2,814 results match your criteria Cellular microbiology[Journal]


Late ESCRT Machinery Mediates The Recycling And Rescue of Invariant Surface Glycoprotein 65 in Trypanosoma brucei.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jul 2. Epub 2020 Jul 2.

Department of Microbiology & Immunology, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo (SUNY), Buffalo, New York, USA.

The Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport machinery consists of four protein complexes (ESCRT 0-IV) and the post ESCRT ATPase Vps4. ESCRT mediates cargo delivery for lysosomal degradation via formation of multivesicular bodies. Trypanosoma brucei contains orthologues of ESCRT I-III and Vps4. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13244DOI Listing

Three proline rotamases involved in calcium homeostasis play differential roles in stress tolerance, virulence and calcineurin regulation of Beauveria bassiana.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jun 29. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

MOE Laboratory of Biosystems Homeostasis & Protection, Institute of Microbiology, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.

FK506-sensitive proline rotamases (FPRs), also known as FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs), can mediate immunosuppressive drug resistance in budding yeast but their physiological roles in filamentous fungi remain opaque. Here, we report that three FPRs (cytosolic/nuclear 12.15-kD Fpr1, membrane-associated 14. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13239DOI Listing

EIF2α phosphorylation is regulated in intracellular amastigotes for generation of infective Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigote forms.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jun 29:e13243. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Departmento de Microbiologia, Imunologia e Parasitologia, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Trypanosomatids regulate gene expression mainly at the post-transcriptional level through processing, exporting and stabilizing mRNA and control of translation. In most eukaryotes, protein synthesis is regulated by phosphorylation of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2) at serine 51. Phosphorylation halts overall translation by decreasing availability of initiator tRNA to form translating ribosomes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13243DOI Listing

Robust Expression of p27Kip1 Induced by Viral Infection Is Critical for Antiviral Innate Immunity.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jun 29:e13242. Epub 2020 Jun 29.

Key Laboratory of Fujian-Taiwan Animal Pathogen Biology, College of Animal Sciences, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou, China.

Influenza A virus (IAV) infection regulates the expression of numerous host genes. However, the precise mechanism underlying implication of these genes in IAV pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Here, we employed iTRAQ to identify host proteins regulated by IAV infection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13242DOI Listing

Type VI secretion system effector proteins: effective weapons for bacterial competitiveness.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jun 27:e13241. Epub 2020 Jun 27.

School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee, United Kingdom.

The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is a protein translocation nanomachine widespread amongst Gram-negative bacteria and used as a means to deliver effectors directly into target bacterial or eukaryotic cells. These effectors have a wide variety of functions within target cells which ultimately help the secreting cell gain a competitive fitness advantage. Here we discuss the different ways in which these effectors can be delivered by the T6SS and the diverse mechanisms by which they exert their noxious action upon recipient cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13241DOI Listing

EGFR/FAK and c-Src signaling pathways mediate the internalization of Staphylococcus aureus by osteoblasts.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jun 25:e13240. Epub 2020 Jun 25.

Division of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Orthopaedics, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.

Internalization of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) in osteoblasts plays a critical role in the persistence and recurrence of osteomyelitis, the mechanisms involved in this process remain largely unknown. In the present study, evidence of internalized S. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13240DOI Listing

Rickettsial pathogen uses arthropod tryptophan pathway metabolites to evade reactive oxygen species in tick cells.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jun 19. Epub 2020 Jun 19.

Department of Biological Sciences, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia, USA.

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are induced upon pathogen infection plays an important role in host defense. The rickettsial pathogen Anaplasma phagocytophilum, which is primarily transmitted by Ixodes scapularis ticks in the United States, has evolved many strategies to escape ROS and survive in mammalian cells. However, little is known on the role of ROS in A. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13237DOI Listing

The heterotrimeric G-protein beta subunit Gpb1 controls hyphal growth under low oxygen conditions through the protein kinase A pathway and is essential for virulence in the fungus Mucor circinelloides.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jun 19:e13236. Epub 2020 Jun 19.

Instituto de Investigaciones Químico Biológicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Ciudad Universitaria, Morelia, Mich, Mexico.

Mucor circinelloides, a dimorphic opportunistic pathogen, expresses three heterotrimeric G-protein beta subunits (Gpb1, Gpb2, Gpb3). The Gpb1-encoding gene is upregulated during mycelial growth compared with that in the spore or yeast stage. gpb1 deletion mutation analysis revealed its relevance for an adequate development during the dimorphic transition and for hyphal growth under low oxygen concentrations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13236DOI Listing

Protective effect of fungal extracellular vesicles against murine candidiasis.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jun 18:e13238. Epub 2020 Jun 18.

Laboratório de Glicobiologia de Eucariotos, Instituto de Microbiologia Paulo de Góes, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are lipid bilayered compartments released by virtually all living cells, including fungi. Among the diverse molecules carried by fungal EVs, a number of immunogens, virulence factors and regulators have been characterized. Within EVs, these components could potentially impact disease outcomes by interacting with the host. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13238DOI Listing

A Critical Role for CARD9 in Pneumocystis Pneumonia Host Defense.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jun 16:e13235. Epub 2020 Jun 16.

Department of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Division of Thoracic Diseases Research, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota, USA.

Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) is an adaptor molecule critical for key signaling pathways initiated through C-type lectin receptors (CLRs). Previous studies demonstrated that Pneumocystis organisms are recognized through a variety of CLRs. However, the role of the downstream CARD9 adaptor signaling protein in host defense against Pneumocystis infection remains to be elucidated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13235DOI Listing

Caenorhabditis elegans mounts a p38 MAPK pathway-mediated defense to Cutibacterium acnes infection.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jun 15. Epub 2020 Jun 15.

