20 results match your criteria Chemoecology[Journal]

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The scent gland chemistry of neogoveid cyphophthalmids (Opiliones): an unusual methyljuglone from .

Chemoecology 2019 26;29(5):189-197. Epub 2019 Sep 26.

2Department of Bioinformatics and Genomics, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, University City Blvd., 9201, Charlotte, NC 28223 USA.

While the chemistries of scent gland secretions from a few selected species of three families of Cyphophthalmi, namely Sironidae, Pettalidae, and Stylocellidae, have already been reported and found to consist of complex blends of naphthoquinones and methyl ketones, nothing is known about the other families. We here report on the secretions of Clouse and Wheeler (Zootaxa 3814:177-201, 2014), a first representative of the family Neogoveidae. The secretions from males, females and one juvenile were extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-019-00288-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6884433PMC
September 2019

Seasonal and herbivore-induced dynamics of foliar glucosinolates in wild cabbage ().

Chemoecology 2018 10;28(3):77-89. Epub 2018 May 10.

5Department of Terrestrial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology, Wageningen, The Netherlands.

Levels of plant secondary metabolites are not static and often change in relation to plant ontogeny. They also respond to abiotic and biotic changes in the environment, e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-018-0258-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5988764PMC
May 2018
1 Read

Methyl-ketones in the scent glands of Opiliones: a chemical trait of cyphophthalmi retrieved in the dyspnoan .

Chemoecology 2018 6;28(2):61-67. Epub 2018 Apr 6.

1Institute of Biology, University Graz, Universitätsplatz 2, 8010 Graz, Austria.

The homologous and phylogenetically old scent glands of harvestmen-also called defensive or repugnatorial glands-represent an ideal system for a model reconstruction of the evolutionary history of exocrine secretion chemistry ("phylogenetic chemosystematics"). While the secretions of Laniatores (mainly phenols, benzoquinones), Cyphophthalmi (naphthoquinones, chloro-naphthoquinones, methyl-ketones) and some Eupnoi (naphthoquinones, ethyl-ketones) are fairly well studied, one open question refers to the still largely enigmatic scent gland chemistry of representatives of the suborder Dyspnoi and the relation of dyspnoan chemistry to the remaining suborders. We here report on the secretion of a nemastomatid Dyspnoi, which is composed of straight-chain methyl-ketones (heptan-2-one, nonan-2-one, 6-tridecen-2-one, 8-tridecen-2-one), methyl-branched methyl-ketones (5-methyl-heptan-2-one, 6-methyl-nonan-2-one), naphthoquinones (1,4-naphthoquinone, 6-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone) and chloro-naphthoquinones (4-chloro-1,2-naphthoquinone, 4-chloro-6-methyl-1,2-naphthoquinone). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-018-0257-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5897473PMC
April 2018
33 Reads

A biosynthetically informed distance measure to compare secondary metabolite profiles.

Authors:
Robert R Junker

Chemoecology 2018 27;28(1):29-37. Epub 2017 Nov 27.

Department of Ecology and Evolution, University Salzburg, Hellbrunnerstraße 34, 5020 Salzburg, Austria.

Secondary metabolite profiles are one of the most diverse phenotypes of organisms and can consist of a large number of compounds originating from a limited number of biosynthetic pathways. The statistical treatment of such profiles often is complicated due to their diversity as well as the intra- and interspecific variability in the quantitative and qualitative composition of secondary metabolites. Most importantly, the assumption of independence of the presence/absence and the quantity of compounds is violated due to the shared biosynthetic origin of many compounds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-017-0250-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5840250PMC
November 2017
18 Reads

Bacteria colonising show volatile and tissue-specific responses to a natural concentration range of the floral volatile linalool.

Chemoecology 2018 1;28(1):11-19. Epub 2018 Mar 1.

1Department of Plant Ecology and Evolution, Evolutionary Biology Centre, Uppsala University, Norbyvägen 18d 75236 Uppsala, Sweden.

Bacteria on floral tissue can have negative effects by consuming resources and affecting nectar quality, which subsequently could reduce pollinator visitation and plant fitness. Plants however can employ chemical defences to reduce bacteria density. In North American, bee-pollinated , the nectar volatile -(+)-linalool can influence plant fitness, and terpenes such as linalool are known for their antimicrobial properties suggesting that it may also play a role in plant-microbe interactions. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00049-018-0252-x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-018-0252-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5840241PMC
March 2018
17 Reads

Host-plant location by the Guatemalan potato moth is assisted by floral volatiles.

Chemoecology 2017 29;27(5):187-198. Epub 2017 Aug 29.

Department Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agricultural Science, P.O. Box 102, 230 53 Alnarp, Sweden.

Insects locate their host plants using mainly visual and olfactory cues, generally of the exploited plant structure. However, when the resource is difficult to access, it could be beneficial to utilise indirect cues, which indicates the presence of reward (e.g. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00049-017-0244-2
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-017-0244-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5587627PMC
August 2017
2 Reads

Methyl -methylanthranilate: major compound in the defensive secretion of (Diplopoda, Julida).

