83 results match your criteria Child And Adolescent Mental Health[Journal]


Debate: Mentalising remotely - The AFNCCF's adaptations to the coronavirus crisis.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Jul 5. Epub 2020 Jul 5.

Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families, London, UK.

An overview of the work the approach taken by the Anna Freud National Centre for Children and Families in the rapid transition to remote working in response to the coronavirus lockdown. We outline some of the challenges of remote working and how we are seeking to mitigate them, informed by the over-riding principle that individual relationships and the experiences of the child, young person and family must remain the central concern. The importance of maintaining a mentalising stance in remote working is discussed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12404DOI Listing

Debate: COVID-19 and children in India.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Jun 29. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Central University of Tamil Nadu, Thiruvarur, India.

The COVID-19 pandemic impact on children is a growing concern. The United Nations and its agencies (the World Health Organization and UNICEF), Indian Association For Child and Adolescent Mental Health and National Institute of Mental Health and Neuroscience in India warn about the broader impacts on children and call for urgent action to support the world's children amidst the pandemic which may have lasting consequences. The COVID-19 pandemic and unprecedented control measures to prevent its spread have disrupted nearly every aspect of children's lives - their health, development, learning, behaviour and their families' economic security, including protection from violence and abuse. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12398DOI Listing

Context-dependent irritability in Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: correlates and stability of family-restricted versus cross-situational temper outbursts.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Jun 19. Epub 2020 Jun 19.

Psychopathology and Neuropsychology Laboratory, Paris 8 Vincennes - St Denis University, Saint-Denis, France.

Background: Impairing irritability is highly prevalent in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), although manifestations of irritability are not necessarily present in all settings (home, school, with peers). At the moment, little is known about the relative prevalence, stability, and etiologies of contextual versus cross-situational manifestations of irritability in ADHD. In this study, levels of dysfunctional parenting practices and sleep problems were compared in irritable versus nonirritable children with ADHD, in cases of family-restricted versus cross-situational irritability, and examined as predictors of irritability levels over a one-year interval. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12399DOI Listing

Sociodemographic factors associated with routine outcome monitoring: a historical cohort study of 28,382 young people accessing child and adolescent mental health services.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Jun 16. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.

Background: Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) are important tools to inform patients, clinicians and policy-makers about clinical need and the effectiveness of any given treatment. Consistent PROM use can promote early symptom detection, help identify unexpected treatment responses and improve therapeutic engagement. Very few studies have examined associations between patient characteristics and PROM data collection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12396DOI Listing

Review: Delivering mental health support within schools and colleges - a thematic synthesis of barriers and facilitators to implementation of indicated psychological interventions for adolescents.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Apr 10. Epub 2020 Apr 10.

Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK.

Background: Increasing the role of schools and colleges in the provision of mental health services for young people has the potential to improve early intervention and access to treatment. We aimed to understand what factors influence the successful implementation of indicated psychological interventions within schools and colleges to help guide increased provision of mental health support within education settings.

Methods: Systematic search for studies that have reported barriers or facilitators to the implementation of indicated interventions for adolescent emotional disorders delivered within schools and further education/sixth form colleges (CRD42018102830). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12381DOI Listing

Coalescing investments in school mental health in South Carolina.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Mar 31. Epub 2020 Mar 31.

Department of Psychology, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.

Background: Improving child and adolescent mental health requires states and jurisdictions to invest in school mental health efforts. In recent years, there has been notable expansion and improvement in school mental health services in the state of South Carolina related to a number of investments that are cumulatively promoting capacity building.

Methods: This narrative overview examines the history of the school mental health movement in one southern state and details efforts by multiple key stakeholders that have coalesced to form a strong system for advancing school mental health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12382DOI Listing

What do young people who self-harm find helpful? A comparative study of young people with and without experience of being looked after in care.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Mar 20. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Self-Harm Research Group, School of Psychology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.

Background: Self-harm amongst young people is an increasing problem, with looked-after young people at higher risk. Despite this, little research exists on what young people who self-harm find helpful.

Method: One hundred and twenty-six 11-21 year olds (53 who had experience of the care system and 73 who did not) were recruited from the community and NHS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12384DOI Listing

Technology Matters: BlueIce - using a smartphone app to beat adolescent self-harm.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Jun 11. Epub 2020 Jun 11.

Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services, Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, Keynsham, UK.

