42 results match your criteria Chemosensory Perception[Journal]

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Development of a Regional Taste Test that uses Edible Circles for Stimulus Delivery.

Chemosens Percept 2019 Oct 12;12:115-124. Epub 2019 Apr 12.

Laboratory of Molecular Psychophysics, Department of Biology, Temple University, 1900 N. 12th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122 USA.

Introduction: Measurements of chemosensory function within specific regions of the tongue can yield important information about the sensitivity of lingual areas to chemosensory stimuli, and may identify possible nerve damage. A novel regional chemosensory test that uses thin edible circles was developed for human testing.

Methods: Edible circles placed at six different regions of the tongue were used to examine regional sensitivity to quinine for bitter taste, NaCl for salt taste, sucralose for sweet taste, and capsaicin for pungency. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-019-09265-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6905467PMC
October 2019

Affective Personality Traits in Olfactory Dysfunction: the Role of Dysthymia and Arousal.

Chemosens Percept 2018 14;11(2):72-76. Epub 2017 Dec 14.

1Department of Psychology, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 2, 8010 Graz, Austria.

Introduction: Olfactory dysfunction can have a negative impact on emotional well-being. The aim of the present study was to examine associations between olfactory deficits and two affective personality characteristics (trait anxiety/trait depression).

Methods: A questionnaire study was conducted with a total of 116 participants (33 classified as anosmic, 40 as hyposmic, and 39 as normosmic). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-017-9242-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6132825PMC
December 2017

Pilot Experiment: The Effect of Added Flavorants on the Taste and Pleasantness of Mixtures of Glycerol and Propylene Glycol.

Chemosens Percept 2018 Apr 28;11(1):1-9. Epub 2017 Jul 28.

Monell Chemical Senses Center, 3500 Market Street, Philadelphia PA 19104.

Introduction: The US Food and Drug Administration banned most "sweet" flavorants for use in cigarettes due to the concern that sweet flavors appeal to young, beginning smokers. However, many of the same flavors, including fruity and confection-associated aromas (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-017-9231-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5945214PMC
April 2018
4 Reads

Babies Smell Wonderful to Their Parents, Teenagers Do Not: an Exploratory Questionnaire Study on Children's Age and Personal Odor Ratings in a Polish Sample.

Chemosens Percept 2017 27;10(3):81-87. Epub 2017 Jun 27.

Department of Psychotherapy and Psychosomatic Medicine, TU Dresden, Fetscherstr. 74, 01307 Dresden, Germany.

Introduction: Infant body odor is subjectively pleasant to parents and activates reward areas in the brain. Hence, body odor perception might contribute to parental bonding. However, it is unknown whether the perceived pleasantness of children's body odor varies over the course of a child's development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-017-9230-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5574933PMC
June 2017
22 Reads

Chronic Oral Capsaicin Exposure During Development Leads to Adult Rats with Reduced Taste Bud Volumes.

Chemosens Percept 2016 Sep 30;9(3):95-104. Epub 2016 Jul 30.

University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Introduction: Cross-sensory interaction between gustatory and trigeminal nerves occurs in the anterior tongue. Surgical manipulations have demonstrated that the strength of this relationship varies across development. Capsaicin is a neurotoxin that affects fibers of the somatosensory lingual nerve surrounding taste buds, but not fibers of the gustatory chorda tympani nerve which synapse with taste receptor cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-016-9214-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5222609PMC
September 2016
5 Reads

Relative Effects of Sensory Modalities and Importance of Fatty Acid Sensitivity on Fat Perception in a Real Food Model.

Chemosens Percept 2016;9:105-119. Epub 2016 Jul 11.

Sensory Centre, Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, The University of Reading, PO Box 226, Whiteknights, Reading, RG6 6AP UK ; Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences, The University of Reading, PO Box 226, Whiteknights, Reading, RG6 6AP UK.

