3,490 results match your criteria Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy


Higher Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Burden is Associated with Smaller Hematoma Volume in Mixed-Location Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

Microcirculation 2021 May 12:e12705. Epub 2021 May 12.

Center of Cerebrovascular Diseases, Department of Neurology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, China.

Objective: To study the relationship between cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) and hematoma volume in mixed-location intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and non-mixed ICH (hypertensive arteriopathy/cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related ICH).

Methods: We consecutively collected patients with primary ICH with MRI. Mixed-location ICH was defined as having ICH or cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) in both lobar and deep regions. Read More

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Heparanase overexpression impedes perivascular clearance of amyloid-β from murine brain: relevance to Alzheimer's disease.

Acta Neuropathol Commun 2021 May 10;9(1):84. Epub 2021 May 10.

Department of Medical Biochemistry and Microbiology, SciLifeLab Uppsala, University of Uppsala, The Biomedical Center Husargatan 3, Box 582, 751 23, Uppsala, Sweden.

Defective amyloid-β (Aβ) clearance from the brain is a major contributing factor to the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ clearance is mediated by macrophages, enzymatic degradation, perivascular drainage along the vascular basement membrane (VBM) and transcytosis across the blood-brain barrier (BBB). AD pathology is typically associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy due to perivascular accumulation of Aβ. Read More

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Epileptiform Activity During Transient Focal Neurologic Episodes in Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy.

Neurol Clin Pract 2021 Feb;11(1):e43-e45

"Luigi Sacco" Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences (DM, FM, PB, LP), University of Milan, Milan, Italy; and Neurology Unit (SR, CB, CN, MO), ASST Fatebenefratelli-Sacco, Milan, Italy.

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February 2021

Amyloid β (Aβ) ELISA of Human iPSC-Derived Neuronal Cultures.

Methods Mol Biol 2021 May 7. Epub 2021 May 7.

Department of Physiology, Keio University, School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan.

Amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are the main component of the characteristic insoluble deposits in brain parenchyma and small blood vessels in the patients afflicted with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). These small peptides are attributed to the pathogenesis of both AD and CAA, suggesting an important index for disease stage and progression. In the brain tissue, Aβs are released mainly from neuronal cells into extracellular space. Read More

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Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Common yet Disproportionately Deadly Stroke Subtype.

Mayo Clin Proc 2021 May 2. Epub 2021 May 2.

Departments of Critical Care Medicine, Neurologic Surgery, and Neurology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL.

Spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a medical emergency and is disproportionately associated with higher mortality and long-term disability compared with ischemic stroke. The phrase "time is brain" was derived for patients with large vessel occlusion ischemic stroke in which approximately 1.9 million neurons are lost every minute. Read More

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Alzheimer's Disease-Rationales for Potential Treatment with the Thrombin Inhibitor Dabigatran.

Authors:
Klaus Grossmann

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Apr 30;22(9). Epub 2021 Apr 30.

Center for Plant Molecular Biology (ZMBP), University of Tübingen, 72076 Tübingen, Germany.

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is caused by neurodegenerative, but also vascular and hemostatic changes in the brain. The oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran, which has been used for over a decade in preventing thromboembolism and has a well-known pharmacokinetic, safety and antidote profile, can be an option to treat vascular dysfunction in early AD, a condition known as cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). Recent results have revealed that amyloid-β proteins (Aβ), thrombin and fibrin play a crucial role in triggering vascular and parenchymal brain abnormalities in CAA. Read More

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Aβ-related Angiitis (ABRA)-A Rare Paraneoplastic Cause of Cerebral Vasculitis in a Young Patient: A Pathway From Unspecific Neurological Symptoms to Final Diagnosis.

Neurologist 2021 May 5;26(3):103-107. Epub 2021 May 5.

Department of Neurology, City of Cologne Municipal Hospitals, Medical Center Cologne-Merheim.

