198 results match your criteria Central Venous Access Subclavian Vein Subclavian Approach


Ultrasound-guided double central venous access for azygos vein via the ninth and tenth intercostal veins.

J Vasc Access 2020 Jun 30:1129729820937133. Epub 2020 Jun 30.

Department of Pediatric Surgery, Reproductive and Developmental Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka, Japan.

Some patients with intestinal failure, who are dependent on total parenteral nutrition for long periods, suffer from a lack of suitable conventional venous access points, including axillary, external jugular, internal jugular, subclavian, saphenous, and the brachio-cephalic and femoral veins, due to their occlusion. Furthermore, extensive central venous stenosis and/or thrombosis of the superior and inferior vena cava may preclude further catheterization, so uncommon routes must be used, which can be challenging. In such patients, the azygos vein via the intercostal vein is a viable candidate. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1129729820937133DOI Listing

Feasibility of the ultrasound-guided supraclavicular cannulation of the brachiocephalic vein in very small weight infants: A case series.

Paediatr Anaesth 2020 May 25. Epub 2020 May 25.

Department of Anesthesia, Klinikum Klagenfurt, Klagenfurt, Austria.

Background: The aim of this retrospective analysis was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of the supraclavicular ultrasound-guided cannulation of the brachiocephalic vein in infants weighing less than 1500 g.

Methods: The ultrasound probe was placed in the supraclavicular region so as to obtain the optimum sonographic long-axis view of the brachiocephalic vein. By using an in-plane approach the brachiocephalic vein was cannulated by using a 24-gauge intravenous cannula under real-time ultrasound guidance into the vein followed by the insertion of a 2-French single lumen catheter using the Seldinger technique. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/pan.13928DOI Listing

Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachiocephalic vein catheterization in children: Syringe-free in-plane technique with micro-convex probe.

J Vasc Access 2020 Mar 6;21(2):241-245. Epub 2019 Sep 6.

Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Kutahya Health Sciences University Hospital, Kutahya, Turkey.

Central venous catheterization of children is often a challenging procedure due to small anatomical structures. Ultrasound guidance has been shown to reduce complications and improve cannulation success as compared with the landmark-based technique. In-plane techniques allow for longitudinal visualization of the vessels and real-time visualization of needle track during its advancement. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1129729819867221DOI Listing

Ultrasound-guided proximal versus distal axillary vein puncture in elderly patients: A randomized controlled trial.

J Vasc Access 2020 Mar 1:1129729820904866. Epub 2020 Mar 1.

Department of Emergency Medicine and Critical Care, The Affiliated Shanghai Songjiang Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Shanghai, China.

Background: Ultrasound-guided axillary vein catheterization is now widely used in hospital, but it remains uncertain whether the distal axillary vein approach is more beneficial for seniors than the proximal axillary vein approach. This study aims to compare the puncture success rate and anatomical characteristics between these two approaches.

Methods: Senior patients requiring central venous catheterization were enrolled and randomized to the proximal axillary vein group ( = 49) or the distal axillary vein group ( = 50). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1129729820904866DOI Listing

Real-time ultrasound-guided supraclavicular technique as a possible alternative approach for Hickman catheter implantation.

J Pediatr Surg 2020 Jun 9;55(6):1157-1161. Epub 2019 Dec 9.

Department of Pediatric Anesthesiology, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn, Germany.

Background: Tunneled Hickman/Broviac central venous catheter implantation is performed when patients require a central vein route for long-term therapy. The subclavian or internal jugular vein approach is often chosen for their implantation sites. However, access to the central vein can be difficult owing to thrombosis or stenosis when the same vein has already been accessed several times. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2019.11.022DOI Listing

A Novel Inside-out Access Approach for Hemodialysis Catheter Placement in Patients With Thoracic Central Venous Occlusion.

Am J Kidney Dis 2020 04 29;75(4):480-487. Epub 2019 Nov 29.

Department of Nephrology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria.

Rationale & Objective: Left-sided internal jugular and all subclavian central venous catheters (CVCs) cause thoracic central vein occlusions (TCVOs) more often than right-sided internal jugular catheters. To enable right-sided CVC placement in patients with TCVO, an inside-out access (IOA) approach was established at 3 vascular access centers in Europe involving use of a novel IOA device advanced from the right femoral vein. In the current analysis, we assessed the eligibility and success rate of this IOA approach in a cohort of patients with TCVO requiring a tunneled dialysis catheter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1053/j.ajkd.2019.08.024DOI Listing

How to perform left atrial transseptal access and catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation from a superior approach.

J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2020 Jan 2;31(1):293-299. Epub 2019 Dec 2.

Division of Cardiology, Electrophysiology Section, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan.

