19 results match your criteria Cellulose[Journal]

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Low consistency refined ligno-cellulose microfibre: an MFC alternative for high bulk, tear and tensile mechanical pulp papers.

Cellulose (Lond) 2020 14;27(5):2803-2816. Epub 2020 Jan 14.

Pulp and Paper Centre, The University of British Columbia, 2385 East Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4 Canada.

Low consistency (LC) refining of (chemi-)thermomechanical pulp (TMP) provides an energy efficient alternative to high consistency refining for pulp property development. However, the benefit of LC refining is often limited by excessive fibre shortening, lower tear strength and a reduction of bulk caused by the refining process. In this study, microfibres produced by LC refining of TMP and kraft pulp fibres were investigated for their reinforcement potential in high freeness mechanical pulp. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-019-02956-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7089721PMC
January 2020

Moisture-induced crossover in the thermodynamic and mechanical response of hydrophilic biopolymer.

Cellulose (Lond) 2020 31;27(1):89-99. Epub 2019 Oct 31.

1Chair of Building Physics, Department of Mechanical and Process Engineering, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich, Switzerland.

The use of natural sustainable resources such as wood in green industrial processes is currently limited by our poor understanding of the impact of moisture on their thermodynamic and mechanical behaviors. Here, a molecular dynamics approach is used to investigate the physical response of a typical hydrophilic biopolymer in softwood hemicellulose-xylan-when subjected to moisture adsorption. A unique moisture-induced crossover is found in the thermodynamic and mechanical properties of this prototypical biopolymer with many quantities such as the heat of adsorption, heat capacity, thermal expansion and elastic moduli exhibiting a marked evolution change for a moisture content about 30 wt%. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-019-02808-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6960215PMC
October 2019

Atomic Resolution of Cotton Cellulose Structure Enabled by Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Solid-State NMR.

Cellulose (Lond) 2019 Jan 11;26(1):329-339. Epub 2018 Nov 11.

Department of Chemistry, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803.

The insufficient resolution of conventional methods has long limited the structural elucidation of cellulose and its derivatives, especially for those with relatively low crystallinities or in native cell walls. Recent 2D/3D solid-state NMR studies of C uniformly labeled plant biomaterials have initiated a re-investigation of our existing knowledge in cellulose structure and its interactions with matrix polymers but for unlabeled materials, this spectroscopic method becomes impractical due to limitations in sensitivity. Here, we investigate the molecular structure of unlabeled cotton cellulose by combining natural abundance C-C 2D correlation solid-state NMR spectroscopy, as enabled by the sensitivity-enhancing technique of dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), with statistical analysis of the observed and literature-reported chemical shifts. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-018-2095-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6615758PMC
January 2019

Fluorescent Dye Adsorption in Aqueous Suspension to Produce Tagged Cellulose Nanofibers for Visualization on Paper.

Cellulose (Lond) 2019 May 20;26(8):5117-5131. Epub 2019 Apr 20.

Department of Chemistry, Paper Surface Science Program, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469.

Cellulose nanofibers (CNFs) have great potential to be a layer in packaging materials because of their good barrier properties. When paper is coated with CNFs, they are difficult to distinguish from the base sheet. This issue creates challenges when trying to determine where CNFs migrate relative to the paper fibers during coating and drying. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-019-02439-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6532663PMC
May 2019
1 Read

Conversion of wood-biopolymers into macrofibers with tunable surface energy via dry-jet wet-spinning.

Cellulose (Lond) 2018 19;25(9):5297-5307. Epub 2018 Jun 19.

2Department of Material Sciences and Process Engineering, Institute of Wood Technology and Renewable Materials, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna, Austria.

