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    257 results match your criteria Children and Youth Services Review [Journal]

    1 OF 6

    School Readiness in the Midwest Child-Parent Center Expansion: A Propensity Score Analysis of Year 1 Impacts.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2017 Aug;79:620-630
    Human Capital Research Collaborative, University of Minnesota, 301 19 Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55455.
    In this paper, we evaluate the effectiveness of the first year of a federally-funded, evidence-based preschool through third grade intervention in Chicago. We use inverse probability weighting with regression adjustment to estimate the impacts of the Child-Parent Center (CPC) program on teacher assessments of school readiness for 1,289 low-income preschool and 591 comparison-group participants. Results indicated significant positive impacts of the program for all domains, including literacy, math, socio-emotional development, science and total score. Read More

    Effects of a video feedback parent training program during child welfare visitation.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Dec 8;71:266-276. Epub 2016 Nov 8.
    University of Oregon, USA.
    Behavioral parent training programs have documented efficacy for improving behaviors among parents and their children and are frequently used by child welfare agencies to prevent removal of a child from the parental home or to facilitate reunification. Although an ideal time for parent training might be during supervised visits where parents may practice skills with their children under the guidance and support of a therapist or caseworker, this is not typically the case. Most often, parents within the child welfare system receive parent training in small groups without their children present, and to date, few studies have examined effects of behavioral parent training interventions during supervised visitation. Read More

    Exploration of Factors Predictive of At-risk Fathers' Participation in a Pilot Study of an Augmented Evidence-Based Parent Training Program: A Mixed Methods Approach.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2017 Aug 4;79:485-494. Epub 2017 Jul 4.
    Georgia State University, School of Public Health, PO Box 3995, Atlanta, GA 30302, USA.
    There has been burgeoning parenting intervention research specifically addressing fathers in recent decades. Corresponding research examining their participation and engagement in evidence-based parent training programs, which have almost exclusively targeted mothers, is just emerging. The current study used mixed methods to examine factors that influenced completion of an augmented version of an evidence-based child maltreatment prevention program developed for male caregivers called SafeCare Dad to Kids (Dad2K) in a pilot study. Read More

    Network Indicators of the Social Ecology of Adolescents in Relative and Non-Relative Foster Households.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2017 Feb 7;73:173-181. Epub 2016 Dec 7.
    Portland State University.
    Though the presence, composition, and quality of social relationships-particularly as found in family networks-has an important influence on adolescent well-being, little is known about the social ecology of youth in foster care. This study examined the social networks of foster youth participating in a large RCT of an intervention for siblings in foster care. Youth reported on the people they lived with and the relatives they were in contact with, which provided indicators of network size, composition, and relationship quality. Read More

    Young child poverty in the United States: Analyzing trends in poverty and the role of anti-poverty programs using the Supplemental Poverty Measure.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2017 Mar 28;74:35-49. Epub 2017 Jan 28.
    Center on Poverty and Social Policy, Columbia University School of Social Work.
    Between 1968 and 2013, the poverty rate of young children age 0 to 5 years fell by nearly one third, in large part because of the role played by anti-poverty programs. However, young children in the U.S. Read More

    Children's Executive Function in a CPS-Involved Sample: Effects of Cumulative Adversity and Specific Types of Adversity.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Dec 9;71:184-190. Epub 2016 Nov 9.
    University of Oregon, Department of Psychology.
    Prior research has identified the presence of executive function (EF) deficits in child protective service (CPS) involved (versus non-involved) children but minimal work has examined predictors that might explain individual differences within these CPS-involved children. Here, we sought to characterize EF in a large sample (N=694) of CPS-involved children and examine how specific adversities (physical abuse, neglect, caregiver domestic violence, and caregiver substance dependence) and cumulative adversity (at ages 0-3 and 3-6 years) predict EF (at approximately 5-6 years). It was expected that the sample would exhibit low EF overall based on previous research in maltreated children. Read More