The standard technique for percutaneous catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) involves obtaining left atrial access and catheter manipulation from an inferior transfemoral venous access. However, in patients with inferior vena cava interruption, a standard transfemoral venous approach is not possible. In these cases, a percutaneous approach from a superior central vein, such as the internal jugular vein or the axillary/subclavian vein can be considered. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jce.14294DOI Listing
January 2020
4 Reads

Cephalic vein approach for the implantable central venous access: A retrospective review of the single institution's experiences; Cohort Study.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2019 Nov;98(46):e18007

Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea.

Long-term venous access is usually required in patients receiving chemotherapy. We hypothesized that, out of the various central line approach techniques, the cephalic vein cut-down technique can be a safe and simple alternative in terms of surgical safety, feasibility, cost-effectiveness, and functional outcomes.We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 569 patients who underwent implantable central venous access between January 2012 and December 2014 at our hospital. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000018007DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6867776PMC
November 2019

Atrial Fibrillation and Atrial Flutter Ablation - an Unconventional Approach.

J Atr Fibrillation 2019 Jun 30;12(1):2106. Epub 2019 Jun 30.

Medical Student Government Kilpauk Medical College & Hospital.

Background: Radiofrequency cathether ablation (RFCA) of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) and typical atrial flutter (AF) is traditionally performed via femoral vein approach and all devices are designed to be delivered via inferior access. In rare cases of congenital or iatrogenic obstruction of inferior vena cava (IVC), RFCA of arrhythmias is performed via transhepatic approach.

Case Report: 87 year old male patient with history of IVC filter placement for recurrent deep venous thrombosis and AFib on amiodarone developed symptoms with worsening Afib burden resulting in deterioration of left ventricular ejection fraction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4022/jafib.2106DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6811339PMC
June 2019
1 Read

Comparison of Subclavian and Peripheral Intravenous Cannula Insertion in Critically Ill Patients Arriving in Emergency Department.

Cureus 2019 Aug 21;11(8):e5452. Epub 2019 Aug 21.

Medicine, Zia Hospital, Sadiqabad, PAK.

Introduction: Peripheral intravenous cannulation (PIVC) is a universal procedure to get venous access in hospital emergency settings. Sometimes, for critically ill patients in an emergency department, when we cannot get peripheral venous access, a central venous access could be established by percutaneous subclavian vein cannula insertion through a supraclavicular approach. This study will compare PIVC and percutaneous subclavian vein cannula insertion through supraclavicular approach, and determine which method is more effective and fast in critically ill patients arriving in the emergency department. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.5452DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6799877PMC
August 2019
2 Reads

Recommendations on the Use of Ultrasound Guidance for Central and Peripheral Vascular Access in Adults: A Position Statement of the Society of Hospital Medicine.

J Hosp Med 2019 Sep 6;14:E1-E22. Epub 2019 Sep 6.

Division of General & Hospital Medicine, University of Texas Health San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas.

Preprocedure: 1) We recommend that providers should be familiar with the operation of their specific ultrasound machine prior to initiation of a vascular access procedure.2) We recommend that providers should use a high-frequency linear transducer with a sterile sheath and sterile gel to perform vascular access procedures.3) We recommend that providers should use two-dimensional ultrasound to evaluate for anatomical variations and absence of vascular thrombosis during preprocedural site selection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12788/jhm.3287DOI Listing
September 2019
6 Reads

Supraclavicular Approach to the Subclavian Vein - One Well Forgotten Technique with Impressive Results.

Pol Przegl Chir 2019 Jun;91(4):19-23

Department of Surgery, Medical University, Pleven, Bulgarian.

Purpose: Insertion of temporary and tunneled catheters for hemodialysis in the internal jugular vein is a "gold standard". On the other hand, the supraclavicular approach to the subclavian vein was described by Yoffa in 1965. Despite its old invention, the latter technique has been well forgotten for unknown reasons. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5604/01.3001.0013.2281DOI Listing
June 2019
4 Reads

Transposition of external jugular to proximal internal jugular vein for relief of venous thoracic outlet syndrome and maintenance of arteriovenous fistula access for chronic hemodialysis: A new approach.

J Vasc Access 2020 Jan 24;21(1):98-102. Epub 2019 Jun 24.

Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.

We are reporting a case of venous thoracic outlet syndrome with recurrent subclavian vein thrombosis in the setting of an ipsilateral brachiocephalic arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis that was malfunctioning due to the central vein obstruction. The patient also had a concomitant external jugular vein origin stenosis. Given her body habitus and aversion to recovery after traditional first rib resection, we elected for an alternative treatment with an external jugular vein to internal jugular vein transposition with balloon angioplasty of the stenosed external jugular origin segment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1129729819851063DOI Listing
January 2020
28 Reads

Complications in internal jugular vs subclavian ultrasound-guided central venous catheterization: a comparative randomized trial.

Intensive Care Med 2019 07 29;45(7):968-976. Epub 2019 May 29.

Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 82, Gumi-ro 173 Beon-gil, Gyeonggi-do, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, 13620, South Korea.

