392 results match your criteria Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis


Honey in the management of side effects of radiotherapy- or radio/chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. A systematic review.

Complement Ther Clin Pract 2019 Feb 30;34:145-152. Epub 2018 Nov 30.

Department Hematology and Internal Oncology, University of Jena, Am Klinikum 1, 07747, Jena, Germany.

Background: and purpose: In spite of several trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses, honey is not considered as a viable candidate for the prophylaxis and treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in the practice guidelines for supportive care. The purpose of this study was to analyse the value of honey in this treatment situation based on randomized trials acknowledging the fact that manuka honey which is used in some trials distinguishes itself from other honey due to the presence of methylglyoxal.

Methods: On the basis of a literature search, we identified and analysed 17 randomized trials on the topic. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ctcp.2018.11.016DOI Listing
February 2019

Effect of freeze drying on stability, thermo-responsive characteristics, and wound healing of erythropoietin-loaded trimethyl chitosan/glycerophosphate hydrogel.

Res Pharm Sci 2018 Dec;13(6):476-483

Pathology Department, School of Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, I. R. Iran.

Erythropoietin (EPO) was successfully incorporated into a bioadhesive thermosensitive hydrogel based on trimethyl chitosan (TMC)/β-glycerophosphate (GP) for prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in cancerous patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of freeze drying on thermo-responsive property of the hydrogel and structural stability of the loaded protein. The freeze-dried EPO-loaded hydrogel were characterized using various methods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/1735-5362.245959DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6288991PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Behaviour and Prevention of 5'Fluorouracil and Doxorubicin-induced Oral Mucositis in Immunocompetent Patients with Solid Tumors: A Randomised Trial.

Oral Health Prev Dent 2018 ;16(6):549-555

Purpose: This study evaluated the efficacy of four methods to prevent chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis (OM) in patients with solid tumors (ST). In addition, the behaviour of OM was investigated in these oncological patients.

Materials And Methods: Forty-eight patients, aged 27-84, were randomly allocated to different groups from the first day of chemotherapy (CT), in the following sequence: group 1: intensive oral care programme (IOCP); group 2: 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3290/j.ohpd.a41659DOI Listing
January 2018

Oral Zinc Sulfate for Prevention and Treatment of Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis: A Meta-Analysis of Five Randomized Controlled Trials.

Front Oncol 2018 19;8:484. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Chongqing Key Laboratory of Translational Research for Cancer Metastasis and Individualized Treatment, Department of Gastroenterology, Chongqing Cancer Institute, Chongqing University Cancer Hospital, Chongqing, China.

Chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis is an extremely serious complication faced by cancer patients. The role of oral zinc sulfate in preventing and treating chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis remains a subject of debate. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the potential of oral zinc sulfate to alleviate this morbid condition. Read More

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https://www.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fonc.2018.00484/
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fonc.2018.00484DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6252385PMC
November 2018
7 Reads

Is there any association between use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis?

Authors:
Kadri Altundag

Eur J Cancer Care (Engl) 2018 Nov;27(6):e12921

MKA Breast Cancer Clinic, Tepe Prime, Ankara, Turkey.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ecc.12921DOI Listing
November 2018

Rabbit as an Animal Model for Pharmacokinetics Studies of Enteric Capsule Contains Recombinant Human Keratinocyte Growth Factor-Loaded Chitosan Nanoparticles.

Curr Clin Pharmacol 2018 Nov 19. Epub 2018 Nov 19.

Universiti Teknologi MARA, Faculty of Pharmacy, Bandar Puncak Alam, 42300 Selangor . Malaysia.

Background: Recombinant human keratinocyte growth factor (rHuKGF) has gained considerable attention by researchers as epithelial cells proliferating agent. Moreover, intravenous truncated rHuKGF (palifermin) has been approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat and prevent chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis and small intestine ulceration. The labile structure and short circulation time of rHuKGF in-vivo are the main obstacles that reduce the oral bioactivity and dosage of such proteins at the target site. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1574884714666181120103907DOI Listing
November 2018
10 Reads

Toxic Side Effects of Targeted Therapies and Immunotherapies Affecting the Skin, Oral Mucosa, Hair, and Nails.

Am J Clin Dermatol 2018 Nov;19(Suppl 1):31-39

Institut Universitaire du Cancer Toulouse - Oncopole, 1 avenue Irène Joliot-Curie, 31059, TOULOUSE Cedex 9, France.