Despite the recent proliferation of mental health apps, few have directly focused on the prevention of self-harm. The available apps are described and the limited, although encouraging, outcome data are summarised. The design, content and initial outcome of the only app developed specifically for adolescents, BlueIce, is presented. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12397DOI Listing

Why don't children in Uganda have tics? A mixed-methods study of beliefs, knowledge, and attitudes of health professionals.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Feb 27. Epub 2020 Feb 27.

Great Ormond Street Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK.

Background: Tourette syndrome (TS) is reported in all cultures, although is speculated to be rare among those of Sub-Saharan African descent. A lack of research exploring TS in the context of Sub-Saharan Africa has meant that it is not yet established whether this apparent rarity is due to a true low prevalence or if identification of the condition merely is unrecognized. The present study aimed to explore health professionals' knowledge and attitudes of the identification, diagnosis and management of TS in Uganda. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12370DOI Listing
February 2020

The identification and psychological treatment of panic disorder in adolescents: a survey of CAMHS clinicians.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Feb 23. Epub 2020 Feb 23.

School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences, University of Reading, Reading, UK.

Background: Panic disorder is experienced by around 1% of adolescents and has a significant impact on social and academic functioning. Preliminary evidence supports the effectiveness of panic disorder-specific treatment in adolescents with panic disorder; however, panic disorder may be overlooked in adolescents due to overlapping symptoms with other anxiety disorders and other difficulties being more noticeable to others. The aim of this study was to establish what training National Health Service (NHS) Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) clinicians have received in psychological therapies and panic disorder and how they identify and treat panic disorder in adolescents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12372DOI Listing
February 2020

Child and adolescent mental health trajectories in relation to exclusion from school from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Jan 21. Epub 2020 Jan 21.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

Background: As the prevalence of childhood mental health conditions varies by age and gender, we explored whether there were similar variations in the relationship between psychopathology and exclusion from school in a prospective UK population-based birth cohort.

Method: The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children collected reports of exclusion at 8 years and 16 years. Mental health was assessed at repeated time points using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12367DOI Listing
January 2020

A cross-cultural qualitative study of the ethical aspects in the transition from child mental health services to adult mental health services.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Mar 23. Epub 2020 Mar 23.

School of Medicine, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland.

Background: Transitioning from Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) to Adult Mental Health Services (AMHS) raises novel ethical aspects for healthcare professionals, as well as for young people, their parents and carers.

Method: Focus groups were conducted in Croatia, Ireland and the United Kingdom with youth mental health groups and youth representatives with no mental health (MH) remit. One hundred and eleven participants, aged from 16 to 60 years, contributed to discussions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12377DOI Listing

Longitudinal examination of youth readmission to mental health inpatient units.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Mar 3. Epub 2020 Mar 3.

Sobey School of Business, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS, Canada.

Objective: Significant barriers exist for youth in obtaining mental health services. These barriers are exacerbated by growing demand, attributed partially to children and adolescents who have repeat hospital admissions. The purpose of this study was to identify demographic, socioeconomic and clinical predictors of readmission to inpatient psychiatric services in New Brunswick, Canada. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12371DOI Listing
March 2020
0.954 Impact Factor

Self-harm and self-regulation in urban ethnic minority youth: a pilot application of dialectical behavior therapy for adolescents.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Mar 11. Epub 2020 Mar 11.

Cognitive & Behavioral Consultants, LLP, White Plains, NY, USA.

Background: Difficulties in coping with stress and regulating emotions are transdiagnostic risk factors for self-harming behavior. Due to sociocultural stressors, ethnic minority adolescents may be at greater risk for self-regulation difficulties and self-harm. Dialectical behavior therapy for adolescents (DBT-A) frames adaptive skill acquisition as a mechanism of change, but few studies have investigated its impact on ethnic minority adolescents' self-regulation (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12374DOI Listing

Alcohol misuse among adolescents with BPD symptoms: exploring the moderating role of reasons for drinking and perceived coping skills in a clinical adolescent sample.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Mar 17. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

Department of Psychology, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, USA.

Background: Adolescents who experience symptoms of borderline personality disorder (BPD) are at high risk for alcohol misuse, yet little is known about why these adolescents drink and what factors heighten or mitigate this risk. The current study explores factors that may impact risk for alcohol misuse among youth with BPD symptoms: using alcohol to self-medicate or to rebel and perceived coping skills.