Introduction: Aβ-related angiitis (ABRA) is a very rare disease entity with combined features of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and primary angiitis of the CNS. However, the pathogenesis has not been conclusively described yet. Interestingly though, a possible paraneoplastic origin has been reported in the past. Read More

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Significance of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and other co-morbidities in Lewy body diseases.

Authors:
Kurt A Jellinger

J Neural Transm (Vienna) 2021 May 29;128(5):687-699. Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Institute of Clinical Neurobiology, Alberichgasse 5/13, 1150, Vienna, Austria.

Lewy body dementia (LBD) and Parkinson's disease-dementia (PDD) are two major neurocognitive disorders with Lewy bodies (LB) of unknown etiology. There is considerable clinical and pathological overlap between these two conditions that are clinically distinguished based on the duration of Parkinsonism prior to development of dementia. Their morphology is characterized by a variable combination of LB and Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathologies. Read More

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Complete Evaluation of Dementia: PET and MRI Correlation and Diagnosis for the Neuroradiologist.

AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 2021 Apr 29. Epub 2021 Apr 29.

Department of Radiology (T.Z.W.), Duke University Hospital, Durham, North Carolina.

This article will familiarize neuroradiologists with the pathophysiology, clinical findings, and standard MR imaging and PET imaging features of multiple forms of dementia as well as new emerging techniques. Cases were compiled from multiple institutions with the goal of improved diagnostic accuracy and improved patient care as well as information about biomarkers on the horizon. Dementia topics addressed include the following: Alzheimer disease, frontotemporal dementia, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, Lewy body dementia, Parkinson disease and Parkinson disease variants, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multisystem atrophy, Huntington disease vascular dementia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Read More

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Compound Heterozygous Mutations Associated with Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy and Cognitive Decline Phenotype.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Apr 8;22(8). Epub 2021 Apr 8.

Genomic and Post-Genomic Unit, IRCCS Mondino Foundation, 27100 Pavia, Italy.

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a cerebrovascular disorder caused by the deposition of amyloid beta-peptide (Aβ) aggregates. Aβ aggregates lead to vessel rupture and intracerebral hemorrhages, detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Presenile CAA is usually genetically determined by mutations in the amyloid precursor protein () gene. Read More

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Current Management and Therapeutic Strategies for Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Apr 8;22(8). Epub 2021 Apr 8.

Department of Neurology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-8556, Japan.

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is characterized by accumulation of amyloid β (Aβ) in walls of leptomeningeal vessels and cortical capillaries in the brain. The loss of integrity of these vessels caused by cerebrovascular Aβ deposits results in fragile vessels and lobar intracerebral hemorrhages. CAA also manifests with progressive cognitive impairment or transient focal neurological symptoms. Read More

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[Cerebral amyloid angiopathy, comorbid atrial fibrillation].

Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova 2021 ;121(3. Vyp. 2):46-52

Privolzhsky Research Medical University, Nizhny Novgorod, Russia.

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is caused by the deposition of β-amyloid in small vessels in the cerebral cortex and leptomeninges. Nowadays, CAA is recognized more often due to the development of neuroimaging technologies. The frequency of CAA increases in old age that explains its frequent association with cardiovascular diseases. Read More

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Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Advances in Emergency Care.

Neurol Clin 2021 05 31;39(2):405-418. Epub 2021 Mar 31.

Division of Brain Injury Outcomes, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Intracerebral hemorrhage is a stroke subtype with high mortality and poor functional outcome in survivors. Its main causes are hypertension, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and anticoagulant treatment. Hematomas have a high frequency of expansion in the first hours after symptom onset, a process associated with neurologic deterioration and poor outcome. Read More

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Biphasic Effects of Ethanol Exposure on Waste Metabolites Clearance in the CNS.

Mol Neurobiol 2021 Apr 25. Epub 2021 Apr 25.

Laboratory of Neurovascular Inflammation and Neurodegeneration, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Center for Injury Bio Mechanics, Materials and Medicine, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ, 07102, USA.