Abstract: Surface chemistry of regenerated all-wood-biopolymer fibers that are fine-tuned by composition of cellulose, lignin and xylan is elucidated via revealing their surface energy and adhesion. Xylan additive resulted in thin fibers and decreased surface energy of the fiber outer surfaces compared to the cellulose fibers, or when lignin was used as an additive. Lignin increased the water contact angle on the fiber surface and decreased adhesion force between the fiber cross section and a hydrophilic probe, confirming that lignin reduced fiber surface affinity to water. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-018-1902-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6105199PMC
June 2018
10 Reads

Development of high throughput, high precision synthesis platforms and characterization methodologies for toxicological studies of nanocellulose.

Cellulose (Lond) 2018 Mar;25:2303-2319

Center for Nanotechnology and Nanotoxicology, Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, 07016, USA.

Cellulose is one of the most abundant natural polymers, is readily available, biodegradable, and inexpensive. Recently, interest is growing around nanoscale cellulose due to the sustainability of these materials, the novel properties, and the overall low environmental impact. The rapid expansion of nanocellulose uses in various applications makes the study of the toxicological properties of these materials of great importance to public health regulators. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6910257PMC

Enhanced stabilization of cellulose-lignin hybrid filaments for carbon fiber production.

Cellulose (Lond) 2018 1;25(1):723-733. Epub 2017 Dec 1.

2Department of Bioproducts and Biosystems, School of Chemical Engineering, Aalto University, PO Box 16300, 00076 Aalto, Finland.

Herein we investigate the stabilization behavior of a cellulose-lignin composite fibre towards application as a new bio derived precursor for carbon fibres. Carbon fibre materials are in high demand as we move towards a lower emission high-efficiency society. However, the most prominent current carbon fibre precursor is an expensive fossil-based polymer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-017-1579-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6956884PMC
December 2017

Modulating cell response on cellulose surfaces; tunable attachment and scaffold mechanics.

Cellulose (Lond) 2018 19;25(2):925-940. Epub 2017 Dec 19.

1Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies, University of Bath, Bath, BA2 7AY UK.

Combining surface chemical modification of cellulose to introduce positively charged trimethylammonium groups by reaction with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride (GTMAC) allowed for direct attachment of mammalian MG-63 cells, without addition of protein modifiers, or ligands. Very small increases in the surface charge resulted in significant increases in cell attachment: at a degree of substitution (DS) of only 1.4%, MG-63 cell attachment was > 90% compared to tissue culture plastic, whereas minimal attachment occurred on unmodified cellulose. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-017-1612-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6954015PMC
December 2017

Chemical composition of processed bamboo for structural applications.

Cellulose (Lond) 2018 23;25(6):3255-3266. Epub 2018 Apr 23.

2Department of Architecture, Centre for Natural Material Innovation, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

Natural materials are a focus for development of low carbon products for a variety of applications. To utilise these materials, processing is required to meet acceptable industry standards. Laminated bamboo is a commercial product that is currently being explored for structural applications, however there is a gap in knowledge about the effects of commercial processing on the chemical composition. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-018-1789-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6448324PMC
April 2018
1 Read

Surface modified cellulose scaffolds for tissue engineering.

Cellulose (Lond) 2017 9;24(1):253-267. Epub 2016 Nov 9.

1Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies, University of Bath, Claverton Down, Bath, BA2 7AY UK.

We report the ability of cellulose to support cells without the use of matrix ligands on the surface of the material, thus creating a two-component system for tissue engineering of cells and materials. Sheets of bacterial cellulose, grown from a culture medium containing organism were chemically modified with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride or by oxidation with sodium hypochlorite in the presence of sodium bromide and 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpipiridine 1-oxyl radical to introduce a positive, or negative, charge, respectively. This modification process did not degrade the mechanical properties of the bulk material, but grafting of a positively charged moiety to the cellulose surface (cationic cellulose) increased cell attachment by 70% compared to unmodified cellulose, while negatively charged, oxidised cellulose films (anionic cellulose), showed low levels of cell attachment comparable to those seen for unmodified cellulose. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-016-1111-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7175690PMC
November 2016

Impacts of chemical modification on the toxicity of diverse nanocellulose materials to developing zebrafish.

Cellulose (Lond) 2016 Jun 28;23(3):1763-1775. Epub 2016 Apr 28.

Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Oregon State University, 1007 ALS Building, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA.

Cellulose is an abundant and renewable resource currently being investigated for utility in nanomaterial form for various promising applications ranging from medical and pharmaceutical uses to mechanical reinforcement and biofuels. The utility of nanocellulose and wide implementation ensures increasing exposure to humans and the environment as nanocellulose-based technologies advance. Here, we investigate how differences in aspect ratio and changes to surface chemistry, as well as synthesis methods, influence the biocompatibility of nanocellulose materials using the embryonic zebrafish. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-016-0947-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4959043PMC
June 2016
36 Reads

Impact of selected solvent systems on the pore and solid structure of cellulose aerogels.

Cellulose (Lond) 2016;23:1949-1966. Epub 2016 Mar 7.

Division of Chemistry of Renewable Resources, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Konrad-Lorenz-Straße 24, 3430 Tulln, Austria.

The impact of selected cellulose solvent systems based on the principal constituents tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF), 1-ethyl-3-methyl-1-imidazolium-acetate, -methylmorpholine--oxide, or calcium thiocyanate octahydrate (CTO) on the properties of cellulose II aerogels prepared from these solvent systems has been investigated as a means towards tailoring cellulose aerogel properties with respect to specific applications. Cotton linters were used as representative plant cellulose. Cellulose was coagulated from solutions with comparable cellulose content, and dried with supercritical carbon dioxide after solvent exchange. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-016-0896-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4869744PMC
March 2016
46 Reads
2 Citations
3.573 Impact Factor

Modification of Bacterial Cellulose with Organosilanes to Improve Attachment and Spreading of Human Fibroblasts.

Cellulose (Lond) 2015 Aug 13;22(4):2311-2324. Epub 2015 May 13.

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, OH, 44325-3906, United States.

Bacterial Cellulose (BC) synthesized by has been a promising candidate for medical applications. Modifying BC to possess the properties needed for specific applications has been reported. In this study, BCs functionalized by organosilanes were hypothesized to improve the attachment and spreading of Normal Human Dermal Fibroblast (NHDF). Read More

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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s10570-015-0651-x
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-015-0651-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4607077PMC
August 2015
10 Reads

Breakdown of hierarchical architecture in cellulose during dilute acid pretreatments.

Cellulose (Lond) 2015;22(3):1495-1504. Epub 2015 Feb 28.

Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 USA ; Department of Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA 02115 USA.

Cellulose is an attractive candidate as a feedstock for sustainable bioenergy because of its global abundance. Pretreatment of biomass has significant influence on the chemical availability of cellulose locked in recalcitrant microfibrils. Optimizing pretreatment depends on an understanding of its impact on the microscale and nanoscale molecular architecture. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-015-0592-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4579859PMC
February 2015
3 Reads

Photolithographic patterning of cellulose: a versatile dual-tone photoresist for advanced applications.

Cellulose (Lond) 2015;22(1):717-727. Epub 2014 Oct 16.

Chair of Chemistry of Polymeric Materials, University of Leoben, Otto Glöckel-Straße 2, 8700 Leoben, Austria.

In many areas of science and technology, patterned films and surfaces play a key role in engineering and development of advanced materials. Here, we present a versatile toolbox that provides an easy patterning method for cellulose thin films by means of photolithography and enzymatic digestion. A patterned UV-illumination of trimethylsilyl cellulose thin films containing small amounts of a photo acid generator leads to a desilylation reaction and thus to the formation of cellulose in the irradiated areas. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-014-0471-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4579862PMC
October 2014
7 Reads

Effect of microfibril twisting on theoretical powder diffraction patterns of cellulose Iβ

Cellulose (Lond) 2014 Apr;21(2):879-884

Complex Carbohydrate Center, University of Georgia, 315 Riverbend Road, Athens, GA 30602 ; School of Chemistry, National University of Ireland, Galway, University Road, Galway, Ireland.

