126 results match your criteria Child Development Perspectives[Journal]


Birth of a Father: Fathering in the First 1,000 Days.

Child Dev Perspect 2019 Dec 14;13(4):247-253. Epub 2019 Oct 14.

Erasmus University.

As a result of societal changes, fathers participate more actively in child care than they used to. In this article, we propose a context-dependent biobehavioral model of emergent fatherhood in which sociocultural, behavioral, hormonal, and neural factors develop and interact during the first 1,000 days of fatherhood. Sociocultural factors, including different expectations of fathers and varying opportunities for paternal caregiving through paid paternal leave, influence paternal involvement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12347DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6919930PMC
December 2019

Innovative Research Methods to Advance Precision in Home Visiting for More Efficient and Effective Programs.

Child Dev Perspect 2019 Sep 9;13(3):173-179. Epub 2019 Jul 9.

Johns Hopkins University.

Home visiting during early childhood can improve a range of outcomes for children and families. As evidence-based models are implemented across the nation, two questions have emerged. First, can home visiting improve outcomes more efficiently? Second, can overall effects be strengthened for specific subgroups of families? For the past several decades, research focused on testing the average effects of home visiting models on short- to long-term outcomes has found small impacts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12334DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6774294PMC
September 2019

Let's Get Digital: Understanding Adolescent Romantic Relationships Using Naturalistic Assessments of Digital Communication.

Child Dev Perspect 2019 Jun 3;13(2):104-109. Epub 2019 Jan 3.

Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Butler Hospital.

Adolescent romantic relationships involve complex patterns of interaction. Innovative technological advances offer opportunities to capture features and dynamics of these relationships that traditional research methods have not addressed. With the explosion of digital communication platforms (e. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12320DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6759216PMC

Toward a Unifying Model of Self-Regulation: A Developmental Approach.

Child Dev Perspect 2019 Jun 18;13(2):91-96. Epub 2018 Dec 18.

The Pennsylvania State University.

The ability to self-regulate is key to healthy, competent functioning. The breadth of evidence supporting the importance of self-regulation is matched by such a diversity of terms, concepts, measures, and levels of analysis that the National Institutes of Health called for progress toward a unifying model. In this article, we review a lineage of conceptual models and suggest a path toward a more unifying model of self-regulation that encompasses both the dynamics of moment-to-moment changes and age-related change. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12316DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6754105PMC

Placental Studies for Child Development.

Child Dev Perspect 2019 Sep 23;13(3):193-198. Epub 2019 Jul 23.

Placental Analytics LLC.

Research on children's psychological and behavioral development readily incorporates changing biological models and techniques. In this article, we suggest that, in response to increasing evidence of robust influences of prenatal exposures on children's neurodevelopment and mental and physical health, developmental science also needs to consider the placenta's role in development. We argue why placental mechanisms are plausible targets in developmental science, and suggest initial and practical steps toward integrating placenta markers and mechanisms into research on child development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12338DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6693854PMC
September 2019
1 Read

The Development of Self and Identity in Adolescence: Neural Evidence and Implications for a Value-Based Choice Perspective on Motivated Behavior.

Child Dev Perspect 2018 Sep 8;12(3):158-164. Epub 2018 Feb 8.

University of Oregon.

Following a key developmental task of childhood-building a foundation of self-knowledge in the form of domain-specific self-concepts-adolescents begin to explore their emerging identities in ways that foster autonomy and connectedness. Neuroimaging studies of self-related processes demonstrate enhanced engagement of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex in adolescence, which may facilitate and reflect the development of identity by integrating the value of potential actions and choices. Drawing from neuroeconomic and social cognitive accounts, we propose that motivated behavior during adolescence can be modeled by a general value-based decision-making process centered around value accumulation in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12279DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6667174PMC
September 2018

Early relational experience: A foundation for the unfolding dynamics of parent-child socialization.

Child Dev Perspect 2019 Mar 24;13(1):41-47. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

The University of Iowa.

Psychologists have long tried to understand why trajectories of socialization in individual parent-child dyads can be distinct, leading to adaptive or maladaptive developmental outcomes. In this article, we elucidate origins of those differences by examining the subtle yet enduring implications of early parent-child relationships in longitudinal studies of low- and high-risk families, using correlational and experimental designs, and multiple measures. Those relationships are key for socialization because they can alter cascades from children's biologically based difficult temperament to parents' negative control to negative children's outcomes, as demonstrated by social-learning theories. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/cdep.12308
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12308DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6533001PMC
March 2019
9 Reads

Positive Risk Taking in Adolescence.