We have shown that the effects of low-dose ethanol promote the clearance of waste metabolites, such as amyloid-beta (Aβ) proteins, from the brain through the perivascular space (PVS). We demonstrated that dilative reactivity of arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells regulate this clearance. These findings indicate the importance of blood-brain barrier (BBB) transvascular clearance of large size metabolites from the central nervous system (CNS), where the lymphatic clearance system is absent. Read More

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Cerebral Microbleeds, Cerebrospinal Fluid, and Neuroimaging Markers in Clinical Subtypes of Alzheimer's Disease.

Front Neurol 2021 6;12:543866. Epub 2021 Apr 6.

Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, Japan.

Lobar cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) in Alzheimer's disease (AD) are associated with cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) due to vascular amyloid beta (Aβ) deposits. However, the relationship between lobar CMBs and clinical subtypes of AD remains unknown. Here, we enrolled patients with early- and late-onset amnestic dominant AD, logopenic variant of primary progressive aphasia (lvPPA) and posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) who were compatible with the AD criteria. Read More

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Contribution of Racial and Ethnic Differences in Cerebral Small Vessel Disease Subtype and Burden to Risk of Cerebral Hemorrhage Recurrence.

Neurology 2021 Apr 21. Epub 2021 Apr 21.

Juan Pablo Castello MD, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Henry and Allison McCance Center for Brain Health, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; Marco Pasi MD, University of Lille, Inserm, CHU Lille, U1172 - LilNCog - Lille Neuroscience & Cognition, Lille, France; Jessica R. Abramson BA, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Henry and Allison McCance Center for Brain Health, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; Axana Rodriguez-Torres MPH, School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital; Sandro Marini MD; Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital; Stacie Demel DO, Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA; Lee Gilkerson RN BSN, Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA; Patryk Kubiszewski BA, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Henry and Allison McCance Center for Brain Health, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; Andreas Charidimou MD PhD, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital; Christina Kourkoulis BS, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Henry and Allison McCance Center for Brain Health, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; Zora DiPucchio BS MBA, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital; Kristin Schwab BA, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital; M. Edip Gurol MD MSc, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital; Anand Viswanathan MD PhD, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital; Christopher D. Anderson MD MMSc, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Henry and Allison McCance Center for Brain Health, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; Carl D. Langefeld PhD, Department of Biostatistics and Data Sciences, Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, NC, USA; Matthew L. Flaherty MD, Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA; Amytis Towfighi MD, Department of Neurology, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County Department of Health Services, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Steven M. Greenberg MD PhD, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital; Daniel Woo MD, Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, USA; Jonathan Rosand MD MSc, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Henry and Allison McCance Center for Brain Health, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; Alessandro Biffi MD, Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Hemorrhagic Stroke Research Program, Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Genomic Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Henry and Allison McCance Center for Brain Health, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.

Objective: Black and Hispanic survivors of Intracerebral Hemorrhage (ICH) are at higher risk of recurrent intracranial bleeding. MRI-based markers of chronic Cerebral Small Vessel Disease (CSVD) are consistently associated with recurrent ICH. We therefore sought to investigate whether racial/ethnic differences in MRI-defined CSVD subtype and severity contribute to disparities in ICH recurrence risk. Read More

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Centrum Semiovale Perivascular Space and Amyloid Deposition in Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

Stroke 2021 Apr 20:STROKEAHA120032139. Epub 2021 Apr 20.

Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital Bei-Hu Branch, Taipei (H.-H.T.).

Background And Purpose: We explored whether high-degree magnetic resonance imaging-visible perivascular spaces in centrum semiovale (CSO) are more prevalent in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) than hypertensive small vessel disease and their relationship to brain amyloid retention in patients with primary intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH).

Methods: One hundred and eight spontaneous ICH patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging and Pittsburgh compound B were enrolled. Topography and severity of enlarged perivascular spaces were compared between CAA-related ICH (CAA-ICH) and hypertensive small vessel disease-related ICH (non-CAA ICH). Read More

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Brain insulin signaling and cerebrovascular disease in human postmortem brain.

