492 results match your criteria Chemistry And Ecology[Journal]


The role of warm, dry summers and variation in snowpack on phytoplankton dynamics in mountain lakes.

Ecology 2020 Jul 6. Epub 2020 Jul 6.

Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, USA.

Climate change is altering biogeochemical, metabolic, and ecological functions in lakes across the globe. Historically, mountain lakes in temperate regions have been unproductive due to brief ice-free seasons, a snowmelt-driven hydrograph, cold temperatures, and steep topography with low vegetation and soil cover. We tested the relative importance of winter and summer weather, watershed characteristics, and water chemistry as drivers of phytoplankton dynamics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.3132DOI Listing

Contribution of fungal and invertebrate communities to wood decay in tropical terrestrial and aquatic habitats.

Ecology 2020 May 16:e03097. Epub 2020 May 16.

Department of Plant Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, 61801, United States.

Wood is a major carbon input into aquatic ecosystems and is thought to decay slowly, yet surprisingly little terrestrial carbon accumulates in marine sediments. A better mechanistic understanding of how habitat conditions and decomposer communities influence wood decay processes along the river-estuary-ocean continuum can address this seeming paradox. We measured mass loss, wood element, and polymer concentrations, quantified invertebrate-induced decay, and sequenced fungal communities associated with replicate sections of Guazuma branch wood submerged in freshwater, estuarine, and near-shore marine habitats and placed on the soil surface in nearby terrestrial habitats in three watersheds in the tropical eastern Pacific. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.3097DOI Listing

Chemistry of streams draining mined and unmined watersheds in the mountaintop mined landscape of Central Appalachia, USA.

Ecology 2020 May 8:e03093. Epub 2020 May 8.

Biology Department, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, 27708, USA.

Mountaintop removal coal mining is the predominant form of surface mining in the Appalachian Region of the United States and leads to elevated levels of chemical constituents in streams draining mined watersheds. This data set contains measurements of water chemistry in the mountaintop mined landscape of Central Appalachia. These data were collected to determine the accumulation and transport of mercury (Hg) and selenium (Se) across environmental compartments in mountaintop mining-impacted waters as well as the impact of mountaintop mining on the aquatic-terrestrial subsidy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.3093DOI Listing

Climate warming and heat waves alter harmful cyanobacterial blooms along the benthic-pelagic interface.

Ecology 2020 Jul 20;101(7):e03025. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Department of Biology/Aquatic Ecology, Lund University, Ecology building, SE-223 62, Lund, Sweden.

In addition to a rise in mean air and water temperatures, more frequent and intense extreme climate events (such as heat waves) have been recorded around the globe during the past decades. These environmental changes are projected to intensify further in the future, and we still know little about how they will affect ecological processes driving harmful cyanobacterial bloom formation. Therefore, we conducted a long-term experiment in 400-L shallow freshwater mesocosms, where we evaluated the effects of a constant +4°C increase in mean water temperatures and compared it with a fluctuating warming scenario ranging from 0 to +8°C (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.3025DOI Listing

Soil nutrients and precipitation are major drivers of global patterns of grass leaf silicification.

Ecology 2020 Jun 17;101(6):e03006. Epub 2020 Apr 17.

Department of Biology, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, 27109, USA.

Grasses accumulate high concentrations of silicon (Si) in their tissues, with potential benefits including herbivore defense, improved water balance, and reduced leaf construction costs. Although Si is one of the most widely varying leaf constituents among individuals, species, and ecosystems, the environmental forces driving this variation remain elusive and understudied. To understand relationships between environmental factors and grass Si accumulation better, we analyzed foliar chemistry of grasses from 17 globally distributed sites where nutrient inputs and grazing were manipulated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.3006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7317429PMC

Signaling from below: rodents select for deeper fruiting truffles with stronger volatile emissions.

Ecology 2020 Mar 23;101(3):e02964. Epub 2020 Jan 23.

Natural Resources and the Environment, University of New Hampshire, 114 James Hall, 56 College Road, Durham, New Hampshire, 03824, USA.

Many plant and fungal species use volatile organic compounds (VOCs) as chemical signals to convey information about the location or quality of their fruits or fruiting bodies to animal dispersers. Identifying the environmental factors and biotic interactions that shape fruit selection by animals is key to understanding the evolutionary processes that underpin chemical signaling. Using four Elaphomyces truffle species, we explored the role of fruiting depth, VOC emissions, and protein content in selection by five rodent species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2964DOI Listing

Faster nitrogen cycling and more fungal and root biomass in cold ecosystems under experimental warming: a meta-analysis.

