572 results match your criteria Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health [Journal]


The importance of social factors in the association between physical activity and depression in children.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 27;14:28. Epub 2020 Jun 27.

Department of Psychology, Yale University, 2 Hillhouse Avenue, New Haven, CT 06520 USA.

Background: Physical activity is associated with reduced depression in youth and adults. However, our understanding of how different aspects of youth activities-specifically, the degree to which they are social, team-oriented, and physical-relate to mental health in children is less clear.

Methods: Here we use a data-driven approach to characterize the degree to which physical and non-physical youth activities are social and team-oriented. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00335-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7321548PMC

Subjective well-being of left-behind children: a cross-sectional study in a rural area of eastern China.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 10;14:27. Epub 2020 Jun 10.

School of Public Health, Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou, 310053 China.

Purpose: Psychological well-beings of left-behind children (LBC) in rural areas of China remain under-studied. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to explore the subjective well-being (SWB) in LBC and its associated factors in a rural area in eastern China.

Methods: Stratified random cluster sampling was used to select middle school and high school students in Qingyuan County of Zhejiang Province. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00333-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7288409PMC

Health care professionals' perspectives on barriers to treatment seeking for formal health services among orphan children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS and mental distress in a rural district in central, Uganda.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 3;14:26. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

Background: Little/no research has been conducted in Uganda in particular and sub-Saharan Africa in general on the health professional's perspectives on barriers to treatment seeking for formal health services among orphan children and adolescents with a double burden of HIV/AIDS and mental distress.

Aim: To explore health professionals' perspectives on barriers to treatment seeking for formal health services among orphan children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS and mental distress in Masaka, Uganda.

Method: Qualitative research design using key informant interviews with health service managers and staff in agencies working with children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS in Masaka district, Uganda. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00332-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7271468PMC

Positive intervention for depression and teacher-student relationship in Iranian high school girl students with moderate/mild depression: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 3;14:25. Epub 2020 Jun 3.

Department of Education and Psychology, Faculty of Humanities, Yasouj University, Yasouj, Iran.

Background: Positive intervention (PI) is a modern and therapeutic approach broadly based on the principles of positive psychology (Rashid in J Posit Psychol 1:25-40, 2014). PI effects at schools have received little attention to date. However, since PI offers a focus on the positive aspects of human experience (Seligman and Csikszentmihalyi in Am Psychol 55:5-14, 2000), we hypothesized that it could exert positive changes in the teacher-student relationship (TSR) and depression symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00331-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7271528PMC

Comorbidity of disruptive behavior disorders and intermittent explosive disorder.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 28;14:24. Epub 2020 May 28.

Clinical Neuroscience and Psychotherapeutics Research Unit, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, 1670 Upham Drive, Columbus, OH USA.

Background: Aggressive behavior in children and adolescents may be accounted for by several disruptive behavioral disorders (DBD) including attention-deficit/hyperactive (ADHD), conduct (CD), and oppositional defiant (ODD), disorders and intermittent explosive disorder (IED). The comorbidity among the DBDs is well known, but not its comorbidity with IED.

Method: We reanalyzed data from the National Comorbidity Studies (adolescents and adults), and from a large clinical research adult sample, to estimate the comorbidity of IED with each of the DBDs and to explore correlates of these comorbidities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00330-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7257202PMC

Mental health in adolescents displaced by the armed conflict: findings from the Colombian national mental health survey.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 19;14:23. Epub 2020 May 19.

3Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Hospital Universitario San Ignacio, School of Medicine, Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Kra. 7 N. 40-62 2nd Floor, Bogotá, Colombia.

Background: Colombia has one of the largest populations of internally displaced individuals by an armed conflict. However, there is no data demonstrating its effect on health, particularly in adolescents.

Purpose: To describe the prevalence and associations of mental illness in the adolescent population displaced by violence in Colombia. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00327-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7236943PMC

Impact of child emotional and behavioural difficulties on educational outcomes of primary school children in Ethiopia: a population-based cohort study.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 16;14:22. Epub 2020 May 16.

1Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, College of Health Sciences, Addis Ababa University, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

Background: The relationship between child emotional and behavioural difficulties (EBD) and educational outcomes has not been investigated in prospective, community studies from low-income countries.

Methods: The association between child EBD symptoms and educational outcomes was examined in an ongoing cohort of 2090 mother-child dyads. Child EBD was measured when the mean age of children was 6. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00326-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7231403PMC

Integrating clinical and research training in child psychiatry: fifteen-year outcomes of a federally supported program.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 14;14:21. Epub 2020 May 14.