Purpose: The use of real-time ultrasound (US) has been shown to reduce complications of central venous (CV) catheterization. However, complication rates have not been compared according to insertion points for CV catheterization using US. Accordingly, this study aimed to compare the complication rates of internal jugular vein (IJV) with those of subclavian vein (SCV) catheterization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00134-019-05651-9DOI Listing
July 2019
10 Reads

Evaluation of a Novel Bony Landmark-Based Method for Teaching Percutaneous Insertion of Subclavian Venous Catheters in Pediatric Patients.

World J Surg 2019 08;43(8):2106-2113

Department of Paediatric Surgery, KK Women's and Children's Hospital, 100 Bukit Timah Road, Singapore, 229899, Singapore.

Background: Surgical trainees performing subclavian vein (SCV) cannulation often incorrectly perceive needle trajectory and anatomical relations. As surface landmark-based methods derived from adult surgical practice may be less effective in younger patients, we developed and evaluated a novel bony landmark-based method for teaching SCV cannulation for central venous access device (CVAD) placement in children.

Methods: Over 2 sequential 3-year periods, pediatric surgical trainees were taught infraclavicular SCV cannulation via surface- and bony-landmark approaches, respectively. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00268-019-04997-xDOI Listing
August 2019
8 Reads

Reduced Complications of Supraclavicular Approach in Simulated Central Venous Access: Applicability to Military Medicine.

Mil Med 2019 03;184(Suppl 1):329-334

Department of Anesthesiology, 1600 SW Archer Road, Gainesville, FL.

In a study with 76 anesthesia providers on a mixed reality simulator, central venous access via the supraclavicular approach to the subclavian vein, without ultrasonography required less attempts compared to the infraclavicular approach. Participants had shorter times to venous access and larger improvements in confidence. Results from this simulation-based study indicate that the supraclavicular approach may deserve consideration as an alternative approach for central venous access in deployed military environments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/milmed/usy381DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6433094PMC
March 2019
22 Reads

Endocavitary versus Linear Array High-Frequency Probe in Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Subclavian Vein Central Access.

Anesth Essays Res 2018 Oct-Dec;12(4):873-878

Department of Anesthesia, Fayoum University, Faiyum, Egypt.

Background: Vascular access is a top priority in the critically ill patients. Cannulation - venous and/or arterial - is the first step in any emergency situation. Ultrasound (US)-guided vascular cannulation was found to have a higher success rate and a decreased incidence of mechanical complications as compared with the landmark one. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.4103/aer.AER_146_18DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6319046PMC
January 2019
30 Reads

Feasibility and safety of exclusive echocardiography-guided intravenous temporary pacemaker implantation.

J Echocardiogr 2019 09 13;17(3):157-161. Epub 2018 Nov 13.

Department of Cardiology, Soroka University Medical Center, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, P.O. Box 151, 84101, Beer Sheva, Israel.

Background: The standard approach for urgent trans-venous temporary cardiac pacemaker (TVTP) implantation is fluoroscopy guidance. The delay in activation of the fluoroscopy-room and the transfer of unstable patients may be life-threatening. Echocardiography-guided TP implantation may increase the safety of the patients by obviating the need for in-hospital transfer. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s12574-018-0406-4
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12574-018-0406-4DOI Listing
September 2019
43 Reads

Studying alternative approaches for placement of cuffed hemodialysis catheters in hemodialysis patients with bilateral internal jugular vein occlusion.

J Vasc Access 2019 May 24;20(3):250-259. Epub 2018 Aug 24.

Internal Medicine Department, Faculty of Medicine, Menoufia University, Shibin El Kom, Egypt.

Introduction: Internal jugular vein occlusion often makes necessary the use of less desirable routes as external jugular, subclavian, and femoral vein approaches in addition to inferior vena cava approaches. This a prospective cross-sectional follow-up study of the alternative approaches for placement of cuffed hemodialysis catheters in end-stage renal disease patients with bilateral internal jugular vein occlusion from the interventional nephrology point of view.

Method: The study was conducted on 134 end-stage renal disease patients who were referred for insertion of a challenging hemodialysis catheter due to bilateral internal jugular vein occlusion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1129729818794414DOI Listing
May 2019
12 Reads

Femoral Access for Central Venous Port System Implantation.

Cureus 2018 Mar 14;10(3):e2327. Epub 2018 Mar 14.

Thoracic Surgery, Saint-Petersburg State University.

Totally implanted venous access port (TIVAP) systems provide adequate quality of care and life, especially for oncology patients. Long-term vascular access is very important and easy to perform, but in some clinical situations, if patients have a superior caval system occlusion, femoral insertion may be the only option. We present a case of a 70-year-old colorectal adenocarcinoma patient diagnosed with subclavian vein hypoplasia. Read More

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https://www.cureus.com/articles/10610-femoral-access-for-cen
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.7759/cureus.2327DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5951597PMC
March 2018
13 Reads

Obtaining central access in challenging pediatric patients.

Pediatr Surg Int 2018 May 26;34(5):529-533. Epub 2018 Mar 26.