Previous studies of calculated diffraction patterns for cellulose crystallites suggest that distortions that arise once models have been subjected to MD simulation are the result of both microfibril twisting and changes in unit cell dimensions induced by the empirical force field; to date, it has not been possible to separate the individual contributions of these effects. To provide a better understanding of how twisting manifests in diffraction data, the present study demonstrates a method for generating twisted and linear cellulose structures that can be compared without the bias of dimensional changes, allowing assessment of the impact of twisting alone. Analysis of unit cell dimensions, microfibril volume, hydrogen bond patterns, glycosidic torsion angles, and hydroxymethyl group orientations confirmed that the twisted and linear structures collected with this method were internally consistent, and theoretical powder diffraction patterns for the two were shown to be effectively indistinguishable. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-013-0051-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3979627PMC

Fluorescent cellulose aerogels containing covalently immobilized (ZnS)(CuInS)/ZnS (core/shell) quantum dots.

Cellulose (Lond) 2013;20(6):3007-3024. Epub 2013 Sep 3.

Division of Chemistry of Renewables, Department of Chemistry, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Konrad-Lorenz-Straße 24, 3430 Tulln, Austria.

Photoluminiscent (PL) cellulose aerogels of variable shape containing homogeneously dispersed and surface-immobilized alloyed (ZnS)(CuInS)/ZnS (core/shell) quantum dots (QD) have been obtained by (1) dissolution of hardwood prehydrolysis kraft pulp in the ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methyl-1-imidazolium chloride, (2) addition of a homogenous dispersion of quantum dots in the same solvent, (3) molding, (4) coagulation of cellulose using ethanol as antisolvent, and (5) scCO drying of the resulting composite aerogels. Both compatibilization with the cellulose solvent and covalent attachment of the quantum dots onto the cellulose surface was achieved through replacement of 1-mercaptododecyl ligands typically used in synthesis of (ZnS)(CuInS)/ZnS (core-shell) QDs by 1-mercapto-3-(trimethoxysilyl)-propyl ligands. The obtained cellulose-quantum dot hybrid aerogels have apparent densities of 37. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-013-0035-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4579861PMC
September 2013
11 Reads

Cellulose nanofibrils as filler for adhesives: effect on specific fracture energy of solid wood-adhesive bonds.

Cellulose (Lond) 2011;18(5):1227-1237. Epub 2011 Jul 15.

Department of Material Sciences and Process Engineering, Institute of Wood Science and Technology, BOKU-University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Konrad Lorenz Straße 24, 3430 Tulln a.d. Donau, Austria.

Cellulose nanofibrils were prepared by mechanical fibrillation of never-dried beech pulp and bacterial cellulose. To facilitate the separation of individual fibrils, one part of the wood pulp was surface-carboxylated by a catalytic oxidation using (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-yl)oxyl (TEMPO) as a catalyst. After fibrillation by a high pressure homogenizer, the obtained aqueous fibril dispersions were directly mixed with different urea-formaldehyde-(UF)-adhesives. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-011-9576-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4579863PMC
July 2011
4 Reads

Time-resolved X-ray diffraction microprobe studies of the conversion of cellulose I to ethylenediamine-cellulose I.

Cellulose (Lond) 2010 Jun;17(4):735-745

Centre de Recherches sur les Macromolécules, Végétales-CNRS, Joseph Fourier University of Grenoble, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9, France.

Structural changes during the treatment of films of highly crystalline microfibers of Cladophora cellulose with ethylenediamine (EDA) have been studied by time-resolved X-ray microprobe diffraction methods. As EDA penetrates the sample and converts cellulose I to EDA-cellulose I, the measured profile widths of reflections reveal changes in the shapes and average dimensions of cellulose I and EDA-cellulose I crystals. The (200) direction of cellulose I is most resistant to EDA penetration, with EDA penetrating most effectively at the hydrophilic edges of the hydrogen bonded sheets of cellulose chains. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-010-9415-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3371382PMC
June 2010
5 Reads
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