The Child Study Center, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, CT USA.

Background: The Albert J. Solnit Integrated Training Program (AJSP) is an educational initiative designed to prepare physician-scientists for independent careers in the investigation and treatment of childhood psychiatric disorders.

Methods: We compared fifteen cohorts (each representing a consecutive year of matriculation) of AJSP trainees and graduates (n = 30) to peers who were comparably ranked in our original match lists but ultimately pursued residency programs elsewhere (n = 60). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00328-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7227282PMC

Challenges and burden of the Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic for child and adolescent mental health: a narrative review to highlight clinical and research needs in the acute phase and the long return to normality.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 12;14:20. Epub 2020 May 12.

1Department for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychotherapy, University of Ulm, Steinhövelstr. 5, 89073 Ulm, Germany.

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is profoundly affecting life around the globe. Isolation, contact restrictions and economic shutdown impose a complete change to the psychosocial environment in affected countries. These measures have the potential to threaten the mental health of children and adolescents significantly. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00329-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7216870PMC

School refusal and bullying in children with autism spectrum disorder.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 7;14:17. Epub 2020 May 7.

1Department of Neuropsychiatry, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Toon, Ehime 791-0295 Japan.

Background: Few studies have explored school refusal in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), despite being considered a serious problem. One of the leading causes of school refusal is bullying, which is defined by the feelings of students who are bullied or not, and psychological suffering caused by a psychological or physical attack. This study investigated the characteristics of school refusal in children with ASD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00325-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7206817PMC

Child and adolescent mental health service provision and research during the Covid-19 pandemic: challenges, opportunities, and a call for submissions.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 11;14:19. Epub 2020 May 11.

1Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00324-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7213544PMC

An integrated approach to meet the needs of high-vulnerable families: a qualitative study on integrated care from a professional perspective.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 9;14:18. Epub 2020 May 9.

1Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Curium-Leiden University Medical Centre, Post Box 15, 2300 AA Leiden, The Netherlands.

Background: To meet the needs of high-vulnerable families with severe and enduring problems across several life domains, professionals must improve their ability to provide integrated care timely and adequately. The aim of this study was to identify facilitators and barriers professionals encounter when providing integrated care.

Methods: Experiences and perspectives of 24 professionals from integrated care teams in the Netherlands were gathered by conducting semi-structured interviews. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00321-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7211334PMC

Adolescents with full or subthreshold anorexia nervosa in a naturalistic sample: treatment interventions and patient satisfaction.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 2;14:16. Epub 2020 May 2.

1University Health Care Research Center, Faculty of Medicine and Health, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.

Background: Despite major research efforts, current recommendations of treatment interventions for adolescents with anorexia nervosa are scarce, and the importance of patient satisfaction for treatment outcome is yet to be established. The overall aim of the present study was to examine treatment interventions and patient satisfaction in a naturalistic sample of adolescents with anorexia nervosa or subthreshold anorexia nervosa and possible associations to outcome defined as being in remission or not at treatment follow-up.

Methods: Participants were identified through the Swedish national quality register for eating disorder treatment (SwEat). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00323-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7196214PMC

A 12-month follow-up of a transdiagnostic indicated prevention of internalizing symptoms in school-aged children: the results from the EMOTION study.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 22;14:15. Epub 2020 Apr 22.

1Department of Psychology, NTNU, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.

Background: Anxious and depressive symptoms in youth are highly prevalent, are often comorbid and have a high rate of relapse. Preventive interventions are promising, but follow-up results are lacking. The transdiagnostic EMOTION program is an indicated preventive cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention targeting children aged 8-12 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00322-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7178617PMC

Challenges in recruiting and retaining adolescents with abuse-related posttraumatic stress disorder: lessons learned from a randomized controlled trial.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 16;14:14. Epub 2020 Apr 16.

Department of Psychology, Catholic University Eichstaett-Ingolstadt, Ostenstrasse 25, 85071 Eichstaett, Germany.

Background: Research on effective recruitment and retention strategies for adolescents and young adults suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder is scarce. The aim of the current study was to provide data on recruitment sources, barriers, and facilitators for participation in a randomized controlled trial for young individuals with histories of sexual and/or physical abuse.