Method: A sample of 181 psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents (M  = 15. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12378DOI Listing

Trends in the utilization of a peer-supported youth hotline.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May 25. Epub 2020 May 25.

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Teen Line, Los Angeles, CA, USA.

Background: Peer-supported youth hotlines have been in operation for many years but studies on the acceptance of this hotline model or on the demographics of the callers are lacking. This study was performed to examine the utilization of a metropolitan peer-supported youth hotline between 2010 and 2016.

Method: The change in demographics, contact channels, and the reasons for contact were analyzed with standard linear regression analysis in 67,478 contacts over 7 years. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12394DOI Listing

Debate: Reality check - Detransitioner's testimonies require us to rethink gender dysphoria.

Authors:
Kirsty Entwistle

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May 14. Epub 2020 May 14.

Independent Practice, Guimaraes, Portugal.

Butler and Hutchinson's clarion call (Butler and Hutchinson, 2020) for empirical research on desistance and detransition deserves careful consideration. It formally documents the needs of the emerging cohort of detransitioners, many of whom are in their teens and early twenties. In the absence of specialist services, some detransitioners have been sharing their experiences in public forums. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12380DOI Listing

Review: Alleviating loneliness in young people - a meta-analysis of interventions.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May 13. Epub 2020 May 13.

Manchester Institute of Education, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.

Background: Loneliness is common among youth and is associated with poor physical and mental health, and poor educational outcomes. To date, there have been no meta-analyses of interventions aimed at reducing loneliness among young people.

Methods: We conducted meta-analyses of single group and randomised control trials (RCTs) of studies published between 1980 and 2019, which measured loneliness as an outcome in youth ages 25 years or younger. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12389DOI Listing

The association of self-esteem and psychosocial outcomes in young adults: a 10-year prospective study.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May 13. Epub 2020 May 13.

Team HEALTHY, Bordeaux Population Health Research Center, University of Bordeaux, Inserm, Bordeaux, France.

Background: This study investigates the association between self-esteem assessed either in adolescence or in adulthood with adult academic and psychosocial outcomes.

Method: One hundred and thirty-one junior high school students were selected based on their experience of academic difficulty or success, and both groups were selected equally from regular or low-performing schools. Ten years later, 100 of these individuals participated in a follow-up assessment of academic, socioprofessional, and health-related outcomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12392DOI Listing

Teachers' concerns about pupils' mental health in a cross-sectional survey of a population sample of British schoolchildren.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Apr 21. Epub 2020 Apr 21.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

Background: Schools are becoming central to the identification and referral of children and young people with poor mental health. Understanding how well a teacher concern predicts mental disorder in a child or young person is important for mental health teams who need to respond to referrals.

Method: This secondary analysis of the 2004 British Child and Adolescent Mental Health Survey used the first item of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) Impact subscale to indicate concern about a child or young person's mental health. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12390DOI Listing

Narrative Matters: Two decades of support: a brief history of online self-harm content.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May 21;25(2):117-119. Epub 2019 Nov 21.

Institute of Applied Health Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12356DOI Listing

Technology Matters: The human touch in a digital age - a blended approach in mental healthcare delivery with children and young people.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May 27;25(2):120-122. Epub 2020 Mar 27.

Division of Psychiatry and Applied Psychology, Institute of Mental Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.

Online psychological interventions have the potential to address many current issues facing service provision in child and adolescent mental health, not least improving access to evidence-based therapies and providing greater patient choice. Recognising this, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) now recommend digitally delivered therapy in the treatment of depression in children and young people (CYP). However, despite the virtual ubiquity of technology in young people's lives, and good evidence that online treatments can be effective, there remain barriers to real-world implementation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12385DOI Listing

Commentary: Anxiety and behaviour in and beyond ASD; does the idea of 'PDA' really help? - a commentary on Stuart et al. (2020).

Authors:
Jonathan Green

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May 16;25(2):74-76. Epub 2020 Mar 16.

Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK.

Many children with austism spectrum disorder (ASD) show difficulties containing anxiety, acute distress, behavioural avoidance or control, and sometimes to an extreme degree. Not nearly enough is known about the variety of likely origins of such presentations or their course. Pathological Demand Avoidance (PDA) has been advocated as a discrete developmental syndrome explaining such characteristics when extreme, but its status as an entity is controversial and to date poorly evidenced. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12379DOI Listing

Commentary: Demand Avoidance Phenomena, a manifold issue? Intolerance of uncertainty and anxiety as explanatory frameworks for extreme demand avoidance in children and adolescents - a commentary on Stuart et al. (2020).