Targeted therapies and immunotherapies are associated with a wide range of dermatologic adverse events (dAEs) resulting from common signaling pathways involved in malignant behavior and normal homeostatic functions of the epidermis and dermis. Dermatologic toxicities include damage to the skin, oral mucosa, hair, and nails. Acneiform rash is the most common dAE, observed in 25-85% of patients treated by epidermal growth factor receptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitors. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s40257-018-0384-3
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s40257-018-0384-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6244569PMC
November 2018
14 Reads

Protocol for a randomised controlled trial to study cryoprevention of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis after autologous stem cell transplantation.

BMJ Open 2018 Oct 24;8(10):e021993. Epub 2018 Oct 24.

School of Business, Economics and IT, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden.

Introduction: A majority of patients who receive myeloablative therapy prior to hematopoetic stem cell transplantation develop oral mucositis (OM). This adverse cytotoxic effect manifests as oral mucosal erythema and ulcerations and frequently necessitates high doses of morphine for pain alleviation. OM may also interfere with food intake and result in parenteral nutrition, weight loss and impaired quality of life. Read More

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http://bmjopen.bmj.com/lookup/doi/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-02199
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-021993DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6224728PMC
October 2018
9 Reads

Effects of Onchung-eum, an Herbal Prescription, on 5-Fluorouracil-Induced Oral Mucositis.

Integr Cancer Ther 2018 12 8;17(4):1285-1296. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

1 Department of Gastroenterology, College of Korean Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul, Korea.

In most cancer patients, chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis (OM) is a frequent side effect, leading to low quality of life and delay in therapy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Onchung-eum, a well-known herbal prescription in traditional medicine comprising 8 herbs that has long been used for skin diseases, on 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-induced OM in human pharyngeal cells and golden Syrian hamsters. DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging activity, MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay, and reactive oxygen species production were measured in vitro. Read More

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http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1534735418805560
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1534735418805560DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6247538PMC
December 2018
5 Reads

Oral mucositis associated with anti-EGFR therapy in colorectal cancer: single institutional retrospective cohort study.

BMC Cancer 2018 Oct 5;18(1):957. Epub 2018 Oct 5.

Department of Pharmacy, Shiga University of Medical Science Hospital, Seta Tsukinowa-cho, Otsu, Shiga, 520-2192, Japan.

Background: Chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis impairs the quality of life. The difference in severity of oral mucositis between different anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies combined with cytotoxic drugs in colorectal cancer is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in oral mucositis between panitumumab (Pmab) and cetuximab (Cmab) combined with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12885-018-4862-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6173836PMC
October 2018
10 Reads

Adjunctive Treatments for the Prevention of Chemotherapy- and Radiotherapy-Induced Mucositis.

Integr Cancer Ther 2018 12 23;17(4):1027-1047. Epub 2018 Aug 23.

1 University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

Background: Chemoradiotherapy-associated mucositis can manifest as pain, inflammation, dysphagia, diarrhea, weight loss, rectal bleeding, and infection. Mucositis is a major dose-limiting side effect of chemotherapy, affecting nutritional intake and oral and intestinal function. Despite several interventions being available, there is a need for safe and effective preventative and treatment options for treatment-induced mucositis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1534735418794885DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6247548PMC
December 2018
21 Reads

The efficacy of sodium azulene sulfonate L-glutamine for managing chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in cancer patients: a prospective comparative study.

J Pharm Health Care Sci 2018 13;4:20. Epub 2018 Aug 13.

1Department of Pharmacy, Iwate Medical University Hospital, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka-shi, Iwate 020-8505 Japan.

Background: The efficacy of sodium azulene sulfonate L-glutamine (GA) in treating oral mucositis caused by the administration of anticancer agents has not been previously elucidated. Therefore, this prospective comparative study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of GA in treating oral mucositis caused by chemotherapy regimens involving fluorinated pyrimidine anticancer drugs.

Methods: The subjects of this study were patients with oral mucositis of grade 2 or higher while on outpatient chemotherapy regimens involving fluorinated pyrimidine anticancer drugs for colorectal or breast cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40780-018-0114-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6088392PMC
August 2018
4 Reads

Effectiveness of Topical Application of Honey on Oral Mucosa of Children for the Management of Oral Mucositis Associated with Chemotherapy.

Indian J Pediatr 2018 Aug 6. Epub 2018 Aug 6.

Department of Neonatology Nursing, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India.

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of topical application of honey on Oral Mucositis (OM) associated with chemotherapy.