Methods: Study participants aged 14 to 21 were asked to complete a checklist on individual sources of recruitment, barriers, and facilitators for participation in the trial. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00320-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7164245PMC

Child and adolescent psychiatry training in Nepal: early career psychiatrists' perspective.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 6;14:13. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

1Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bengaluru, India.

Background: Nepal is a developing low-income country in Southeast Asia. There is a huge burden of child and adolescent mental health (CAMH) in Nepal which has a population of around 29 million and 40-50% of the population comprises of children and adolescents. Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) has not been formally recognized as a subspecialty in Nepal and there is no standardized curriculum for CAP training. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00319-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7137493PMC

Mental health problems and associated school interpersonal relationships among adolescents in China: a cross-sectional study.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 30;14:12. Epub 2020 Mar 30.

1Department of Child and Adolescent Health, School of Public Health, Medical College of Soochow University, No. 199 Ren Ai Road, Suzhou, 215123 Jiangsu People's Republic of China.

Background: During adolescence, middle school students facing psychophysical changes are vulnerable to psychological problems. The present study aimed to investigate mental health status and associated school interpersonal relationships among adolescents in China, which may help to inform effective prevention strategies to reduce the prevalence of mental health problems.

Methods: In the cross-sectional study, a total of 10,131 middle school students were selected from three cities in eastern China by stratified random sampling. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00318-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7106742PMC

Outcomes of reducing stigma towards alcohol misuse during adolescence: results of a randomized controlled trial of the MAKINGtheLINK intervention.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 21;14:11. Epub 2020 Mar 21.

1Turning Point, Eastern Health, 110 Church St, Richmond VIC, Richmond, VIC 3131 Australia.

Background: While it is well-recognized that the stigma associated with alcohol use problems can prevent or delay help-seeking, there is limited research examining stigmatising attitudes towards alcohol misuse, or their consequences, during adolescence. The current study examined the results of a school-based intervention on adolescents' stigmatising attitudes towards alcohol misuse among their peers, and how changes in attitudes influenced intentions to encourage help-seeking, as well as participants' personal use and misuse of alcohol.

Methods: Participants (n = 463) were a subset of a larger sample participating in a randomized controlled trial of the MAKINGtheLINK intervention. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00317-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7085161PMC

Medications for sleep disturbance in children and adolescents with depression: a survey of Canadian child and adolescent psychiatrists.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 10;14:10. Epub 2020 Mar 10.

Sleep Research Unit, The Royal's Institute of Mental Health Research, Ottawa, ON Canada.

Background: Primary care physicians and child and adolescent psychiatrists often treat sleep disturbances in children and adolescents with mood disorders using medications off-label, in the absence of clear evidence for efficacy, tolerability and short or long-term safety. This study is the first to report Canadian data about prescribing preferences and perceived effectiveness reported by child and adolescent psychiatrists regarding medications used to manage sleep disturbances in children and adolescents with depression.

Methods: Canadian child and adolescent psychiatrists were surveyed on their perception of effectiveness of a range of medications commonly prescribed for sleep disturbances, their ranked preferences for these medications, reasons for avoiding certain medications, and perceived side effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00316-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7063733PMC

Attributional and attentional bias in children with conduct problems and callous-unemotional traits: a case-control study.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 10;14. Epub 2020 Mar 10.

1Department of Special Needs Educational and Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Justus-Liebig-University of Giessen, Otto-Behaghel-Straße 10 C, 35394 Giessen, Germany.

Background: Children who are frequently aggressive or lack empathy show various deficits in their social information processing. Several findings suggest that children with conduct problems (CP) show a tendency to interpret ambiguous situations as hostile (hostile attribution bias) and have difficulties to disengage from negative stimuli (attentional bias). The role that additional callous-unemotional traits (CU-traits) play in these biases is yet unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00315-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7063755PMC

Adapting a family intervention to reduce risk factors for sexual exploitation.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 18;14. Epub 2020 Feb 18.

4College of Nursing, Department of Women, Children and Family Nursing, Rush University Medical Center, 600 S. Paulina St. Suite 1080, Chicago, IL 60612 USA.

Background: Sexually exploited youth are disconnected from societal tethers and need support systems, which makes them some of the most vulnerable of youth. This heightened level of vulnerability increases their risk for violence, abuse, ongoing sexual exploitation and all its sequelae. The purpose of this study was to examine an evidence-based intervention called STRIVE (support to reunite, involve and value each other) that has been a successful family re-engagement strategy with newly homeless youth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-00314-wDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7029494PMC
February 2020

Psychosocial stressors and protective factors for major depression in youth: evidence from a case-control study.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 8;14. Epub 2020 Feb 8.

1Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and Psychotherapy, University Hospital, LMU Munich, Waltherstr. 23, 80337 Munich, Germany.

Background: Severe adverse life events, such as traumatic experiences, are well-known stressors implicated in (youth) major depression (MD). However, to date, far less is known about the role of more common psychosocial stressors in the context of MD, which are part of everyday life during youth. In addition, it is not well-understood whether and how distinct stressors interact with protective factors in youths diagnosed with MD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-0312-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7007652PMC
February 2020

Serial measurement of mood via text messaging in young people.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 29;14. Epub 2020 Jan 29.

1University of Sydney School of Medicine, Sydney, Australia.

Background: To support longitudinal research into mood in adolescents we sought to assess the feasibility of collecting mood data via Short Message Service (SMS) over 3 years, and to investigate the relationship between SMS data and self-report measures of depression.

Methods: Prospective cohort study of young people aged 9 to 14 years at baseline. Participants completed Short Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (SMFQ) and the Youth Self Report Anxious/Depressed ((YSR)/AD) and Withdrawn/Depressed (YSR/WD) scales at baseline and annually for 3 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-0313-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6988358PMC
January 2020

Smartphone use disorder and future time perspective of college students: the mediating role of depression and moderating role of mindfulness.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 18;14. Epub 2020 Jan 18.

1Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health and Management, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 China.

Background: Smartphone use disorder (SUD) of college students has drawn increasing attention. Although future time perspective (FTP) may be an important protective factor for individual SUD, the moderating and mediating mechanisms underlying this relationship remain unknown. We tested the individual roles of depression and mindfulness as moderators of this relationship. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-0309-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6969420PMC
January 2020

User participation and shared decision-making in adolescent mental healthcare: a qualitative study of healthcare professionals' perspectives.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2020 18;14. Epub 2020 Jan 18.

3Department for Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Stavanger, Stavanger, Norway.

Background: Most mental health problems occur in adolescence. There is increasing recognition of user participation and shared decision-making in adolescents' mental healthcare. However, research in this field of clinical practice is still sparse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-020-0310-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6969458PMC
January 2020

Virtual reality exposure therapy for adolescents with fear of public speaking: a non-randomized feasibility and pilot study.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 27;13:47. Epub 2019 Dec 27.

1Division of Psychiatry, Haukeland University Hospital, Haukelandsbakken 15, 5009 Bergen, Norway.

Background: Public Speaking Anxiety (PSA) is a common anxiety with onset in adolescence and early adulthood. With the advent of consumer virtual reality (VR) technology, VR-delivered exposure therapy is now a scalable and practical treatment option and has previously been shown to be efficacious with adults. In this non-randomized feasibility and pilot trial, we explore the effect of one-session (90 min) VR-delivered exposure therapy for adolescents (aged 13-16) with PSA. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0307-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6933883PMC
December 2019

Looking into the crystal ball: quality of life, delinquency, and problems experienced by young male adults after discharge from a secure residential care setting in the Netherlands.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 18;13:45. Epub 2019 Nov 18.

GGzE Centre for Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, PO BOX 909 (DP 8001), 5600 AX Eindhoven, The Netherlands.

Background: Adolescents in residential care are a vulnerable population with many problems in several life areas. For most of these adolescents, these problems persist after discharge and into adulthood. Since an accumulation of risk factors in multiple domains increases the likelihood of future adverse outcomes, it would be valuable to investigate whether there are differences in life after residential care between subgroups based on multiple co-occurring risk factors. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0305-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6859618PMC
November 2019

Measuring children's emotional and behavioural problems: are SDQ parent reports from native and immigrant parents comparable?

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 28;13:46. Epub 2019 Nov 28.

Institut für Psychologie, Stiftung Universität Hildesheim, Universitätsplatz 1, 31141 Hildesheim, Germany.

Background: The number of immigrants worldwide is growing and migration might be a risk factor for the mental health of children. A reliable instrument is needed to measure immigrants' childrens mental health. The aim of the study was to test the measurement invariance of the parent version of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) between German native, Turkish origin and Russian origin immigrant parents in Germany. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0306-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6882192PMC
November 2019

Developing the universal unified prevention program for diverse disorders for school-aged children.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 13;13:44. Epub 2019 Nov 13.