Ecology 2020 Feb 31;101(2):e02938. Epub 2019 Dec 31.

Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Iceland, Sturlugata 7, 101, Reykjavík, Iceland.

Warming can alter the biogeochemistry and ecology of soils. These alterations can be particularly large in high northern latitude ecosystems, which are experiencing the most intense warming globally. In this meta-analysis, we investigated global trends in how experimental warming is altering the biogeochemistry of the most common limiting nutrient for biological processes in cold ecosystems of high northern latitudes (>50°): nitrogen (N). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2938DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7027553PMC
February 2020

Soil chemistry turned upside down: a meta-analysis of invasive earthworm effects on soil chemical properties.

Ecology 2020 Mar 8;101(3):e02936. Epub 2020 Jan 8.

German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-Leipzig, Deutscher Platz 5e, 04103, Leipzig, Germany.

Recent studies have shown that invasive earthworms can dramatically reduce native biodiversity, both above and below the ground. However, we still lack a synthetic understanding of the underlying mechanisms behind these changes, such as whether earthworm effects on soil chemical properties drive such relationships. Here, we investigated the effects of invasive earthworms on soil chemical properties (pH, water content, and the stocks and fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus) by conducting a meta-analysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2936DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7054046PMC

Phytoplankton community responses to temperature fluctuations under different nutrient concentrations and stoichiometry.

Ecology 2019 11 23;100(11):e02834. Epub 2019 Aug 23.

Institute for Chemistry and Biology of the Marine Environment (ICBM), University of Oldenburg, Schleusenstrsse 1, 26382, Wilhelmshaven, Germany.

Nutrient availability and temperature are important drivers of phytoplankton growth and stoichiometry. However, the interactive effects of nutrients and temperature on phytoplankton have been analyzed mostly by addressing changes in average temperature, whereas recent evidence suggests an important role of temperature fluctuations. In a laboratory experiment, we grew a natural phytoplankton community under fluctuating and constant temperature regimes across 25 combinations of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) supply. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2834DOI Listing
November 2019

Neighborhood effects explain increasing asynchronous seedling survival in a subtropical forest.

Ecology 2019 11 14;100(11):e02821. Epub 2019 Aug 14.

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Los Angeles, California, 90095, USA.

Biotic interactions play a critical role in mediating community responses to temporal environmental variation, but the importance of these effects relative to the direct effects of environmental change remains poorly understood, particularly in diverse forest communities. Here we combine a neighborhood modeling approach with insights from coexistence theory to assess the effects of temporal variation in species interactions and environmental conditions (e.g. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2821DOI Listing
November 2019
2 Reads

From plant fungi to bee parasites: mycorrhizae and soil nutrients shape floral chemistry and bee pathogens.

Ecology 2019 10 15;100(10):e02801. Epub 2019 Jul 15.

Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, 01003, USA.

Bee populations have experienced declines in recent years, due in part to increased disease incidence. Multiple factors influence bee-pathogen interactions, including nectar and pollen quality and secondary metabolites. However, we lack an understanding of how plant interactions with their environment shape bee diet quality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2801DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6773465PMC
October 2019
14 Reads

Kelp beds and their local effects on seawater chemistry, productivity, and microbial communities.

Ecology 2019 10 30;100(10):e02798. Epub 2019 Jul 30.

Committee on Evolutionary Biology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, 60637, USA.

Kelp forests are known as key habitats for species diversity and macroalgal productivity; however, we know little about how these biogenic habitats interact with seawater chemistry and phototroph productivity in the water column. We examined kelp forest functions at three locales along the Olympic Peninsula of Washington state by quantifying carbonate chemistry, nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton productivity, and seawater microbial communities inside and outside of kelp beds dominated by the canopy kelp species Nereocystis luetkeana and Macrocystis pyrifera. Kelp beds locally increased the pH, oxygen, and aragonite saturation state of the seawater, but lowered seawater inorganic carbon content and total alkalinity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2798DOI Listing
October 2019
6 Reads

Insect community structure covaries with host plant chemistry but is not affected by prior herbivory.

Ecology 2019 08 17;100(8):e02739. Epub 2019 May 17.

Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3SZ, United Kingdom.

