346 results match your criteria Chemical immunology and allergy[Journal]


Educational programmes in food allergy.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:263-9. Epub 2015 May 21.

Department of Dermatology and Allergy Biederstein, Technische Universität München, München, Germany.

About 17% of German children and adolescents suffer from at least one of the following atopic illnesses: allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, atopic eczema or asthma. Consistent professional therapy is necessary to limit the health-related risks and improve these medical conditions. The consequences of a diagnosis often mean an additional task for the parents of diseased children, where they have to act simultaneously as an educator and therapist for their children. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000373913DOI Listing
February 2016
8 Reads

Prevention of food allergy.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:253-62. Epub 2015 May 21.

Department of Paediatric Allergy, Guy's and St. Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.

Despite a trend towards delayed weaning, food allergies (FAs) have increased in the past few decades and are now considered a public health concern, resulting in significant morbidity as well as occasional mortality. Whilst genetic factors are clearly important in the development of FA, a rise in FAs has occurred over a short period of time and is therefore unlikely to be due to germ-line genetic changes alone. Thus, it seems plausible that one or more environmental exposures may, via epigenetic changes, result in the interruption of the 'default immunologic state' of tolerance to foods. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000373911DOI Listing
February 2016
18 Reads

The effects of food allergy on quality of life.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:235-52. Epub 2015 May 21.

Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland.

The majority of research on food allergy has been bio-medical in orientation, focusing on issues such as the molecular structure of allergens, or aimed at methods of diagnosis. In the last decade, there has been a growing interest in the development of questionnaires that measure the impact of food allergy on health-related quality of life (HRQL). These studies have provided insight into the everyday burden of living with food allergy and have suggested ways that HRQL can be improved. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000375106DOI Listing
February 2016
13 Reads

Worldwide food allergy labeling and detection of allergens in processed foods.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:227-34. Epub 2015 May 21.

Food Allergy Research and Resource Program, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebr., USA.

The labeling of allergenic foods is an important public health measure to assist food-allergic consumers in avoiding foods that can cause allergic reactions. The regulatory framework for such labeling depends upon the selection of priority allergenic foods, which vary among countries. Most countries include milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, peanuts, tree nuts, soybeans, and cereal sources of gluten on the priority allergenic foods list, as recommended by the Codex Alimentarius Commission. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000373910DOI Listing
February 2016
28 Reads

Food allergy: psychosocial impact and public policy implications.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:221-6. Epub 2015 May 21.

Department of Pediatrics, George Washington University School of Medicine, and Division of Allergy and Immunology, Children's National Health System, Washington, D.C., USA.

Given its increasing prevalence and potential severity, food allergy not only negatively impacts the health and quality of life of affected individuals but also carries a significant economic burden. To address these problems, a community approach including efforts to increase awareness of food allergy among the general public and the implementation of appropriate public policies to keep affected individuals safe is required. This chapter reviews the general public's knowledge and perceptions of food allergy, the disease's psychosocial impact on affected individuals, and the current state and future directions of food allergy public policy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000373907DOI Listing
February 2016
5 Reads

Nutritional aspects and diets in food allergy.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:209-20. Epub 2015 May 21.

Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, N.Y., USA.

Dietary intervention is a crucial component of food allergy management but can negatively impact nutrient intake. A comprehensive nutrition assessment with appropriate intervention is warranted in all children with food allergies to meet nutrient needs and optimize growth. Nutrition assessment may also be indicated in adults with food allergy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000373904DOI Listing
February 2016
15 Reads

Eosinophilic oesophagitis.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:199-208. Epub 2015 May 21.

Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Nutrition and Department of Allergy and Immunology, The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.

Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is an antigen-driven pan-oesophagitis that is defined by the presence of at least 15 eosinophils per high power field on oesophageal histology in conjunction with upper gastrointestinal symptoms. EoE is closely associated with atopic disorders, in particular with food allergy, and as for other atopic diseases in childhood, there is a strong preponderance of male patients who have this disorder. The mechanisms leading to EoE have been characterised at the molecular level. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371703DOI Listing
February 2016
8 Reads

Anaphylaxis in food allergy.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:191-8. Epub 2015 May 21.