Introduction: Fat can be perceived through mouthfeel, odour and taste, but the influence of these modalities on fat perception remains undefined. Fatty acids are stimuli and individual sensitivity to fatty acids varies. Studies show association between fatty acid sensitivity, dietary intake and BMI, but results are conflicting. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-016-9211-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4989022PMC
July 2016
5 Reads

Perceptual Qualities of Ethanol Depend on Concentration, and Variation in These Percepts Associates with Drinking Frequency.

Chemosens Percept 2015 Sep 19;8(3):149-157. Epub 2015 Sep 19.

Sensory Evaluation Center, Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, 220 Food Science Building, University Park, PA 16802, USA.

Introduction: Ethanol, the pharmaceutically active ingredient in all alcoholic beverages, elicits multiple percepts including sweet, bitter, drying, and burning. However, quality-specific perceptual dose-response functions have not been previously reported. Also, individual differences in ethanol perception may associate with differences in alcoholic beverage use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-015-9196-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5006941PMC
September 2015
7 Reads

An introduction to this Special Issue: Chemosensation and Health.

Authors:
John E Hayes

Chemosens Percept 2015 Sep 26;8(3):109-111. Epub 2015 Sep 26.

Sensory Evaluation Center, Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-015-9197-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4725316PMC
September 2015
4 Reads

A role for lung retention in the sense of retronasal smell.

Chemosens Percept 2015 Aug 10;8(2):78-84. Epub 2015 May 10.

The John B. Pierce Laboratory, 209 Congress Avenue, New Haven, CT 06519, USA ; Department of Neurobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.

In olfaction, odors typically engage the lungs on the way to the nose to evoke retronasal smell. This is most notable when the lung has a first pass effect during smoking/vaping, but also upon exhaling after sniffing an odor. The lungs act as a sink for odors, which can both reduce the retronasal odor concentration and the odor mixture makeup. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-015-9181-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4635677PMC
August 2015
3 Reads

Using Animal Models to Determine the Role of Gustatory Neural Input in the Control of Ingestive Behavior and the Maintenance of Body Weight.

Chemosens Percept 2015 Aug 13;8(2):61-77. Epub 2015 Aug 13.

Departments of Neuroscience and Psychiatry, Division of Addiction Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, and Center for Smell and Taste, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA,

Introduction: Decades of research have suggested that nutritional intake contributes to the development of human disease, mainly by influencing the development of obesity and obesity-related conditions. A relatively large body of research indicates that functional variation in human taste perception can influence nutritional intake as well as body mass accumulation. However, there are a considerable number of studies that suggest that no link between these variables actually exists. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4636125PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-015-9190-yDOI Listing
August 2015
1 Read

Shifting human salty taste preference: Potential opportunities and challenges in reducing dietary salt intake of Americans.

Authors:
Nuala Bobowski

Chemosens Percept 2015 Sep 9;8(3):112-116. Epub 2015 May 9.

Monell Chemical Senses Center, 3500 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-3308, phone: 267-519-4891.

Dietary salt reduction of Americans has been a focus of public health initiatives for more than 40 years primarily due to the association between high salt intake and development of hypertension. Despite past efforts, salt intake of Americans has remained at levels well above dietary recommendations, likely due in part to the hedonic appeal of salty taste. As such, in 2010 the Institute of Medicine suggested a strategy of gradual salt reduction of processed foods, the primary source of Americans' dietary salt intake, via an approach intended to minimize impact on consumer acceptability of lower-sodium foods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-015-9179-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4593321PMC
September 2015
1 Read

Thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channel agonists and their role in mechanical, thermal and nociceptive sensations as assessed using animal models.

Chemosens Percept 2015 Aug;8(2):96-108

Dept of Neurobiology, Physiology and Behavior, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.

Introduction: The present paper summarizes research using animal models to investigate the roles of thermosensitive transient receptor potential (TRP) channels in somatosensory functions including touch, temperature and pain. We present new data assessing the effects of eugenol and carvacrol, agonists of the warmth-sensitive TRPV3, on thermal, mechanical and pain sensitivity in rats.

Methods: Thermal sensitivity was assessed using a thermal preference test, which measured the amount of time the animal occupied one of two adjacent thermoelectric plates set at different temperatures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-015-9176-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4572737PMC
August 2015
1 Read

Perceptual and neural responses to sweet taste in humans and rodents.