Methods: An observational blind study is performed upon a sample of 100 children receiving chemotherapy who developed oral mucositis. All children are divided into two groups (control and experimental) who received different regimens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12098-018-2733-xDOI Listing
August 2018
4 Reads
0.920 Impact Factor

A mucoadhesive thermosensitive hydrogel containing erythropoietin as a potential treatment in oral mucositis: in vitro and in vivo studies.

Drug Deliv Transl Res 2018 10;8(5):1226-1237

Department of Medicinal Chemistry, School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Science, Isfahan University of Medical Science, Isfahan, Iran.

Oral mucositis (OM) represents a therapeutic challenge frequently encountered in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Erythropoietin (EPO) has anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and wound-healing properties and therefore has important roles in the prevention and treatment of OM. In the current study, we developed a thermally sensitive mucoadhesive gel based on trimethyl chitosan (TMC) containing EPO for the treatment of OM. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13346-018-0566-9DOI Listing
October 2018
4 Reads

Prophylactic Effect of Polaprezinc, a Zinc-L-carnosine, Against Chemotherapy-induced Oral Mucositis in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation.

Anticancer Res 2018 Aug;38(8):4691-4697

Department of Pharmacy, Gifu University Hospital, Gifu, Japan.

Background/aim: Polaprezinc suspension in sodium alginate (PZ-AG) reduces the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in adult patients receiving radiotherapy or high-dose chemotherapy. In the present study, the prophylactic effect of PZ-AG against oral mucositis was assessed in pediatric patients with hematological malignancies receiving high-dose chemotherapy followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).

Patients And Methods: Data of 16 children who underwent HSCT during a period between January 2010 and December 2017 were obtained from medical records and they were retrospectively analyzed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.21873/anticanres.12775DOI Listing
August 2018
12 Reads

Intestinal homeostasis is restored in mice following a period of intestinal growth induced by orally administered Emu Oil.

Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 2018 07 9;243(11):945-952. Epub 2018 Jul 9.

2 Gastroenterology Department, Women's & Children's Hospital, North Adelaide 5006, Australia.

Previously, we reported that orally administered Emu Oil (EO) increases mucosal thickness in the small intestine and colon in rodent models of chemotherapy-induced mucositis and colitis. However, it remains unclear whether mucosal thickening (crypt and villus lengthening) represents a process of normal or aberrant growth. We sought to determine if villus height (VH) and crypt depth (CD) measurements returned to normal in EO-treated rats following withdrawal of EO therapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1535370218787457DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6108051PMC
July 2018
2 Reads

Factors Contributing to the Duration of Chemotherapy-Induced Severe Oral Mucositis in Oncopediatric Patients.

Int J Environ Res Public Health 2018 06 1;15(6). Epub 2018 Jun 1.

Departament of Clinical and Social Dentistry, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, João Pessoa, Paraíba 50445, Brazil.

This study analyzes the factors contributing to the duration of severe oral mucositis in oncopediatric patients. A longitudinal study was conducted in the pediatric department of a cancer referral hospital between 2013 and 2017. Seventy-three patients diagnosed with cancer undergoing chemotherapy protocols were analyzed. Read More

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http://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/15/6/1153
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061153DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6025254PMC
June 2018
10 Reads

[The Collaboration between Clinical Therapy and Academic Study to Benefit Patients].

Yakugaku Zasshi 2018 ;138(6):767-772

School of Pharmacy, Iwate Medical University.

 Cancer chemotherapy-induced stomatitis may spread throughout a patient's entire oral cavity and decrease the patient's QOL. The therapy for stomatitis at Iwate Medical University Hospital (IMUH) includes dental treatment before chemotherapy, in addition to oral rinses or cryotherapy as a preventative measure. However, in our survey of doctors and nurses, the responses of patients "satisfied" with the present approach for stomatitis treatment reached only 5. Read More

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https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/yakushi/138/6/138_17-00
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1248/yakushi.17-00184-4DOI Listing
August 2018
28 Reads

The clinical impact of Hangeshashinto (TJ-14) in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer: Analyses of pooled data from two phase II randomized clinical trials (HANGESHA-G and HANGESHA-C).

J Cancer 2018 19;9(10):1725-1730. Epub 2018 Apr 19.

Tokai Central Hospital.