Division of Allergy and Immunology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Ark., USA.

Food allergy is a known trigger of anaphylaxis. Although the awareness of food allergies has improved, food-related allergic reactions and anaphylaxis still commonly occur. The recognition of anaphylaxis, its prompt treatment, and patient education are important for the prevention of future food reactions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371702DOI Listing
February 2016
8 Reads

Atopic eczema and food allergy.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:181-90. Epub 2015 May 21.

Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.

Approximately one-third of children with severe atopic eczema suffer from a food allergy, whereas in adult patients, food allergies are rare. In child patients, three different clinical reaction patterns can be differentiated as follows: (1) immediate-type reactions, (2) isolated late eczematous reactions, and (3) combined immediate-type and late eczematous reactions. In childhood food allergies, food allergens, such as cow's milk or hen's egg, are primarily responsible for allergic reactions, while in adolescents and adults, food allergies often develop consecutively after primary sensitization to pollen allergens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371701DOI Listing
February 2016
18 Reads

Gastrointestinal food allergies.

Authors:
Ralf G Heine

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:171-80. Epub 2015 May 21.

Department of Gastroenterology and Clinical Nutrition and Department of Allergy and Immunology, The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Melbourne, Vic., and Department of Paediatrics, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.

Gastrointestinal food allergies present during early childhood with a diverse range of symptoms. Cow's milk, soy and wheat are the three most common gastrointestinal food allergens. Several clinical syndromes have been described, including food protein-induced enteropathy, proctocolitis and enterocolitis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371700DOI Listing
February 2016
40 Reads

Fruit and vegetable allergy.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:162-70. Epub 2015 May 21.

Allergy Department, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, IdISSC, Madrid, Spain.

Fruit and vegetable allergies are the most prevalent food allergies in adolescents and adults. The identification of the allergens involved and the elucidation of their intrinsic properties and cross-reactivity patterns has helped in the understanding of the mechanisms of sensitisation and how the allergen profiles determine the different phenotypes. The most frequent yet contrasting fruit and vegetable allergies are pollen-food syndrome (PFS) and lipid transfer protein (LTP) syndrome. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000375469DOI Listing
February 2016
7 Reads

Fish and shellfish allergy.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:152-61. Epub 2015 May 21.

Department of Paediatrics, Khoo Teck Puat National University Children's Medical Institute, National University Hospital, Singapore.

Fish and shellfish consumption has increased worldwide, and there are increasing reports of adverse reactions to fish and shellfish, with an approximate prevalence of 0.5-5%. Fish allergy often develops early in life, whilst shellfish allergy tends to develop later, from adolescence onwards. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000375508DOI Listing
February 2016
28 Reads

Grain and legume allergy.

Authors:
Komei Ito

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:145-51. Epub 2015 May 21.

Department of Allergy, Aichi Children's Health and Medical Center, Aichi, Japan.

Among grains and legumes, wheat and soybean are the most frequent and well-characterized allergenic foods. Wheat proteins are divided into water/salt-soluble and water/salt-insoluble (gluten) fractions. The most dominant allergen in the former is α-amylase/trypsin inhibitor, which acts as an inhaled allergen causing baker's asthma. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000375468DOI Listing
February 2016
6 Reads

Peanut and tree nut allergy.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:131-44. Epub 2015 May 21.

Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, N.Y., USA.

Allergy to peanut and tree nuts is a major worldwide health concern. The prevalence of these allergies may be increasing, but the reasons for these increases remain unclear. This group of foods accounts for a large proportion of severe and fatal food-allergic reactions. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000375417DOI Listing
February 2016
18 Reads

Hen's Egg Allergy.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:124-30. Epub 2015 May 21.