Acta Neuropathol Commun 2021 04 15;9(1):71. Epub 2021 Apr 15.

Department of Neurology and the Massachusetts Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 149 13th Street, Charlestown, MA, 02129, USA.

Insulin is an important hormone for brain function, and alterations in insulin metabolism may be associated with neuropathology. We examined associations of molecular markers of brain insulin signaling with cerebrovascular disease. Participants were enrolled in the Religious Orders Study (ROS), an ongoing epidemiologic community-based, clinical-pathologic study of aging from across the United States. Read More

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Cerebral amyloid angiopathy and related inflammatory disorders.

Authors:
B K Chwalisz

J Neurol Sci 2021 05 27;424:117425. Epub 2021 Mar 27.

Department of Neurology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, 15 Parkman Street, Suite 835, Boston, MA 02114, USA; Division of Neuro-Ophthalmology, Department of Ophthalmology, Massachusetts Eye & Ear Infirmary/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA. Electronic address:

Inflammatory cerebral amyloid angiopathy is a largely reversible inflammatory vasculopathy that develops in an acute or subacute fashion in reaction to amyloid protein deposition in the central nervous system blood vessels. There are two recognized pathologically characterized variants: cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation (CAAri) and A beta-related angiitis (ABRA). Both variants produce a clinical picture that resembles primary angiitis of the CNS but is distinguished by a characteristic radiologic appearance. Read More

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Late-Life Vascular Risk Score in Association With Postmortem Cerebrovascular Disease Brain Pathologies.

Stroke 2021 Apr 12:STROKEAHA120030226. Epub 2021 Apr 12.

Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL. (S.O., L.Y., A.C., Z.A., L.L.B., J.A.S., D.A.B., A.S.B.).

Background And Purpose: The general cardiovascular Framingham risk score (FRS) identifies adults at increased risk for stroke. We tested the hypothesis that baseline FRS is associated with the presence of postmortem cerebrovascular disease (CVD) pathologies.

Methods: We studied the brains of 1672 older decedents with baseline FRS and measured CVD pathologies including macroinfarcts, microinfarcts, atherosclerosis, arteriolosclerosis, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Read More

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Innumerable hemorrhagic brain metastases from a neuroendocrine tumor grade-1 with prolonged natural history.

Int J Surg Case Rep 2021 Apr 1;82:105855. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Department of Neurosciences, Division of Neurosurgery, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Electronic address:

Background: Neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are rare tumors with a low incidence of brain metastasis, especially in grade 1 NET. The most common source of brain metastasis is the lung. We present an unusual case of NET grade 1 with multiple hemorrhagic brain metastases. Read More

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Cerebral amyloid angiopathy: an underdiagnosed cause of recurrent neurological symptoms.

BMJ Case Rep 2021 Apr 7;14(4). Epub 2021 Apr 7.

Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, Department of Biomolecular Science, University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, Manchester, UK

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a common, yet frequently underdiagnosed pathology characterised by accumulation of amyloid β proteins in the small blood vessels of the brain. As a result, cerebrovascular dysregulation follows, leading to cerebral microbleeds, lobar intracerebral haematomas and sulcal subarachnoid haemorrhages. Gradual motor and cognitive decline due to these brain injuries leads to significant functional limitation in patients. Read More

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Clinical usefulness of Edinburgh CT criteria in patients with lobar intracerebral hemorrhage.

Eur Stroke J 2021 Mar 25;6(1):36-43. Epub 2020 Nov 25.

Neuroscience Section, Department of Applied Clinical Sciences and Biotechnology, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy.

Background: Identifying the cause of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is relevant to optimize its management. We aimed to assess the applicability and utility of the Edinburgh CT criteria for cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in an unselected cohort of hospitalized patients.

Patients And Methods: We retrospectively applied the Edinburgh criteria to the first available brain CTs of patients hospitalized for a first-ever lobar ICH in the district of L'Aquila from 2011 to 2017. Read More

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Age, sex, and cerebral microbleeds in EFAD Alzheimer disease mice.