Section of Pediatric Surgery, Department of Surgery, Michigan Medicine, C.S. Mott Children's and Von Voigtlander Women's Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.

Purpose: Central catheter placement is one of the most commonly performed procedures by pediatric surgeons. Here, we present a case series of patients where central access was obtained at our institution with the utilization of a novel ultrasound-guided technique. This series represents the first of its kind where the native, parent vessels were inaccessible, resulting in a challenging situation for providers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00383-018-4251-3DOI Listing
May 2018
54 Reads

Percutaneous Cut-Down Technique for Indwelling Port Placement.

Am Surg 2017 Dec;83(12):1336-1342

The superiority of surgical cut-down of the cephalic vein versus percutaneous catheterization of the subclavian vein for the insertion of totally implantable venous access devices (TIVADs) is debated. To compare the safety and efficacy of surgical cut-down versus percutaneous placement of TIVADs. This is a single-institution retrospective cohort study of oncologic patients who had TIVADs implanted by 14 surgeons. Read More

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December 2017
70 Reads

[Complications analysis of subcutaneous venous access port for chemotherapy in patients with gastrointestinal malignancy].

Zhonghua Wei Chang Wai Ke Za Zhi 2017 Dec;20(12):1393-1398

Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510655, China.

Objective: To describe and analyze the complications of subcutaneous venous access port for patients with gastrointestinal malignancy.

Methods: Data of 1 912 patients with gastrointestinal malignancy who accepted chemotherapy in our department via subcutaneous venous access ports, including 127 cases in upper arm, 865 cases in subclavicular vein and 920 cases in internal jugular vein, from June 2007 to April 2016 were analyzed retrospectively. Associated complications and risk factors were emphatically investigated. Read More

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December 2017
24 Reads

Endovascular stent-based revascularization of malignant superior vena cava syndrome with concomitant implantation of a port device using a dual venous approach.

Support Care Cancer 2018 Jun 22;26(6):1881-1888. Epub 2017 Dec 22.

Clinic for Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Lübeck, Ratzeburger Allee 160, 23538, Lübeck, Germany.

Purpose: The aim of this paper is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of endovascular revascularization of malignant superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) and simultaneous implantation of a totally implantable venous access port (TIVAP) using a dual venous approach.

Materials And Methods: Retrospectively, 31 patients (mean age 67 ± 8 years) with malignant CVO who had undergone revascularization by implantation of a self-expanding stent into the superior vena cava (SVC) (Sinus XL®, OptiMed, Germany; n = 11 [Group1] and Protégé ™ EverFlex, Covidien, Ireland; n = 20 [Group 2]) via a transfemoral access were identified. Simultaneously, percutaneous access via a subclavian vein was used to (a) probe the lesion from above, (b) facilitate a through-and-through maneuver, and (c) implant a TIVAP. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00520-017-3997-9DOI Listing
June 2018
17 Reads

Visualization Improves Supraclavicular Access to the Subclavian Vein in a Mixed Reality Simulator.

Anesth Analg 2018 07;127(1):83-89

From the Department of Anesthesiology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, Florida.

Background: We investigated whether visual augmentation (3D, real-time, color visualization) of a procedural simulator improved performance during training in the supraclavicular approach to the subclavian vein, not as widely known or used as its infraclavicular counterpart.

Methods: To train anesthesiology residents to access a central vein, a mixed reality simulator with emulated ultrasound imaging was created using an anatomically authentic, 3D-printed, physical mannequin based on a computed tomographic scan of an actual human. The simulator has a corresponding 3D virtual model of the neck and upper chest anatomy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1213/ANE.0000000000002572DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6774241PMC
July 2018
52 Reads

The correlation between ATLS and junior doctors' anatomical knowledge of central venous catheter insertion at a major trauma centre in South Africa.

Injury 2018 Feb 7;49(2):203-207. Epub 2017 Nov 7.

Pietermaritzburg Metropolitan Trauma Service, Department of Surgery, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa; Department of Surgery, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Objective: To review the ability of junior doctors (JDs) in identifying the correct anatomical site for central venous catheterization (CVC) and whether prior Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) training influences this.

Design: We performed a prospective, observational study using a structured survey and asked a group of JDs (postgraduate year 1 [PGY1] or year 2 [PGY2]) to indicate on a photograph the exact site for CVC insertion via the internal jugular (IJV) and the subclavian (SCV) approach. This study was conducted in a large metropolitan university hospital in South Africa. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.injury.2017.11.004DOI Listing
February 2018
13 Reads

Supraclavicular Approach to Ultrasound-Guided Brachiocephalic Vein Cannulation in Children and Neonates.

Front Pediatr 2017 5;5:211. Epub 2017 Oct 5.

Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Paris South University Hospitals, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.