: The current pooled analysis evaluated the efficacy of Hangeshashinto (TJ-14) in the prevention and/or treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis (COM) in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer using two prospective, multi-institutional, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II trials. : HANGESHA-G and HANGESHA-C randomly assigned patients with gastric cancer or colorectal cancer who developed moderate to severe COM (grade ≥1) during any cycle of chemotherapy to receive either TJ-14 or a placebo as a double-blind trial. The patients received a placebo or TJ-14 for four to six weeks, according to the chemotherapy regimen, from the start of their next course of chemotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7150/jca.24733DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5968759PMC
April 2018
22 Reads

Efficacy and safety of oral zinc sulfate in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: Protocol for a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2018 May;97(21):e10839

Chongqing Key Laboratory of Translational Research for Cancer Metastasis and Individualized Treatment.

Background: Oral mucositis has been an extremely serious complication resulted from cytotoxic effects of the chemotherapy among cancer patients. Several randomized controlled trials investigated the efficacy of zinc sulfate in prevention of this morbid condition among cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, however conclusive findings has not yet been generated. This systematic review will assess the efficacy and safety of oral zinc sulfate for chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. Read More

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http://Insights.ovid.com/crossref?an=00005792-201805250-0005
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000010839DOI Listing
May 2018
6 Reads

Multicenter randomized, double-blind controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy of laser therapy for the treatment of severe oral mucositis induced by chemotherapy in children: laMPO RCT.

Pediatr Blood Cancer 2018 Aug 4;65(8):e27098. Epub 2018 May 4.

Pediatric Hemato-Oncology Unit, IRCCS materno infantile Burlo Garofolo, Trieste, Italy.

Objectives: To demonstrate the efficacy of laser photobiomodulation (PBM) compared to that of placebo on severe oral mucositis (OM) in pediatric oncology patients. The primary objective was the reduction of OM grade (World Health Organization [WHO] scale) 7 days after starting PBM. Secondary objectives were reduction of pain, analgesic consumption, and incidence of side effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/pbc.27098DOI Listing
August 2018
11 Reads
2.562 Impact Factor

Advances in the Use of Anti-inflammatory Agents to Manage Chemotherapy-induced Oral and Gastrointestinal Mucositis.

Curr Pharm Des 2018 ;24(14):1518-1532

School of Pharmacy and Medical Sciences, Sansom Institute for Health Research, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.

Mucositis is a side effect associated with the use of chemotherapy, and has a significant impact on the quality of life. Mucositis, by definition, refers to the inflammation of the mucosa and occurs throughout the alimentary tract from the mouth to anus. Nuclear Factor kappa B (NFκB) encompasses a family of transcription factors, which upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.2174/1381612824666180409093918DOI Listing
January 2018
14 Reads

[Oral mucositis as the most common complication of childhood cancer therapy. Review of the literature].

Orv Hetil 2018 Apr;159(13):495-502

Konzerváló Fogászati Tanszék, Debreceni Egyetem, Klinikai Központ, Fogorvostudományi Kar Debrecen.

Mucositis is the most common oral complication of cancer therapy. Oral mucositis in childhood is more frequent and severe compared to adults, especially in children with leukemia. Lesions develop as the chemotherapeutic agents attack the rapidly dividing cells of the oral mucous membrane. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1556/650.2018.31011DOI Listing
April 2018
7 Reads

Preventive effect of oral hangeshashinto (TJ-14) on the development of reflux-induced esophageal cancer.

Surgery 2018 Mar 22. Epub 2018 Mar 22.

Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Kanazawa University Hospital, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, Japan.

Background: Prostaglandin E2 is one of the potential products that promotes development of tumors and also is a strong inducer of M2 phenotype macrophages, which contribute to tumor development in the immunosuppressed microenvironment. Hangeshashinto (TJ-14), a Japanese traditional medicine (Kampo medicine), has been reported to be effective in preventing chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis through the reduction of prostaglandin E2. We previously developed a surgical rat reflux model of esophageal cancer and used this well-established animal model to investigate the action of TJ-14 in preventing esophageal cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.surg.2018.02.003DOI Listing
March 2018
7 Reads

[Development of "Patient Friendly Formulations" to Counter the Side Effects of Cancer Chemotherapy].

Yakugaku Zasshi 2018 ;138(2):169-175

Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Meiji Pharmaceutical University.

 Anticancer drug-induced stomatitis develops in 30% to 40% of cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. However, medications for this condition are not commercially available in Japan. The "hospital formulation" is a customized medicine which hospital pharmacists prepare when doctors cannot carry out the medical therapy most suitable for a patient using commercial medicines. Read More

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https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article/yakushi/138/2/138_17-00
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1248/yakushi.17-00174-2DOI Listing
February 2018
10 Reads

Efficacy of Plantago major, chlorhexidine 0.12% and sodium bicarbonate 5% solution in the treatment of oral mucositis in cancer patients with solid tumour: A feasibility randomised triple-blind phase III clinical trial.