    Nutritional status of foster children in the U.S.: Implications for cognitive and behavioral development.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Nov 14;70:369-374. Epub 2016 Oct 14.
    Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, UO Prevention Science Institute, 6217 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403, USA.
    Objective: Children in foster care are at greater risk for poor health, physical, cognitive, behavioral, and developmental outcomes than are children in the general population. Considerable research links early nutrition to later cognitive and behavioral outcomes. The aim of this narrative review is to examine the prevalence of poor nutrition and its relation to subsequent health and development in foster children. Read More

    The influence of concrete support on child welfare program engagement, progress, and recurrence.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2017 Jan 17;72:26-33. Epub 2016 Oct 17.
    The Mark Chaffin Center for Healthy Development, School of Public Health, Georgia State University, PO Box 3995, Atlanta, GA 30302, USA.
    Families living in poverty are significantly more likely to become involved with child welfare services, and consequently, referred to interventions that target abusive and neglectful parenting practices. Program engagement and retention are difficult to achieve, possibly because of the concrete resource insufficiencies that may have contributed to a family's involvement with services in the first place. Various strategies have been used to enhance program completion, such as motivational interventions, monetary incentives, and financial assistance with concrete needs. Read More

    Behavior problems and children's academic achievement: A test of growth-curve models with gender and racial differences.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Aug 2;67:95-104. Epub 2016 Jun 2.
    School of Social Work, College for Public Health and Social Justice, Saint Louis University, 3550 Lindell Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63103, United States.
    The aim of this study was to examine the longitudinal association between externalizing and internalizing behavior and children's academic achievement, particularly in terms of whether these variables varied as a function of gender and race. Data pertaining to externalizing and internalizing behavior, academic achievement, gender, and race from three waves of the Child Development Supplement of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (N = 2028) were used. Results indicate that behavior problems had a negative relationship with academic performance and some of these associations endured over time. Read More

    To Educate or To Incarcerate: Factors in Disproportionality in School Discipline.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Nov 9;70:102-111. Epub 2016 Sep 9.
    RAND Corporation, 1776 Main Street, Santa Monica, CA 90407-2138.
    The school-to-prison pipeline describes the process by which school suspension/expulsion may push adolescents into the justice system disproportionately based on race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and gender. The current study moves the field forward by analyzing a survey of a diverse sample of 2,539 students in 10(th) to 12(th) grade in Southern California to examine how demographic, individual, and family factors contribute to disparities in office referral and suspension/expulsion. African Americans, boys, and students whose parents had less education were more likely to be suspended/expelled. Read More

    Mental Health Interventions for Children in Foster Care: A Systematic Review.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Nov 8;70:65-77. Epub 2016 Sep 8.
    The Kempe Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Child Abuse and Neglect, Departments of Pediatrics and Psychiatry, University of Colorado - School of Medicine.
    Children in foster care have high rates of adverse childhood experiences and are at risk for mental health problems. These problems can be difficult to ameliorate, creating a need for rigorous intervention research. Previous research suggests that intervening with children in foster care can be challenging for several reasons, including the severity and complexity of their mental health problems, and challenges engaging this often transitory population in mental health services. Read More

    The Great Recession and risk for child abuse and neglect.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2017 Jan 15;72:71-81. Epub 2016 Oct 15.
    Teachers College, Columbia University, 525 West 120th St. New York, NY 10027,
    This paper examines the association between the Great Recession and four measures of the risk for maternal child abuse and neglect: (1) maternal physical aggression; (2) maternal psychological aggression; (3) physical neglect by mothers; and (4) supervisory/exposure neglect by mothers. It draws on rich longitudinal data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, a longitudinal birth cohort study of families in 20 U.S. Read More

    ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES AMONG YOUTH AGING OUT OF FOSTER CARE: A LATENT CLASS ANALYSIS.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2017 Mar 6;74:108-116. Epub 2017 Feb 6.
    University of Chicago, School of Social Service Administration, 969 E. 60th Street Chicago, IL 60637, USA.
    Research has demonstrated that youth who age out, or emancipate, from foster care face deleterious outcomes across a variety of domains in early adulthood. This article builds on this knowledge base by investigating the role of adverse childhood experience accumulation and composition on these outcomes. A latent class analysis was performed to identify three subgroups: Complex Adversity, Environmental Adversity, and Lower Adversity. Read More