Authors:
Richard Woods

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May 16;25(2):68-70. Epub 2020 Jan 16.

Independent Scholar, Nottingham, UK.

Demand Avoidance Phenomena (DAP) is a neutral term for Pathological Demand Avoidance, which is sometimes conceptualised as an autism subtype. There is much ongoing controversy around the construct. In this commentary, I attempt to contextualise the recent article, Intolerance of Uncertainty and anxiety (Stuart et al. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12368DOI Listing

Clinical research updates.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May;25(2):123-124

King's College London, London, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12386DOI Listing

SafeSpot: an innovative app and mental health support package for Scottish schools - a qualitative analysis as part of a mixed methods study.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May 8;25(2):110-116. Epub 2020 Mar 8.

Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.

Aims: The aim of the study was to investigate teachers' and pupils' perceptions about the effect of the SafeSpot mental health curriculum on the well-being of young people and on their knowledge of mental health conditions. This trial intends to determine the acceptability and benefits of web and mobile technology in delivering emotional well-being in schools, through use of the SafeSpot programme.

Background: With 10% of young people aged 5 to 16 diagnosed with a mental disorder, there is pressure for schools to address their pupils' emotional well-being. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12375DOI Listing
May 2020
0.954 Impact Factor

Measuring movements in adolescents with psychosis using the Microsoft Kinect sensor: a pilot study exploring a new tool for assessing aspects of antipsychotic-induced parkinsonism.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May 7;25(2):79-94. Epub 2020 Jan 7.

Psychiatric Centre Copenhagen, University Hospital Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Background: The assessment of motor disturbances in antipsychotic-treated adolescent patients is often limited to the use of observer-based rating scales with interobserver variability. The objectives of this pilot study were to measure movement patterns associated with antipsychotic-induced parkinsonism in young patients with psychosis and initiating/treated with antipsychotics, using a computer application connected with the Microsoft Kinect sensor (Motorgame).

Method: All participants were assessed by neurological examination, clinical side effect rating scales (Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser Side Effect Rating Scale, Barnes Akathisia Rating Scale, Simpson Angus Scale (SAS), and Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale), and the Motorgame. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12360DOI Listing

Response: Demand Avoidance Phenomena: a manifold issue? Intolerance of uncertainty and anxiety as explanatory frameworks for extreme demand avoidance in children and adolescents - a response to Woods (2020).

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May 17;25(2):71-73. Epub 2020 Mar 17.

School of Psychology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

This paper is in response to the commentary written by Richard Woods in which he attempts to provide support for his Monotropism autism theory and the research indicating that Demand Avoidance Phenomena may not be developmentally persistent (Woods, 2019). We acknowledge the continuing controversy around the proposed construct of PDA and the clinical dilemma faced by professionals, within the United Kingdom, following increased demand from families seeking assessment and support. We appreciate that research on this topic is scarce and understanding of PDA behaviours remains limited and that methodological improvements are required. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12376DOI Listing

Intolerance of uncertainty and anxiety as explanatory frameworks for extreme demand avoidance in children and adolescents.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May 22;25(2):59-67. Epub 2019 May 22.

School of Psychology, Newcastle University, Newcastle, UK.

Background: Pathological demand avoidance (PDA) is a proposed subtype of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), characterised by extreme avoidance of demands. Demand avoidant behaviour has been proposed to be driven by an anxious need to be in control, although has never been explicitly studied. Emerging evidence suggests intolerance of uncertainty (IU) and anxiety may explain the behaviours seen in ASD. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12336DOI Listing

Response: Anxiety and behaviour in and beyond ASD; does the idea of 'PDA' really help? - a response to Green (2020).

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May 27;25(2):77-78. Epub 2020 Mar 27.

School of Psychology, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK.

We acknowledge Green's viewpoint and agree that currently the literature does not support the validity of PDA as an independent syndrome. However, the controversy is real and exists for a reason. We therefore argue that it is important to move beyond labelling and the potentially unhelpful implications of discussion around whether or not it is a condition, diagnosis or a co-morbid condition, to a point of recognition of the phenomenon. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12383DOI Listing

Editorial: Demand avoidance - pathological, extreme or oppositional?