By feeding on plant tissue, insect herbivores can change several characteristics of their hosts. These changes have the potential to alter the quality of the plant for other herbivore species, potentially altering the structure of the community of species attacking the plant at a later point in time. We tested whether herbivory early in the season changes host plant performance, polyphenol chemistry, and the community structure of sessile herbivores later in the season. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2739DOI Listing
August 2019
1 Read

Protura are unique: first evidence of specialized feeding on ectomycorrhizal fungi in soil invertebrates.

BMC Ecol 2019 02 22;19(1):10. Epub 2019 Feb 22.

J.F. Blumenbach Institute of Zoology and Anthropology, Animal Ecology, University of Göttingen, Untere Karspüle 2, 37073, Göttingen, Germany.

Background: Ectomycorrhizal fungi (ECM) play a central role in nutrient cycling in boreal and temperate forests, but their role in the soil food web remains little understood. One of the groups assumed to live as specialised mycorrhizal feeders are Protura, but experimental and field evidence is lacking. We used a combination of three methods to test if Protura are specialized mycorrhizal feeders and compared their trophic niche with other soil invertebrates. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-019-0227-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6387494PMC
February 2019
3 Reads

Secondary metabolites from nectar and pollen: a resource for ecological and evolutionary studies.

Ecology 2019 04 8;100(4):e02621. Epub 2019 Mar 8.

Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 3AE, United Kingdom.

Floral chemistry mediates plant interactions with herbivores, pathogens, and pollinators. The chemistry of floral nectar and pollen, the primary food rewards for pollinators, can affect both plant reproduction and pollinator health. Although the existence and functional significance of nectar and pollen secondary metabolites has long been known, comprehensive quantitative characterizations of secondary chemistry exist for only a few species. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2621DOI Listing
April 2019
2 Reads

Effects of salinity on microbialite-associated production in Great Salt Lake, Utah.

Ecology 2019 03 21;100(3):e02611. Epub 2019 Feb 21.

Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717, USA.

Microbialites, organosedimentary carbonate structures, cover approximately 20% of the basin floor in the south arm of Great Salt Lake, which ranges from ~12 to 15% salinity. Photosynthetic microbial mats associated with these benthic mounds contribute biomass that supports secondary production in the ecosystem, including that of the brine shrimp, Artemia franciscana. However, the effects of predicted increases in the salinity of the lake on the productivity and composition of these mats and on A. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ecy.2611
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2611DOI Listing
March 2019
13 Reads

The impact of cattle dung pats on earthworm distribution in grazed pastures.

BMC Ecol 2018 12 19;18(1):59. Epub 2018 Dec 19.

UCD School of Agriculture and Food Science, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland.

Background: Grazed grassland management regimes can have various effects on soil fauna. For example, effects on earthworms can be negative through compaction induced by grazing animals, or positive mediated by increases in sward productivity and cattle dung pats providing a food source. Knowledge gaps exist in relation to the behaviour of different earthworm species i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0216-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6299995PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Silicon uptake by a pasture grass experiencing simulated grazing is greatest under elevated precipitation.

BMC Ecol 2018 12 4;18(1):53. Epub 2018 Dec 4.

Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment, Western Sydney University, Richmond, NSW, Australia.

Background: Grasses are hyper-accumulators of silicon (Si) and often up-regulate Si following herbivory. Positive correlations exist between Si and plant water content, yet the extent to which Si uptake responses can be mediated by changes in soil water availability has rarely been studied and never, to our knowledge, under field conditions. We used field-based rain-exclusion shelters to investigate how simulated grazing (shoot clipping) and altered rainfall patterns (drought and elevated precipitation, representing 50% and 150% of ambient precipitation levels, respectively) affected initial patterns of root- and shoot-Si uptake in a native Australian grass (Microlaena stipoides) in Si-supplemented and untreated soils. Read More

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https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0208-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6280423PMC
December 2018
3 Reads

Species-specific interference exerted by the shrub Cistus clusii Dunal in a semi-arid Mediterranean gypsum plant community.

BMC Ecol 2018 11 29;18(1):49. Epub 2018 Nov 29.

Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología, CSIC, Avda. Montañana, 1005, 50059, Saragossa, Spain.

Background: The gypsovag shrub Cistus clusii is locally dominant in semi-arid gypsum plant communities of North-Eastern Spain. This species commonly grows in species-poor patches even though it has nurse potential, suggesting interference on neighbouring species. Other Cistus species exert a chemically mediated interference on plant communities, suggesting that it might be a common phenomenon in this genus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0204-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6267893PMC
November 2018
3 Reads

Comparative foliar metabolomics of a tropical and a temperate forest community.