Chemoecology 2017 24;27(4):171-175. Epub 2017 Jul 24.

Institute of Zoology, University of Graz, Universitätsplatz 2, 8010 Graz, Austria.

The defensive secretion of the julid diplopod contains methyl -methylanthranilate (MNMA), an ester of -methylanthranilic acid that comprises more than 99% of secretion of this species. MNMA is accompanied by small amounts of methyl anthranilate and two benzoquinones (2-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone and 2-ethyl-1,4-benzoquinone, respectively). MNMA is a known intermediate in the biosynthesis of both benzoquinones (as present in defensive secretions of juliformians) and glomerin-like quinazolines (chemical defense in Glomerida). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-017-0242-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5533857PMC
July 2017
1 Read

Seasonal changes in the preen wax composition of the Herring gull .

Chemoecology 2017 19;27(4):127-139. Epub 2017 Jul 19.

Avian Ecophysiology Unit, Department of Vertebrate Ecology and Zoology, University of Gdańsk, Wita Stwosza 59, 80-308 Gdańsk, Poland.

The preen gland produces oily secretion, which smeared onto a bird's plumage improves its maintenance. The main components of the secretion are waxes, and its composition often changes during the year. The aim of this study was to determine the differences in the chemical composition of preen waxes in adult herring gulls captured in Poland in winter and in the breeding season. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-017-0239-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5533864PMC
July 2017
25 Reads

Effects of population-related variation in plant primary and secondary metabolites on aboveground and belowground multitrophic interactions.

Chemoecology 2016 6;26(6):219-233. Epub 2016 Oct 6.

Department of Terrestrial Ecology, Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, The Netherlands ; Department of Ecological Sciences, Section Animal Ecology, VU University, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Insects feeding on aboveground and belowground tissues can influence each other through their shared plant and this is often mediated by changes in plant chemistry. We examined the effects of belowground root fly () herbivory on the performance of an aboveground herbivore () and its endoparasitoid wasp (). Insects were reared on three populations of wild cabbage () plants, exhibiting qualitative and quantitative differences in root and shoot defense chemistry, that had or had not been exposed to root herbivory. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-016-0222-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5063910PMC
October 2016
4 Reads

Dragon's blood secretion and its ecological significance.

Chemoecology 2016;26:101-105. Epub 2016 Mar 19.

Department of Forest Botany, Warsaw University of Life Sciences-WULS, Nowoursynowska 159, 02-776 Warsaw, Poland.

Dragon's blood is the name given to a red exudate produced by some plant species belonging to the genera , , and . These are endemic to various parts of the globe. It is classified as a resin or latex depending on its mode of secretion and its chemical composition, which is species specific. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-016-0212-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4863904PMC
March 2016
3 Reads

Benzoquinones from scent glands of phalangiid harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones, Eupnoi): a lesson from .

Chemoecology 2015;25(2):63-72. Epub 2014 Oct 24.

Institute of Animal Ecology and Landscape Planning, ÖKOTEAM, Bergmanngasse 22, 8010 Graz, Austria.

In case of disturbance, the phalangiine harvestman (Eupnoi, Phalangiidae) emits a directed jet from large prosomal scent ("defensive") glands. The pungent-smelling secretion was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and found to contain mainly 1,4-benzoquinone along with 1,4-naphthoquinone and caprylic (=octanoic) acid. While various alkylated benzoquinones are characteristic for the scent gland secretions of many grassatorean Laniatores, this is the first incidence of benzoquinone-based chemical defense in palpatorean harvestmen. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-014-0177-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4353884PMC
October 2014
2 Reads

Preferences of the peripheral olfactory system of Western Flower Thrips, towards stereoisomers of common plant volatiles.

Chemoecology 2015;25:47-51. Epub 2014 Oct 18.

Department of Biosciences, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, SA2 8PP UK.

Stereochemistry plays a significant role in structure-activity relationships of messenger chemicals. The ability to distinguish between enantiomers and geometric isomers, however, may be limited to certain stereoisomeric substances, depending on the receiver. In this study, we assessed the preference of the peripheral olfactometry system of Western Flower Thrips, towards ubiquitously expressed host compounds, with a goal of establishing whether particular stereoisomers enhance host odour recognition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-014-0173-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4289970PMC
October 2014
2 Reads

Chemical communication and host search in leaf beetles.

Chemoecology 2015;25:33-45. Epub 2014 Oct 18.

Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.

Herbivore insects use a variety of search cues during host finding and mate recognition, including visual, gustatory, and olfactory stimuli, leaving multiple traits for evolution to act upon. However, information about differences or similarities in search pattern amongst closely related insect herbivore species is still scarce. Here, we study the production of and the response to pheromone in (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to investigate the beetles' search behaviour. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-014-0174-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4289973PMC
October 2014
21 Reads

On the enigmatic scent glands of dyspnoan harvestmen (Arachnida, Opiliones): first evidence for the production of volatile secretions.

Chemoecology 2014 31;24:43-55. Epub 2014 Jan 31.