Department of Pediatrics, The Second Teaching Hospital, Fujita Health University, Nagoya, Japan.

Egg allergy is one of the most frequent food allergies in infants and young children. The prevalence of egg allergy is estimated to be between 1.8 and 2% in children younger than 5 years of age. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000375416DOI Listing
February 2016
19 Reads

Cow's milk allergy in children and adults.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:114-23. Epub 2015 May 21.

Division of Allergy, Department of Pediatrics, Pediatric Hospital Bambino Gesù, Rome, Italy.

Cow's milk allergy is among the more frequent food allergies in infants and children. Because its suspicion stems from a plethora of symptoms, it is frequently reported. However, the development of a rigorous diagnostic pathway will reduce the diagnosed children to less than 50% of those reported. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000375415DOI Listing
February 2016
6 Reads

Oral immunotherapy and potential treatment.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:106-13. Epub 2015 May 21.

Department of Allergy, Clinical Research Center for Allergology and Rheumatology, Sagamihara National Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa, Japan.

The standardized therapeutic approach for food allergy is based on avoidance of allergens in foods. Oral immunotherapy (OIT) is a significant focus of food allergy research and appears to be effective in inducing desensitization. However, most patients receiving OIT have mild to moderate symptoms during the therapy, and it has not been clearly established whether OIT is effective in inducing permanent tolerance. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371697DOI Listing
February 2016
62 Reads

Pharmacological management of acute food-allergic reactions.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:96-105. Epub 2015 May 21.

Department of Allergy and Immunology, The Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.

There is currently no well-established disease-modifying treatment for food allergy, so management relies upon strict avoidance of food allergen(s), implementation of risk minimisation strategies to avoid inadvertent exposure and allergic reactions, and prompt management of acute allergic reactions, should they occur. The pharmacological management of acute food-induced allergic reactions is dependent on the underlying pathophysiology of the allergic reaction and the severity of clinical symptoms and signs. Mild to moderate symptoms of an immunoglobulin E-mediated acute allergic reaction may be treated effectively with an oral anti-histamine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000374080DOI Listing
February 2016
2 Reads

Diagnostic elimination diets and oral food provocation.

Authors:
Robert A Wood

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:87-95. Epub 2015 May 21.

Division of Pediatric Allergy and Immunology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Md., USA.

Accurately diagnosing patients with suspected food allergy is obviously critically important. The patient's health may be compromised if problem foods are left in the diet, while nutrition and quality of life may be negatively affected if foods are unnecessarily removed from the diet. In some patients, the diagnosis is very straightforward, such as with anaphylaxis with the first known exposure to peanut, but in many cases, the diagnosis will not be clear based on the history, skin tests, and serologic tests, especially because these tests often yield falsely positive results. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371680DOI Listing
February 2016
3 Reads

Non-IgE-related diagnostic methods (LST, patch test).

Authors:
Kenji Matsumoto

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:79-86. Epub 2015 May 21.

Department of Allergy and Immunology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo, Japan.

Although most food allergy patients have immediate-type reactions, some have delayed-type reactions. Unlike for the detection of food-specific IgE antibody in immediate-type (IgE-mediated) food allergies, only a few tests are currently available to aid in the diagnosis of delayed-type (non-IgE-mediated) food allergies. This chapter summarizes our current understanding of one in vitro test and one in vivo test for non-IgE-mediated food allergies: the lymphocyte stimulation test (LST) and the atopy patch test (APT). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371676DOI Listing
February 2016
13 Reads

IgE-related examination in food allergy with focus on allergen components.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:68-78. Epub 2015 May 21.

Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.

Molecular allergology is a breakthrough science that enables the quantification of IgE antibodies against individual allergen protein components at the molecular level. The diagnosis of IgE-mediated allergic disorders is based on the clinical history and on sensitization demonstrated through an allergy test. Identifying whether the sensitization is primary (species specific) or due to cross-reactivity with proteins with similar protein structures helps the clinician to judge the risk of allergic reaction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371675DOI Listing
February 2016
4 Reads

Hints for diagnosis.