The correct choice of intra vascular access in critically ill neonates should be individualized depending on the type and duration of therapy, gestational and chronological age, weight and/or size, diagnosis, clinical status, and venous system patency. Accordingly, there is an ongoing demand for optimization of catheterization. Recently, the use of ultrasound (US)-guided cannulation of the subclavian vein (SCV) has been described in children and neonates. Read More

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http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fped.2017.002
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fped.2017.00211DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5633682PMC
October 2017
60 Reads

Ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement: a structured review and recommendations for clinical practice.

Crit Care 2017 Aug 28;21(1):225. Epub 2017 Aug 28.

Service de Réanimation Médicale Hôpital de Bicêtre, Hôpitaux Universitaires Paris-Sud, AP-HP, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France.

The use of ultrasound (US) has been proposed to reduce the number of complications and to increase the safety and quality of central venous catheter (CVC) placement. In this review, we describe the rationale for the use of US during CVC placement, the basic principles of this technique, and the current evidence and existing guidelines for its use. In addition, we recommend a structured approach for US-guided central venous access for clinical practice. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13054-017-1814-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5572160PMC
August 2017
56 Reads

Indications and outcomes for tunneled central venous line placement via the axillary vein in children.

Pediatr Surg Int 2017 Sep 27;33(9):1001-1005. Epub 2017 Jun 27.

Department of Surgery, Medstar Georgetown University Hospital, 3800 Reservoir Road, NW, Washington, DC, 20007, USA.

Purpose: To assess the indications, safety and outcomes of tunneled central venous catheters (CVCs) placed via a cutdown approach into the axillary vein in children, an approach not well described in this population.

Methods: A retrospective cohort study was performed on pediatric patients who received CVCs via open cannulation of the axillary vein or one of its tributaries between January 2006 and October 2016 at two hospitals.

Results: A total of 24 axillary CVCs were placed in 20 patients [10 male (42%); mean weight 7. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00383-017-4099-y
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00383-017-4099-yDOI Listing
September 2017
38 Reads

[Use of ultrasound for placement of central venous catheters in pediatrics: results of a national survey].

Cir Pediatr 2017 Jan 25;30(1):9-16. Epub 2017 Jan 25.

Servicio de Cirugía Pediátrica. Hospital Clínico Universitario Virgen de la Arrixaca. Murcia.

Objectives: To study the variability of techniques used for vascular access of central venous devices, totally implanted and external tunneled, as well as polling the use of ultrasound by pediatric surgeons in Spain.

Material And Methods: Descriptive study of a survey results, conducted by phone, email and online, about 20 items related to the placement of these devices in children and the use of ultrasound in this procedure.

Results: We analyzed 71 surveys from 31 national hospitals. Read More

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January 2017
36 Reads

A comparison of longitudinal and transverse approaches to ultrasound-guided axillary vein cannulation by experienced operators.

J Thorac Dis 2017 Apr;9(4):1133-1139

Department of Intensive Care Unit, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China.

Background: The axillary vein is an easily accessible vessel that can be used for ultrasound-guided central vascular access and offers an alternative to the internal jugular and subclavian veins. The objective of this study was to identify which transducer orientation, longitudinal or transverse, is better for imaging the axillary vein with ultrasound.

Methods: We analyzed 236 patients who had undergone central venous cannulation of axillary vein in this retrospective study. Read More

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http://jtd.amegroups.com/article/view/12958/10944
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.21037/jtd.2017.03.137DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5418287PMC
April 2017
36 Reads

Complications after implantation of subcutaneous central venous ports (PowerPort).

Ann Med Surg (Lond) 2017 May 10;17:1-6. Epub 2017 Mar 10.

Department of Surgery, Kitasato University School of Medicine, Japan.

Background: The aim of our study was revised as follows: to clarify the postoperative complications of multifunctional central venous ports and the risk factors for such complications to promote the safe use of the PowerPort system in the hospital.

Methods: The study group comprised 132 patients in whom implantable central venous access ports (PowerPort) were placed in our hospital from March 2014 through December 2015. The approach used for port placement was the subclavian vein in 43 patients (33%), the internal jugular vein in 87 patients (66%), and the femoral vein in 2 patients (1%). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.amsu.2017.03.014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5358939PMC
May 2017
39 Reads

Response to: Central venous catheterization in fragile patients: which is the best approach?

J Vasc Access 2017 03 21;18(2):e25. Epub 2017 Mar 21.

Department of Diagnostic Science - Radiology and Interventional Radiology Unit, ASST Santi Paolo and Carlo - San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Milan - Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5301/jva.5000667DOI Listing
March 2017
9 Reads

Central venous catheterization in fragile patients: which is the best approach?

J Vasc Access 2017 03 21;18(2):e24. Epub 2017 Mar 21.

Department of Health Sciences, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, San Paolo Hospital, University of Milan, Milan - Italy.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5301/jva.5000666DOI Listing
March 2017
2 Reads

Ultrasound-Guided Subclavian Vein Cannulation in Low Birth Weight Neonates.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2017 02;18(2):172-175

1Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Paris South University Hospitals, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, Paris, France. 2School of Medicine, Paris South University, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, Paris, France. 3Institute of Integrative Biology of the Cell-UMR 9198, Paris Saclay University, Gif-sur-Yvette, Paris, France. 4Espace Ethique/IDF, Saint Louis University Hospital, Assistance Publique Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France.