Ecology 2018 12 12;99(12):2647-2653. Epub 2018 Nov 12.

Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Apartado 0843-03092, Balboa, Ancón, Republic of Panama.

Plant enemies that attack chemically similar host species are thought to mediate competitive exclusion of chemically similar plants and select for chemical divergence among closely related species. This hypothesis predicts that plant defenses should diverge rapidly, minimizing phylogenetic signal. To evaluate this prediction, we quantified metabolomic similarity for 203 tree species that represent >89% of all individuals in large forest plots in Maryland and Panama. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ecy.2533
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2533DOI Listing
December 2018
37 Reads

Enhancing soil organic carbon, particulate organic carbon and microbial biomass in semi-arid rangeland using pasture enclosures.

BMC Ecol 2018 11 6;18(1):45. Epub 2018 Nov 6.

Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), 90183, Umeå, Sweden.

Background: Rehabilitation of degraded rangelands through the establishment of enclosures (fencing grazing lands) is believed to improve soil quality and livelihoods, and enhance the sustainability of rangelands. Grazing dominated enclosure (GDE) and contractual grazing enclosure (CGE) are the common enclosure management systems in West Pokot County, Kenya. Under CGE, a farmer owning few animals leases the enclosure to households with relatively more livestock, while GDE is where the livestock utilizing the enclosure are purely owned by the farmer. Read More

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https://bmcecol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12898-01
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0202-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6219041PMC
November 2018
21 Reads

The measurement and quantification of generalized gradients of soil fertility relevant to plant community ecology.

Ecology 2019 01;100(1):e02549

Département de biologie, Laboratoire d'Écologie Fonctionnelle, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec, J1K 2R1, Canada.

We propose an operational definition of soil "fertility" that is applicable to plant community ecology and develop a method of measuring and quantifying it, using structural equations modeling, that is generalizable to soils in different regions whose fertility has different causes. To do this, we used structural equation modeling (SEM). The measurement submodel predicts the latent "generalized fertility," F , of a soil using four indicator variables: the relative growth rates of Festuca rubra, Trifolium pratense, Triticum aestivum, and Arabidopsis thaliana. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2549DOI Listing
January 2019
1 Read

A random survival forest illustrates the importance of natural enemies compared to host plant quality on leaf beetle survival rates.

BMC Ecol 2018 09 10;18(1):33. Epub 2018 Sep 10.

Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences, Stockholm University, 106 91, Stockholm, Sweden.

Background: Wetlands are habitats where variation in soil moisture content and associated environmental conditions can strongly affect the survival of herbivorous insects by changing host plant quality and natural enemy densities. In this study, we combined natural enemy exclusion experiments with random survival forest analyses to study the importance of local variation in host plant quality and predation by natural enemies on the egg and larval survival of the leaf beetle Galerucella sagittariae along a soil moisture gradient.

Results: Our results showed that the exclusion of natural enemies substantially increased the survival probability of G. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0187-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6131828PMC
September 2018
1 Read

Soil multifunctionality and drought resistance are determined by plant structural traits in restoring grassland.

Ecology 2018 10 20;99(10):2260-2271. Epub 2018 Aug 20.

School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PT, United Kingdom.

It is increasingly recognized that belowground responses to vegetation change are closely linked to plant functional traits. However, our understanding is limited concerning the relative importance of different plant traits for soil functions and of the mechanisms by which traits influence soil properties in the real world. Here we test the hypothesis that taller species, or those with complex rooting structures, are associated with high rates of nutrient and carbon (C) cycling in grassland. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2437DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6849565PMC
October 2018
2 Reads

Life history traits in a capital breeding pine caterpillar: effect of host species and needle age.

BMC Ecol 2018 08 8;18(1):24. Epub 2018 Aug 8.

College of Forestry, Jiangxi Agricultural University, Nanchang, 330045, Jiangxi, China.

Background: For capital breeding Lepidoptera, larval food quality is a key determinant of their fitness. A series of studies have suggested that the larval host species or varieties dramatically impact their development and reproductive output. However, few studies have reported the role of foliar age and adult mating success has often been ignored in these studies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0181-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6083516PMC
August 2018
48 Reads

Plant-soil feedbacks on free-living nitrogen fixation over geological time.

Ecology 2018 11 19;99(11):2496-2505. Epub 2018 Oct 19.

Department of Land, Air, and Water Resources, University of California, Davis, California, 95616, USA.