Chemosens Percept 2015 Aug;8(2):46-52

Department of Biology, University of Oklahoma, 730 Van Vleet Oval, Norman, OK 73019, 1-405-325-2365 (office), 1-405-325-7560 (fax).

Introduction: This mini-review discusses some of the parallels between rodent neurophysiological and human psychophysical data concerning temperature effects on sweet taste.

Methods And Purpose: "Sweet" is an innately rewarding taste sensation that is associated in part with foods that contain calories in the form of sugars. Humans and other mammals can show unconditioned preference for select sweet stimuli. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-015-9177-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4572743PMC
August 2015
11 Reads

The Taste and Smell Protocol in the 2011-2014 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES): Test-Retest Reliability and Validity Testing.

Chemosens Percept 2015 Sep 7;8(3):138-148. Epub 2015 Aug 7.

Department of Allied Health Sciences, University of Connecticut, 358 Mansfield Road, Unit 1101, Storrs, CT 06269, USA.

Introduction: The US NHANES 2011-2014 protocol includes a taste and smell questionnaire (CSQ) in home-based interviews and brief assessments in mobile exam centers. We report the short- and longer-term test-retest reliability and validity of this protocol against broader chemosensory measures.

Methods: A convenience sample of 73 adults (age=39. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-015-9194-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5100746PMC
September 2015
16 Reads

Perceptual mapping of chemesthetic stimuli in naïve assessors.

Chemosens Percept 2015 Jun;8(1):19-32

Sensory Evaluation Center, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA ; Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

Chemesthetic compounds, responsible for sensations such as burning, cooling, and astringency, are difficult stimuli to work with, especially when the evaluation task requires retasting. Here, we developed a protocol by which chemesthetic compounds can be assessed using sorting. We compared the performance of two cohorts of untrained assessors on this task, one with nose clips and the other without. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-015-9178-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4518850PMC
June 2015
3 Reads

The Relationships Between Common Measurements of Taste Function.

Chemosens Percept 2015;8(1):11-18. Epub 2015 Jun 5.

Centre for Advanced Sensory Science, School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Burwood, Victoria 3125 Australia.

Background: There are five common, independent measures used to characterize taste function in humans: detection and recognition thresholds (DT and RT), suprathreshold intensity ratings of prototypical tastants, propylthiouracil (PROP) bitterness intensity, and fungiform papillae (FP) number.

Methods: We employed all five methods to assess taste function of 65 women (21.5 ± 4 years, BMI 22. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12078-015-9183-x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-015-9183-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4475569PMC
June 2015
35 Reads

Sensitivity and Specificity of Self-Reported Olfactory Function in a Home-Based Study of Independent-Living, Healthy Older Women.

Chemosens Percept 2014 Dec;7(3-4):108-116

Department of Allied Health Sciences, College of Agriculture, Health, and Natural Resources, University of Connecticut-UCONN, 358 Mansfield Road, Box U1101, Storrs, CT 06269-2101, USA.

Introduction: The 2011-14 US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey chemosensory protocol asks adults to self-rate their orthonasal (via nostrils) and retronasal (via mouth) smell abilities for subsequent odor identification testing. From data collected with a similar protocol, we aimed to identify a self-reported olfactory index that showed the best sensitivity (correctly identifying dysfunction) and specificity (correctly indentifying normosmia) with measured olfaction.

Methods: In home-based testing, 121 independent-living older women (age 73±7 years) reported their olfactory function by interviewer-administered survey. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-014-9170-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4392851PMC
December 2014
8 Reads

Regional differences in suprathreshold intensity for bitter and umami stimuli.

Chemosens Percept 2014 Dec;7(3-4):147-157

Sensory Evaluation Center, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA ; Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

The sense of taste is often referred to as a 'nutritional gatekeeper', thought to have evolved to indicate energy sources and prevent ingestion of potential toxins. Fungiform papillae are structures on the anterior tongue in which taste buds are situated. They are concentrated at the tongue's tip and they can provide a useful estimate of overall taste bud density for taste research. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12078-014-9166-3
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-014-9166-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4254731PMC
December 2014
6 Reads

Does it Matter How We Pose the Question "How is Your Sense of Smell?"