Objectives: Central venous access in critically ill, small infants remains technically challenging even in experienced hands. Several vascular accesses exist, but the subclavian vein is often preferred for central venous catheter insertion in infants where abdominal malformation and/or closure of the vein preclude the use of umbilical venous catheters, as catheterization of the subclavian vein is easier in very short necks than the internal jugular vein for age-related anatomical reasons. The subclavian vein approach is yet relatively undescribed in low birth weight infants (i. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000001028DOI Listing
February 2017
36 Reads

Analysis of the Outcomes in Central Venous Access Port Implantation Performed by Residents via the Internal Jugular Vein and Subclavian Vein.

J Surg Educ 2017 May - Jun;74(3):443-449. Epub 2016 Dec 5.

Department of Surgery, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki, Japan.

Objective: The central venous access port (CVAP) has played an important role in the safe administration of chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition. The aim of the present study was to clarify the optimal access vein for CVAP implantation when performed by residents rather than attending surgeons.

Methods: A consecutive cases of CVAP implantation via the subclavian vein (SV) using a landmark-guided technique or via the internal jugular vein (JV) using an ultrasound-guided technique were divided into 2 groups according to whether the intervention was performed by a resident or an attending surgeon. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsurg.2016.11.005DOI Listing
April 2018
42 Reads

Infraclavicular access to the axillary vein - new possibilities for the catheterization of the central veins in the intensive care unit.

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2016 21;48(5):360-366. Epub 2016 Nov 21.

Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, PS ZOZ Wojewodzkie Centrum Medyczne w Opolu, Poland.

Central vein cannulation is one of the most commonly performed procedures in intensive care. Traditionally, the jugular and subclavian vein are recommended as the first choice option. Nevertheless, these attempts are not always obtainable for critically ill patients. Read More

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https://journals.viamedica.pl/anaesthesiology_intensivethera
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.5603/AIT.a2016.0055DOI Listing
March 2017
50 Reads

A novel "shrug technique" for totally implantable venous access devices via the external jugular vein: A consecutive series of 254 patients.

J Surg Oncol 2017 Mar 4;115(3):291-295. Epub 2016 Nov 4.

Department of Gastroenterological Surgery, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama, Japan.

Background: The external jugular vein (EJV) approach for totally implantable venous access devices (TIVADs) is safe. However, the success rate is unsatisfactory because of the difficulty in catheterization due to the acute angle between the EJV and the subclavian vein (SCV). A novel "shrug technique" to overcome this difficulty was developed, and its efficacy was assessed in a consecutive case series. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.24504DOI Listing
March 2017
40 Reads

A Novel Technique of Subclavian Artery Cannulation for Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

Exp Clin Transplant 2017 Dec 14;15(6):658-663. Epub 2016 Oct 14.

From the Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Turkey Yuksek Ihtisas Hospital, Ankara, Turkey.

Objectives: The common femoral artery is the standard site for immediate vascular access when initiating adult venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. However, this approach is fraught with problems such as femoral artery occlusion, distal limb ischemia, reperfusion injury resulting in compartment syndrome, retroperitoneal hemorrhage, thrombosis, embolization, and most importantly, pulmonary edema. Here, we show our preference of using the subclavian artery with a side graft as a different cannulation technique for outflow of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, which can avoid complications associated with different access techniques. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.6002/ect.2016.0002DOI Listing
December 2017
62 Reads

Novel experience of laser-assisted 'inside-out' central venous access in a patient with bilateral subclavian vein occlusion requiring pacemaker implantation.

Europace 2017 Oct;19(10):1750-1753

Department of Cardiology, The James Cook University Hospital, South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Marton Road, Middlesbrough TS4 3BW, UK.

Aim: This new laser facilitated 'inside-out' technique was used for transvenous pacemaker insertion in a pacemaker-dependent patient with bilateral subclavian occlusion and a failed epicardial system who is not suitable for a transfemoral approach.

Method And Results: Procedure was undertaken under general anaesthesia with venous access obtained from right femoral vein and left axillary vein. 7F multipurpose catheter was used to enter proximal edge of the occluded segment of subclavian vein via femoral approach, which then supported stiff angioplasty wires and microcatheters to tunnel into the body of occlusion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/europace/euw239DOI Listing
October 2017
47 Reads

Application and comparison of different implanted ports in malignant tumor patients.

World J Surg Oncol 2016 Sep 23;14(1):251. Epub 2016 Sep 23.

Department of Medical Oncology, The Sixth Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong, 510655, China.

Background: The current study aims to compare the application and convenience of the upper arm port with the other two methods of implanted ports in the jugular vein and the subclavian vein in patients with gastrointestinal cancers.

