32 results match your criteria Chemical Engineering Science[Journal]

  • Page 1 of 1

Baculovirus transit through insect cell membranes: A mechanistic approach.

Chem Eng Sci 2020 Apr 25:115727. Epub 2020 Apr 25.

Department of Chemical Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, 84105, Israel.

Baculovirus systems are used for various purposes, but the kinetics of the infection process is not fully understood yet. We investigated the dynamics of virion movement from a medium toward the interior of insect cells and established a mechanistic model that shows an excellent fit to experimental results. It also makes possible a description of the viral dynamics on the cell surface. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2020.115727DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7195021PMC

Predicting the performance of pressure filtration processes by coupling computational fluid dynamics and discrete element methods.

Chem Eng Sci 2019 Nov 13;208. Epub 2019 Aug 13.

Department of Chemical Engineering and the Institute for Applied Life Sciences, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003, USA.

To obtain a fundamental understanding of the various factors affecting pressure filtration performance, we developed a coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and discrete element method (DEM) model for simulating the effect of solvent flow through the solid particle cake. The model was validated using data collected by filtering mixtures of spherical glass beads and deionized water through a dead-end cell over a range of applied pressures. Numerical experiments were performed to study the effects of particle properties, liquid properties and operating conditions on filtration performance. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2019.115162DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6774648PMC
November 2019

Transport properties and size exclusion effects in wide-pore superficially porous particles.

Chem Eng Sci 2018 Aug 26;185:243-255. Epub 2018 Mar 26.

Theoretical Separation Science Laboratory, Kroungold Analytical Inc., 1299 Butler Pike, Blue Bell, PA 19422, USA.

The effects of hydrodynamic radius on the transport of solute molecules in packed beds of wide-pore superficially porous particles (SPP) are studied using pore-scale simulation. The free molecular diffusion rate varies with radius through the Stokes-Einstein relation. Lattice Boltzmann and Langevin methods are used to model fluid motion and the transport of an ensemble of solute molecules in the fluid, providing statistics on solute concentration, flux, molecule age and residence time, as a function of depth in the SPP. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2018.03.041DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6319947PMC
August 2018
1 Read

Computer-aided Molecular Design of Water Compatible Visible Light Photosensitizers for Dental Adhesive.

Chem Eng Sci 2017 Feb 30;159:131-139. Epub 2016 Sep 30.

The University of Kansas, Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, 1530 W 15 Street, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA.

Dental adhesive resin undergoes phase separation during its infiltration through the wet demineralized dentin and it has been observed previously that the hydrophilic-rich phase is a vulnerable region for failure due to the lack of photo-polymerization and crosslinking density. The lack of photo-polymerization is mostly due to the partitioning of photo-initiators in low concentrations within this phase. Here, a computational approach has been employed to design candidate water compatible visible light photosensitizers which could improve the photo-polymerization of the hydrophilic-rich phase. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2016.09.033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5699481PMC
February 2017
8 Reads

Effect of chyme viscosity and nutrient feedback mechanism on gastric emptying.

Chem Eng Sci 2017 Nov;171:318-330

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, UK.

A comprehensive mathematical model of the digestive processes in humans could allow for better design of functional foods which may play a role in stemming the prevalence of food related diseases around the world. This work presents a mathematical model for a nutrient based feedback mechanism controlling gastric emptying, which has been identified by numerous researchers. The model also takes into account the viscosity of nutrient meals upon gastric secretions and emptying. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2017.05.048DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5569601PMC
November 2017
4 Reads

Maximum Entropy Prediction of Non-Equilibrium Stationary Distributions for Stochastic Reaction Networks with Oscillatory Dynamics.

Chem Eng Sci 2017 Nov 22;171:139-148. Epub 2017 May 22.

Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.

Many chemical reaction networks in biological systems present complex oscillatory dynamics. In systems such as regulatory gene networks, cell cycle, and enzymatic processes, the number of molecules involved is often far from the thermodynamic limit. Although stochastic models based on the probabilistic approach of the Chemical Master Equation (CME) have been proposed, studies in the literature have been limited by the challenges of solving the CME and the lack of computational power to perform large-scale stochastic simulations. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2017.05.029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6424531PMC
November 2017
2 Reads

Coupled gel spreading and diffusive transport models describing microbicidal drug delivery.

Chem Eng Sci 2016 Oct 12;152:12-20. Epub 2016 May 12.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, Box 90281, Durham, NC 22708, USA; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Duke University, Box 90281, Durham, NC 22708, USA.