Child Dev Perspect 2019 Mar 6;13(1):48-52. Epub 2018 Nov 6.

Temple University.

Adolescents are more likely to take risks than children or adults. This propensity can be directed toward negative (illegal and dangerous) or positive (socially acceptable and constructive) risk behaviors. Adolescents who take positive risks include teenagers winning Olympic medals for landing snowboard tricks and students protesting gun violence on a national platform. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12310DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6371981PMC
March 2019
14 Reads

How Evolution Constrains Human Numerical Concepts.

Child Dev Perspect 2018 Mar 7;12(1):65-71. Epub 2017 Nov 7.

University of Rochester.

The types of cognitive and neural mechanisms available to children for making concepts depend on the problems their brains evolved to solve over the past millions of years. Comparative research on numerical cognition with humans and nonhuman primates has revealed a system for quantity representation that lays the foundation for quantitative development. Nonhuman primates in particular share many human abilities to compute quantities, and are likely to exhibit evolutionary continuity with humans. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/cdep.12264
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12264DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6349390PMC
March 2018
15 Reads

An Introduction to the Approximate Number System.

Child Dev Perspect 2018 Dec 10;12(4):223-229. Epub 2018 Apr 10.

University of California, Berkeley.

What are young children's first intuitions about numbers and what role do these play in their later understanding of mathematics? Traditionally, has been viewed as a culturally derived breakthrough occurring relatively recently in human history that requires years of education to master. Contrary to this view, research in cognitive development indicates that our minds come equipped with a rich and flexible sense of number-the Approximate Number System (ANS). Recently, several major challenges have been mounted to the existence of the ANS and its value as a domain-specific system for representing number. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/cdep.12288
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12288DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6286047PMC
December 2018
2 Reads

What Factors Facilitate Resilience in Developmental Dyslexia? Examining Protective and Compensatory Mechanisms Across the Neurodevelopmental Trajectory.

Child Dev Perspect 2018 Dec 4;12(4):240-246. Epub 2018 May 4.

Boston Children's Hospital.

Developmental dyslexia is a specific learning disability characterized by deficits reading single words. Dyslexia is heritable and has been associated with neural alterations in regions of the left hemisphere in the brain. Cognitive and neural atypicalities have been observed before children with familial risk for dyslexia begin reading, yet children who are at risk subsequently develop reading abilities on a continuum from good to poor. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12293DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6261519PMC
December 2018
3 Reads

Infants' Understanding of Distributive Fairness as a Test Case for Identifying the Extents and Limits of Infants' Sociomoral Cognition and Behavior.

Child Dev Perspect 2018 Sep 19;12(3):141-145. Epub 2018 Feb 19.

The University of Washington.

In this article, I use infants' sensitivity to distributive fairness as a test case to identify the extents and limits of infants' sociomoral cognition and behavior. Infants' sensitivity to distributive fairness is in some ways commensurate with this understanding in older children and adults; infants expect fair distributions of resources and evaluate others based on their adherence to or violation of fairness norms. Yet these sensitivities also differ in important ways, including that infants do not spontaneously punish unfair individuals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12283DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6101045PMC
September 2018
2 Reads

How Will Higher Minimum Wages Affect Family Life and Children's Well-Being?

Child Dev Perspect 2018 Jun 15;12(2):109-114. Epub 2017 Nov 15.

University of Washington.

In recent years, new national and regional minimum wage laws have been passed in the United States and other countries. The laws assume that benefits flow not only to workers but also to their children. Adolescent workers will most likely be affected directly given their concentration in low-paying jobs, but younger children may be affected indirectly by changes in parents' work conditions, family income, and the quality of nonparental child care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12270DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5966045PMC

Bilingual Development in Children of Immigrant Families.

Authors:
Erika Hoff

Child Dev Perspect 2018 Jun 30;12(2):80-86. Epub 2017 Oct 30.

Department of Psychology, Florida Atlantic University.

Early exposure to two languages is widely thought to guarantee successful bilingual development. Contradicting that belief, children in bilingual immigrant families who grow up hearing a heritage language and a majority language from birth often reach school age with low levels of skill in both languages. This outcome cannot be explained fully by influences of socioeconomic status. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12262DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5966288PMC
June 2018
1 Read

Beyond Pink and Blue: The Complexity of Early Androgen Effects on Gender Development.

