127 results match your criteria Centaurus[Journal]


From the History of Science to the History of Knowledge - and Back.

Authors:
Jürgen Renn

Centaurus 2015 Feb;57(1):37-53

The history of science can be better understood against the background of a history of knowledge comprising not only theoretical but also intuitive and practical knowledge. This widening of scope necessitates a more concise definition of the concept of knowledge, relating its cognitive to its material and social dimensions. The history of knowledge comprises the history of institutions in which knowledge is produced and transmitted. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1600-0498.12075DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4320774PMC
February 2015
1 Read

Sword, Shield and Buoys: A History of the NATO Sub-Committee on Oceanographic Research, 1959-1973.

Authors:
Simone Turchetti

Centaurus 2012 Aug;54(3):205-231

Centre for the History of Science, Technology and Medicine (CHSTM), Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester Manchester, M13 9PL, UK.

In the late 1950s the North-Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) made a major effort to fund collaborative research between its member states. One of the first initiatives following the establishment of the alliance's Science Committee was the creation of a sub-group devoted to marine science: the Sub-committee on Oceanographic Research.This paper explores the history of this organization, charts its trajectory over the 13 years of its existence, and considers its activities in light of NATO's naval defence strategies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.2012.00258.xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3734671PMC

Collecting Knowledge for the Family: Recipes, Gender and Practical Knowledge in the Early Modern English Household.

Authors:
Elaine Leong

Centaurus 2013 May;55(2):81-103

Department II (Daston), Max Planck Institute for the History of Science Boltzmannstrasse 22, Berlin, 14195, Germany

When Mary Cholmeley married Henry Fairfax in 1627, she carried to her new home in Yorkshire a leather-bound notebook filled with medical recipes. Over the next few decades, Mary and Henry, their children and various members of the Fairfax and Cholmeley families continually entered new medical and culinary information into this 'treasury for health.' Consequently, as it stands now, the manuscript can be read both as a repository of household medical knowledge and as a family archive. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/1600-0498.12019DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3709121PMC
May 2013
40 Reads

The "Annie hypothesis": did the death of his daughter cause Darwin to "give up Christianity"?

Centaurus 2012 ;54(2):105-23

National University of Singapore.

This article examines one of the most widely believed episodes in the life of Charles Darwin, that the death of his daughter Annie in 1851 caused the end of Darwin's belief in Christianity, and according to some versions, ended his attendance of church on Sundays. This hypothesis, it is argued, is commonly treated as a straightforward true account of Darwin's life, yet there is little or no supporting evidence. Furthermore, we argue, there is sufficient evidence that Darwin's loss of faith occurred before Annie's death. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.2012.00256.xDOI Listing
October 2012
12 Reads

The survival of 19th-century scientific optimism: the public discourse on science in Belgium in the aftermath of the Great War (ca. 1919-1930).

Authors:
Sofie Onghena

Centaurus 2011 ;53(4):280-305

KU Leuven.

In historiography there is a tendency to see the Great War as marking the end of scientific optimism and the period that followed the war as a time of discord. Connecting to current (inter)national historiographical debate on the question of whether the First World War meant a disruption from the pre-war period or not, this article strives to prove that faith in scientific progress still prevailed in the 1920s. This is shown through the use of Belgium as a case study, which suggests that the generally adopted cultural pessimism in the post-war years did not apply to the public rhetoric of science in this country. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.2011.00239.xDOI Listing
April 2012
1 Read

"Mathematics made no contribution to the public weal": why Jean Fernel (1497-1558) became a physician.

Authors:
John Henry

Centaurus 2011 ;53(3):193-220

University of Edinburgh.

This paper offers a caution that emphasis upon the importance of mathematics in recent historiography is in danger of obscuring the historical fact that, for the most part, mathematics was not seen as important in the pre-modern period. The paper proceeds by following a single case study, and in so doing offers the first account of the mathematical writings of Jean Fernel (1497-1558), better known as a leading medical innovator of the 16th century. After establishing Fernel's early commitment to mathematics, and attempt to forge a career as a cosmographer, it goes on to explain his abandonment of mathematics for a career in medicine. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.2011.00234.xDOI Listing
April 2012
1 Read

Unstable networks among women in academe: the legal case of Shyamala Rajender.

Centaurus 2009 ;51(1):37-62

Scientific networks are often credited with bringing about institutional change and professional advancement, but less attention has been paid to their instability and occasional failures. In the 1970s optimism among academic women was high as changing US policies on sex discrimination in the workplace, including higher education, seemed to promise equity. Encouraged by colleagues, Shyamala Rajender charged the University of Minnesota with sex discrimination when if failed to consider her for a tenure-track position. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.2008.00131.xDOI Listing
October 2009
1 Read

Spirit and unity: Orsted's fascination by Winterl's chemistry.