Gels are a drug delivery platform that is being evaluated for application of active pharmaceutical ingredients, termed microbicides, that act topically against vaginal and rectal mucosal infection by sexually transmitted HIV. Despite success in one Phase IIb trial of a vaginal gel delivering tenofovir, problems of user adherence to designed gel application scheduling have compromised results in two other trials. The microbicides field is responding to this dilemma by expanding behavioral analysis of the determinants of adherence while simultaneously improving the pharmacological, biochemical, and biophysical analyses of the determinants of microbicide drug delivery. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2016.05.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5193484PMC
October 2016
29 Reads

Numerical study of gravity effects on phase separation in a swirl chamber.

Chem Eng Sci 2016 10;2. Epub 2016 Jul 10.

Dynaflow, Inc., 10621-J Iron Bridge Road, Jessup, MD 20794, USA.

The effects of gravity on a phase separator are studied numerically using an Eulerian/Lagrangian two-phase flow approach. The separator utilizes high intensity swirl to separate bubbles from the liquid. The two-phase flow enters tangentially a cylindrical swirl chamber and rotate around the cylinder axis. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1115/FEDSM2016-7845DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5884129PMC
July 2016
2 Reads

On speeding up stochastic simulations by parallelization of random number generation.

Chem Eng Sci 2015 Dec;137:828-836

School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, United States.

This paper adds to the tool kit of stochastic simulations based on a very simple idea. Applicable to both SSA and Tau-leap algorithms, it can notably reduce computational times. Stochastic simulations are based on computing sample paths based on the generation of random numbers with either exactly stipulated distribution functions as in SSA (Gillespie, 1977) or in the method of interval of quiescence (Shah et al. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2015.06.066DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4562036PMC
December 2015
7 Reads

Non-Spherical Particles for Targeted Drug Delivery.

Chem Eng Sci 2015 Mar;125:20-24

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana IL, 61801, USA ; Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 West Gregory Drive, Urbana IL, 61801, USA ; Department of Chemical Engineering, Soongsil University, Seoul, South Korea.

Nano- and microparticles loaded with various bioimaging contrast agents or therapeutic molecules have been increasingly used for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases and tissue defects. These particles, often a filled or hollow sphere, can extend the lifetime of encapsulated biomedical modalities in circulation and in target tissue. However, there is a great need to improve the drug loading and targeting efficiency of these particles. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2014.10.022DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4378540PMC
March 2015
18 Reads

Smart Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery: Boundaries and Opportunities.

Chem Eng Sci 2015 Mar;125:158-164

Purdue University, Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, West Lafayette, IN 47907, U.S.A. ; Purdue University, Department of Industrial and Physical Pharmacy, West Lafayette, IN 47907, U.S.A.

Various pharmaceutical particles have been used in developing different drug delivery systems ranging from traditional tablets to state-of-the-art nanoparticle formulations. Nanoparticle formulations are unique in that the small size with huge surface area sometimes provides unique properties that larger particles and bulk materials do not have. Nanoparticle formulations have been used in improving the bioavailability of various drugs, in particular, poorly soluble drugs. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2014.06.042DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4322781PMC
March 2015
19 Reads

Controlled Drug Release from Pharmaceutical Nanocarriers.

Chem Eng Sci 2015 Mar;125:75-84

College of Pharmacy and Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907, USA ; Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Hwarangno 14-gil 5, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791, Republic of Korea.

Nanocarriers providing spatiotemporal control of drug release contribute to reducing toxicity and improving therapeutic efficacy of a drug. On the other hand, nanocarriers face unique challenges in controlling drug release kinetics, due to the large surface area per volume ratio and the short diffusion distance. To develop nanocarriers with desirable release kinetics for target applications, it is important to understand the mechanisms by which a carrier retains and releases a drug, the effects of composition and morphology of the carrier on the drug release kinetics, and current techniques for preparation and modification of nanocarriers. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2014.08.046DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4322773PMC
March 2015
1 Read

Electrohydrodynamic atomization: A two-decade effort to produce and process micro-/nanoparticulate materials.

Chem Eng Sci 2015 Mar;125:32-57

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, Singapore, 117585.

Electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA), also called electrospray technique, has been studied for more than one century. However, since 1990s it has begun to be used to produce and process micro-/nanostructured materials. Owing to the simplicity and flexibility in EHDA experimental setup, it has been successfully employed to generate particulate materials with controllable compositions, structures, sizes, morphologies, and shapes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2014.08.061DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4322784PMC
March 2015
6 Reads

On the fluid dynamics of a laboratory scale single-use stirred bioreactor.

Chem Eng Sci 2014 May;111(100):299-312

Department of Biochemical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE, United Kingdom.

The commercial success of mammalian cell-derived recombinant proteins has fostered an increase in demand for novel single-use bioreactor (SUB) systems that facilitate greater productivity, increased flexibility and reduced costs (Zhang et al., 2010). These systems exhibit fluid flow regimes unlike those encountered in traditional glass/stainless steel bioreactors because of the way in which they are designed. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2014.02.032DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4015722PMC

Coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization process for production of polymeric composite microspheres.

Chem Eng Sci 2013 Dec;104

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, National University of Singapore, 4 Engineering Drive 4, Singapore 117576, Singapore.

Polymeric composite microspheres consisting of a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) core surrounded by a poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PDLLA) shell layer were successfully fabricated by coaxial electrohydrodynamic atomization (CEHDA) process. Process conditions, including nozzle voltage and polymer solution flow rates, as well as solution parameters, such as polymer concentrations, were investigated to ensure the formation of composite microspheres with a doxorubicin-loaded PLGA core surrounded by a relatively drug-free PDLLA shell layer. Various microsphere formulations were fabricated and characterized in terms of their drug distribution, encapsulation efficiency and release. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2013.09.020DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3859445PMC
December 2013
8 Reads

Challenges and opportunities in synthetic biology for chemical engineers.

Chem Eng Sci 2013 Nov;103

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, United States.

Synthetic biology provides numerous great opportunities for chemical engineers in the development of new processes for large-scale production of biofuels, value-added chemicals, and protein therapeutics. However, challenges across all scales abound. In particular, the modularization and standardization of the components in a biological system, so-called biological parts, remain the biggest obstacle in synthetic biology. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2012.06.013DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3821781PMC
November 2013
10 Reads

A Porous Media Model for Blood Flow within Reticulated Foam.

Authors:
J M Ortega

Chem Eng Sci 2013 Aug;99:59-66

Staff Scientist, Computational Engineering Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Liver-more, CA.

A porous media model is developed for non-Newtonian blood flow through reticulated foam at Reynolds numbers ranging from 10 to 10. This empirical model effectively divides the pressure gradient versus flow speed curve into three regimes, in which either the non-Newtonian viscous forces, the Newtonian viscous forces, or the inertial fluid forces are most prevalent. When compared to simulation data of blood flow through two reticulated foam geometries, the model adequately captures the pressure gradient within all three regimes, especially that within the Newtonian regime where blood transitions from a power-law to a constant viscosity fluid. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2013.05.025DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3767460PMC

Dispersion and Filtration of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and Measurement of Nanoparticle Agglomerates in Diesel Exhaust.

Chem Eng Sci 2013 Jan 16;85:69-76. Epub 2012 Feb 16.

Institute of Environmental Engineering, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland ; Empa, Analytical Chemistry, 8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland.

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) tend to form bundles due to their geometry and van der Walls forces, which usually complicates studies of the CNT properties. Dispersion plays a significant role in CNT studies and we summarize dispersion techniques to generate airborne CNTs from suspensions or powders. We describe in detail our technique of CNT aerosolization with controlled degree of agglomeration using an electrospray system. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00092509120008
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2011.12.045DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3551975PMC
January 2013
4 Reads

Efficient Moment Matrix Generation for Arbitrary Chemical Networks.

Chem Eng Sci 2012 Dec;84:612-618

Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.

As stochastic simulations become increasingly common in biological research, tools for analysis of such systems are in demand. The deterministic analogue to stochastic models, a set of probability moment equations equivalent to the Chemical Master Equation (CME), offers the possibility of a priori analysis of systems without the need for computationally costly Monte Carlo simulations. Despite the drawbacks of the method, in particular non-linearity in even the simplest of cases, the use of moment equations combined with moment-closure techniques has been used effectively in many fields. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2012.08.031DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3501206PMC
December 2012

MODELING OF GENE REGULATORY PROCESSES BY POPULATION MEDIATED SIGNALING. NEW APPLICATIONS OF POPULATION BALANCES.

Chem Eng Sci 2012 Mar 11;70:188-199. Epub 2011 Aug 11.