Authors:
Ann Ozsivadjian

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May;25(2):57-58

Honorary Principal Clinical Psychologist, Evelina London Children's Hospital, Guy's and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust and Independent Practitioner, London, UK.

Since its inception in 1980, the term PDA has generated much debate, indeed, arguably few subjects have generated such controversy in the neurodevelopmental literature. However research in the area is moving into more practical arenas, including trying to understand why some children present with problematic demand avoidant behaviour, in order to provide practical support to families. In this special edition of Child and Adolescent Mental Health, data from two studies are presented which begin to look for underlying factors contributing to an anxious need for control. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12388DOI Listing

School-based targeted prevention compared to specialist mental health treatment for youth anxiety.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May 12;25(2):102-109. Epub 2020 Jan 12.

Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Chile Welfare, NORCE Norwegian Research Centre, Bergen, Norway.

Background: The 'FRIENDS for life' program (FRIENDS) is a 10-session cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) program used for prevention and treatment of youth anxiety. There is discussion about whether FRIENDS is best applied as prevention or as treatment.

Methods: We compared FRIENDS delivered in schools as targeted prevention to a previous specialist mental health clinic trial. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12366DOI Listing

Clinicians' use of and attitudes towards technology to provide and support interventions in child and adolescent mental health services.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 May 11;25(2):95-101. Epub 2019 Dec 11.

Department for Health, University of Bath, Bath, UK.

Background: Technology can increase child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) capacity by supporting and delivering interventions, yet it has not been widely adopted by CAMHS child mental health professionals. Uptake can either be facilitated or obstructed by child mental health professionals' attitudes, which remain largely unknown.

Method: One hundred fifty-four CAMHS child mental health professionals completed a questionnaire about their use of, and attitudes towards, using technology with children and adolescents. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12362DOI Listing

The relationship of severity of depression with homocysteine, folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin D levels in children and adolescents.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Apr 18. Epub 2020 Apr 18.

Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Ordu University, Ordu, Turkey.

Background: Depression is a heterogeneous disorder and is thought to develop as a result of complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. One-carbon metabolism that includes vitamin B12, folic acid, and homocysteine has been investigated in psychiatric disorders like depression. In recent years, vitamin D has also been considered to contribute to psychiatric disorders. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12387DOI Listing

Racial/ethnic differences in treatment quality among youth with primary care provider-initiated versus mental health specialist-initiated care for major depressive disorders.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Feb 5;25(1):28-35. Epub 2019 Dec 5.

Department of Pharmaceutical Health Outcomes and Policy, University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA.

Objectives: To compare the racial/ethnic differences in treatment quality among youth with primary care provider-initiated versus mental health specialist-initiated care for major depressive disorders (MDD).

Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted using the 2005-2007 Medicaid claims data from Texas. Youth aged 10-20 during the study period were identified if they had two consecutive MDD diagnoses and received either medications for MDD or psychotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12359DOI Listing
February 2020
0.954 Impact Factor

Exploring young people's experiences and perceptions of mental health and well-being using photography.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Feb 24;25(1):13-20. Epub 2019 Oct 24.

Institute of Health and Allied Professions, Nottingham Trent University, Nottingham, UK.

Introduction: The mental health of young people is a major global public health concern. A shift in focus towards children and young people's mental health in the UK has emphasized young people's voices, as of paramount importance in shaping the path for future quality care provision. The paper examines a study that aimed to explore young people's perceptions of mental health and well-being using photographs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12351DOI Listing
February 2020

Attachment disorders diagnosed by community practitioners: a replication and extension.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Feb 27;25(1):4-10. Epub 2019 Jun 27.

Section of Clinical Child and Family Studies, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Background: While considered a rare diagnosis, reactive attachment disorder (RAD) is simultaneously the subject of considerable debate. A recent report suggested that RAD is overdiagnosed in community settings and that conduct problems may be used to make a diagnosis of RAD (Woolgar & Baldock, Child and Adolescent Mental Health, 20, 2015, 34-40). This study seeks to replicate and extend these findings. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12338DOI Listing
February 2020

Narrative Matters: Young people, social media and body image.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Feb 19;25(1):48-50. Epub 2019 Aug 19.

School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12345DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7317704PMC
February 2020

Debate: What if it's not just a phase?

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Feb;25(1):43-44

Manchester University NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK.

