of the low-income housing tax credit on children's health and wellbeing in Georgia.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2018 Oct;93:390-396

Office of the Director, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.

Housing instability is a risk factor for child abuse and neglect (CAN). Thus, policies that increase availability of affordable housing may reduce CAN rates. The Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC) program is the largest affordable housing policy initiative in the country. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.08.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6314036PMC
October 2018
24 Reads

An evaluation of welfare and child welfare system integration on rates of child maltreatment in Colorado.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2019 Jan;96

ICF International, 3 Corporate Square, Suite 370, Atlanta, GA 30329, United States.

Policies that improve the socioeconomic conditions of families have been identified as one of the most promising strategies to prevent child maltreatment, particularly neglect. In this study, we examined the impact of integrated Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) and child welfare (CW) systems on child maltreatment-related hospitalizations and Child Protective Services investigations and substantiations in nine counties in Colorado from 1996 to 2014. Regression analyses showed TANF-CW integration was associated with subsequent year, but not second-year, increases rates of substantiated child maltreatment overall and neglect specifically (that is, there was no longer a difference in the rate two years after the change in integration). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.12.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7177175PMC
January 2019

Examining the wider context of formal youth mentoring programme development, delivery and maintenance: A qualitative study with mentoring managers and experts in the United Kingdom.

Child Youth Serv Rev 2018 Dec;95:95-108

Bristol Medical School, Population Health Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom.

Mentoring programmes are commonplace, yet little is known about the circumstances in which they operate. This study aimed to gain insight into the context surrounding youth mentoring programmes by asking programme managers and experts in the United Kingdom about their experiences. Telephone interviews with twenty-three programme managers and five experts were undertaken. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.childyouth.2018.10.028DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6294841PMC
December 2018
2 Reads