Chemosens Percept 2014 29;7(3-4):103-107. Epub 2014 Jul 29.

Department of Psychology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.

There is a rather large, and unfortunate, discrepancy in the outcome between self-reported and standardized assessment of olfactory function. Questions for self-evaluation are commonly used that provide no information of with what to compare (comparison target) one's olfactory function. We therefore investigated whether responses differed between an unspecific question and two questions providing comparison targets. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-014-9171-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4250572PMC
July 2014
20 Reads

Quantitative Validation of the -Butanol Sniffin' Sticks Threshold Pens.

Chemosens Percept 2014 29;7(2):91-101. Epub 2014 Apr 29.

Department of Sensory Analytics, Fraunhofer Institute for Process Engineering and Packaging IVV, Giggenhauser Strasse 35, 85354 Freising, Germany.

Odorant pens are used by medical practitioners and researchers to assess olfactory dysfunction. Despite their routine use, there are currently no data on the gas-phase odorant concentrations released from the pen tips or whether these concentrations scale linearly with the aqueous-phase concentrations inside the pens. The commercially available Sniffin' Sticks odor threshold test containing -butanol was chosen for evaluation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-014-9168-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4037591PMC
April 2014
27 Reads

Cross-Cultural Administration of an Odor Discrimination Test.

Chemosens Percept 2014 22;7(2):85-90. Epub 2014 Apr 22.

TU Dresden, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Smell & Taste Clinic, Dresden, Germany.

Olfactory sensitivity can be evaluated by various tests, with "Sniffin' Sticks" test (SST) being one of the most popular. SST consists of tests for odor threshold, discrimination, and identification. It seems relatively straightforward to administer threshold tests in different groups and societies and it has been shown that odor identification tests requires special adaptation before they can be administered to various populations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-014-9169-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4037584PMC
April 2014
23 Reads

Rebaudioside A and Rebaudioside D bitterness do not covary with Acesulfame K bitterness or polymorphisms in and

Chemosens Percept 2013 Sep;6(3)

Sensory Evaluation Center, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA ; Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

In order to reduce calories in foods and beverages, the food industry routinely uses non-nutritive sweeteners. Unfortunately, many are synthetically derived, and many consumers have a strong preference for natural sweeteners, irrespective of the safety data on synthetic non-nutritive sweeteners. Additionally, many non-nutritive sweeteners elicit aversive side tastes such as bitter and metallic in addition to sweetness. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-013-9149-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3811954PMC
September 2013
9 Reads

Masking Vegetable Bitterness to Improve Palatability Depends on Vegetable Type and Taste Phenotype.

Chemosens Percept 2013 Mar;6(1):8-19

Department of Allied Health Sciences, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Connecticut, 358 Mansfield Road, Unit 2101, Storrs 06269 CT, USA.

Consumption of dark green vegetables falls short of recommendations, in part, because of unpleasant bitterness. A laboratory-based study of 37 adults was used to determine bitter and hedonic responses to vegetables (asparagus, Brussels sprouts, kale) with bitter masking agents (1.33 M sodium acetate, 10 and 32 mM sodium chloride, and 3. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-012-9137-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3652488PMC
March 2013
25 Reads

Time for Taste-A Review of the Early Cerebral Processing of Gustatory Perception.

Chemosens Percept 2012 Mar;5(1):87-99

Monell Chemical Senses Center, 3500 Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

The first successfully recorded event-related potential (ERP) for taste, one of our basic senses, was published nearly half a century ago. Despite this large time span, surprisingly little is known about the early neural processing of taste perception. Here, we are providing a comprehensive and critical overview of over four decades of research, with a focus on the temporal dimension of cerebral taste processing in healthy humans. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12078-011-9106-4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-011-9106-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3630074PMC
March 2012
8 Reads

Using milk fat to reduce the irritation and bitter taste of ibuprofen.

Chemosens Percept 2012 Dec 1;5(3-4):231-236. Epub 2012 May 1.