Eur J Oncol Nurs 2018 Feb 14;32:40-47. Epub 2017 Dec 14.

Nursing Research, Catalan Institute of Oncology (ICO), L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain.

Purpose: Oral mucositis is one of the most common adverse effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of Plantago major extract versus chlorhexidine 0.12% versus sodium bicarbonate 5% in the symptomatic treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in solid tumour cancer patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ejon.2017.11.006DOI Listing
February 2018
6 Reads

Oral microbiota reduce wound healing capacity of epithelial monolayers, irrespective of the presence of 5-fluorouracil.

Exp Biol Med (Maywood) 2018 02 16;243(4):350-360. Epub 2018 Jan 16.

1 Center for Microbial Ecology and Technology (CMET), Ghent University, Ghent 9000, Belgium.

Oral mucositis is still one of the most painful side effects of chemotherapeutic treatment and a mounting body of evidence suggests a key role for the oral microbiome in mucositis development. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this work, we have investigated the interactions between the host, the microbiome, and chemotherapeutic treatments in more detail. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1535370217753842DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6022929PMC
February 2018
17 Reads

Effects of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Against Chemotherapy-induced Mucositis: A Double-blind Randomized Clinical Trial.

Wounds 2017 Dec;29(12):360-366

Kerman Dental and Oral Diseases Research Center, Kerman University of Medical Sciences, Kerman, Iran.

Objective: This double-blind randomized clinical trial evaluates the ef cacy and route of administration of omega-3 fatty acids for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis in patients undergoing che- motherapy in Iranian hospitals.

Materials And Methods: Sixty patients developing World Health Organization (WHO) grade 1 oral mucositis were randomized to the omega-3 fatty acid (n=30) or placebo (n=30) group. Mucositis was assessed according to the WHO, Western Consortium for Cancer Nursing Research, and Oral Mucositis Weekly Questionnaire cri- teria at baseline and rst, second, and third weeks of chemotherapy un- til mucositis resolved. Read More

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December 2017
6 Reads

Phase II investigational oral drugs for the treatment of radio/chemotherapy induced oral mucositis.

Expert Opin Investig Drugs 2018 Feb 17;27(2):147-154. Epub 2018 Jan 17.

a Divisions of Oral Medicine and Dentistry , Brigham and Women's Hospital and the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute , Boston , MA , USA.

Introduction: Oral mucositis is a significant unmet clinical need for many cancer patients. The biological complexity of mucositis' pathogenesis provides a number of mechanistic targets suitable as pharmacologic targets. The diversity of targets has stimulated drug development in search of an effective intervention. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/13543784.2018.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13543784.2018.1427732DOI Listing
February 2018
12 Reads

Chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis and associated infections in a novel organotypic model.

Mol Oral Microbiol 2018 06 20;33(3):212-223. Epub 2018 Feb 20.

Department of Oral Health and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Connecticut School of Dental Medicine, Farmington, CT, USA.

Oral mucositis is a common side effect of cancer chemotherapy, with significant adverse impact on the delivery of anti-neoplastic treatment. There is a lack of consensus regarding the role of oral commensal microorganisms in the initiation or progression of mucositis because relevant experimental models are non-existent. The goal of this study was to develop an in vitro mucosal injury model that mimics chemotherapy-induced mucositis, where the effect of oral commensals can be studied. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/omi.12214DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5945319PMC
June 2018
9 Reads

Global Health Journal Club: Is Honey Effective as a Treatment for Chemotherapy-induced Mucositis in Paediatric Oncology Patients?

J Trop Pediatr 2018 Apr;64(2):162-168

Assistant Professor, Pediatrics, Yale University, Rwanda Human Resources for Health Program.

Oral mucositis (OM) is an inflammatory response of mucosal epithelium to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy causing severe oral pain and ulceration, which may complicate the management of cancer. The Mucositis Prevention Guideline Development Group has developed an international guideline for the prevention of mucositis in children receiving treatment for cancer or undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Evidence-based preventative strategies include cryotherapy, low-level light therapy and keratinocyte growth factor. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/tropej/fmx092DOI Listing
April 2018
12 Reads
0.857 Impact Factor

Photodynamic therapy for treatment of oral mucositis: Pilot study with pediatric patients undergoing chemotherapy.