Child Dev Perspect 2018 Mar 1;12(1):58-64. Epub 2017 Nov 1.

The Pennsylvania State University.

Why do girls and women differ from boys and men? Gender development is typically considered to result from socialization, but sex hormones present during sensitive periods of development, particularly prenatal androgens, play an important role. Data from natural experiments, especially from females with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, show the complexity of the effects of androgens on behavior: Prenatal androgens apparently have large effects on interests and engagement in gendered activities; moderate effects on spatial abilities; and relatively small or no effects on gender identity, gender cognitions, and gendered peer involvement. These differential effects provide an opportunity to move beyond identifying sources of variation in behavior to understanding developmental processes. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/cdep.12261
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12261DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5935256PMC
March 2018
17 Reads

Family Functioning and Children's Sleep.

Child Dev Perspect 2017 Dec 21;11(4):264-269. Epub 2017 Jul 21.

University of New Mexico.

Sleep is a pivotal correlate and predictor of many domains of child development, including socioemotional adjustment, physical health, and cognitive functioning. The family plays a major role in shaping children's sleep-wake behaviors, and developmental research on children's sleep in a family context is on the rise. As in any relatively young field, many gaps and questions remain. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12243DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5931738PMC
December 2017
1 Read

Neural and Cognitive Factors Influencing the Emergence of Psychopathology: Insights From the Bucharest Early Intervention Project.

Child Dev Perspect 2018 Mar 7;12(1):28-33. Epub 2017 Sep 7.

University of Maryland, College Park.

The adverse effects of institutionalized care and psychosocial deprivation have been documented for more than 100 years. Children who have been raised in institutions are at heightened risk of developing internalizing and externalizing disorders. Given the profound biological and psychological effects of institutional rearing, identifying neural and cognitive factors that influence the emergence of psychopathology in institutionalized children is of great interest. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12251DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5844478PMC
March 2018
6 Reads

New Directions and Challenges in Preventing Conduct Problems in Early Childhood.

Child Dev Perspect 2017 Jun 16;11(2):85-89. Epub 2016 Nov 16.

University of Pittsburgh.

In this article, we review advances in developing and preventing conduct problems in early childhood and identify challenges. Among the topics we address are expanding the targets of prevention programs beyond improving parenting skills, implementing family-based interventions during early childhood for families living in impoverished communities, making greater use of community platforms that serve young children at risk for early conduct problems, and incorporating techniques such as motivational interviewing to improve families' engagement in nontraditional mental health settings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12212DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5844270PMC
June 2017
3 Reads

Continuity and Stability in Development.

Child Dev Perspect 2017 Jun 19;11(2):113-119. Epub 2017 Jan 19.

Child and Family Research, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development and Nanyang Technological University.

Developmental science is centrally concerned with both consistency and change in characteristics through time. Consistency and change in development are tracked by group mean level continuity and individual order stability. Group mean level and individual order consistency and change are both developmentally informative and can co-exist conceptually and empirically as the two are partially orthogonal perspectives on development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12221DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5830131PMC
June 2017
3 Reads

Psychosocial Factors in Children's Obesity: Examples from an Innovative Line of Inquiry.

Child Dev Perspect 2017 Dec 28;11(4):275-281. Epub 2017 Aug 28.

University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.

In recent years, researchers and policymakers have recognized that obesity in childhood is not simply a medical problem, but is a complex social and psychological phenomenon. Our research team used an interpersonal and intrapersonal risk model to examine the psychosocial aspects of obesity among rural children. In this article, we describe how the global study of children's obesity has broadened over the last 10 to 15 years, and we present our model of interpersonal and intrapersonal risk factors, which includes complex pathways with many psychosocial variables. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12245DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5693230PMC
December 2017
3 Reads

The Stony Brook Temperament Study: Early Antecedents and Pathways to Emotional Disorders.

Child Dev Perspect 2017 Dec 21;11(4):257-263. Epub 2017 Jul 21.

Stony Brook University.

In this article, we summarize findings from the Stony Brook Temperament Study, which seeks to elucidate the early antecedents and pathways to later depressive and anxiety disorders. The study focuses on parents' internalizing disorders and children's early temperament as distal risk factors that operate, in part, through biobehavioral reward and threat systems. We summarize findings linking parents' emotional disorders and observations of children's early temperament to subsequent neural measures of children's affective processing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12242DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5690488PMC
December 2017
3 Reads

Using Principles of Behavioral Epigenetics to Advance Research on Early-Life Stress.