School of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Population balance modeling is considered for cell populations in gene regulatory processes in which one or more intracellular variables undergo stochastic dynamics as determined by Ito stochastic differential equations. This paper addresses formulation and computational issues with sample applications to the spread of drug resistance among bacterial cells. It is shown that predictions from population balances can display qualitative differences from those made with single cell models which are usually encountered in the literature. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2011.07.062DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3347889PMC
March 2012
11 Reads

Diffusive transfer between two intensely interacting cells with limited surface kinetics.

Chem Eng Sci 2012 May 6;74:114-123. Epub 2012 Feb 6.

Ansama Research, 5 Highview Ct., Wayne, NJ 07470: 973-831-8766:

The diffusive transfer, or paracrine delivery, of chemical factors during the interaction of an emitting cell and a receiving cell is a ubiquitous cellular process that facilitates information exchange between the cells an/or to bystander cells. In the cellular immune response this exchange governs the magnitude and breadth of killing of cellular targets, inflammation or tolerance. Paracrine delivery is examined here by solving the the steady-state diffusion equation for the concentration field surrounding two intensely interacting, equi-sized cells on which surface kinetics limits the rates of factor emission and absorption. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2012.02.001DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3319135PMC
May 2012
1 Read

Analytical Derivation of Moment Equations in Stochastic Chemical Kinetics.

Chem Eng Sci 2011 Feb;66(3):268-277

Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, 421 Washington Ave. SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA.

The master probability equation captures the dynamic behavior of a variety of stochastic phenomena that can be modeled as Markov processes. Analytical solutions to the master equation are hard to come by though because they require the enumeration of all possible states and the determination of the transition probabilities between any two states. These two tasks quickly become intractable for all but the simplest of systems. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2010.10.024DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3176737PMC
February 2011
51 Reads

Enhanced Inter-helical Residue Contact Prediction in Transmembrane Proteins.

Authors:
Y Wei C A Floudas

Chem Eng Sci 2011 Oct;66(19):4356-4369

Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-5263, U.S.A.

In this paper, based on a recent work by McAllister and Floudas who developed a mathematical optimization model to predict the contacts in transmembrane alpha-helical proteins from a limited protein data set [1], we have enhanced this method by 1) building a more comprehensive data set for transmembrane alpha-helical proteins and this enhanced data set is then used to construct the probability sets, MIN-1N and MIN-2N, for residue contact prediction, 2) enhancing the mathematical model via modifications of several important physical constraints and 3) applying a new blind contact prediction scheme on different protein sets proposed from analyzing the contact prediction on 65 proteins from Fuchs et al. [2]. The blind contact prediction scheme has been tested on two different membrane protein sets. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2011.04.033DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3164537PMC
October 2011
1 Read

Experimental Validation of a Fundamental Model for PCR Efficiency.

Chem Eng Sci 2011 Apr;66(8):1783-1789

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68588-0643.

Recently a theoretical analysis of PCR efficiency has been published by Booth et al., (2010). The PCR yield is the product of three efficiencies: (i) the annealing efficiency is the fraction of templates that form binary complexes with primers during annealing, (ii)the polymerase binding efficiency is the fraction of binary complexes that bind to polymerase to form ternary complexes and (iii)the elongation efficiency is the fraction of ternary complexes that extend fully. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2011.01.029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3148806PMC
April 2011
3 Reads

Efficiency of the Polymerase Chain Reaction.

Chem Eng Sci 2010 Sep;65(17):4996-5006

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Lincoln, NE 68588-0643.

The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has found wide application in biochemistry and molecular biology such as gene expression studies, mutation detection, forensic analysis and pathogen detection. Increasingly quantitative real time PCR is used to assess copy numbers from overall yield. In this study the yield is analyzed as a function of several processes: (1) thermal damage of the template and polymerase occurs during the denaturing step, (2) competition exists between primers and templates to either anneal or form dsDNA, (3) polymerase binding to annealed products (primer/ssDNA) to form ternary complexes and (4) extension of ternary complexes. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2010.05.046DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3142788PMC
September 2010
8 Reads

Rare Cell Capture in Microfluidic Devices.

Chem Eng Sci 2011 Apr;66(7):1508-1522

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853, United States.