Sensory Evaluation Center, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA ; Department of Food Science, College of Agricultural Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.

Bitterness and irritation elicited by pharmaceutically active molecules remain problematic for pediatric medications, fortified foods and dietary supplements. Few effective methods exist for reducing these unpalatable sensations, negatively impacting medication compliance and intake of beneficial phytonutrients. A physicochemical approach to masking these sensations may be the most successful approach for generalizability to a wide range of structurally and functionally unique compounds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-012-9128-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3603579PMC
December 2012
7 Reads

Effect of Magnitude Estimation of Pleasantness and Intensity on fMRI Activation to Taste.

Chemosens Percept 2012 Mar;5(1):100-109

Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA.

The goal of the present study was to investigate whether the psychophysical evaluation of taste stimuli using magnitude estimation influences the pattern of cortical activation observed with neuroimaging. That is, whether different brain areas are involved in the magnitude estimation of pleasantness relative to the magnitude estimation of intensity. fMRI was utilized to examine the patterns of cortical activation involved in magnitude estimation of pleasantness and intensity during hunger in response to taste stimuli. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-011-9109-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3516393PMC

Enhanced Olfactory Sensory Perception of Threat in Anxiety: An Event-Related fMRI Study.

Chemosens Percept 2012 Mar 10;5(1):37-45. Epub 2012 Jan 10.

Department of Psychology, Brogden Hall, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA.

The current conceptualization of threat processing in anxiety emphasizes emotional hyper-reactivity, which mediates various debilitating symptoms and derangements in anxiety disorders. Here, we investigated olfactory sensory perception of threat as an alternative causal mechanism of anxiety. Combining an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging paradigm with an olfactory discrimination task, we examined how anxiety modulates basic perception of olfactory threats at behavioral and neural levels. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12078-011-9111-7
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-011-9111-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3410736PMC
March 2012
4 Reads

Intensity of Salt Taste and Prevalence of Hypertension Are Not Related in the Beaver Dam Offspring Study.

Chemosens Percept 2012 Jun 20;5(2):139-145. Epub 2012 Jan 20.

Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI.

BACKGROUND: Standard clinical advice for the prevention and treatment of hypertension includes limitation of salt intake. Previous studies of the association between perception of salt taste and hypertension prevalence have not reported consistent results and have usually been conducted in small study populations. PURPOSE: To determine the cross-sectional relationship between intensity of salt taste, discretionary salt use, and hypertension. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-012-9118-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3381604PMC
June 2012
1 Read

Taste Enhancement by Pulsatile Stimulation Is Receptor Based But Independent of Receptor Type.

Chemosens Percept 2012 Jun 27;5(2):179-187. Epub 2012 Apr 27.

Effects of subjects' taste sensitivity (expressed as taste detection threshold), tastant quality and taste transduction mechanism on pulsation-induced taste enhancement were tested. Taste intensities of pulsatile MSG and NaCl stimuli at pulsation periods below, at and above individual taste fusion periods (TFP in seconds) were compared to taste intensities of a continuous reference of the same net tastant concentration and quality. In line with results previously reported for sucrose, pulsation-induced taste enhancement peaked around TFP for both MSG and NaCl and did not require perception of tastant pulsation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-012-9126-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3343238PMC
June 2012
1 Read

Processing of Body Odor Signals by the Human Brain.

Authors:
Bettina M Pause

Chemosens Percept 2012 Mar 10;5(1):55-63. Epub 2011 Dec 10.

Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Duesseldorf, Universitaetsstraße 1, 40225 Duesseldorf, Germany.

Brain development in mammals has been proposed to be promoted by successful adaptations to the social complexity as well as to the social and non-social chemical environment. Therefore, the communication via chemosensory signals might have been and might still be a phylogenetically ancient communication channel transmitting evolutionary significant information. In humans, the neuronal underpinnings of the processing of social chemosignals have been investigated in relation to kin recognition, mate choice, the reproductive state and emotional contagion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-011-9108-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3309140PMC
March 2012
3 Reads

Orosensory and Homeostatic Functions of the Insular Taste Cortex.