Department of Biology and Ecology, Faculty of Science, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 2, 2100 Novi Sad, Serbia.

While considerable knowledge on the chemistry of the scent gland secretions from the opilionid suborders Laniatores and Cyphophthalmi has been compiled, it is the Palpatores (Eupnoi and Dyspnoi) where chemical data are scarce. In particular, the Dyspnoi have remained nearly unstudied, mainly due to their reported general reluctance to release secretions as well as to the phenomenon of production of insoluble-and inaccessible-solid secretion. We here show that at least certain nemastomatid Dyspnoi, namely all three species of genus , indeed produce a volatile secretion, comprising octan-3-one, 6-methyl-5-hepten-2-one and acetophenone in species-specific combinations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-014-0146-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3948569PMC
January 2014
10 Reads

Sequestered defensive toxins in tetrapod vertebrates: principles, patterns, and prospects for future studies.

Chemoecology 2012 Sep 4;22(3):141-158. Epub 2012 Aug 4.

Chemical defenses are widespread among animals, and the compounds involved may be either synthesized from nontoxic precursors or sequestered from an environmental source. Defensive sequestration has been studied extensively among invertebrates, but relatively few examples have been documented among vertebrates. Nonetheless, the number of described cases of defensive sequestration in tetrapod vertebrates has increased recently and includes diverse lineages of amphibians and reptiles (including birds). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-012-0112-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3418492PMC
September 2012
25 Reads

Towards plant-odor-related olfactory neuroethology in Drosophila.

Chemoecology 2010 Jun 20;20(2):51-61. Epub 2009 Dec 20.

Department of Evolutionary Neuroethology, Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Hans Knoell Strasse 8, 07745 Jena, Germany.

Drosophila melanogaster is today one of the three foremost models in olfactory research, paralleled only by the mouse and the nematode. In the last years, immense progress has been achieved by combining neurogenetic tools with neurophysiology, anatomy, chemistry, and behavioral assays. One of the most important tasks for a fruit fly is to find a substrate for eating and laying eggs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-009-0033-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2864897PMC
June 2010
4 Reads

The influence of metabolically engineered glucosinolates profiles in Arabidopsis thaliana on Plutella xylostella preference and performance.

Chemoecology 2010 Mar 12;20(1):1-9. Epub 2009 Nov 12.

The oviposition preference and larval performance of the diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella, was studied using Arabidopsis thaliana plants with modified glucosinolate (GS) profiles containing novel GSs as a result of the introduction of individual CYP79 genes. The insect parameters were determined in a series of bioassays. The GS content of the plants as well as the number of trichomes were measured. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00049-009-0028-4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-009-0028-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2835634PMC
March 2010
4 Reads

Aggregation pheromone compounds of the black larder beetle Dermestes haemorrhoidalis Kuster (Coleoptera: Dermestidae).

Chemoecology 2009 Sep 7;19(3):177-184. Epub 2009 Jul 7.

Gas chromatography with simultaneous flame ionisation and electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry analysis (GC-MS) of abdominal extracts of adult male Dermestes haemorrhoidalis Kuster (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) revealed the presence of electrophysiologically and behaviourally active compounds to its conspecific males and females. Isopropyl dodecanoate (3), isopropyl (Z)-9-tetradecenoate (5), isopropyl tetradecanoate (6), isopropyl (Z)-9-hexadecenoate (7) and isopropyl hexadecanoate (8) were detected in male abdominal extracts only. Analysis of collected male headspace volatiles revealed the presence of six EAD-active compounds (3), (5), (6) and isopropyl tridecanoate (4) plus two unidentified compounds (1) and (9). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-009-0020-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2744823PMC
September 2009
1 Read

"Anting" in Blue Jays: evidence in support of a food-preparatory function.

Chemoecology 2008 Dec;18(4):197-203

Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA.

Anting, the plumage-dipping behavior to which ants (mostly formicines) are commonly subjected by birds (mostly passerines), is shown in tests with hand-raised Blue Jays (Cyanocitta cristata) and the ant Formica exsectoides to be instinctive: the birds displayed typical renditions of the behavior on the first occasion that they encountered ants. Evidence is presented supportive of the view that anting is a strategy by which birds render ants fit for ingestion. Formicine ants are ordinarily protected by their formic acid-containing spray. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-008-0406-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2630239PMC
December 2008
3 Reads

Defensive Chemistry of Lycid Beetles and of Mimetic Cerambycid Beetles that Feed on Them.

Chemoecology 2008 ;18(2):109-119

Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY, 14853, USA.

Beetles of the family Lycidae have long been known to be chemically protected. We present evidence that North American species of the lycid genera Calopteron and Lycus are rejected by thrushes, wolf spiders, and orb-weaving spiders, and that they contain a systemic compound that could account, at least in part, for this unacceptability. This compound, a novel acetylenic acid that we named lycidic acid, proved actively deterrent in feeding tests with wolf spiders and coccinellid beetles. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00049-007-0398-4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00049-007-0398-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2512966PMC
January 2008
6 Reads
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