Photodiagnosis Photodyn Ther 2018 Mar 22;21:115-120. Epub 2017 Nov 22.

"Universidade Federal de Pernambuco", Avenida Professor Moraes Rego, 1235, CEP 50670-901, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil. Electronic address:

Background: Oral mucositis has become a major dose-limiting toxicity of antineoplastic treatment.

Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of photodynamic therapy (PDT) and low level laser therapy (LLLT) on the treatment of chemotherapy-induced mucositis in pediatric patients.

Methods: An open, controlled, and blind, randomized clinical trial was conducted with 29 patients, from 10 months to 18 years old, who were divided into two groups. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S15721000173046
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.pdpdt.2017.11.010DOI Listing
March 2018
18 Reads

Chemotherapy induced oral mucositis: prevention is possible.

Authors:
E Una Cidon

Chin Clin Oncol 2018 Feb 3;7(1). Epub 2017 Nov 3.

Medical Oncology, Royal Bournemouth and Christchurch Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Bournemouth, UK.

Background: Oral mucositis (OM) is an inflammation of the oral mucosa which occurs in 20-40% of patients receiving conventional chemotherapy (CM). Many different substances have been used separately to treat or prevent OM but no standard procedure has been settled as definitive. We conducted a prospective study to examine whether rinses with a mixture of soluble prednisolone, nystatin and salt water applied before the expected OM appears, would reduce the incidence of grade 2-3 OM in subsequent cycles of CM. Read More

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http://cco.amegroups.com/article/view/17197/18674
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/cco.2017.10.01DOI Listing
February 2018
9 Reads

Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma stimulation for prevention of 5-fluorouracil-induced oral mucositis in mice.

Head Neck 2018 03 20;40(3):577-583. Epub 2017 Nov 20.

Radiotherapy Unit, Department of Biomedical, Experimental and Clinical Sciences "Mario Serio", University of Florence, Firenze, Italy.

Background: Oral mucositis is a side effect of treatment regimens containing 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). The purpose of this study was to present our evaluation to see if rosiglitazone (RGZ) protected normal tissues from chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

Methods: C57BL/6J mice were treated with 5-FU for 5 days, with or without RGZ. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hed.25017DOI Listing
March 2018
14 Reads

A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis in pediatric and young patients.

Eur J Pediatr 2018 Jan 11;177(1):7-17. Epub 2017 Nov 11.

Department of Nursing,, Shanghai Children's Medical Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.

Oral mucositis is one of the most frequent complications after chemotherapy, occurring in approximately 52 to 80% of children receiving treatment for cancer. Recently, it has been suggested that the use of low-energy laser could reduce the grade of oral mucositis and alleviate the symptoms. In 2014, Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society of Oral Oncology has recommended low-level laser therapy in prevention of mucositis for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients because of its beneficial effects in majority of recent studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00431-017-3043-4DOI Listing
January 2018
11 Reads

Dental Treatment Planning for the Patient with Oral Cancer.

Dent Clin North Am 2018 01 7;62(1):121-130. Epub 2017 Oct 7.

Department of Oral Medicine, UConn Health, 263 Farmington Avenue, Farmington, CT 06030-1605, USA. Electronic address:

Oral cancer therapy is associated with a multitude of head and neck sequelae that includes, but is not limited to, hyposalivation, increased risk for dental caries, osteoradionecrosis of the jaw, radiation fibrosis syndrome, mucositis, chemotherapy-induced neuropathy, dysgeusia, dysphagia, mucosal lesions, trismus, and infections. Preparing a comprehensive treatment plan for patients undergoing cancer therapy is essential to help minimize their risks for developing these oral and dental complications. In addition, dentists must take into account a patient's ongoing oncologic therapy for those patients who present to the dentist while concurrently receiving cancer treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cden.2017.08.009DOI Listing
January 2018
19 Reads

Preventive effect of kampo medicine (hangeshashin-to, TJ-14) plus minocycline against afatinib-induced diarrhea and skin rash in patients with non-small cell lung cancer.

Onco Targets Ther 2017 24;10:5107-5113. Epub 2017 Oct 24.

Division of Respirology, Neurology, and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Kurume University, Kurume City.