Chemosens Percept 2012 Mar;5(1):64-79

The John B. Pierce Laboratory, School of Medicine, Yale University, 290 Congress Avenue, New Haven, CT 06519, USA. Department of Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Yale University, 300 George Street, Suite 901, New Haven, CT 06511, USA.

The gustatory aspect of the insular cortex is part of the brain circuit that controls ingestive behaviors based on chemosensory inputs. However, the sensory properties of foods are not restricted to taste and should also include salient features such as odor, texture, temperature, and appearance. Therefore, it is reasonable to hypothesize that specialized circuits within the central taste pathways must be involved in representing several other oral sensory modalities in addition to taste. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-012-9117-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4254792PMC
March 2012
24 Reads

Correlation between Ventromedial Prefrontal Cortex Activation to Food Aromas and Cue-driven Eating: An fMRI Study.

Chemosens Percept 2012 Mar;5(1):27-36

Department of Neurology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA ; Department of Radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA ; Department of Psychiatry, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana, USA.

Food aromas are signals associated with both food's availability and pleasure. Previous research from this laboratory has shown that food aromas under fasting conditions evoke robust activation of medial prefrontal brain regions thought to reflect reward value (Bragulat, et al. 2010). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-011-9112-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4255712PMC
March 2012
6 Reads

An fMRI Study of the Interactions Between the Attention and the Gustatory Networks.

Chemosens Percept 2012 Mar;5(1):117-127

Interdepartmental Neuroscience, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.

In a prior study, we showed that trying to detect a taste in a tasteless solution results in enhanced activity in the gustatory and attention networks. The aim of the current study was to use connectivity analyses to test if and how these networks interact during directed attention to taste. We predicted that the attention network modulates taste cortex, reflecting top-down enhancement of incoming sensory signals that are relevant to goal-directed behavior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-012-9122-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4239214PMC
March 2012
27 Reads

Individually Modified Saliva Delivery Changes the Perceived Intensity of Saltiness and Sourness.

Chemosens Percept 2011 Dec 3;4(4):145-153. Epub 2011 Sep 3.

Individuals vary largely in their salivary flow and composition, and given the importance of saliva on perception of taste, this might influence how the tastant stimuli are perceived. We therefore hypothesise that altering the individual salivary flow rates has an impact on the perceived taste intensity. In this study, we investigated the role of saliva amount on the perceived taste intensity by excluding parotid saliva and adding artificial saliva close to the parotid duct at preset flow rates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-011-9099-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3226696PMC
December 2011
3 Reads

Can Ambient Scent Enhance the Nightlife Experience?

Chemosens Percept 2011 Jun 13;4(1-2):55-64. Epub 2011 May 13.

Ever since smoking was prohibited in restaurants, bars, and clubs, undesirable smells that were previously masked by cigarette smoke became noticeable. This opens up opportunities to improve the dance club environment by introducing pleasant ambient scents that mask the unwanted odors and to allow competing clubs to differentiate themselves. A field study was conducted at three dance clubs using a 3 × 3 Latin square design with pre- and post-measurements of no-scent control conditions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-011-9088-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3106157PMC
June 2011
2 Reads

Vegetable Intake in College-Aged Adults Is Explained by Oral Sensory Phenotypes and TAS2R38 Genotype.

Chemosens Percept 2010 Dec;3(3-4):137-148

Department of Allied Health Sciences, College of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Connecticut, 358 Mansfield Road, Unit 2101, Storrs, CT 06269-2101, USA.

Taste and oral sensations vary in humans. Some of this variation has a genetic basis, and two commonly measured phenotypes are the bitterness of propylthiouracil (PROP) and the number of fungiform papillae on the anterior tongue. While the genetic control of fungiform papilla is unclear, PROP bitterness associates with allelic variation in the taste receptor gene, TAS2R38. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-010-9079-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3000691PMC
December 2010
14 Reads

Effects of Pleasant Ambient Fragrances on Dental Fear: Comparing Apples and Oranges.

Chemosens Percept 2010 Dec 17;3(3-4):182-189. Epub 2010 Aug 17.

