1,606 results match your criteria Child Welfare[Journal]


A Longitudinal Examination of Service Utilization and Trauma Symptoms among Young Women with Prior Foster Care and Juvenile Justice System Involvement.

Child Welfare 2019 ;97(5-6):199-215

University of Oregon.

We investigated the prediction of young adult service utilization and trauma symptoms from adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and adolescent mental health symptoms in young women with dual child welfare and juvenile justice system involvement. A sample of 166 females (ages 13 to 17) was followed to examine the transition to young adulthood. Path models indicated that more ACEs were associated with poorer adolescent mental health. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7167304PMC
January 2019

Developing Relationship-Building Tools for Foster Families Caring for Teens who are LGBTQ2S.

Child Welfare 2018 ;96(2):75-97

University of Washington.

Youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer/questioning, and two-spirit (LGBTQ2S) are disproportionally represented in the foster care population and often face discrimination within the system. This article summarizes findings from focus groups with youth in care who are LGBTQ2S, foster caregivers, and child welfare workers to explore (a) the unique challenges and support-related needs of youth in care who are LGBTQ2S and their foster caregivers, and (b) strategies for building better relationships between these youth and caregivers. Findings can be used to improve youth placement stability. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5978427PMC
January 2019
22 Reads

Health and Well-Being of Children in Kinship Care: Findings from the National Survey of Children in Nonparental Care.

Child Welfare 2017 ;95(3):41-60

Society for Research in Child Development Fellow, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Washington, DC 20201, (202)260-5863.

This study uses nationally representative survey data to describe differences in characteristics, adverse family experiences, and child well-being among children in kinship care with varying levels of involvement with the child welfare system. Well-being is examined in the domains of physical and mental health, education, and permanency. Comparisons provide insight on kinship care arrangements inside and outside the child welfare system, as well as the variability among nonfoster kinship care arrangements. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5798622PMC
July 2018
8 Reads

Prevalence of Chronic Illness among Youth with DSM-IV-TR Axis I Diagnoses at a Large Mental Health Agency in Northeast Ohio.

Child Welfare 2017 ;95(5):79-95

Case Western Reserve University.

This descriptive study examines the prevalence of comorbid physical and mental health issues among young clients at a large mental health agency. Health status data was collected from the intake process of youth seeking mental health services at a Northeast Ohio agency ( = 1,076). The results show a higher prevalence of asthma and obesity among clients with known mental health diagnoses at this agency compared to national averages. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6103528PMC
January 2017
2 Reads

New Approaches for Working with Children and Families Involved in Family Treatment Drug Courts: Findings from the Children Affected by Methamphetamine Program.

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(4):205-32

This is a descriptive study of the Children Affected by Methamphetamine (CAM) grant program, a federally funded effort to improve outcomes through the addition of targeted interventions for 1,940 families, including 2,596 adults and 4,245 children involved in 12 diverse Family Treatment Drug Courts (FTDCs) located across six U.S. states. Read More

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March 2016
3 Reads

Rethinking Child Welfare to Keep Families Safe and Together: Effective Housing-Based Supports to Reduce Child Trauma, Maltreatment Recidivism, and Re-Entry to Foster Care.

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(4):185-204

Large numbers of children who are placed in child protective custody have parents with a substance use disorder. This placement occurs despite evidence that the trauma of removal is associated with poor long-term child outcomes. This article describes a collaborative model of a continuum of housing-based clinical and support services for the whole family that has safely reduced foster care placement. Read More

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Family-Based Recovery: An Innovative In-Home Substance Abuse Treatment Model for Families with Young Children.

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(4):161-83

Family-based in-home treatment can effectively meet the needs of mothers and fathers struggling with the dual challenges of substance abuse recovery and parenting infants and toddlers. This article describes one such program, Family-Based Recovery (FBR), which integrates substance abuse treatment for parents and infant mental health intervention with the goal of preventing child maltreatment and family disruption. Program design, implementation, and results are provided. Read More

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March 2016
59 Reads

Effects of a Rural Family Drug Treatment Court Collaborative on Child Welfare Outcomes: Comparison Using Propensity Score Analysis.