In order to support children and young people who are exploring their gender, we need to develop a shared understanding of gender identities and enhance the evidence base relating to long-term outcomes. All professionals working with children and young people should be trained in gender diversity. Health-care systems must be adapted to enable us to record gender identity; outcome measures should be developed that accommodate different gender identities. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12352DOI Listing
February 2020

Debate: Different strokes for different folks.

Authors:
Kenneth J Zucker

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Feb 31;25(1):36-37. Epub 2019 May 31.

Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada.

A gender social transition in prepubertal children is a form of psychosocial treatment that aims to reduce gender dysphoria, but with the likely consequence of subsequent (lifelong) biomedical treatments as well (gender-affirming hormonal treatment and surgery). Gender social transition of prepubertal children will increase dramatically the rate of gender dysphoria persistence when compared to follow-up studies of children with gender dysphoria who did not receive this type of psychosocial intervention and, oddly enough, might be characterized as iatrogenic. Parents who bring their children for clinical care hold different philosophical views on what is the best way to help reduce the gender dysphoria, which require both respect and understanding. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12330DOI Listing
February 2020

Commentary: Increasing diagnostic precision in reactive attachment disorder - a commentary on Allen & Schuengel (2019).

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Feb 1;25(1):11-12. Epub 2019 Dec 1.

Department of Pediatrics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.

A study by Allen and Schuengel in this issue of the journal replicates and extends previous findings by Woolgar and Baldock (2015) indicating that community practitioners are far more likely to diagnose reactive attachment disorder in symptomatic children than are specialists using well-validated measures. We consider historic variability in how this disorder is defined but note an emerging consensus in nosologies and among researchers. We consider how more systematic assessments might improve diagnostic efforts to specify the kinds of clinical phenomena that are associated with neglect and deprivation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12357DOI Listing
February 2020

Clinical research updates.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Feb;25(1):54-55

King's College London, London, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12364DOI Listing
February 2020

Loneliness and friendlessness among adolescents in 25 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Feb 16;25(1):21-27. Epub 2019 Dec 16.

College of Health and Human Services, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, USA.

Background: Loneliness is a common health problem among the elderly but is not well understood in the adolescent population, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Adolescent loneliness can have adverse impacts on short- and long-term health status.

Methods: This study examined rates of self-reported loneliness and friendlessness among 76,982 secondary school students in 25 LMICs in Latin America and the Caribbean who participated in the Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12358DOI Listing
February 2020

Editorial: Improving health care for gender diverse youth through education and training.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Feb;25(1):1-3

Department of Psychiatry, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

As a global community, there is increasing understanding and acceptance that children and adolescents must not conform their gender identity and expression to that of their sex assigned at birth. Until recently, the cultural norm was an expectation that children and adolescents would be raised by their caregivers to express themselves in ways that matched their sex assigned at birth. While there has been a significant cultural shift to identify gender identity as an important concept that is related to human development, there is not yet consensus on how caregivers and healthcare systems ought to attend to this awareness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12365DOI Listing
February 2020

Debate: Not cosmetic surgery: dysphoria is a physical symptom.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Feb 26;25(1):38-39. Epub 2019 Aug 26.

Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12343DOI Listing
February 2020

Debate: The pressing need for research and services for gender desisters/detransitioners.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Feb;25(1):45-47

The Integrated Psychology Clinic, London, UK.

The number of people presenting at gender clinics is increasing worldwide. Many people undergo a gender transition with subsequent improved psychological well-being (Paediatrics, 2014, 134, 696). However, some people choose to stop this journey, 'desisters', or to reverse their transition, 'detransitioners'. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12361DOI Listing
February 2020

Debate: You can't take politics out of the debate on gender-diverse children.

Authors:
Bernadette Wren

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 Feb;25(1):40-42

Gender Identity Development Service, Tavistock & Portman NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.

The focus of concern in the public conversation about the care of gender-diverse children and adolescents is to some degree a matter of politics: that is, the dynamics of power and 'voice' in our modern world. There are questions relating to child and parent autonomy in making identity-driven life decisions; the counterbalancing need to safeguard children when new technologies enable new life choices to be made; the role of professional 'experts' (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12350DOI Listing
February 2020

Technology Matters: Mental health apps - separating the wheat from the chaff.

Child Adolesc Ment Health 2020 02 13;25(1):51-53. Epub 2019 Dec 13.

NIHR MindTech MedTech Co-operative, Institute of Mental Health, School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/camh.12363DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7006755PMC
February 2020