Child Dev Perspect 2017 Jun 25;11(2):107-112. Epub 2017 Jan 25.

The University of Utah.

While the negative effects of early-life stress on children's developmental outcomes are well documented, we know little about how these processes unfold and which children are more susceptible to these exposures. In this article, I outline how studying the effects of early-life stress on children's development can be advanced by considering how epigenetic processes may contribute to the emergence of children's behavior. The study of epigenetics can help pinpoint the mechanisms by which early-life stress may affect developmental outcomes and identify which children may be most sensitive to the effects of these exposures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12219DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5658048PMC
June 2017
1 Read

Dealing with Social Difficulty During Adolescence: The Role of Implicit Theories of Personality.

Authors:
David S Yeager

Child Dev Perspect 2017 Sep 11;11(3):196-201. Epub 2017 Apr 11.

University of Texas at Austin.

Social difficulty during adolescence contributes to internalizing problems (e.g., depression, stress) and spurs cycles of aggression and retaliation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12234DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5624341PMC
September 2017
5 Reads

Promoting Healthy Child Development via a Two-Generation Translational Neuroscience Framework: The Filming Interactions to Nurture Development Video Coaching Program.

Child Dev Perspect 2016 Dec 10;10(4):251-256. Epub 2016 Aug 10.

University of Oregon.

In this article, we focus on applying methods of translational neuroscience to two-generation, family-based interventions. In recent years, a small but growing body of evidence has documented the reversibility of some of the neurobiological effects of early adversity in the context of environmental early interventions. Some of these interventions are now being implemented at scale, which may help reduce disparities in the face of early life stress. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12195DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5603284PMC
December 2016
4 Reads

The Role of Children's Health in the Intergenerational Transmission of Economic Status.

Authors:
Anna Aizer

Child Dev Perspect 2017 Sep 7;11(3):167-172. Epub 2017 Mar 7.

Brown University and NBER.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12231DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6886118PMC
September 2017

Callous-Unemotional Behaviors in Early Childhood: Measurement, Meaning, and the Influence of Parenting.

Child Dev Perspect 2017 Jun 12;11(2):120-126. Epub 2017 Jan 12.

University of Michigan.

Antisocial behavior is costly and harmful to families, communities, and society. With roots in early childhood, antisocial behavior puts children at risk for poor physical and mental health outcomes across development. Callous-unemotional (CU) traits identify a subgroup of youth with particularly severe and stable antisocial behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12222DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5560612PMC
June 2017
9 Reads

Ecological Commitments: Why Developmental Science Needs Naturalistic Methods.

Authors:
Audun Dahl

Child Dev Perspect 2017 Jun 26;11(2):79-84. Epub 2016 Nov 26.

University of California, Santa Cruz.

Much of developmental science aims to explain how or whether children's experiences influence their thoughts and actions. Developmental theories make assumptions and claims-what I call -about events outside research contexts. In this article, I argue that most developmental theories make ecological commitments about children's thoughts, actions, and experiences outside research contexts, and that these commitments sometimes go unstated and untested. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12217DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5455774PMC
June 2017
1 Read

Teenage Mothers Today: What We Know and How It Matters.

Child Dev Perspect 2017 Mar 7;11(1):63-69. Epub 2016 Nov 7.

University of Colorado Boulder.

Over the past two decades, births to U.S. teenagers have fallen and no longer follow overall fertility patterns. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12205DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5438165PMC
March 2017
2 Reads

The Potential for Youth Programs To Promote African American Youth's Development of Ethnic and Racial Identity.

Child Dev Perspect 2017 Mar 7;11(1):29-38. Epub 2016 Nov 7.

Department of Educational Psychology, University of Illinois at Chicago.

Effective programs for youth can reduce problem behaviors and promote positive development. In particular, cultural assets (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12204DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5425161PMC
March 2017
4 Reads

A Lattice Model of the Development of Reading Comprehension.

Child Dev Perspect 2016 Dec 11;10(4):269-274. Epub 2016 Oct 11.

University of California Irvine.