Authors:
Lars K Poulsen

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:59-67. Epub 2015 May 21.

Laboratory of Medical Allergology, Allergy Clinic, Copenhagen University Hospital at Gentofte, Copenhagen, Denmark.

The diagnosis of food allergy requires responses to two important questions: Does the patient have a food allergy? If so, which foods will elicit allergic symptoms? The first question will most often have to be answered following a physical examination and an interview with the patient and/or caretakers. Based on this, a provisional decision to pursue a food allergy diagnosis may be made after carefully considering other possible reasons for an adverse reaction to a food: aversion, infection, intoxication, or an underlying metabolic disease. To respond to the next question, the anamnesis is highly important in selecting which tests and, ultimately, oral food challenges the patient should undergo to reach the final diagnosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371674DOI Listing
February 2016
16 Reads

Food allergy in adolescence and adulthood.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:51-8. Epub 2015 May 21.

Allergy Unit, Department of Dermatology, University Hospital Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

In young children, food allergy is usually acquired via the gastrointestinal tract and directed toward egg and milk. Adolescent and adult patients, however, mainly acquire food allergy via primary sensitization to inhalant allergens on the basis of cross-reactivity between proteins in inhalant sources and in food. This type of food allergy is frequently mediated by sensitization to broadly represented allergens, or so-called panallergens. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371669DOI Listing
February 2016
11 Reads

Food allergy in childhood (infancy to school age).

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:38-50. Epub 2015 May 21.

Pediatric Allergy Unit, Department of Child and Adolescent, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.

Food allergy is a potentially life-threatening condition affecting almost 10% of children, with an increasing incidence in the last few decades. It is defined as an immune reaction to food, and its pathogenesis may be IgE mediated, mixed IgE and non-IgE mediated, or non-IgE mediated. Potentially all foods can cause food allergy, but a minority of foods are responsible for the vast majority of reactions reported. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371666DOI Listing
February 2016
8 Reads

Epidemiology: international point of view, from childhood to adults, food allergens.

Authors:
Gary W K Wong

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:30-7. Epub 2015 May 21.

Department of Paediatrics and School of Public Health, Prince of Wales Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, PR China.

Recent studies have suggested that the prevalence of food allergy is increasing in many parts of the world. However, many epidemiology studies have been based only on questionnaires without objective testing. The data from these studies do show that the pattern of food allergies is different across the world. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371662DOI Listing
February 2016
5 Reads

Food allergens: molecular and immunological aspects, allergen databases and cross-reactivity.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:18-29. Epub 2015 May 21.

Paul-Ehrlich-Institut, Langen, Germany.

The currently known food allergens are assigned to a relatively small number of protein families. Food allergens grouped into protein families share common functional and structural features that can be attributed to the allergenic potency and potential cross-reactivity of certain proteins. Molecular data, in terms of structural information, biochemical characteristics and clinical relevance for each known allergen, including isoforms and variants, are mainly compiled into four open-access databases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371647DOI Listing
February 2016
14 Reads

Immunological basis of food allergy (IgE-mediated, non-IgE-mediated, and tolerance).

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:8-17. Epub 2015 May 21.

Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology, Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, N.C., USA.

Food allergy includes a number of diseases that present with adverse immunological reactions to foods and can be IgE-mediated, non-IgE-mediated, or a combination of both mechanisms. IgE-mediated food allergy involves immediate hypersensitivity through the action of mast cells, whereas non-IgE-mediated food allergy is most commonly cell-mediated. These food allergies are thought to occur as a result of a breakdown in oral tolerance and, more specifically, from an aberrant regulatory T-cell response. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371646DOI Listing
February 2016
1 Read

Historical background, definitions and differential diagnosis.

Authors:
Hugh A Sampson

Chem Immunol Allergy 2015 21;101:1-7. Epub 2015 May 21.