Methods: Currently, the standard of practice is placement of central venous access via an internal jugular vein approach. Perioperative time, postoperative complications, and postoperative comfort level in patients receiving an implanted venous port in the upper arm were retrospectively compared to those in the jugular vein and the subclavian vein from April 2013 to November 2014. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12957-016-1002-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5035459PMC
September 2016
55 Reads

Totally implantable venous access port via the femoral vein in a femoral port position with CT-venography.

J Surg Oncol 2016 Dec 22;114(8):1024-1028. Epub 2016 Sep 22.

Department of Surgery, Asahikawa Medical University, Asahikawa City, Japan.

Background And Purpose: We aimed to determine the success rate and any complications using a percutaneous approach to the femoral vein (FV) for placement of a totally implantable access port (TIVAP), with a preoperative assessment of the femoral and iliac veins using computed tomography-venography (CT-V).

Methods: A prospective study of 72 patients was conducted where placement of a TIVAP was attempted via the right FV, with the port placed in the anterior thigh, when subclavian vein or jugular vein access was contraindicated. Preoperative assessment of the femoral venous plexus was performed with CT-V in 72 patients. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.24441DOI Listing
December 2016
65 Reads

12th WINFOCUS world congress on ultrasound in emergency and critical care.

Authors:
Yahya Acar Onur Tezel Necati Salman Erdem Cevik Margarita Algaba-Montes Alberto Oviedo-García Mayra Patricio-Bordomás Mustafa Z Mahmoud Abdelmoneim Sulieman Abbas Ali Alrayah Mustafa Ihab Abdelrahman Mustafa Bahar Osama Ali H Lester Kirchner Gregor Prosen Ajda Anzic Paul Leeson Maryam Bahreini Fatemeh Rasooli Houman Hosseinnejad Gabriel Blecher Robert Meek Diana Egerton-Warburton Edina Ćatić Ćuti Stanko Belina Tihomir Vančina Idriz Kovačević Nadan Rustemović Ikwan Chang Jin Hee Lee Young Ho Kwak Do Kyun Kim Chi-Yung Cheng Hsiu-Yung Pan Chia-Te Kung Ela Ćurčić Ena Pritišanac Ivo Planinc Marijana Grgić Medić Radovan Radonić Abiola Fasina Anthony J Dean Nova L Panebianco Patricia S Henwood Oliviero Fochi Moreno Favarato Ezio Bonanomi Ivan Tomić Youngrock Ha Hongchuen Toh Elizabeth Harmon Wilma Chan Cameron Baston Gail Morrison Frances Shofer Angela Hua Sharon Kim James Tsung Isa Gunaydin Zeynep Kekec Mehmet Oguzhan Ay Jinjoo Kim Jinhyun Kim Gyoosung Choi Dowon Shim Ji-Han Lee Jana Ambrozic Katja Prokselj Miha Lucovnik Gabrijela Brzan Simenc Asta Mačiulienė Almantas Maleckas Algimantas Kriščiukaitis Vytautas Mačiulis Andrius Macas Sharad Mohite Zoltan Narancsik Hugon Možina Sara Nikolić Jan Hansel Rok Petrovčič Una Mršić Simon Orlob Markus Lerchbaumer Niklas Schönegger Reinhard Kaufmann Chun-I Pan Chien-Hung Wu Sarah Pasquale Stephanie J Doniger Sharon Yellin Gerardo Chiricolo Maja Potisek Borut Drnovšek Boštjan Leskovar Kristine Robinson Clara Kraft Benjamin Moser Stephen Davis Shelley Layman Yusef Sayeed Joseph Minardi Irmina Sefic Pasic Amra Dzananovic Anes Pasic Sandra Vegar Zubovic Ana Godan Hauptman Ana Vujaklija Brajkovic Jaksa Babel Marina Peklic Vedran Radonic Luka Bielen Peh Wee Ming Nur Hafiza Yezid Fatahul Laham Mohammed Zainal Abidin Huda Wan Nasarudin Wan Ismail W Yus Haniff W Isa Hashairi Fauzi Praveena Seeva Mohd Zulfakar Mazlan

Crit Ultrasound J 2016 Sep;8(Suppl 1):12

Anaesthesiology Department, University Science of Malaysia, Kota Bharu, Malaysia.

Table Of Contents: A1 Point-of-care ultrasound examination of cervical spine in emergency departmentYahya Acar, Onur Tezel, Necati SalmanA2 A new technique in verifying the placement of a nasogastric tube: obtaining the longitudinal view of nasogastric tube in addition to transverse view with ultrasoundYahya Acar, Necati Salman, Onur Tezel, Erdem CevikA3 Pseudoaneurysm of the femoral artery after cannulation of a central venous line. Should we always use ultrasound in these procedures?Margarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-BordomásA4 Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular subclavian vein catheterization. A novel approach in emergency departmentMargarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-BordomásA5 Clinical ultrasound in a septic and jaundice patient in the emergency departmentMargarita Algaba-Montes, Alberto Oviedo-García, Mayra Patricio-BordomásA6 Characterization of the eyes in preoperative cataract Saudi patients by using medical diagnostic ultrasoundMustafa Z. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13089-016-0046-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5014769PMC
September 2016
102 Reads
2 Citations

Subclavian Vein Central Line Catheter Mistakenly Placed in the Aorta: A Case Report and How to Avoid Complications.