Purpose: Diarrhea and oral mucositis induced by afatinib can cause devastating quality of life issues for patients undergoing afatinib treatment. Several studies have shown that hangeshashin-to (TJ-14) might be useful for chemotherapy-induced diarrhea and oral mucositis. In this study, we investigated the prophylactic effects of TJ-14 for afatinib-induced diarrhea and oral mucositis and minocycline for afatinib-induced skin rash. Read More

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https://www.dovepress.com/preventive-effect-of-kampo-medicin
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http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OTT.S145613DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5661491PMC
October 2017
15 Reads

Contribution of oxidative stress in acute intestinal mucositis induced by 5 fluorouracil (5-FU) and its pro-drug capecitabine in rats.

Toxicol Mech Methods 2018 May 24;28(4):262-267. Epub 2017 Nov 24.

a Laboratoire de Physiologie Fonctionnelle et Valorisation des Bioressources-Institut Supérieur de Biotechnologie de Béja , Béja , 9000 , Tunisia.

This study was designed to examine the contribution of oxidative stress in gastrointestinal disorders after an intraperitoneal administration of 5 fluorouracil (5-FU; 100 mg/kg of body weight (b.w.)) and capecitabine oral administration (500 mg/kg b. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15376516.2017.1402976DOI Listing
May 2018
35 Reads
1.550 Impact Factor

Rebamipide suppresses 5-fluorouracil-induced cell death via the activation of Akt/mTOR pathway and regulates the expression of Bcl-2 family proteins.

Toxicol In Vitro 2018 Feb 17;46:284-293. Epub 2017 Oct 17.

Division of Pharmacotherapy, Kindai University, Faculty of Pharmacy, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka, Japan. Electronic address:

Oral mucositis is a common adverse effect of chemotherapy that limits the required dose of chemotherapeutic agents. Numerous attempts to mitigate chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis have failed to identify an appropriate treatment. Recently, it has been indicated that rebamipide prevents chemoradiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tiv.2017.10.019DOI Listing
February 2018
16 Reads

Double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial evaluating doxycycline effects on chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis.

J Clin Pharm Ther 2018 Apr 25;43(2):202-208. Epub 2017 Sep 25.

Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán, Mexico City, Mexico.

What Is Known And Objective: Chemotherapy (CT)-associated oral mucositis (OM) is one of the most debilitating and painful side effects in oncology patients, with limited effective management options. During CT, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are upregulated, causing damage in mucosal and submucosal tissues, and playing a key role in OM; therefore, the use of subantimicrobial doxycycline as a MMP inhibitor may represent a potential approach for OM management. The aim of this clinical trial was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of low doses of doxycycline in OM development in individuals with acute leukaemia (AL) during CT. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpt.12633DOI Listing
April 2018
7 Reads

Erratum: Oral cryotherapy for preventing chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: An effective but yet neglected strategy.

Authors:

J Cancer Res Ther 2017 Jul-Sep;13(3):603

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.4103/0973-1482.188301. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0973-1482.213699DOI Listing
September 2017
5 Reads

Bifidobacterium Infantis Ameliorates Chemotherapy-Induced Intestinal Mucositis Via Regulating T Cell Immunity in Colorectal Cancer Rats.

Cell Physiol Biochem 2017 18;42(6):2330-2341. Epub 2017 Aug 18.

Department of Oncology, the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University, Dalian, China.

Background/aims: Intestinal mucositis (IM) is a commonly encountered side effect in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy. This study aimed to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium infantis (B. infantis) in attenuating the severity of chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis by regulating the T cell subsets in rats with colorectal cancer (CRC). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000480005DOI Listing
November 2017
23 Reads
2.880 Impact Factor

Supportive Treatments for Patients with Cancer.

Dtsch Arztebl Int 2017 Jul;114(27-28):481-487

Department of Internal Medicine V: Hematology, Oncology, Rheumatology, Heidelberg University Hospital; Department of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology, Vivantes Hospital Neukölln, Berlin; Medical Center Charité Vivantes Radiotherapy, Berlin; Department of Internal Medicine I, Westpfalz Hospital Kaiserslautern; Department of Medicine: Hematology, Oncology, and Tumor Immunology, Charité Campus Virchow Hospital, Berlin; Department of Internal Medicine IV: Hematology and Oncology, University of Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Saale).

Background: For the treatment of patients with cancer to be successful and well-tolerated, the complications and side effects of the disease and its treatment must be treated and limited as far as possible. Summarized recommendations based on the constantly increasing evidence in the area of supportive care must be defined, standardized, and communicated.

Methods: We systematically reviewed the literature on the topics of anemia, neutropenia, nausea/vomiting, diarrhea, oral mucositis, skin toxicity, and peripheral neurotoxicity induced by cancer treatment, as well as osseous complications, extravasation, and side effects of radiotherapy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3238/arztebl.2017.0481DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5545632PMC
July 2017
11 Reads

Chemotherapy Induces Oral Mucositis in Mice Without Additional Noxious Stimuli.