Free-living heterotrophic nitrogen fixation (FNF) is a widespread nitrogen input pathway in terrestrial ecosystems. However, questions remain over the relative influence of co-occurring controls on patterns of heterotrophic FNF activity, especially across generalized stages of primary succession, from biomass accumulation to retrogressive phases. Here, we experimentally test two alternative hypotheses regarding FNF rates during ecosystem development: (H1) site (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2486DOI Listing
November 2018
18 Reads

Microbes follow Humboldt: temperature drives plant and soil microbial diversity patterns from the Amazon to the Andes.

Ecology 2018 11 26;99(11):2455-2466. Epub 2018 Oct 26.

School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, Crew Building, Kings Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3FF, United Kingdom.

More than 200 years ago, Alexander von Humboldt reported that tropical plant species richness decreased with increasing elevation and decreasing temperature. Surprisingly, coordinated patterns in plant, bacterial, and fungal diversity on tropical mountains have not yet been observed, despite the central role of soil microorganisms in terrestrial biogeochemistry and ecology. We studied an Andean transect traversing 3. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2482DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6850070PMC
November 2018
11 Reads

Soil carbon losses due to higher pH offset vegetation gains due to calcium enrichment in an acid mitigation experiment.

Ecology 2018 10 22;99(10):2363-2373. Epub 2018 Aug 22.

Department of Biology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, 27708, USA.

Reductions in acid precipitation across North America and Europe have been linked to substantial declines of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks in temperate forests, but the mechanisms underlying these declines remain poorly understood. As forests recover from acid precipitation, soil pH and calcium fertility are both expected to increase, and these changes in soil chemistry may drive altered SOC dynamics. Here, we performed a year-long pot experiment on acid-impacted soils to test the independent and interactive effects of increased soil pH and Ca fertility on SOC solubility, microbial activity and sugar maple (Acer saccharum) sapling growth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2478DOI Listing
October 2018
3 Reads

Exploring drivers of litter decomposition in a greening Arctic: results from a transplant experiment across a treeline.

Ecology 2018 10 15;99(10):2284-2294. Epub 2018 Aug 15.

Biological and Environmental Sciences, School of Natural Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, FK9 4LA, United Kingdom.

Decomposition of plant litter is a key control over carbon (C) storage in the soil. The biochemistry of the litter being produced, the environment in which the decomposition is taking place, and the community composition and metabolism of the decomposer organisms exert a combined influence over decomposition rates. As deciduous shrubs and trees are expanding into tundra ecosystems as a result of regional climate warming, this change in vegetation represents a change in litter input to tundra soils and a change in the environment in which litter decomposes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2442DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6849570PMC
October 2018

Remotely sensed canopy nitrogen correlates with nitrous oxide emissions in a lowland tropical rainforest.

Ecology 2018 09 26;99(9):2080-2089. Epub 2018 Jul 26.

Department of Ecosystem and Conservation Sciences, University of Montana, Missoula, Montana, 59808, USA.

Tropical forests exhibit significant heterogeneity in plant functional and chemical traits that may contribute to spatial patterns of key soil biogeochemical processes, such as carbon storage and greenhouse gas emissions. Although tropical forests are the largest ecosystem source of nitrous oxide (N O), drivers of spatial patterns within forests are poorly resolved. Here, we show that local variation in canopy foliar N, mapped by remote-sensing image spectroscopy, correlates with patterns of soil N O emission from a lowland tropical rainforest. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2434DOI Listing
September 2018
16 Reads

Dung beetle-mediated soil modification: a data set for analyzing the effects of a recent introduction on soil quality.

Ecology 2018 07 12;99(7):1694. Epub 2018 Jun 12.

Department of Entomology, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, 99164, USA.

Globally, dung beetles (Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae) are linked to many critical ecosystem processes involving the consumption and breakdown of mammal dung. Due to New Zealand's unique evolutionary history, resulting from its geographic isolation from Gondwana, endemic dung-dwelling fauna evolved in the absence of large mammals. Europeans introduced livestock to the islands in the late 18th and 19th centuries, resulting in a buildup of undecomposed feces and unrecycled nutrients due to the absence of dung beetles. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2374DOI Listing
July 2018
43 Reads

Stoichiometry controls asymbiotic nitrogen fixation and its response to nitrogen inputs in a nitrogen-saturated forest.

Ecology 2018 09 27;99(9):2037-2046. Epub 2018 Jul 27.