In this article, I present a developmental model of how children learn to comprehend what they read, which builds on current models of reading comprehension and integrates findings from instructional research and evidence-based models of development in early and middle childhood. The lattice model holds that children's developing reading comprehension is a function of the interacting, reciprocal, and bootstrapping effects of developing text-specific, linguistic, and social-cognitive processes, which interact with instruction as child-characteristic-by-instruction (CXI) interaction effects. The processes develop over time and in the context of classroom, home, peer, community, and other influences to affect children's development of proficient reading comprehension. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12200DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5110216PMC
December 2016
24 Reads

Embodiment and Human Development.

Authors:
Peter J Marshall

Child Dev Perspect 2016 Dec 20;10(4):245-250. Epub 2016 Jul 20.

Temple University.

We are recognizing increasingly that the study of cognitive, social, and emotional processes must account for their embodiment in living, acting beings. The related field of embodied cognition (EC) has coalesced around dissatisfaction with the lack of attention to the body in cognitive science. For developmental scientists, the emphasis in the literature on adult EC on the role of the body in cognition may not seem particularly novel, given that bodily action was central to Piaget's theory of cognitive development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12190DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5098554PMC
December 2016
20 Reads

How International Research on Parenting Advances Understanding of Child Development.

Child Dev Perspect 2016 Sep 14;10(3):202-207. Epub 2016 Jun 14.

University of Rome Foro Italico.

International research on parenting and child development can advance our understanding of similarities and differences in how parenting is related to children's development across countries. Challenges to conducting international research include operationalizing culture, disentangling effects within and between countries, and balancing emic and etic perspectives. Benefits of international research include testing whether findings regarding parenting and child development replicate across diverse samples, incorporating cultural and contextual diversity to foster more inclusive and representative research samples and investigators than has typically occurred, and understanding how children develop in proximal parenting and family and distal international contexts. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5054977PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12186DOI Listing
September 2016
41 Reads

Using Eye Tracking to Understand Infants' Attentional Bias for Faces.

Child Dev Perspect 2016 Sep 15;10(3):161-165. Epub 2016 Apr 15.

University of Tampere.

Infants have a natural tendency to look at adults' faces, possibly to help initiate vital interactions with caregivers during sensitive periods of development. Recent studies using eye-tracking technologies have identified the mechanisms that underlie infants' capacity to orient and hold attention on faces. These studies have shown that the bias for faces is weak in young infants, but becomes more robust and resistant to distraction during the second half of the 1st year. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12180DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5021109PMC
September 2016

Beyond Cognition: Reading Motivation and Reading Comprehension.

Child Dev Perspect 2016 Sep 23;10(3):190-195. Epub 2016 May 23.

Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology, University of Maryland.

The authors review research on children's reading motivation and its relation to their reading comprehension. They begin by discussing work on the development of school motivation in general and reading motivation in particular, reviewing work showing that many children's reading motivation declines over the school years. Girls tend to have more positive motivation for reading than do boys, and there are ethnic differences in children's reading motivation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12184DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5014370PMC
September 2016
18 Reads

Executive Function in Previously Institutionalized Children.

Child Dev Perspect 2016 Jun 19;10(2):105-110. Epub 2016 Feb 19.

University of Pittsburgh.

In studies of children adopted from institutions, being raised in an institution has been associated consistently with an increased risk of persistent cognitive, academic, and social-emotional problems. These findings raise questions about the neurocognitive mechanisms that contribute to these negative outcomes. Theory and models based on studies of animals indicate that development of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and executive function (EF) may be particularly susceptible to environmental influences during early childhood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12170DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4981771PMC
June 2016
4 Reads

Children's Racial Categorization in Context.

Child Dev Perspect 2016 Mar 22;10(1):33-38. Epub 2015 Nov 22.

York University.

The ability to discriminate visually based on race emerges early in infancy: 3-month-olds can perceptually differentiate faces by race and 6-month-olds can perceptually categorize faces by race. Between ages 6 and 8 years, children can sort others into racial groups. But to what extent are these abilities influenced by context? In this article, we review studies on children's racial categorization and discuss how our conclusions are affected by how we ask the questions (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12155DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4836385PMC
March 2016
7 Reads

Intergenerational Transmission of Aggression: Physiological Regulatory Processes.

Child Dev Perspect 2016 Mar 11;10(1):15-21. Epub 2015 Dec 11.

University of Southern California.