4Department of Preventive Intervention for Psychiatric Disorders, National Institute of Mental Health, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry, 4-1-1, Ogawa Higasahi-cho, Kodaira, Tokyo 187-8553 Japan.

Background: Psychological problems during childhood and adolescence are highly prevalent, frequently comorbid, and incur severe social burden. A school-based universal prevention approach is one avenue to address these issues.

Objective: The first aim of this study was the development of a novel, transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioral universal prevention program: The Universal Unified Prevention Program for Diverse Disorders (Up2-D2). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0303-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6852986PMC
November 2019

Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder among targets of school bullying.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 9;13:43. Epub 2019 Nov 9.

2Center for Psychosocial Medicine, Department of Child and Adolescents Psychiatry, Section for Translational Psychobiology in Child and Adolescent, University Hospital Heidelberg, Blumenstraße 8, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany.

Background: The aim of this study was to investigate whether bullying among students is associated with symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and whether associations are comparable to other traumatic events leading to PTSD.

Methods: Data were collected from 219 German children and adolescents: 150 students from grade six to ten and 69 patients from an outpatient clinic for PTSD as a comparison group. Symptoms of PTSD were assessed using the Children's Revised Impact of Event Scale (CRIES) and the Posttraumatic Symptom Scale (PTSS-10). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0304-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6842197PMC
November 2019

Reduced caregiving quality measured during the strange situation procedure increases child's autonomic nervous system stress response.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 31;13:41. Epub 2019 Oct 31.

2Department of Psychosomatic Medicine and Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Ulm, Ulm, Germany.

Background: Dysfunctional maternal behavior has been shown to lead to disturbances in infant's regulatory capacities and alterations in vagal reactivity. We aim to investigate the autonomic nervous system (ANS) response of the child during the strange situation procedure (SSP) in relation to the quality of maternal behavior.

Methods: Twelve month after birth, 163 mother-child-dyads were investigated during the SSP. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0302-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6824052PMC
October 2019

A pilot and feasibility study of a cognitive behavioural therapy-based anxiety prevention programme for junior high school students in Japan: a quasi-experimental study.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 31;13:40. Epub 2019 Oct 31.

1United Graduate School of Child Development, Osaka University, Kanazawa University, Hamamatsu University School of Medicine, Chiba University and University of Fukui, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka, 565-0871 Japan.

Background: There is a good deal of evidence that cognitive behavioural therapy is effective for children and adolescents with anxiety-related problems. In Japan, an anxiety prevention programme based on cognitive behavioural therapy called 'Journey of the Brave' has been developed, and it has been demonstrated to be effective for elementary school students (aged 10-11 years). The purpose of this study was to have classroom teachers deliver the programme to junior high school students (aged 12-13 years) and to test the feasibility and efficacy of the programme in this setting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0300-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6824127PMC
October 2019

Mental health and risk behaviors of children in rural China with different patterns of parental migration: a cross-sectional study.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 22;13:39. Epub 2019 Oct 22.

1The Institute of Social and Family Medicine, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang People's Republic of China.

Background: One in seven members of China's population are migrants. There are an estimated 41 million children left behind in rural areas who are living without one or both of their parents. The impact of two- and single-parent migration on child mental health and risk behaviors is unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0298-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6805552PMC
October 2019

Executive functioning and neurodevelopmental disorders in early childhood: a prospective population-based study.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 22;13:38. Epub 2019 Oct 22.

1Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychology, Erasmus MC-University Medical Center-Sophia Children's Hospital, Wytemaweg 80, 3000 CA Rotterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: Executive functioning deficits are common in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. However, prior research mainly focused on clinical populations employing cross-sectional designs, impeding conclusions on temporal neurodevelopmental pathways. Here, we examined the prospective association of executive functioning with subsequent autism spectrum disorder (ASD) traits and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) traits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0299-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6805591PMC
October 2019

Social anxiety disorder and emotion regulation problems in adolescents.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 30;13:37. Epub 2019 Sep 30.

3Outpatient Clinic of Transcultural Psychiatry and Migration Induced Disorders in Childhood and Adolescence, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria.

Background: Social anxiety disorder (SAD) in adolescents may be associated with the use of maladaptive emotion regulation (ER) strategies. The present study examined the use of maladaptive and adaptive ER strategies in adolescents with SAD.