    Chaotic Experiences and Low-Income Children's Social-Emotional Development.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Nov 7;70:19-29. Epub 2016 Sep 7.
    University of Texas at Austin, 2315 Red River St., P.O. Box Y, Austin, TX 78712, USA.
    Development in early childhood is increasingly likely to take place in multiple contexts. Continuity and discontinuity in children's experiences across multiple contexts have important implications for their development. This study examines the extent to which children experience chaos in their homes and in their preschool settings is linked with their social-emotional development over the course of the preschool year. Read More

    Bullying among Urban Mexican-heritage Youth: Exploring Risk for Substance Use by Status as a Bully, Victim, and Bully-Victim.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Feb 19;61:216-221. Epub 2015 Dec 19.
    School of Social Work, Arizona State University, Tucson, AZ, Mailing address: 340 N. Commerce Park Loop, Suite 250, Tucson, AZ 85745, School of Social Work, Arizona State University, Phoenix, AZ, Mailing address: 411 N. Central Avenue, Suite 800, Phoenix, AZ 85004,
    Little is known about adolescent bullying behavior and its relationship to substance use in ethnic minority populations. In a sample of youth of Mexican heritage, the current study aimed to examine the prevalence of bullying behavior subtypes and its co-occurrence with recent alcohol, cigarette, and inhalant use. Data come from a school-based substance use prevention study in the Southwestern U. Read More

    Case file coding of child maltreatment: Methods, challenges, and innovations in a longitudinal project of youth in foster care.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Aug 21;67:254-262. Epub 2016 Jun 21.
    Clinical Child Psychology Program, University of Kansas, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA.
    State social service agency case files are a common mechanism for obtaining information about a child's maltreatment history, yet these documents are often challenging for researchers to access, and then to process in a manner consistent with the requirements of social science research designs. Specifically, accessing and navigating case files is an extensive undertaking, and a task that many researchers have had to maneuver with little guidance. Even after the files are in hand and the research questions and relevant variables have been clarified, case file information about a child's maltreatment exposure can be idiosyncratic, vague, inconsistent, and incomplete, making coding such information into useful variables for statistical analyses difficult. Read More

    Foster care placement change: The role of family dynamics and household composition.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Sep 28;68:44-50. Epub 2016 Jun 28.
    Oregon Social Learning Center, Eugene, OR, United States ; School of Social Work, Portland State University, Portland, OR, United States.
    Sibling co-placement and kinship care have each been shown to protect against the occurrence of placement change for youth in substitute care. However, little is known about the effects of different combinations of sibling placement and relative caregiver status on placement change. Nor does the field fully understand how family dynamics may differ in these households. Read More

    Morbid Obesity and Use of Second Generation Antipsychotics among Adolescents in Foster Care: Evidence from Medicaid.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Aug 30;67:27-31. Epub 2016 May 30.
    Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1196, Goldfarb Hall, Room 229C, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, United States.
    Background: Many adolescents enter foster care with high body mass index (BMI), and patterns of treatment further exacerbate the risk of morbid obesity. A principal risk factor for such exacerbation is the use of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs). We examine the association between receiving a morbid obesity diagnosis and SGA prescriptions among adolescents in foster care. Read More

    Community-based organisations for vulnerable children in South Africa: Reach, psychosocial correlates, and potential mechanisms.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Mar 21;62:58-64. Epub 2016 Jan 21.
    Department of Psychology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa.
    Community-based organisations (CBOs) have the potential to provide high quality services for orphaned and vulnerable children in resource-limited settings. However, evidence is lacking as to whether CBOs are reaching those who are most vulnerable, whether attending these organisations is associated with greater psychosocial wellbeing, and how they might work. This study addressed these three questions using cross-sectional data from 1848 South African children aged 9-13. Read More