Division of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, Jaffe Food Allergy Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, N.Y., USA.

Although awareness that food can cause adverse symptoms and even death in some individuals has been present since the times of Hippocrates, it was not until the seminal experiment of Prausnitz that the investigation of food allergy had a more scientific basis. In the first half of the 20th century, there were periodic reports in the medical literature describing various food allergic reactions. Until the studies of Charles May and colleagues in the mid- to late '70s, there was a great deal of skepticism in the medical world about the relevance of food allergy and how to diagnose it, since standard skin testing was known to correlate poorly with clinical symptoms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000371644DOI Listing
February 2016
13 Reads

Václav Špičák. Prague, Czech Republic.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:373-5. Epub 2014 May 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000360111DOI Listing

Heimo Reulecke. Iffeldorf, Germany.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:371-2. Epub 2014 May 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000360108DOI Listing
April 2015
1 Read

Albert K. Oehling. Navaleno, Spain.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:368-70. Epub 2014 May 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000360107DOI Listing
April 2015
1 Read

Harry Morrow Brown (1917-2013). Derby, UK.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:365-7. Epub 2014 May 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000360106DOI Listing
April 2015
16 Reads

Terumasa Miyamoto. Tokyo, Japan.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:363-4. Epub 2014 May 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000360105DOI Listing
April 2015
17 Reads

Lothar Jäger. Jena, Germany.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:361-2. Epub 2014 May 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000360103DOI Listing

Kimishige Ishizaka. Tokyo, Japan.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:356-60. Epub 2014 May 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000360100DOI Listing
April 2015
2 Reads

OSCAR L. Frick. San francisco, Calif., USA.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:353-5. Epub 2014 May 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000360099DOI Listing
April 2015
2 Reads

Alfred William Frankland. London, UK.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:350-2. Epub 2014 May 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000360097DOI Listing
April 2015
1 Read

Alain de Weck (1928-2013). Fribourg, Switzerland.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:346-9. Epub 2014 May 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000360061DOI Listing
April 2015
2 Reads

Kurt Blaser. Davos, Switzerland.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:344-5. Epub 2014 May 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000360059DOI Listing
April 2015
62 Reads

John Bienenstock. Hamilton, Ont., Canada.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:342-3. Epub 2014 May 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000360057DOI Listing
April 2015
5 Reads

K. Frank Austen. Boston, Mass., USA.

Authors:
K Frank Austen

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:340-1. Epub 2014 May 22.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000360050DOI Listing

Allergen-specific immunotherapy.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:333-8. Epub 2014 May 22.

National Jewish Health and University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, Colo., USA.

Specific immunotherapy was introduced for the treatment of grass pollen-induced hay fever in 1911. The treatment was soon extended to other pollens as well as perennial allergens, and to the treatment of bronchial asthma. Definitive studies of its efficacy for both rhinitis and asthma came only many decades later. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000360047DOI Listing
April 2015
4 Reads

Characterization and standardization of allergen extracts.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:323-32. Epub 2014 May 22.

Nødebo, Denmark.

This paper summarizes the development of the extraction and characterization of allergens responsible for the induction of immunoglobulin (lg) E-induced allergies from the beginning of the 20th century, including the nomenclature of allergens. The majority of papers characterizing allergens and allergen extracts state that the lack of standardization of allergen extracts is the reason for the paper, and so it has been for more than 100 years. A natural part of that process might be the isolation of an allergen molecule and this starts the speculation of 'what makes that allergen an allergen?' To achieve the perfect standardization is a desirable end that is still awaited. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000359989DOI Listing
April 2015
3 Reads

Chromones.

Authors:
Alan M Edwards

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:317-22. Epub 2014 May 22.

The David Hide Asthma and Allergy Research Centre, St. Mary's Hospital, Newport, UK.