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(4):139-59

Previous studies that have examined the impact of family drug treatment courts (FDTCs) on child welfare outcomes have produced mixed results. This study evaluates the impact of a rural, FDTC collaborative on child welfare outcomes using propensity score analysis. Findings from the study show that children in the treatment group had longer stays in child welfare custody but were substantially less likely to experience future incidents of maltreatment than those in families with parental substance use disorders without these services. Read More

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March 2016
4 Reads

Sobriety Treatment and Recovery Teams in Rural Appalachia: Implementation and Outcomes.

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(4):119-38

The Sobriety Treatment and Recovery Teams (START) model is designed for families with co-occurring substance use and child maltreatment. This study describes the implementation and outcomes of START in a rural Appalachian county with high rates of poverty, non-medical prescription drug use, and child maltreatment. Despite a severely limited addiction treatment infrastructure at baseline, children served by START were less likely to experience recurrence of child abuse or neglect within 6 months or re-enter foster care at 12 months compared with a matched control group. Read More

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March 2016
4 Reads

Practice-Informed Approaches to Addressing Substance Abuse and Trauma Exposure in Urban Native Families Involved with Child Welfare.

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(4):97-117

Similar to families from other groups, urban-based American Indian and Alaska Native ("Native") family members involved with the child welfare system due to substance abuse issues are also often challenged by untreated trauma exposure. The link between these conditions and the history of genocidal policies aimed at destroying Native family ties, as well as experiences of ongoing discrimination, bring added dimensions for consideration when pro- viding services to these families. Practice-based evidence indicates that the trauma-informed and culturally responsive model developed by the Denver Indian Family Resource Center (DIFRC) shows promise in reducing out-of-home placements and re-referrals in urban Native families with substance abuse and child welfare concerns, while also increasing caregiver capabilities, family safety, and child well-being. Read More

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March 2016
2 Reads

Co-Occurrence of Parental Substance Abuse and Child Serious Emotional Disturbance: Understanding Multiple Pathways to Improve Child and Family Outcomes.

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(4):71-96

This study is a mixed-methods examination of the prevalence and impact of parental substance abuse among families involved in foster care who have a child with a serious emotional disturbance. Data utilized for this study were both administrative and assessment data collected by case managers and parents as part of a federally funded demonstration project in a Midwestern state. At baseline, parent self-report and case manager ratings of family functioning found that parents affected by substance abuse fared worse in domains related to socioeconomics, parental trauma, parental mental health, and social supports when compared to families without parental substance abuse. Read More

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March 2016
161 Reads

Mental Health Disorders among Children within Child Welfare who have Prenatal Substance Exposure: Rural vs. Urban Populations.

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(4):53-70

This study analyzed differences in mental health diagnoses among Illinois child welfare-involved youth who have had prenatal substance exposure. Results indicate that youth from the rural area had a significantly higher rate of co-occurring mental health disorders. A multiple regression analysis revealed five significant predictors: living in a rural area, a history of neglect, having Fetal Alcohol Syndrome or an alcohol-related neurodevelopmental disorder, and age. Read More

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March 2016
33 Reads

How Many Families in Child Welfare Services Are Affected by Parental Substance Use Disorders? A Common Question that Remains Unanswered.

Authors:
Kristen Seay

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(4):19-51

Associated with extensive negative outcomes for children, parental substance use disorders are a major concern within the child welfare system. Obtaining actual prevalence rate data has been difficult, however, and there are no recent published reports on this issue. Using a systematic search, this paper examines: (1) Prevalence estimates of parental substance use disorders in the child welfare population; (2) the types of child welfare involvement for reported prevalence estimates; and (3) how prevalence information is being collected. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4894838PMC
March 2016
1 Read

Special Foreword: Substance Use and Child Welfare (First Issue).