Methods: 30 adolescents with SAD (CLIN) and 36 healthy adolescents for the control group (CON) aged between 11 and 16 years were assessed with the standardized questionnaires PHOKI () for self-reported fears as well as FEEL-KJ () for different emotion regulation strategies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0297-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6771087PMC
September 2019
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Omega-3 fatty acids for the treatment of depressive disorders in children and adolescents: a meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 14;13:36. Epub 2019 Sep 14.

2Department of Psychiatry, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Yixueyuan Road, Yuzhong District, Chongqing, 400016 People's Republic of China.

Background: To investigate the efficacy and safety of omega-3 fatty acids (O3FA) in treating depressive disorders in children and adolescents.

Method: We conducted a comprehensive search in electronic databases and hand-searched articles included for relevant studies. We included randomized controlled trials which studied on O3FA for treatment of children and adolescents with depression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0296-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6744624PMC
September 2019
1 Read

Mental health problems of children and adolescents, with and without migration background, living in Vienna, Austria.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 10;13:35. Epub 2019 Sep 10.

3Outpatient Clinic of Transcultural Psychiatry and Migration-Induced Disorders in Childhood and Adolescence, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria.

Background: Compared to their indigenous peers, migrant children and adolescents are at increased risk for mental health problems. The aim of our study was to compare psychological disorders of children and adolescents with Turkish migration background and their native Austrian peers.

Methods: We analysed 302 children and adolescents aged between 7 and 18 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0295-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6737609PMC
September 2019
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Come together: case specific cross-institutional cooperation of youth welfare services and child and adolescent psychiatry.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 29;13:34. Epub 2019 Aug 29.

1Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus, TU Dresden, Fetscherstraße 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany.

Background: Due to the increasing rate of children and families who require support from both youth welfare services and from mental health services, a solid cross-institutional cooperation is needed to provide coordinated and integrated help. Studies involving not only qualitative, but also quantitative information from both services regarding not only general, but also case specific views on cross-institutional cooperation and psychosocial needs are lacking.

Methods: Hence, we collected data from  = 96 children and families who received support from youth welfare office (YWO) and child and adolescents psychiatry (CAP) simultaneously. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0294-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6716872PMC

Cannabis and amphetamine use and its psychosocial correlates among school-going adolescents in Ghana.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 29;13:33. Epub 2019 Aug 29.

1Department of Psychology, University of Ghana, P. O. Box LG 84, Legon, Accra, Ghana.

Background: The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence of cannabis and amphetamine use and to determine its associated factors among school-going adolescents in Ghana.

Method: The 2012 Ghanaian Global School-based Student Health Survey on 3632 adolescents aged 11-19 years ( = 15.1 years;  = 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0293-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6716856PMC

Online sexual abuse of adolescents by a perpetrator met online: a cross-sectional study.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 24;13:32. Epub 2019 Aug 24.

1Barnafrid, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Linköping University, 581 83 Linköping, Sweden.

Background: The current study aimed at exploring adolescents' experiences of online sexual contacts leading to online sexual abuse by a perpetrator whom the victim had first met online. Associations with socio demographic background, experience of abuse, relation to parents, health and risk behaviors were studied.

Methods: The participants were a representative national sample of 5175 students in the third year of the Swedish high school Swedish (M age = 17. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0292-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6708231PMC

Goal setting improves retention in youth mental health: a cross-sectional analysis.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 9;13:31. Epub 2019 Jul 9.

5Australian Centre for Health Services Innovation, School of Public Health and Social Work and Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia.

Background: This study explored if a youth-specific mental health service routinely set goals with young people during initial intake/assessment and if goal setting and goal quality in this service was associated with patient retention.

Methods: Consecutive initial assessments (n = 283) and administrative service data from two youth-specific health services in Australia were audited for evidence of goal setting, content and quality of the goal and number of therapy services provided after the intake/assessment process. Logistic regression was used to determine if goal setting was associated with disengagement after the assessment session, controlling for drug use, unemployment, age, gender, mental health diagnosis and service site. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0288-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6615268PMC

International findings with the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA): applications to clinical services, research, and training.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 5;13:30. Epub 2019 Jul 5.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont, 1 South Prospect Street, Burlington, VT 05401 USA.