Transl Oncol 2017 Aug 27;10(4):612-620. Epub 2017 Jun 27.

University of Connecticut, Department of Oral Health and Diagnostic Sciences. Electronic address:

Oral mucositis (OM) is a serious side effect of cancer chemotherapy. The pathobiology of oral mucositis remains incompletely understood due to lack of appropriate models which recapitulate the human condition. Existing rodent models are intraperitoneal and require radiation, chemical or mechanical injury to the chemotherapy protocol to induce oral lesions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tranon.2017.05.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5491455PMC
August 2017
24 Reads

Oral cryotherapy for preventing chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis: An effective but yet neglected strategy.

J Cancer Res Ther 2017 Apr-Jun;13(2):386-387

Student Research Committee, Department of Medical-Surgical Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Mashhad, Iran.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/0973-1482.188301DOI Listing
November 2018
12 Reads

Double-blind randomized study of oral glutamine on the management of radio/chemotherapy-induced mucositis and dermatitis in head and neck cancer.

Mol Clin Oncol 2017 Jun 5;6(6):931-936. Epub 2017 May 5.

Department of Surgery, School of Medicine, University of Seville, 41009 Seville, Spain.

This randomized clinical trial was designed to determine whether glutamine administration was effective in reducing the incidence and severity of mucositis and dermatitis induced by radiotherapy (RT) or chemoradiotherapy (CHRT) in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). Fifty patients were randomized to receive orally either L-Glutamine or placebo (25 patients in each arm). In the glutamine-treated group, 10 g of oral glutamine was administered three times daily. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3892/mco.2017.1238DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5451869PMC
June 2017
10 Reads

A Randomized Placebo- Controlled Double Blind Clinical Trial of Quercetin in the Prevention and Treatment of Chemotherapy-Induced Oral Mucositis.

J Clin Diagn Res 2017 Mar 1;11(3):ZC46-ZC50. Epub 2017 Mar 1.

PhD Candidate of Statistics, Statistics Office, Mashhad University of Statistics, Mashhad, Iran.

Introduction: Oral Mucositis (OM) is a serious complication of chemotherapy that results in painful debilitating inflammation that sometimes ends in interruption of treatment.

Aim: The study evaluated the effect of quercetin (a natural flavonoid) on preventing and treating chemotherapy induced OM in patients with blood malignancies. This double-blind, placebo controlled randomized trial was carried out on 20 adult patients who underwent high dose chemotherapy for blood malignancies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7860/JCDR/2017/23975.9571DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5427434PMC
March 2017
30 Reads

Oral Mucositis: Melatonin Gel an Effective New Treatment.

Int J Mol Sci 2017 May 7;18(5). Epub 2017 May 7.

Centro de Investigación Biomédica, Universidad de Granada, 18016 Granada, Spain.

The current treatment for cervico-facial cancer involves radio and/or chemotherapy. Unfortunately, cancer therapies can lead to local and systemic complications such as mucositis, which is the most common dose-dependent complication in the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. Mucositis can cause a considerably reduced quality of life in cancer patients already suffering from physical and psychological exhaustion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijms18051003DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5454916PMC
May 2017
22 Reads

Feeding strategies in pediatric cancer patients with gastrointestinal mucositis: a multicenter prospective observational study and international survey.

Support Care Cancer 2017 10 26;25(10):3075-3083. Epub 2017 Apr 26.

Department of Pediatric Oncology, Beatrix Children's Hospital, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, PO Box 30001, 9700 RB, Groningen, The Netherlands.

Introduction: Currently, there is no adequate prevention or treatment for both oral and gastrointestinal mucositis induced by chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy. Supportive care of symptoms plays a primary role during mucositis in the pediatric clinical setting. We aimed to get insight in the currently used feeding strategies in clinical practice in pediatric cancer patients with chemotherapy-induced mucositis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-017-3715-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5577052PMC
October 2017
16 Reads

Bacteremia due to Capnocytophaga species during chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in patients with hematological malignancies.

Rinsho Ketsueki 2017 ;58(3):210-215

Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine.

The number of reported cases of infections due to Capnocytophaga species (spp.) is limited. We herein describe four cases developing bacteremia due to Capnocytophaga spp. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.11406/rinketsu.58.210DOI Listing
August 2017
10 Reads