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(4):11-8

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March 2016
1 Read

Substance Use and Child Welfare.

Authors:
Gerald P Mallon

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(4)

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March 2016
1 Read

A Note on Substance Use Disorder Terminology.

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Child Welfare 2015 ;94(4):6-7

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March 2016
1 Read

Effects of Intensive Family Preservation Services in Rural Tennessee on Parental Hopefulness with Families Affected by Substance Use.

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(5):187-200

This article describes how Building Strong Families in Rural Tennessee (BS-FinRT) increased hopefulness and helped to promote the policy goal of developing a recovery focus among families with vulnerabilities. These outcomes were achieved by implementing collaborative strategies for addressing issues of child safety, substance use, and family stability. Early analyses of the program's outcomes indicated an unexpected positive influence on parent and child hopefulness. Read More

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March 2016
3 Reads

An Integrated Intervention to Address the Comorbid Needs of Families Referred to Child Welfare for Substance Use Disorders and Child Neglect: FAIR Pilot Outcomes.

Authors:
Lisa Saldana

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(5):167-86

Despite repeated calls for evidence-based practice to address the co-occurring needs of families referred to the child welfare system for parental substance use disorders and child neglect, limited attention has been given to the rigorous evaluation of such interventions. This paper describes the initial testing of an intervention developed to meet the complex needs of such families. The Families Actively Improving Relationships (FAIR) program and preliminary outcomes are described. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5415408PMC
March 2016
1 Read

Peer Mentoring in Child Welfare: A Motivational Framework.

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(5):125-44

Peer mentoring interventions for parents with substance use disorders who are involved with the child welfare system are relatively new, complex, individualized interventions and thus need to be understood both in regard to program efficacy and the processes of how they work. This qualitative study of the experiences of parents involved in a parent mentoring program suggested that certain practices helped motivate parents to think and act in ways that supported their goals and child welfare case plans. The three key mentoring practices that emerged were building caring relationships, providing guidance, and putting parents in charge. Read More

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March 2016
2 Reads

Making It Work Without a Family Drug Court: Connecticut's Approach to Parental Substance Abuse in the Child Welfare System.

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(5):107-23

Parental substance abuse presents, complex challenges for the child welfare system and courts. This article describes the State of Connecticut's experience implementing the Recovery Specialist Voluntary Program (RSVP), a recovery support program designed to confront the problem of parental substance abuse within the child welfare system without, a family drug court. The state-level collaboration efforts, system changes, factors affecting development and implementation of RSVP, program participants, and preliminary outcomes are described. Read More

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March 2016
4 Reads

Changes in Adult, Child, and Family Functioning among Participants in a Family Treatment Drug Court.

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(5):89-106

Behavioral changes for 76 adults and 115 children from 62 families participating in a Family Treatment Drug Court (FTDC), in either residential or outpatient settings, were studied. Improvements in psychosocial functioning were calculated using a reliable change index (RCI) for family, adult, and child measures. Among outcomes, significant improvements in family functioning were noted and associated with improvements in child development and the likelihood of reunification. Read More

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March 2016
3 Reads

Examining the Relationships between Family Drug Court Program Compliance and Child Welfare Outcomes.

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(5):67-87

Although the evidence is accumulating to substantiate the successes of Family Drug Courts (FDC), there is little research on the relationship between parent compliance and successful reunification of children with their parent(s). This study looked at data from 206 families participating in a FDC in Sacramento County, California. Four compliance measures were examined individually and collectively, after controlling for participant characteristics, using logistic regression models to determine how FDC participation benchmarks impact child reunification. Read More

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March 2016
3 Reads

Predictors of Substance Abuse Assessment and Treatment Completion for Parents Involved with Child Welfare: One State's Experience in Matching across Systems.