The purpose of this invited article is to present multicultural norms and related international findings obtained with the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA) by indigenous researchers in over 50 societies. The article describes ASEBA instruments for which multicultural norms are available, plus procedures for constructing the multicultural norms. It presents applications to clinical services, including use of multi-informant data for assessing children and their parents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0291-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6610912PMC
July 2019
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Reduced prefrontal hemodynamic response in pediatric autism spectrum disorder measured with near-infrared spectroscopy.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 28;13:29. Epub 2019 Jun 28.

2Department of Psychiatry, Nara Medical University, 840 Shijyo-cho, Kashihara, Nara 634-8522 Japan.

Background: Functional neuroimaging studies suggest that prefrontal cortex dysfunction is present in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Near-infrared spectroscopy is a noninvasive optical tool for examining oxygenation and hemodynamic changes in the cerebral cortex by measuring changes in oxygenated hemoglobin.

Methods: Twelve drug-naïve male participants, aged 7-15 years and diagnosed with ASD according to DSM-5 criteria, and 12 age- and intelligence quotient (IQ)-matched healthy control males participated in the present study after giving informed consent. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0289-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6599245PMC
June 2019
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The effects of comorbid Tourette symptoms on distress caused by compulsive-like behavior in very young children: a cross-sectional study.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 28;13:28. Epub 2019 Jun 28.

3Department of Child Neuropsychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo, 113-8655 Japan.

Background: Many children 4 to 6 years old exhibit compulsive-like behavior, often with comorbid Tourette symptoms, making this age group critical for investigating the effects of having comorbid Tourette symptoms with compulsive-like behavior. However, these effects have not yet been elucidated: it is unclear whether having comorbid tics with compulsive-like behavior leads to lower quality of life. This cross-sectional study aims to investigate the effect of comorbid Tourette symptoms on distress caused by compulsive-like behavior in very young children. Read More

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https://capmh.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13034-019-
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0290-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6599284PMC
June 2019
2 Reads

The Sävsjö-school-project: a cluster-randomized trial aimed at improving the literacy of beginners-achievements, mental health, school satisfaction and reading capacity at the end of grade three using an alternative school curriculum.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 24;13:27. Epub 2019 Jun 24.

2Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institutet, 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: A curriculum was planned using modern concepts based on the "old" principles to test if such an educational intervention provided pupils with good mental health and a solid basis for good reading and writing skills, as well as generated a positive attitude to learn. These "old" principles were based on previous knowledge derived from school psychiatry (which in Sweden was a branch of child and adolescent psychiatry 1915-1970), educational psychology and the educational approach from the differentiating Swedish School system of 1946-1970 (itself based on the principles of curative education "Heilpädagogie", which was later renamed mental health care).

Methods: All six available schools in the small Swedish city of Sävsjö participated in the study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0285-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6591978PMC
June 2019
2 Reads

Parental military deployment as risk factor for children's mental health: a meta-analytical review.

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 21;13:26. Epub 2019 Jun 21.

1Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry/Psychotherapy, University Hospital of Ulm, Steinhövelstr. 5, 89075 Ulm, Germany.

There is evidence that military service increases the risk of psychosocial burden for not only service members but also their spouses and children. This meta-analysis aimed to systematically assess the association between military deployment of (at least one) parent and impact on children's mental health. For this meta-analytic review, publications were systematically searched and assessed for eligibility based on predefined inclusion criteria (studies between 2001 until 2017 involving children with at least one parent working in military services). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0287-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6587296PMC
June 2019
5 Reads

Psychometric evaluation of a parent-rating and self-rating inventory for pediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: German OCD Inventory for Children and Adolescents (OCD-CA).

Child Adolesc Psychiatry Ment Health 2019 18;13:25. Epub 2019 Jun 18.

1School of Child and Adolescent Cognitive Behavior Therapy at the University Hospital Cologne, Pohligstr. 9, 50969 Cologne, Germany.

Background: This study assesses the psychometric properties of the German version of the Padua Inventory-Washington State University Revision for measuring pediatric OCD.

Methods: The parent-rating and self-rating inventory is assessed in a clinical sample (CLIN: n = 342, age range = 6-18 years) comprising an OCD subsample (OCDS: n = 181) and a non-OCD clinical subsample (non-OCD: n = 161), and in a community sample (COS: n = 367, age range = 11-18 years).

Results: An exploratory factor analysis yielded a four-factor solution: (1) Contamination & Washing, (2) Catastrophes & Injuries, (3) Checking, and (4) Ordering & Repeating. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13034-019-0286-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6582526PMC
June 2019
2 Reads