    Family formation: A positive outcome for vulnerable young women?
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Aug 31;67:57-66. Epub 2016 May 31.
    Brown School of Social Work, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1196, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130, USA.
    While marriage and childbirth are generally considered positive adult outcomes, it is not clear that this holds true among low income young women. Beyond adolescent parenting, little empirical data exists on various types of family formation in this population. The aims of this study were twofold: (1) to understand predictors of type of family formation (e. Read More

    Fostering Higher Education: A Postsecondary Access and Retention Intervention for Youth with Foster Care Experience.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Nov 9;70:46-56. Epub 2016 Sep 9.
    Social Development Research Group, School of Social Work, University of Washington, 9725 3rd Ave. NE, Suite 401, Seattle, WA 98115, USA.
    Most youth in foster care aspire to obtain higher education, but face daunting obstacles in doing so. While societal interest and effort to support foster youth in achieving higher education has grown, very few supports have evidence to show that they are effective at improving postsecondary outcomes. In an effort to address the dearth of clearly articulated, evidence-based postsecondary support approaches for foster youth, we have developed Fostering Higher Education (FHE), a comprehensive, structured, and evaluable postsecondary access and retention intervention composed of elements (professional educational advocacy, substance abuse prevention, mentoring) that are either evidence based or promising based on the scientific literature and their ability to address the outcomes of interest. Read More

    Decreasing Risk Factors for Later Alcohol Use and Antisocial Behaviors in Children in Foster Care by Increasing Early Promotive Factors.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 May;65:156-165
    University of Oregon, Department of Psychology, 1227 University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, 97403, USA, , ,
    Children in foster care are at high risk for poor psychosocial outcomes, including school failure, alcohol and other substance abuse, and criminal behaviors. Promoting healthy development by increasing broad-impact positive skills may help reduce some of the risk factors for longer-term negative outcomes. School readiness has been linked to a number of positive outcomes across childhood, adolescence, and adulthood, and may also boost intermediary positive skills such as self-competence. Read More

    Guiding and supporting adolescents living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: The development of a curriculum for family and community members.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Feb;61:253-260
    School of Public Health, University of Memphis, Memphis, TA 38111, United States.
    Although HIV-related deaths declined globally by 30% between 2005 and 2012, those among adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) rose by 50%. This discrepancy is primarily due to failure to address the specific needs of ALHIV and resulting poor clinical outcomes related to late diagnosis and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The Families Matter! Program (FMP) is an evidence-based intervention for parents and caregivers of 9-12 year-olds that promotes positive parenting practices and effective parent-child communication about sexuality and sexual risk reduction. Read More

    Fragile Families in the American Welfare State.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2015 Aug;55:210-221
    University College London, Epidemiology and Public Health, 1-19 Torrington Place, London, WC1E 6BT, UK.
    The proportion of children born out of wedlock is now over 40 percent. At birth, about half of these parents are co-habiting. This paper examines data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study (N = 4,271) to describe for the first time the role of welfare state benefits in the economic lives of married, cohabiting, and single parent families with young children. Read More

    Professional and youth perspectives on higher education-focused interventions for youth transitioning from foster care.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 May;64:23-34
    Social Development Research Group, School of Social Work, University of Washington, 9725 3rd Ave. NE, Suite 401, Seattle, WA 98115, USA.
    Youth transitioning from foster care to adulthood access and succeed in college at much lower rates than the general population. A variety of services exist to support youth with their postsecondary goals, but few if any have evidence for their effectiveness. As part of a National Institute on Drug Abuse-funded intervention development project to design Fostering Higher Education, a structured, testable postsecondary access and retention intervention for youth transitioning from foster care to adulthood, focus groups were conducted with community stakeholders to collect recommendations for how to most effectively structure the intervention. Read More

    Qualitative Evaluation of Historical and Relational Factors Influencing Pregnancy and Sexually Transmitted Infection Risks in Foster Youth.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Feb;61:245-252
    Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development Research/Division of Adolescent Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children's Hospital and Research Institute/University of Washington, 2001 8 Ave Suite 400, Mailstop CW8-6, Seattle, WA, 98121, USA.
    Purpose: To explore how attitudes, norms, behaviors, responses to early life experiences, and protective factors influence pregnancy and sexually transmitted infection risks from the perspectives of current and former foster youth to inform the development of prevention strategies.