W V Med J 2016 Sep-Oct;112(5):60-4

An 85-year-old female with multiple medical problems presented with a sigmoid volvulus. While in the ICU, the patient required a central line because of poor peripheral access. The central line was mistakenly placed in the aorta while attempting to use the subclavian approach. Read More

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March 2018
47 Reads

A Randomized Controlled Comparison of the Internal Jugular Vein and the Subclavian Vein as Access Sites for Central Venous Catheterization in Pediatric Cardiac Surgery.

Pediatr Crit Care Med 2016 09;17(9):e413-9

1Department of Anesthesiology, Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. 2Department of Cardiovascular Surgery, Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey.

Objectives: To compare internal jugular vein and subclavian vein access for central venous catheterization in terms of success rate and complications.

Design: A 1:1 randomized controlled trial.

Setting: Baskent University Medical Center. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PCC.0000000000000878DOI Listing
September 2016
36 Reads

Ultrasound-guided central venous access: which probe is preferred for viewing the subclavian vein using a supraclavicular approach?

Am J Emerg Med 2016 Sep 7;34(9):1761-4. Epub 2016 Jun 7.

Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California Irvine, Irvine, California.

Background: Point-of-care ultrasound guidance using a linear probe is well established as a tool to increase safety when performing a supradiaphragmatic cannulation of the internal jugular central vein. However, little data exist on which probe is best for performing a supradiaphragmatic cannulation of the subclavian vein.

Methods: This was a prospective, observational study at a single-site emergency department, where 5 different physician sonologists evaluate individual practice preference for visualization of the subclavian vein using a supraclavicular approach with 2 different linear probes and 1 endocavitary probe. Read More

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http://search.proquest.com/openview/df9f9840dc499bc238a06932
Web Search
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S073567571630224
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajem.2016.06.013DOI Listing
September 2016
143 Reads

Trapezius placement of implanted ports: understanding the procedure.

Authors:
Steve Hill

Br J Nurs 2016 Jan 28-Feb 10;25(2):S9-15

Totally implantable vascular access devices (TIVADs) are indicated for intermittent long-term intravenous access. It is widely accepted within medical literature that TIVADs are associated with statistically significant lower infection rates than other central venous access devices. Typical sites for implantation are on the anterior chest wall, using the internal jugular, axillary, cephalic or a subclavian vein. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2016.25.sup2.s9DOI Listing
May 2016
18 Reads

Ultrasound-guided supraclavicular central venous catheter tip positioning via the right subclavian vein using a microconvex probe.

J Vasc Access 2016 Sep 22;17(5):435-9. Epub 2016 Mar 22.

Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Bonn, Bonn - Germany.

Purpose: The ultrasound-guided central venous catheter (CVC) guidewire tip positioning has been demonstrated for catheterization of the right internal jugular vein. We explored the feasibility of an ultrasound-guided right subclavian vein (RScV) CVC tip positioning via a right supraclavicular approach using a microconvex probe.

Methods: Twenty patients scheduled for elective surgery were consecutively included in this observational feasibility study following written informed consent. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.5301/jva.5000518DOI Listing
September 2016
121 Reads

Wireless Ultrasound-Guided Axillary Vein Cannulation for the Implantation of Cardiovascular Implantable Electric Devices.

J Cardiovasc Electrophysiol 2016 Apr 12;27(4):482-7. Epub 2016 Feb 12.

Cardiology Department, University Hospital Ramon y Cajal, Madrid, Spain.

Introduction: Ultrasound guidance for vascular cannulation seems safer and more effective than an anatomical landmark approach, though it has not gained widespread support partly due to workflow interference of wired probes. A wireless ultrasound transducer (WUST) may overcome this issue. We report the effectiveness, time consumption, and safety of the first-in-human experience in axillary vein cannulation guided with a novel WUST for the implantation of cardiovascular implantable electric devices (CIEDs). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jce.12917DOI Listing
April 2016
51 Reads

[Reconstructive operations in pathology of central veins, associated with vascular approach].

Angiol Sosud Khir 2015 ;21(4):171-7

Kazan State Medical University, Kazan, Russia.

Presented herein are the results of treatment of 28 patients with stenosis/occlusion of central veins undergoing replacement therapy by means of programmed haemodialysis for terminal renal failure. The clinical symptomatology in all patients manifested itself by chronic lymphovenous insufficiency of the upper limb, dysfunction of the vascular access (14 patients, thrombosis of the vascular approach (5 patients), venous hypertension of the brain (4 patients). 17 patients had aneurysms of the vascular approach in the zone of puncture. Read More

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February 2016
33 Reads