This article reviews existing methods for the isolation, fractionation, or capture of rare cells in microfluidic devices. Rare cell capture devices face the challenge of maintaining the efficiency standard of traditional bulk separation methods such as flow cytometers and immunomagnetic separators while requiring very high purity of the target cell population, which is typically already at very low starting concentrations. Two major classifications of rare cell capture approaches are covered: (1) non-electrokinetic methods (e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2010.09.012DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3082151PMC
April 2011
6 Reads

Design of Aerosol Particle Coating: Thickness, Texture and Efficiency.

Chem Eng Sci 2010 Oct;65(20):5471-5481

Particle Technology Laboratory, Institute of Process Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zürich, Switzerland.

Core-shell particles preserve the performance (e.g. magnetic, plasmonic or opacifying) of a core material while modifying its surface with a shell that facilitates (e. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2010.07.011DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3666159PMC
October 2010
4 Reads

Utilizing Simple Biochemical Measurements to Predict Lifetime Output of Biocatalysts in Continuous Isothermal Processes.

Chem Eng Sci 2010 Mar;65(6):2118-2124

School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 315 Ferst Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332-0363, USA.

The expected product yield of a biocatalyst during its useful lifetime is an important consideration when designing a continuous biocatalytic process. One important indicator of lifetime biocatalyst productivity is the dimensionless total turnover number (TTN). Here, a method is proposed for estimating the TTN of a given biocatalyst from readily-measured biochemical quantities, namely the specific activity and the deactivation half-life, measured under identical conditions. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2009.12.005DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2946236PMC
March 2010
4 Reads

Impact of Absorption and Transport on Intelligent Therapeutics and Nano-scale Delivery of Protein Therapeutic Agents.

Chem Eng Sci 2009 Nov;64(22):4553-4565

Center of Biomaterials, Drug Delivery, Bionanotechnology and Molecular Recognition, Departments of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering and College of Pharmacy, The University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C0400, Austin, Texas 78712, USA.

The combination of materials design and advances in nanotechnology has led to the development of new therapeutic protein delivery systems. The pulmonary, nasal, buccal and other routes have been investigated as delivery options for protein therapy, but none result in improved patient compliances and patient quality of life as the oral route. For the oral administration of these new systems, an understanding of protein transport is essential because of the dynamic nature of the gastrointestinal tract and the barriers to transport that exist. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2009.04.050DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2782827PMC
November 2009
3 Reads

Ozone Uptake During Inspiratory Flow in a Model of the Larynx, Trachea and Primary Bronchial Bifurcation.

Chem Eng Sci 2009 Nov;64(22):4640-4648

Interdisciplinary Graduate Degree Program in Physiology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802.

Three-dimensional simulations of the transport and uptake of a reactive gas such as O(3) were compared between an idealized model of the larynx, trachea, and first bifurcation and a second "control" model in which the larynx was replaced by an equivalent, cylindrical, tube segment. The Navier-Stokes equations, Spalart-Allmaras turbulence equation, and convection-diffusion equation were implemented at conditions reflecting inhalation into an adult human lung. Simulation results were used to analyze axial velocity, turbulent viscosity, local fractional uptake, and regional uptake. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S000925090900331
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2009.05.017DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3432288PMC
November 2009
7 Reads

A Kinetic Study of In Vitro Lysis of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

Chem Eng Sci 2009 May;64(9):1944-1952

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, NE 68588-0643.

The traditional diagnostic tests for tuberculosis consist of an acid fast stain and a culture test from a sputum sample. With the emergence of drug resistant strains of tuberculosis, nucleic acid amplification has become the diagnostic test of choice. The nucleic acid amplification test consists of four steps: sputum sample collection, lysis of bacilli to release DNA, DNA amplification by PCR and detection of PCR products. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2008.12.015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3065029PMC

Determining Surface Plasmon Resonance Response Factors for Deposition onto Three-Dimensional Surfaces.

Authors:
D Keith Roper

Chem Eng Sci 2007 Apr;62(7):1988-1996

Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 USA.

Intrinsic sorption rates of ligand/receptor binding have been measured by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) using response factors for deposition of proteins or smaller molecules on planar surfaces. In this study generalized expressions for SPR response factor and effective refractive index are developed to measure rates of analyte sorption onto 3-D surfaces. The expressions are specialized for two limiting cases of immediate practical interest and broad applicability: analyte deposition onto a homogeneous anisotropic porous media and deposition onto close-packed solid spheres adjacent to the sensor surface. Read More

View Article

Download full-text PDF

Source
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S000925090600805
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ces.2006.12.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2763323PMC
April 2007
5 Reads
  • Page 1 of 1