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(5):45-66

To date, few studies have examined the effect of interagency collaboration on substance abuse assessment ity of Southern California and treatment completion for parents who are involved in child welfare. The purpose of this paper is to: (1) describe a statewide, interagency collaborative program aimed at providing targeted substance abuse assessment and treatment to parents engaged in the child welfare system; (2) document the specialized assessment and treatment outcomes for parents engaged through this collaborative program; and (3) determine factors related to successful treatment completion for parents involved in the child welfare system. This is a retrospective study of an open cohort of 13,829 individuals admitted to the New Jersey Child Protection Substance Abuse Initiative (CPSAI) program from October 1, 2009, through September 30, 2010. Read More

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March 2016
4 Reads

Promising Results for Cross-Systems Collaborative Efforts to Meet the Needs of Families Impacted by Substance Use.

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(5):21-43

This study is based on data regarding more than 15,000 families served by 53 federal grantees showing that child safety and permanency, parental recovery, and family well-being improve when agencies work together to address the complex needs of families at the intersection of substance abuse treatment and child welfare. Strategies summarized here offer promising collaborative approaches to mitigate the negative outcomes too often experienced by families impacted by substance use disorders. Read More

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March 2016
4 Reads

Special Foreword: Substance Use and Child Welfare (Second Issue).

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(5):11-9

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Substance Use and Child Welfare.

Authors:
Gerald P Mallon

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(5)

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March 2016
1 Read

A Note on Substance Use Disorder Terminology.

Authors:

Child Welfare 2015 ;94(5):6-7

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March 2016
2 Reads

Family Stability and Child Welfare Involvement among Families Served in Permanent Supportive Housing.

Child Welfare 2015;94(1):189-208

This article examines the effectiveness of supportive housing in fostering family preservation and reunification for homeless families with multiple housing barriers. Results indicate that more thanhalfofthe supportive housing program families who are separated from their families by Child Protective Services prior to entering the program are reunified during the 12-month period after entering housing. The rate of reunification for supportive housing families is significantly higher than the rate for matched families who enter shelters, but not significantly different than the rate experienced by matched families entering public housing. Read More

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March 2018
2 Reads

The Family Unification Program: A Randomized-Controlled Trial of Housing Stability.

Child Welfare 2015;94(1):167-187

The study tests the short-term impact on housing stability of the Family Unification Program (FUP), a permanent housing program for child welfare- involved families at risk of separation from children due to inadequate housing. Families eligible for FUP (n = 150) received housing case management services as usual, and half were referred for permanent housing vouchers made available through FUP. Families referred for FUP secured more enriched home learning environments, while more precariously housed families exhibited greater housing, stability when referred for FUP. Read More

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March 2018
2 Reads

Integrated Solutions for Intertwined Challenges: A Statewide Collaboration in Supportive Housing for Child Welfare-Involved Families.

Child Welfare 2015;94(1):141-165

This paper describes Connecticut's Supportive Housing for Families (SHF) program, which is one of five national sites comprising a federally- funded demonstration of housing and child welfare. Evaluations of supportive housing (SH) interventions are complicated by contextual factors that make it difficult to isolate their effects. 'Ihese and other challenges complicate efforts to conduct rigorous research and establish external validity, and to date, few studies examine the impact of SH interventions for child- welfare involved families. Read More

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March 2018
3 Reads

Housing Matters for Families: Promising Practices from Child Welfare Agencies.

Child Welfare 2015;94(1):123-140

There is growing acknowledgement that housing can provide more than shelter, a basic need. Housing can also act as a foundation, helping families stay together.The provision of housing as a prevention or protective strategy against child maltreatment has not been widely used by child welfare agencies. Read More

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March 2018
1 Read

Physically Hazardous Housing and Risk for Child Protective Services Involvement.

Child Welfare 2015;94(1):87-104

The quality and safety of the home environment is a common focus of Child Protective Services (CPS) investigations.Yet little is known about whether such conditions influence CPS outcomes. The present study uses a sample of low-income families to assess the relative importance of housing conditions and other common risk and protective factors associated with child maltreatment. Read More

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March 2018
1 Read

Partnering to Leverage Multiple Data Sources: Preliminary Findings from a Supportive Housing Impact Study.