Children who grow up in aggressive households are at risk of having problems with physiological regulation, but researchers have not investigated physiology as a mechanism in the intergenerational transmission of aggression. In this article, we posit that physiological regulation, particularly during stressful interpersonal interactions, may shed light on sensitivity to conflict, It can also inform our understanding of associations between childhood exposure to aggression in families of origin and aggression against partners in adolescence or adulthood. In support of this model, we highlight findings showing that childhood exposure to family aggression relates to physiological regulation across the life span, and that reactions to physiological stress concurrently relate to aggression against intimate partners. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12156DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4767800PMC
March 2016
5 Reads

Latent Class Analysis for Developmental Research.

Child Dev Perspect 2016 Mar 27;10(1):59-64. Epub 2016 Jan 27.

The Pennsylvania State University, Brittany Rhoades Cooper, Washington State University.

In this article, we consider the broad applicability of latent class analysis (LCA) and related approaches to advance research on child development. First, we describe the role of person-centered methods such as LCA in developmental research, and review prior applications of LCA to the study of development and related areas of research. Then we present practical considerations when applying LCA in developmental research, including model selection and statistical power. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12163DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6914261PMC

The Development of Body Structure Knowledge in Infancy.

Child Dev Perspect 2016 Mar 7;10(1):45-52. Epub 2016 Jan 7.

Kent State University at Tuscarawas.

Although we know much about the development of face processing, we know considerably less about the development of body knowledge-despite bodies also being significant sources of social information. One set of studies indicated that body structure knowledge is poor during the 1st year of life and spawned a model that posits that, unlike the development of face knowledge, which benefits from innate propensities and dedicated learning mechanisms, the development of body knowledge relies on general learning mechanisms and develops slowly. In this article, we review studies on infants' knowledge about the structure of bodies and their processing of gender and emotion that paint a different picture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12162DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5486992PMC
March 2016
1 Read

Slowing Down Fast Mapping: Redefining the Dynamics of Word Learning.

Child Dev Perspect 2015 Jun 12;9(2):74-78. Epub 2015 Mar 12.

The University of Iowa, The Delta Center.

In this article, we review literature on word learning and propose a theoretical account of how lexical knowledge and word use emerge and develop over time. We contend that the developing lexical system is built on processes that support children's in-the-moment word usage interacting with processes that create long-term learning. We argue for a new characterization of word learning in which simple mechanisms like association and competition, and the interaction between the two, guide children's selection of referents and word use in the moment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12110DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4764087PMC
June 2015
4 Reads

Answering Developmental Questions Using Secondary Data.

Child Dev Perspect 2015 Dec 22;9(4):256-261. Epub 2015 Oct 22.

University of Texas-Austin.

Secondary data analysis of large longitudinal and national data sets is a standard method used in many social sciences to answer complex questions regarding behavior. In this article, we detail the advantages of using these data sets to study developmental questions across the lifespan. First, we provide an overview of how using secondary data can increase studies' scientific integrity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12151DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4724430PMC
December 2015
53 Reads

Biological Risk for the Development of Problem Behavior in Adolescence: Integrating Insights from Behavioral Genetics and Neuroscience.

Child Dev Perspect 2015 Dec 29;9(4):211-216. Epub 2015 Jul 29.

The University of Texas at Austin.

Adolescence is a time of increasing engagement in a variety of problem behaviors, including substance use and delinquency. Genetic risk for problem behavior increases over adolescence, is mediated partially by individual differences in sensation seeking, and is exacerbated by involvement with deviant peers. In this article, we describe how findings from behavioral genetic research on problem behavior intersect with research from developmental neuroscience. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12135DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4671633PMC
December 2015
18 Reads

How Economic Downturns Affect Children's Development: An Interdisciplinary Perspective on Pathways of Influence.

Child Dev Perspect 2015 Dec 22;9(4):233-238. Epub 2015 Jul 22.

Duke University.

To understand how economic downturns affect children's development, scholars have concentrated on how parents' loss of a job affects children's well-being, but have largely ignored the potential effects of downturns on children whose parents remain employed. In this article, we review research across disciplines to demonstrate that economic downturns should be conceptualized as a community-level event that affects all children in a community, not just those whose parents have lost jobs. We focus on three mechanisms linking downturns to children's developmental outcomes: structural changes to communities, the economic and psychological effects on individuals who are continuously employed, and the strain of job loss on social networks. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12137DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6641565PMC
December 2015

Sleep as a window into early neural development: Shifts in sleep-dependent learning effects across early childhood.