Neurobiol Aging 2021 Feb 28;103:42-51. Epub 2021 Feb 28.

Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA; Departments of Neurobiology and Molecular Biology, The Dornsife College, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address:

Cerebral microbleeds (MBs) increase at later ages in association with increased cognitive decline and Alzheimer Disease (AD). MB prevalence is also increased by APOE4 and hypertension. In EFAD mice (5XFAD/human APOE), cerebral cortex MBs are most prevalent in E4 females at 6 months, paralleling plaque amyloid. Read More

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February 2021

Plasma Amyloid-Beta Levels in a Pre-Symptomatic Dutch-Type Hereditary Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy Pedigree: A Cross-Sectional and Longitudinal Investigation.

Int J Mol Sci 2021 Mar 13;22(6). Epub 2021 Mar 13.

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia.

Plasma amyloid-beta (Aβ) has long been investigated as a blood biomarker candidate for Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy (CAA), however previous findings have been inconsistent which could be attributed to the use of less sensitive assays. This study investigates plasma Aβ alterations between pre-symptomatic Dutch-type hereditary CAA (D-CAA) mutation-carriers (MC) and non-carriers (NC) using two Aβ measurement platforms. Seventeen pre-symptomatic members of a D-CAA pedigree were assembled and followed up 3-4 years later (NC = 8; MC = 9). Read More

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Circulating AQP4 Levels in Patients with Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy-Associated Intracerebral Hemorrhage.

J Clin Med 2021 Mar 2;10(5). Epub 2021 Mar 2.

Neurovascular Research Laboratory, Vall d'Hebron Research Institute, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08035 Barcelona, Spain.

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a major cause of lobar intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in elderly patients. Growing evidence suggests a potential role of aquaporin 4 (AQP4) in amyloid-beta-associated diseases, including CAA pathology. Our aim was to investigate the circulating levels of AQP4 in a cohort of patients who had suffered a lobar ICH with a clinical diagnosis of CAA. Read More

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Stopping "transient ischemic attacks" by antiplatelet withdrawal.

Neurol Res Pract 2021 Apr 1;3(1):19. Epub 2021 Apr 1.

Second Department of Neurology, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, School of Medicine, "Attikon" University Hospital, Rimini 1, Chaidari, 12462, Athens, Greece.

Introduction: Transient ischemic attack (TIA) is considered to be an important risk factor for the development of ischemic stroke and requires complete etiopathogenic evaluation and prompt initiation of secondary prevention treatment. In addition, an accurate differential diagnosis should be performed in order to exclude other disorders mimicking TIA.

Methods: In this case report, we describe the clinical and neuroimaging evaluation and the differential diagnosis of a patient with suspected crescendo TIAs. Read More

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Cerebral small vessel disease: A review.

Adv Clin Exp Med 2021 Mar;30(3):349-356

Department of Neurology, Wroclaw Medical University, Poland.

Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is the most common, chronic and progressive vascular disease. The changes affect arterioles, capillaries and small veins supplying the white matter and deep structures of the brain. It is the most common incidental finding on brain scans, especially in people over 80 years of age. Read More

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NAC blocks Cystatin C amyloid complex aggregation in a cell system and in skin of HCCAA patients.

Nat Commun 2021 03 23;12(1):1827. Epub 2021 Mar 23.

The Center for Applied Genomics, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA.

Hereditary cystatin C amyloid angiopathy is a dominantly inherited disease caused by a leucine to glutamine variant of human cystatin C (hCC). L68Q-hCC forms amyloid deposits in brain arteries associated with micro-infarcts, leading ultimately to paralysis, dementia and death in young adults. To evaluate the ability of molecules to interfere with aggregation of hCC while informing about cellular toxicity, we generated cells that produce and secrete WT and L68Q-hCC and have detected high-molecular weight complexes formed from the mutant protein. Read More

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