    Methods: We conducted semi-structured individual qualitative interviews with a diverse sample of 22 current/former foster youth aged 15-21 years (63% female; average age = 18.6 years). Read More

    The impact of fathers on maltreated youths' mental health.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Apr;63:16-20
    The RAND Corporation, 1200 South Hayes Street, Arlington, VA 22202.
    Men are increasingly the heads of single parent households, yet are often excluded from child welfare research and practice. To better serve all families in the child welfare system, it is necessary to understand the impact of primary caregiving men on children's wellbeing. In this study we investigated the longitudinal effects of primary caregiving fathers' mental health and substance use on child mental health, and examined possible differences by child age and gender. Read More

    Promoting Birth Parents' Relationships with their Toddlers upon Reunification: Results from Promoting First Relationships(®) Home Visiting Program.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Feb;61:109-116
    Family & Child Nursing, University of Washington.
    Birth parents, once reunified with their child after a foster care placement, are in need of in-home support services to prevent reoccurrence of maltreatment and reentry into foster care, establish a strong relationship with their child, and enhance child well-being. Few studies have addressed the efficacy of home visiting services for reunified birth parents of toddlers. This study reports on the findings from a randomized control trial of a 10-week home visiting program, Promoting First Relationships(®) (Kelly, Sandoval, Zuckerman, & Buehlman, 2008), for a subsample of 43 reunified birth parents that were part of the larger trial. Read More

    Children's Hyperactivity, Television Viewing, and The Potential for Child Effects.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Feb;61:135-140
    University of Texas at Austin.
    Using data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Birth Cohort (ECLS-B; n = 6,250), this study examined whether children who display difficult behaviors early in life watch more television from year-to-year. Results revealed that 4-year-old children's hyperactive, but not aggressive, behavior was associated with an increase in television watching over the ensuing year. These potential child effects, however, were embedded in both proximate and distal ecologies. Read More

    The Effect of Race/Ethnicity on the Relation between Substance Use Disorder Diagnosis and Substance Use Treatment Receipt among Male Serious Adolescent Offenders.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Feb;61:237-244
    Arizona State University Psychology Department, USA.
    The high rates of substance disorders in the juvenile justice system, as well as the relation between substance use and reoffending, suggest the importance of substance use treatment service and understanding the factors that influence treatment provision. The current study tested whether race/ethnicity affects the relation between substance use disorder diagnosis and the receipt of substance use treatment services among a sample of male serious juvenile offenders (N=638). Findings showed that among adolescents with a substance use disorder diagnosis, there were no race/ethnicity differences in substance use treatment receipt. Read More

    Household Incarceration in Early Adolescence and Risk of Premarital First Birth.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Feb;61:126-134
    Princeton University 229 Wallace Hall, Princeton NJ, 08544,
    In the second half of the 20(th) century, the United States experienced a massive increase in incarceration. In response to this growth, a burgeoning scholarship has sought to explore the collateral consequences of incarceration for young children. However, this scholarship has less frequently explored the impact of incarceration on long-term outcomes, how incarceration experienced in periods other than early childhood impacts children, and whether the incarceration of family members other than parents has negative implications for children. Read More

    Parent Training to Reduce Problem Behaviors over the Transition to High School: Tests of Indirect Effects through Improved Emotion Regulation Skills.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Feb;61:176-183
    Department of Psychology, 1845 Fairmount Street, Wichita State University, Wichita, KS, USA, 67260.
    Adolescent problem behaviors are costly for individuals and society. Promoting the self-regulatory functioning of youth may help prevent the development of such behaviors. Parent-training and family intervention programs have been shown to improve child and adolescent self-regulation. Read More