The chromones are a class of chemical compounds characterised by the presence of the structure 5:6 benz-1:4-pyrone in their chemical make-up. The first chromone in clinical use, khellin, was extracted from the seeds of the plant Ammi visnaga, and had been used for centuries as a diuretic and as a smooth muscle relaxant. Its use in bronchial asthma was reported in 1947. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000359986DOI Listing
April 2015
20 Reads

Glucocorticoids.

Authors:
Peter J Barnes

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:311-6. Epub 2014 May 22.

Airway Disease Section, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College, London, UK.

Glucocorticoids are the most effective anti-inflammatory treatment for allergic diseases, and inhaled glucocorticoids have now become the first-line treatment for asthma. Glucocorticoids were discovered in the 1940s as extracts of the adrenal cortex and this was followed by the isolation of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) from pituitary gland extracts. Cortisone and ACTH were found to be very beneficial in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and Kendall, Reichstein and Hench received the Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine for this work in 1950. Read More

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https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/359984
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000359984DOI Listing
April 2015
2 Reads

Antihistamines.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:302-10. Epub 2014 May 22.

Department of Dermatology and Allergy, Allergy Center Charité, Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany.

The discovery of histamine, its physiological role and reversal of its pharmacological effects by antihistamines takes us on a journey through the origins of modern physiology and the rising understanding of pharmacology at the end of the 19th and the early part of the 20th centuries. This journey, which has been traced in the excellent historical review by Michael Emanuel [Clin Exp Allergy 1999;29:1-11], is populated by some of the greatest scientists of the era, including six Nobel laureates - Bovet, Dale, Ehrlich, Richet, Windaus and Black. In addition, it laid the basis of medicinal chemistry not only for antihistamines, but also for the discovery of a plethora of drugs still in use today. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000359963DOI Listing
April 2015
10 Reads

History of catecholamine research.

Authors:
Klaus Starke

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 23;100:288-301. Epub 2014 May 23.

Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology, Albert-Ludwigs-Universität, Freiburg im Breisgau, Germany.

The prominence of catecholamines and their congeners in allergic diseases rests chiefly on their use in asthma and acute hypersensitivity reactions, such as anaphylaxis. They act in these indications by activating both α- and β-adrenoceptors. Adrenaline, the prototype, was discovered in the adrenals in 1893/1894. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000359962DOI Listing
April 2015
1 Read

Farmers and their environment: protective influences of the farming environment against the development of allergies.

Authors:
Markus Gassner

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:278-86. Epub 2014 May 22.

Institute of Allergology and Dermatology and Institute for Family Medicine, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.

Compared with other population groups, the way of life of farmers can be viewed as being similar to that of our ancestors. The settled continuation of generations within certain critical geographical and environmental conditions requires a special local network of knowledge and experience. The immune system provides protection against microbes and their toxins. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000359961DOI Listing
April 2015
3 Reads

Environmental pollution and allergy: historical aspects.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:268-77. Epub 2014 May 22.

Center for Allergy and Environment (ZAUM), Munich, Germany.

It may be a coincidence, but it is a fact that the first clear characterization of hay fever began in England where modern industrialization started in Europe. Only at the end of the 20th century were associations of the increasing prevalence of allergy with outdoor air pollution discussed. The seminal study came from Japan from the group of T. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000359918DOI Listing
April 2015
21 Reads

Peanut allergens.

Chem Immunol Allergy 2014 22;100:256-67. Epub 2014 May 22.

Division of Clinical and Molecular Allergology, Research Center Borstel, Airway Research Center North (ARCN), German Center for Lung Research, Borstel, Germany.

The earliest known evidence of peanut farming dates back 7,600 years. With a prevalence of roughly 1%, peanut allergy is a diagnostic and treatment challenge, but is also a very good model for studying all aspects of food allergy, including its molecular basis and pathomechanisms. Therefore, the very starting point for elucidating all these aspects is the identification of peanut allergens with subsequent clearing of their structure and their preparation as pure recombinant and/or natural allergens. Read More

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https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/359916
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000359916DOI Listing
April 2015
3 Reads