Key Laboratory of Vegetation Restoration and Management of Degraded Ecosystems, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Botany, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou, 510650, China.

Lowland tropical forests with chronic nitrogen (N) deposition and/or abundant N-fixing organisms are commonly rich in N relative to other nutrients. The tropical N richness introduces a paradoxical relationship in which many tropical forests sustain high rates of asymbiotic N fixation despite the soil N richness and the higher energy cost of N fixation than of soil N uptake. However, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2416DOI Listing
September 2018
18 Reads

Microbial decomposers not constrained by climate history along a Mediterranean climate gradient in southern California.

Ecology 2018 06;99(6):1441-1452

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California, Irvine, California, 92697, USA.

Microbial decomposers mediate the return of CO to the atmosphere by producing extracellular enzymes to degrade complex plant polymers, making plant carbon available for metabolism. Determining if and how these decomposer communities are constrained in their ability to degrade plant litter is necessary for predicting how carbon cycling will be affected by future climate change. We analyzed mass loss, litter chemistry, microbial biomass, extracellular enzyme activities, and enzyme temperature sensitivities in grassland litter transplanted along a Mediterranean climate gradient in southern California. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ecy.2345
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2345DOI Listing
June 2018
27 Reads

Herbivory and eutrophication mediate grassland plant nutrient responses across a global climatic gradient.

Ecology 2018 04 31;99(4):822-831. Epub 2018 Mar 31.

Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of MN, St. Paul, Minnesota, 55108, USA.

Plant stoichiometry, the relative concentration of elements, is a key regulator of ecosystem functioning and is also being altered by human activities. In this paper we sought to understand the global drivers of plant stoichiometry and compare the relative contribution of climatic vs. anthropogenic effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2175DOI Listing
April 2018
10 Reads

Linking tree genetics and stream consumers: isotopic tracers elucidate controls on carbon and nitrogen assimilation.

Ecology 2018 08 5;99(8):1759-1770. Epub 2018 Jul 5.

Center for Ecosystem Science and Society, 800 S. Beaver Street, P.O. Box 5620, Flagstaff, Arizona, 86011-5620, USA.

Leaf litter provides an important nutrient subsidy to headwater streams, but little is known about how tree genetics influence energy pathways from litter to higher trophic levels. Despite the charge to quantify carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) pathways from decomposing litter, the relationship between litter decomposition and aquatic consumers remains unresolved. We measured litter preference (attachments to litter), C and N assimilation rates, and growth rates of a shredding caddisfly (Hesperophylax magnus, Limnephilidae) in response to leaf litter of different chemical and physical phenotypes using Populus cross types (P. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ecy.2224
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2224DOI Listing
August 2018
26 Reads

Effect of grazing on methane uptake from Eurasian steppe of China.

BMC Ecol 2018 03 20;18(1):11. Epub 2018 Mar 20.

Department of Grassland Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing, 100193, China.

Background: The effects of grazing on soil methane (CH) uptake in steppe ecosystems are important for understanding carbon sequestration and cycling because the role of grassland soil for CH uptake can have major impacts at the global level. Here, a meta-analysis of 27 individual studies was carried out to assess the response patterns of soil CH uptake to grazing in steppe ecosystems of China. The weighted log response ratio was used to assess the effect size. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-018-0168-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5859401PMC
March 2018
10 Reads

Temperature and aridity regulate spatial variability of soil multifunctionality in drylands across the globe.

Ecology 2018 05;99(5):1184-1193

Departamento de Biología y Geología, Física y Química Inorgánica, Escuela Superior de Ciencias Experimentales y Tecnología, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Móstoles, 28933, Spain.

The relationship between the spatial variability of soil multifunctionality (i.e., the capacity of soils to conduct multiple functions; SVM) and major climatic drivers, such as temperature and aridity, has never been assessed globally in terrestrial ecosystems. Read More

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https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/ecy.2199
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2199DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6053039PMC
May 2018
35 Reads

A Canadian upland forest soil profile and carbon stocks database.

Ecology 2018 04 12;99(4):989. Epub 2018 Mar 12.

Canadian Forest Service, Pacific Forestry Centre, 506 West Burnside Road, Victoria, British Columbia, V8Z 4N9, Canada.