    Self-Report of Health Problems and Health Care Use among Maltreated and Comparison Adolescents.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2016 Feb;61:1-5
    School of Social Work, University of Southern California, 669 West 34th Street, Los Angeles, CA 90089.
    The study aims were to compare maltreated and comparison adolescents' health problems and to identify how individual, family and home characteristics and maltreatment status affect adolescents' self-report of health status and health care use. The sample was 224 maltreated adolescents (mean age = 18.3 years) and 128 comparison adolescents (mean age = 18. Read More

    It's not as simple as it sounds: Problems and solutions in accessing and using administrative child welfare data for evaluating the impact of early childhood interventions.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2015 Oct;57:40-49
    Center for the Improvement of Child and Family Studies, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-07541, United States.
    In recent years, there has been increasing interest in using administrative data collected by state child welfare agencies as a source of information for research and evaluation. The challenges of obtaining access to and using these data, however, have not been well documented. This study describes the processes used to access child welfare records in six different states and the approach to combining and using the information gathered to evaluate the impact of the Early Head Start program on children's involvement with the child welfare system from birth through age eleven. Read More

    Preventing domestic abuse for children and young people: A review of school-based interventions.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2015 Dec;59:120-131
    School of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK.
    Schools provide the setting in which interventions aimed at preventing intimate partner violence and abuse (IPVA) are delivered to young people in the general population and a range of programmes have been designed and evaluated. To date, most rigorous studies have been undertaken in North America and the extent to which programmes are transferable to other settings and cultures is uncertain. This paper reports on a mixed methods review, aimed at informing UK practise and policy, which included a systematic review of the international literature, a review of the UK grey literature and consultation with young people as well as experts to address the question of what works for whom in what circumstances. Read More

    Predictors of treatment attrition and treatment length in Parent-Child Interaction Therapy in Taiwanese families(.)
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2015 Dec;56:28-37
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Violence Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
    Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) has been used successfully in the United States and in other countries around the world, but its use in Asian countries has been more limited. The present study is the first of its kind to examine the predictors of treatment attrition and length in a sample of Taiwanese caregivers and their children. It is also the first to examine PCIT outcomes in Taiwanese families. Read More

    Building an evidence-base for the training of evidence-based treatments in community settings: Use of an expert-informed approach.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2015 Aug;55:84-92
    Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine.
    In order to make EBTs available to a large number of children and families, developers and expert therapists have used their experience and expertise to train community-based therapists in EBTs. Understanding current training practices of treatment experts may be one method for establishing best practices for training community-based therapists prior to comprehensive empirical examinations of training practices. A qualitative study was conducted using surveys and phone interviews to identify the specific procedures used by treatment experts to train and implement an evidence-based treatment in community settings. Read More

    Tobacco Use among Foster Youth: Evidence of Health Disparities.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2015 Nov;58:142-145
    Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies, Brown University, Box G-S121-4, Providence, RI, USA, 02912.
    Youth aging out of foster care face a challenging road to independence. Following exposure to myriad risk factors such as abuse, neglect, parental substance use, and severe housing mobility, supportive services decrease upon exit from care, often increasing risk for substance use, homelessness, and unemployment. Although tobacco use is also highly prevalent, little attention has been paid to screening, assessment, and treatment of tobacco use in this vulnerable group. Read More

    IMMIGRATION ENFORCEMENT AND MIXED-STATUS FAMILIES: THE EFFECTS OF RISK OF DEPORTATION ON MEDICAID USE.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2015 Oct 26;57:83-89. Epub 2015 Jul 26.
    Center for Women's Health and Health Disparities Research, University of Wisconsin-Madison 310 N. Midvale Blvd, Suite 201; Madison, WI 53705, USA.
    As Congress priorities the immigration debate on increased border security, the fate of an estimated 11 million undocumented citizens remains uncertain. Stuck in between partisan politics and practical solutions are mixed-status families in which some members of the family are U.S. Read More