Child Welfare 2015;94(1):73-85

This article presents preliminary findings from an impact study that drew upon administrative data collected by city agencies and data collected by a supportive housing program for young adults who are aging out of foster care, homeless, or at risk of homelessness. Participation in the program was associated with a reduction in shelter use and jail stays during the two years after program entry. The study demonstrates the benefits of collaboration and the possibilities of using administrative data from multiple public agencies to evaluate program impacts on young adult outcomes. Read More

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March 2018
2 Reads

Economic Well-Being and Independent Living in FosterYouth: Paving the Road to Effective Transitioning out of Care.

Child Welfare 2015;94(1):53-71

Using a mixed-methods methodological approach, the proposed study examines the associations between economic well-being and independent living experiences in foster youth. Quantitative data were collected from N = 294 in-care foster youth using the Casey Life Skills assessment (α = .79 to α = . Read More

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Housing Trajectories for Youth Transitioning from Foster Care: Gender Differences from 2010-2014.

Child Welfare 2015;94(1):35-52

This study focuses on longitudinal housing trends for males and females among transitional youth who were participants of a transitional living program (2010 to 2014). Results indicate that young women were more likely to transition to secure independent housing than young men. Demographic characteristics, education, and employment predicted time to secure independent housing. Read More

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Factors Influencing Risk of Homelessness among Youth in Transition from Foster Care in Oklahoma: Implications for Reforming Independent Living Services and Opportunities.

Child Welfare 2015;94(1):19-34

Research suggests that youth aging out of foster care may be at higher risk of experiencing homelessness than other youth. Among this already at-risk population there may be certain characteristics that further exacerbate the risk. This paper uses data collected from various local and state agencies to further examine significant predictors of homelessness among youth who have aged out of foster care. Read More

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March 2018
3 Reads

Poverty, Homelessness, and Family Break-Up.

Child Welfare 2015;94(1):105-122

Vanderbilt University.

This study examines the extent and correlates of family separations in families experiencing homelessness. Of 2,307 parents recruited in family shelters across 12 sites, a tenth were separated from partners and a quarter from one or more children. Additional separations before and after shelter entry and reasons, from parents' perspectives, were documented in qualitative interviews with a subsample of 80 parents. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5760188PMC
March 2018
3 Reads

Efficacy of Blended Preservice Training for Resource Parents.

Child Welfare 2014 Nov-Dec;93(6):45-72

Institute for Human Services, Columbus, Ohio.

To evaluate a new way of meeting the growing demand for training prospective resource parents, our study compared the efficacy of a blended online and in-person approach with a traditional classroom-only approach. Findings based on a sample of 111 resource parent prospects showed significantly greater gains in knowledge from pre- to posttest for the blended approach over the classroom-only approach. The blended approach also produced dramatically lower dropout rates during preservice training. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5471628PMC
June 2017
10 Reads

Evaluation of Smoke-free Foster Care Education for Foster and Adoptive Caregivers.

Child Welfare 2014 ;93(5):105-116

Only half of the states in the U.S. mandate that foster homes have a smoking ban. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5727377PMC
January 2014
4 Reads

Differential effects of single and double parental death on child emotional functioning and daily life in South Africa.

Child Welfare 2014 ;93(1):149-72

There is a high level of orphaning in Africa due to war, violence, and more recently HIV and AIDS. This study examines parental death in South African children and examines the differential impact on child functioning of double, single and non-orphanhoods. Bereavement, depression, behavior problems, and violence were examined in a consecutive sample of 381 children/adolescents (51. Read More

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June 2015
22 Reads

Risk of early sexual initiation and pregnancy among youth reported to the child welfare system.

Child Welfare 2014 ;93(1):127-47

This study found that youth involved with the child welfare system have high rates of sexual risk behaviors and outcomes, including forced sex, early age at first sex, low contraceptive use, and pregnancy, which are more than double those of adolescents from the general population. Caseworkers may need training in how to address sexual risk factors and may need to support caregivers in addressing these issues with their children. Findings highlight the importance for case-workers, caregivers, and others to address the sexual and reproductive health needs of maltreated youth. Read More

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June 2015
27 Reads

Former foster youth's perspectives on independent living preparation six months after discharge.