"A Canadian upland forest soil profile and carbon stocks database" was compiled in phases over a period of 10 years to address various questions related to modeling upland forest soil carbon in a national forest carbon accounting model. For 3,253 pedons, the SITES table contains estimates for soil organic carbon stocks (Mg/ha) in organic horizons and mineral horizons to a 100-cm depth, soil taxonomy, leading tree species, mean annual temperature, annual precipitation, province or territory, terrestrial ecozone, and latitude and longitude, with an assessment of the quality of information about location. The PROFILES table contains profile data (16,167 records by horizon) used to estimate the carbon stocks that appear in the SITES table, plus additional soil chemical and physical data, where provided by the data source. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2159DOI Listing
April 2018
4 Reads

Toward more robust plant-soil feedback research.

Ecology 2018 03;99(3):550-556

United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Fort Keogh Livestock and Range Research Laboratory, 243 Fort Keogh Road, Miles City, Montana, 59301, USA.

Understanding if and how plant-soil biota feedbacks (PSFs) shape plant communities has become a major research priority. In this paper, we draw on a recent, high-profile PSF study to illustrate that certain widely used experimental methods cannot reliably determine if PSFs occur. One problem involves gathering soil samples adjacent to multiple conditioning plants, mixing the samples and then growing phytometers in the mixtures to test for PSFs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2146DOI Listing
March 2018
6 Reads

Ecological drivers of soil microbial diversity and soil biological networks in the Southern Hemisphere.

Ecology 2018 03 12;99(3):583-596. Epub 2018 Feb 12.

CSIRO, Oceans and Atmosphere, Hobart, Tasmania, 7000, Australia.

The ecological drivers of soil biodiversity in the Southern Hemisphere remain underexplored. Here, in a continental survey comprising 647 sites, across 58 degrees of latitude between tropical Australia and Antarctica, we evaluated the major ecological patterns in soil biodiversity and relative abundance of ecological clusters within a co-occurrence network of soil bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. Six major ecological clusters (modules) of co-occurring soil taxa were identified. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2137DOI Listing
March 2018
10 Reads

Observed trends of soil fauna in the Antarctic Dry Valleys: early signs of shifts predicted under climate change.

Ecology 2018 02 5;99(2):312-321. Epub 2018 Jan 5.

Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, 80523, USA.

Long-term observations of ecological communities are necessary for generating and testing predictions of ecosystem responses to climate change. We investigated temporal trends and spatial patterns of soil fauna along similar environmental gradients in three sites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica, spanning two distinct climatic phases: a decadal cooling trend from the early 1990s through the austral summer of February 2001, followed by a shift to the current trend of warming summers and more frequent discrete warming events. After February 2001, we observed a decline in the dominant species (the nematode Scottnema lindsayae) and increased abundance and expanded distribution of less common taxa (rotifers, tardigrades, and other nematode species). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2090DOI Listing
February 2018

Complementing endozoochorous seed dispersal patterns by donkeys and goats in a semi-natural island ecosystem.

BMC Ecol 2017 Dec 19;17(1):42. Epub 2017 Dec 19.

RG Ecology and Environmental Education, Institute of Biology and Chemistry, University of Hildesheim, Universitätsplatz 1, 31141, Hildesheim, Germany.

Background: Endozoochory is, in grazing systems, a substantial vector for seed dispersal. It can play an important role in vegetation dynamics, especially in colonization processes through seed input on the vegetation and on the soil seed bank. We investigated the endozoochorous seed input of donkeys and goats on a semi-natural island ecosystem in the Mediterranean. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-017-0148-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5738203PMC
December 2017
7 Reads

Unifying the functional diversity in natural and cultivated soils using the overall body-mass distribution of nematodes.

BMC Ecol 2017 Nov 28;17(1):36. Epub 2017 Nov 28.

National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, The Netherlands.

Background: Sustainable use of our soils is a key goal for environmental protection. As many ecosystem services are supported belowground at different trophic levels by nematodes, soil nematodes are expected to provide objective metrics for biological quality to integrate physical and chemical soil variables. Trait measurements of body mass carried out at the individual level can in this way be correlated with environmental properties that influence the performance of soil biota. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12898-017-0145-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5706308PMC
November 2017
5 Reads

The China Plant Trait Database: toward a comprehensive regional compilation of functional traits for land plants.

Ecology 2018 Feb 27;99(2):500. Epub 2017 Dec 27.

College of Chemistry and Life Sciences, Zhejiang Normal University, Yingbin Avenue 688, Jinhua, 321004, China.