    Juvenile Justice, Mental Health, and the Transition to Adulthood: A Review of Service System Involvement and Unmet Needs in the U.S.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2015 Sep;56:139-148
    Transitions Research and Training Center, Systems and Psychosocial Advances Research Center, Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA.
    Although adolescents are the primary focus of juvenile justice, a significant number of young people involved with this system are considered transition age youth (i.e., 16-25 years of age). Read More

    Who Am I? Who Do You Think I Am? Stability of Racial/Ethnic Self-Identification among Youth in Foster Care and Concordance with Agency Categorization.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2015 Sep;56:61-67
    Regional Research Institute for Human Services, Portland State University, PO Box 751, Portland, OR 97207-0751.
    While it has been well documented that racial and ethnic disparities exist for children of color in child welfare, the accuracy of the race and ethnicity information collected by agencies has not been examined, nor has the concordance of this information with youth self-report. This article addresses a major gap in the literature by examining: 1) the racial and ethnic self-identification of youth in foster care, and the rate of agreement with child welfare and school categorizations; 2) the level of concordance between different agencies (school and child welfare); and 3) the stability of racial and ethnic self-identification among youth in foster care over time. Results reveal that almost 1 in 5 youth change their racial identification over a one-year period, high rates of discordance exist between the youth self-report of Native American, Hispanic and multiracial youth and how agencies categorize them, and a greater tendency for the child welfare system to classify a youth as White, as compared to school and youth themselves. Read More

    Social and Emotional Learning Services and Child Outcomes in Third Grade: Evidence from a Cohort of Head Start Participants.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2015 Sep;56:42-51
    Harvard University Graduate School of Education, Larsen 603, 14 Appian Way, Cambridge, MA 02138, ,
    A variety of universal school-based social and emotional learning (SEL) programs have been designed in the past decades to help children improve social-emotional and academic skills. Evidence on the effectiveness of SEL programs has been mixed in the literature. Using data from a longitudinal follow-up study of children (n = 414) originally enrolled in a clustered randomized controlled trial (RCT) when they were in Head Start, we examined whether universal SEL services in third grade were associated with the development of children from disadvantaged families. Read More

    Parenting stress among child welfare involved families: Differences by child placement.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2014 Nov;46:19-27
    University of Washington School of Social Work Partners for Our Children.
    The intersection of parenting stress and maltreatment underscores the importance of understanding the factors associated with parenting stress among child welfare involved families. This study takes advantage of a statewide survey of child welfare involved families to examine parent and child characteristics and concrete resources, in relation to parenting stress. Separate multivariate analyses were conducted by placement status given the difference in day-to-day parenting responsibilities for families receiving in-home supervision compared to those whose children are in out-of-home care. Read More

    A national study of intimate partner violence risk among female caregivers involved in the child welfare system: The role of nativity, acculturation, and legal status.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2015 Jan;48:60-69
    Brown School Work, Washington University in St. Louis, Campus Box 1196, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130.
    Although intimate partner violence (IPV) is a well-known risk for child maltreatment, little is known if the prevalence of and risk factors for IPV differ among US-born and foreign-born families involved with Child Protective Services. Data came from a new cohort of the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being II (NSCAW II), a national probability study of children reported for child abuse and neglect. The study sample was restricted to female caregivers whose children remained in the home following an investigation (N=2,210). Read More

    Non-Parental Adults in the Social and Risk Behavior Networks of Sexual Minority Male Youth.
    Child Youth Serv Rev 2015 Aug;55:62-70
    Department of Medical Social Sciences, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, 625 N. Michigan Ave. Ste. 2700, Chicago, IL 60611, U.S.
    The presence of non-parental adults (NPAs), or adults outside of caregivers (e.g., extended family, natural mentors), in the lives of adolescents and emerging adults has received a rapidly expanding amount of empirical attention in the last decade. Read More

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