Authors:
Loring P Jones

Child Welfare 2014 ;93(1):99-126

Research findings have developed a troubling narrative of youth leaving foster care. Congress attempted to address the post-discharge difficulties of foster youth by passing the Independent Living Initiative in 1986, which mandated that the states develop services that would prepare youth for life after foster care. However, it is unclear what effect these programs have on post-foster care trajectories. Read More

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June 2015
3 Reads

Child maltreatment entrenched by poverty: how financial need is linked to poorer outcomes in family preservation.

Child Welfare 2014 ;93(1):79-98

This cross-sectional secondary data analysis examined the ecological factors influencing the outcomes of families receiving services from a local department of social services to address child maltreatment risk and incidence. The results indicated that families that experienced repeated maltreatment also experienced greater poverty and material need than families with more successful outcomes. This study highlights the responsibility of the child welfare system to address deep-seated poverty issues of families experiencing child maltreatment risk and incidence. Read More

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June 2015
1 Read

The Scottish children's panels as a catalyst for civic engagement and child well-being.

Authors:
Anne S Robertson

Child Welfare 2014 ;93(1):59-77

Scotland's child welfare system has developed as hybrid of both residual and universal approaches and incorporates local involvement through trained volunteers participating in children's panels and community-based interventions. Furthermore, Scotland's move toward independence from the United Kingdom, called devolution in Scotland, has resulted in a resurgence of new recommendations focused on child well-being from birth through adolescence for all Scottish children. This article will explore policy development of Scotland's unique child welfare approach through the children's panels and the commitment to civic participation. Read More

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June 2015
4 Reads

Mental health care of families affected by the child welfare system.

Authors:
Manny J Gonzalez

Child Welfare 2014 ;93(1):7-57

The primary aim of this paper is to introduce practitioners to the mental health needs of children and families who are under the care and supervision of the child welfare system because of substantiated child maltreatment. Emphasis is placed on children and families who are receiving foster care services. The paper draws attention to the most prevalent mental health conditions that affect foster care children and their families based on type of maltreatment. Read More

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June 2015
3 Reads

The road ahead: comprehensive and innovative approaches for improving safety and preventing child maltreatment fatalities.

Child Welfare 2013 ;92(2):237-53

Casey Family Programs, USA.

This article presents a high-level overview of the complex issues, opportunities, and challenges involved in improving child safety and preventing child maltreatment fatalities. It emphasizes that improving measurement and classification is critical to understanding and preventing child maltreatment fatalities. It also stresses the need to reframe child maltreatment interventions from a public health perspective. Read More

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December 2013
2 Reads

Effective communications strategies: engaging the media, policymakers, and the public.

Child Welfare 2013 ;92(2):217-33

State of New Jersey Department of Children & Families, USA.

Too often, strategic communication is too little, or comes too late, when involved with a child fatality or serious injury. This article explores the challenges arising from negative publicity around child safety issues and the opportunities for communications strategies that employ a proactive public health approach to engaging media, policymakers, and the public. The authors provide a case study and review methods by which child welfare agencies across the nation are building public engagement and support for improved outcomes in child safety while protecting legitimate confidentiality requirements. Read More

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December 2013
17 Reads

Soft is hardest: leading for learning in child protection services following a child fatality.

Child Welfare 2013 ;92(2):199-216

Resolutions Consultancy, Victoria Park, Western Australia.

The way in which a child protection agency responds to a child fatality always has a strong influence on subsequent practice. Very often, organizational responses and child death reviews are punitive and escalate an already anxious and defensive organizational culture. This paper outlines an alternative approach that not only helps staff to manage their emotional responses but also encourages and prioritizes a learning culture within the organization throughout the crisis and in the longer-term. Read More

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December 2013
46 Reads