Plant functional traits provide information about adaptations to climate and environmental conditions, and can be used to explore the existence of alternative plant strategies within ecosystems. Trait data are also increasingly being used to provide parameter estimates for vegetation models. Here we present a new database of plant functional traits from China. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2091DOI Listing
February 2018
13 Reads

Resource availability underlies the plant-fungal diversity relationship in a grassland ecosystem.

Ecology 2018 Jan 21;99(1):204-216. Epub 2017 Dec 21.

Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior, University of Minnesota, 123 Snyder Hall, 1475 Gortner Ave., St. Paul, Minnesota, 55108, USA.

It is commonly assumed that microbial communities are structured by "bottom-up" ecological forces, although few experimental manipulations have rigorously tested the mechanisms by which resources structure soil communities. We investigated how plant substrate availability might structure fungal communities and belowground processes along an experimental plant richness gradient in a grassland ecosystem. We hypothesized that variation in total plant-derived substrate inputs, plant functional group diversity, as well as the relative abundance of C grasses and legumes would modulate fungal α- and β-diversity and their rates of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2075DOI Listing
January 2018
13 Reads
4.660 Impact Factor

Comparing chemistry and bioactivity of burned vs. decomposed plant litter: different pathways but same result?

Ecology 2018 Jan 27;99(1):158-171. Epub 2017 Nov 27.

Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, via Università 100, 80055, Portici, Napoli, Italy.

Litter burning and biological decomposition are oxidative processes co-occurring in many terrestrial ecosystems, producing organic matter with different chemical properties and differently affecting plant growth and soil microbial activity. We tested the chemical convergence hypothesis, i.e. Read More

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http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/ecy.2053
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2053DOI Listing
January 2018
8 Reads

Carbon dioxide and submersed macrophytes in lakes: linking functional ecology to community composition.

Ecology 2017 Dec 9;98(12):3096-3105. Epub 2017 Nov 9.

Department of Biological Sciences, State University of New York at Binghamton, Binghamton, New York, 13902, USA.

Evaluating plant community response to atmospheric CO rise is critical to predicting ecosystem level change. Freshwater lakes offer a model system for examining CO effects as submersed macrophyte species differ greatly in their growth responses to CO enrichment, and free CO concentrations among these habitats show a wide range of natural, spatial variation. We determined free CO concentrations in the water column and sediment porewater in littoral zones with pH < 6. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2030DOI Listing
December 2017
1 Read

Orthogonal fitness benefits of nitrogen and ants for nitrogen-limited plants in the presence of herbivores.

Ecology 2017 Dec 8;98(12):3003-3010. Epub 2017 Nov 8.

Department of Biology, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, 30322, USA.

Predictable effects of resource availability on plant growth-defense strategies provide a unifying theme in theories of direct anti-herbivore defense, but it is less clear how resource availability modulates plant indirect defense. Ant-plant-hemipteran interactions produce mutualistic trophic cascades when hemipteran-tending ants reduce total herbivory, and these interactions are a key component of plant indirect defense in most terrestrial ecosystems. Here we conducted an experiment to test how ant-plant-hemipteran interactions depend on nitrogen (N) availability by manipulating the presence of ants and aphids under different N fertilization treatments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2013DOI Listing
December 2017
5 Reads

Influence of littoral periphyton on whole-lake metabolism relates to littoral vegetation in humic lakes.

Ecology 2017 Dec 25;98(12):3074-3085. Epub 2017 Oct 25.

Department of Biological and Environmental Science, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35, Jyväskylä, FI-40014, Finland.

The role of littoral habitats in lake metabolism has been underrated, especially in humic lakes, based on an assumption of low benthic primary production (PP) due to low light penetration into water. This assumption has been challenged by recent recognition of littoral epiphyton dominance of whole-lake PP in a small highly humic lake and of epiphyton as an important basal food source for humic lake biota. However, as these studies have mostly concerned single lakes, there is a need to test their wider generality. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2012DOI Listing
December 2017
3 Reads
4.660 Impact Factor

Drivers of nitrogen transfer in stream food webs across continents.

Ecology 2017 Dec 25;98(12):3044-3055. Epub 2017 Oct 25.

Department of Biological Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia, 24061, USA.

Studies of trophic-level material and energy transfers are central to ecology. The use of isotopic tracers has now made it possible to measure trophic transfer efficiencies of important nutrients and to better understand how these materials move through food webs. We analyzed data from thirteen N-ammonium tracer addition experiments to quantify N transfer from basal resources to animals in headwater streams with varying physical, chemical, and biological features. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ecy.2009DOI Listing
December 2017
27 Reads