Authors:
A S Jacobsen

Centaurus 2001 ;43(3-4):184-218

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.2000.cnt430303.xDOI Listing
September 2008
3 Reads

Medical statistics and hospital medicine: the case of the smallpox vaccination.

Authors:
Andrea Rusnock

Centaurus 2007 ;49(4):337-59

Department of History, University of Rhode Island.

Between 1799 and 1806, trials of vaccination to determine its safety and efficacy were undertaken in hospitals in London, Paris, Vienna, and Boston. These trials were among the first instances of formal hospital evaluations of a medical procedure and signal a growing acceptance of a relatively new approach to medical practice. These early evaluations of smallpox vaccination also relied on descriptive and quantitative accounts, as well as probabilistic analyses, and thus occupy a significant, yet hitherto unexamined, place in the history of medical statistics. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.2007.00084.xDOI Listing
September 2008
2 Reads

Heredity as transmission of information: Butlerian 'Intelligent Design.'.

Centaurus 2006 ;48(3):133-48

Department of Biochemistry, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

In the 1870s, Ewald Hering and Samuel Butler provided what was, for that time, a scientifically coherent foundation for the Lamarckist view that positive adaptations to the environment acquired during an individual's lifetime can be transmitted to the offspring. Observing that heredity was a form of memory (involving stored information), they distinguished what are now known as genotype and phenotype and proposed that cognitive abilities present in the the most elementary organisms might mediate a transmission of acquired adaptations. While compatible with the then-available facts of evolution, this Butlerian version of 'intelligent design' was rendered less credible by subsequent appreciations of the discrete (discontinuous) inheritance of many phenotypic characters (Mendelism) and of the separation of germ line from soma (Weismanism). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.2006.00045.xDOI Listing
September 2008
1 Read

The legacy of Tycho Brahe.

Authors:
J R Christianson

Centaurus 2002 ;44(3-4):228-47

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1034/j.1600-0498.2002.440302.xDOI Listing
June 2007
1 Read

[The zoological observations of Abd al-Latif al-Bagdadi].

Authors:
P Provençal

Centaurus 1992 ;35(1):28-45

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.1992.tb00868.xDOI Listing
November 1992
1 Read

Mendel's theory: its context and plausibility.

Authors:
M Campbell

Centaurus 1982 ;26(1):38-69

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.1982.tb00654.xDOI Listing
March 1983
1 Read

Eine Freiburger medizinische Glossensammlung aus dem 15. Jahrhundert.

Authors:
H Broszinski

Centaurus 1973 ;18:57-63

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[A 15th century Freiburg medical glossary].

Authors:
H Broszinski

Centaurus 1973 ;18(1):57-63

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April 1974
1 Read

Wer war Jacob von Landsberg?

Authors:
B D Haage

Centaurus 1972 ;16:313-6

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Prout's hypothesis: a reconsideration.

Authors:
D F Larder

Centaurus 1970 ;15:44-50

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.1971.tb00150.xDOI Listing
July 1976
1 Read

Bateson and chromosomes: conservative thought in science.

Authors:
W Coleman

Centaurus 1970 ;15:228-314

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July 1976
1 Read

Bateson and chromosomes: conservative thought in science.

Authors:
W Coleman

Centaurus 1970 ;15(3):228-314

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March 1972
1 Read

Aristotle corrects Eudoxus.

Authors:
Z Bechler

Centaurus 1970 ;15(2):113-23

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.1971.tb00154.xDOI Listing

[Niels Stensen's studies on the skin. Attempt at a critical view].

Centaurus 1970 ;15(1):51-71

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June 1971
1 Read

Sagredo's optical researches.

Authors:
O Pedersen

Centaurus 1968 ;13(2):139-50

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.1969.tb00112.xDOI Listing
October 1969
1 Read

The early days of chemistry in Bulgaria.

Authors:
S Tchorbadjiev

Centaurus 1968 ;12(4):289-302

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.1968.tb00099.xDOI Listing
January 1969
1 Read

Mendel's experiments.

Centaurus 1968 ;12(4):275-88

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.1968.tb00098.xDOI Listing
January 1969
1 Read

Moseley's interpretation of x-ray spectra.

Authors:
P M Heimann

Centaurus 1968 ;12(4):261-74

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.1968.tb00097.xDOI Listing
January 1969
1 Read

[Paracelsus' theory of cancer and the present].

Authors:
J Körbler

Centaurus 1967 ;12(3):182-91

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N2O4: a historical survey.

Authors:
B S Cartwright

Centaurus 1965 ;11(2):96-110

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0498.1966.tb00052.xDOI Listing
March 1966
1 Read