Previous studies showed that orange odor reduces the anticipatory anxiety and improves the mood of patients waiting for scheduled appointments in small dental practices. We replicated these previous studies in the setting of three large dental clinics. In addition, we investigated whether another pleasant fruity smell (apple odor) is similarly associated with reduced anxiety. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-010-9078-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2975911PMC
December 2010
2 Reads

Oral Fat Exposure Pattern and Lipid Loading Effects on the Serum Triacylglycerol Concentration of Humans.

Authors:
Richard D Mattes

Chemosens Percept 2009 Dec;2(4):180-185

Department of Foods and Nutrition, Purdue University, 212 Stone Hall, 700 W State Street, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2059, USA.

Orosensory exposure to dietary fat elicits an early, transient spike (first phase; minutes 0-60) and augmented, more sustained postprandial (second phase; minutes 120-360) elevation of serum triacylglycerol (TAG) in humans. To assess the physiological significance of these effects, TAG concentrations were monitored following manipulation of the oral exposure pattern and accompanying lipid load. Fifteen healthy adults participated in a randomized, 6-arm, crossover design study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-009-9062-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2843922PMC
December 2009
4 Reads

A Brief Review on How Pregnancy and Sex Hormones Interfere with Taste and Food Intake.

Chemosens Percept 2010 Mar 4;3(1):51-56. Epub 2009 Nov 4.

Immunoendocrinology, Division of Medical Biology, Department of Pathology and Medical Biology, University Medical Centre Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands.

Many physiological and behavioral changes take place during pregnancy, including changes in taste and an increase in food intake. These changes are necessary to ensure growth and development of a healthy fetus. Both hyperphagia and taste changes during pregnancy may be induced by sex hormones estrogen and progesterone that are increased during pregnancy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-009-9061-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2844535PMC
March 2010
5 Reads

Reliability of Threshold and Suprathreshold Methods for Taste Phenotyping: Characterization with PROP and Sodium Chloride.

Chemosens Percept 2009 Dec 10;2(4):214-228. Epub 2009 Nov 10.

The present study aimed to compare the accuracy and reliability of four standard methods used for classification of people as taster or non-tasters based on their sensitivity to PROP (6-n-propylthiouracil). A panel consisting of 21 subjects was tested for threshold and suprathreshold sensitivity of sodium chloride, PROP, and genotyped for TAS2R38. Two threshold methods, staircase and modified Harris-Kalmus, were used to obtain detection and recognition thresholds and compared for accuracy and repeatability. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12078-009-9059-z
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-009-9059-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2788141PMC
December 2009
11 Reads

Multisensory Processing of Gustatory Stimuli.

Chemosens Percept 2008 Jun;1(2):95-102

Department of Neurobiology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710 ; Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710 ; Center of Neuroengineering, Duke University, Durham, NC 27710 ; Edmond and Lily Safra International Institute of Neuroscience of Natal Natal RN, Brazil 59066-060 ; Brain and Mind Institute, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne Lausanne, Switzerland 1015.

Gustatory perception is inherently multimodal, since approximately the same time that intra-oral stimuli activate taste receptors, somatosensory information is concurrently sent to the CNS. We review evidence that gustatory perception is intrinsically linked to concurrent somatosensory processing. We will show that processing of multisensory information can occur at the level of the taste cells through to the gustatory cortex. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-008-9014-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4551454PMC
June 2008
1 Read

Merkel Cells in Somatosensation.

Chemosens Percept 2008 Jun;1(2):110-118

Neuroscience Graduate Program, UCSF, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston TX 77030.

Merkel cells are rare epidermal cells whose function in the skin is still debated. These cells localize to highly touch-sensitive areas of vertebrate epithelia, including palatine ridges, touch domes and finger tips. In most cases, Merkel cells complex with somatosensory afferents to form slowly adapting touch receptors; it is unclear, however, whether mechanosensory transduction occurs in the Merkel cell, the somatosensory afferent or both. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12078-008-9012-6
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12078-008-9012-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2761664PMC
June 2008
10 Reads
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