Child Dev Perspect 2015 Sep 20;9(3):183-189. Epub 2015 Jun 20.

The University Of Arizona.

Sleep is an important physiological state for the consolidation and generalization of new learning in children and adults. We review the literature on sleep-dependent memory consolidation and generalization in infants and preschool children and place the findings in the context of the development of the neural systems underlying memory (hippocampus and its connections to cortex). Based on the extended trajectory of hippocampal development, transitions in the nature of sleep-dependent learning are expected. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12130DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4636128PMC
September 2015
2 Reads

The Temporal Dynamics of Childhood Economic Deprivation and Children's Achievement.

Child Dev Perspect 2015 Sep 27;9(3):158-163. Epub 2015 Jun 27.

University at Buffalo.

Economic deprivation during childhood adversely affects achievement in adolescence and early adulthood. Economically disadvantaged children tend to achieve less than their more advantaged peers on a variety of measures of educational and socioeconomic achievement. Researchers recognize that what matters for achievement is not merely exposure to economic deprivation during childhood but also the temporal dynamics of deprivation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12125DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4591874PMC
September 2015
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Emerging Trends in Behavioral Genetic Studies of Child Temperament.

Child Dev Perspect 2015 Sep 29;9(3):144-148. Epub 2015 Apr 29.

Boston University.

In this article, we describe three emerging trends in the application of behavioral genetic methods to the study of temperament. The trends-using multiple methods to assess temperament, considering contextual influences on temperament, and evaluating the structure of temperament-have been well studied in the phenotypic literature, but adding a behavioral genetic perspective can enrich our understanding of temperament. We review recent behavioral genetic research in each of these areas and discuss its implications. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12123DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4582767PMC
September 2015
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Long-Term Effects of Parenting-Focused Preventive Interventions to Promote Resilience of Children and Adolescents.

Child Dev Perspect 2015 Sep 15;9(3):164-171. Epub 2015 Jul 15.

Arizona State University.

In this article, we address three questions concerning the long-term effects of parenting-focused preventive interventions: 1) Do prevention programs promote effective parenting in families facing normative stressors as well as those facing frequent adversity? 2) Do parenting programs prevent children's long-term problems? 3) Do changes in parenting mediate long-term effects of programs? We address these questions by summarizing evidence from 22 programs with randomized trials and followups of three years or longer. We describe in more detail two interventions for divorced and bereaved families, suggesting that they prevent a range of problems and promote a range of developmental competencies over a prolonged period. Program effects to strengthen parenting mediated many of these long-term outcomes. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/cdep.12126
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12126DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6407875PMC
September 2015
8 Reads

Learning to Read: What We Know and What We Need to Understand Better.

Child Dev Perspect 2015 Mar;7(1):1-5

St. John's College, University of York.

The authors review current knowledge about the cognitive processes underlying the early stages of word reading development. Recent findings in a variety of alphabetic languages converge on the conclusion that there are 3 "cognitive foundations" for learning to read: letter-sound knowledge, phonemic awareness, and rapid automatized naming skills. Deficits in each of these skills appear causally related to problems in learning to read, and deficits in letter-sound knowledge and phonemic awareness appear to be remediable by suitable teaching. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4538787PMC
March 2015
16 Reads

The Microstructure of Action Perception in Infancy: Decomposing the Temporal Structure of Social Information Processing.

Child Dev Perspect 2015 Jun 26;9(2):79-83. Epub 2015 Feb 26.

University of Zurich.

In this article, we review recent evidence of infants' early competence in perceiving and interpreting the actions of others. We present a theoretical model that decomposes the timeline of action perception into a series of distinct processes that occur in a particular order. Once an agent is detected, covert attention can be allocated to the future state of the agent (priming), which may lead to overt gaze shifts that predict goals (prediction). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12109DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5006841PMC
June 2015
4 Reads

Bilingualism and the Development of Executive Function: The Role of Attention.

Authors:
Ellen Bialystok

Child Dev Perspect 2015 Jun;9(2):117-121

York University.

This paper reviews research examining the effect of bilingualism on children's cognitive development, and in particular, executive function. Studies reporting bilingual advantages in various tasks are described with the purpose of identifying the process or executive function component that might be responsible for this bilingual advantage. Several possibilities are discussed, such as inhibitory control. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cdep.12116DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4442091PMC
June 2015
4 Reads