Division of Infectious Diseases, Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA.

Cutibacterium acnes is capable of inducing inflammation in acne and can lead to a chronic prostatic infection. The diverse pathogenicity among different strains of C. acnes has been presented, but simple appropriate animal models for the evaluation of this bacterium are lacking. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13234DOI Listing

Interview with Dr Sarah Coulthurst.

Authors:
Sarah Coulthurst

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jun 11:e13233. Epub 2020 Jun 11.

School of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13233DOI Listing

A processing product of the Plasmodium falciparum reticulocyte binding protein RH1 shows a close association with AMA1 during junction formation.

Cell Microbiol 2020 May 25:e13232. Epub 2020 May 25.

Division of Molecular Genetics & Cell Biology, School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, Singapore.

Plasmodium falciparum responsible for the most virulent form of malaria invades human erythrocytes through multiple ligand-receptor interactions. The P. falciparum reticulocyte binding protein homologues (PfRHs) are expressed at the apical end of merozoites and form interactions with distinct erythrocyte surface receptors that are important for invasion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13232DOI Listing

Targeting E. coli invasion of the blood-brain barrier for investigating the pathogenesis and therapeutic development of E. coli meningitis.

Cell Microbiol 2020 May 24:e13231. Epub 2020 May 24.

Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Escherichia coli is the most common Gram-negative bacillary organism causing neonatal meningitis. Escherichia coli meningitis remains an important cause of mortality and morbidity, but the pathogenesis of E. coli penetration of the blood-brain barrier remains incompletely understood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13231DOI Listing

Media matters! Alterations in the loading and release of Histoplasma capsulatum extracellular vesicles in response to different nutritional milieus.

Cell Microbiol 2020 May 14:e13217. Epub 2020 May 14.

Department of Medicine (Division of Infectious Diseases) and Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.

Histoplasma capsulatum is a dimorphic fungus that most frequently causes pneumonia, but can also disseminate and proliferate in diverse tissues. Histoplasma capsulatum has a complex secretion system that mediates the release of macromolecule-degrading enzymes and virulence factors. The formation and release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) are an important mechanism for non-conventional secretion in both ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13217DOI Listing

Key role of the macrophage microtubule network in the intracellular lifestyle of Leishmania amazonensis.

Cell Microbiol 2020 May 14:e13218. Epub 2020 May 14.

Inserm, UMR-S 996 Inflammation, Microbiome and Immunosurveillance, University Paris-Saclay, Clamart, France.

We conducted a study to decipher the mechanism of the formation of the large communal Leishmania amazonensis-containing parasitophorous vacuole (PV) and found that the macrophage microtubule (MT) network dynamically orchestrates the intracellular lifestyle of this intracellular parasite. Physical disassembly of the MT network of macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells or silencing of the dynein gene, encoding the MT-associated molecular motor that powers MT-dependent vacuolar movement, by siRNA resulted in most of the infected cells hosting only tight parasite-containing phagosome-like vacuoles randomly distributed throughout the cytoplasm, each insulating a single parasite. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13218DOI Listing

Directing traffic: Chaperone-mediated protein transport in malaria parasites.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jul 26;22(7):e13215. Epub 2020 May 26.

Department of Cellular Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA.

The ability of eukaryotic parasites from the phylum Apicomplexa to cause devastating diseases is predicated upon their ability to maintain faithful and precise protein trafficking mechanisms. Their parasitic life cycle depends on the trafficking of effector proteins to the infected host cell, transport of proteins to several critical organelles required for survival, as well as transport of parasite and host proteins to the digestive organelles to generate the building blocks for parasite growth. Several recent studies have shed light on the molecular mechanisms parasites utilise to transform the infected host cells, transport proteins to essential metabolic organelles and for biogenesis of organelles required for continuation of their life cycle. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13215DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7282954PMC

Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv3034c regulates mTORC1 and PPAR-γ dependant pexophagy mechanism to control redox levels in macrophages.

Cell Microbiol 2020 May 9:e13214. Epub 2020 May 9.

School of Biotechnology, KIIT (Deemed to be University), Bhubaneswar, India.

Mycobacterium tuberculosis survives inside the macrophages by employing several host immune evasion strategies. Here, we reported a novel mechanism in which M. tuberculosis acetyltransferase, encoded by Rv3034c, induces peroxisome homeostasis to regulate host oxidative stress levels to facilitate intracellular mycobacterial infection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13214DOI Listing

Metabolic profiles of fish nodavirus infection in vitro: RGNNV induced and exploited cellular fatty acid synthesis for virus infection.

Cell Microbiol 2020 May 10:e13216. Epub 2020 May 10.

Joint Laboratory of Guangdong Province and Hong Kong Region on Marine Bioresource Conservation and Exploitation, College of Marine Sciences, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou, China.

Red-spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV), the causative agent of viral nervous necrosis disease, has caused high mortality and heavy economic losses in marine aquaculture worldwide. However, changes in host cell metabolism during RGNNV infection remain largely unknown. Here, the global metabolic profiling during RGNNV infection and the roles of cellular fatty acid synthesis in RGNNV infection were investigated. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13216DOI Listing

Bacterial intracellularly active toxins: Membrane localisation of the active domain.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jul 28;22(7):e13213. Epub 2020 May 28.

Bacterial Toxins, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.

Numerous bacterial toxins exert their activity by inactivating or modulating a specific intracellular host target. For this purpose, these toxins have developed efficient strategies to overcome the different host cell defences including specific binding to cell surface, internalisation, passage through the endosome or plasma membrane, exploiting intracellular trafficking and addressing to intracellular targets. Several intracellularly active toxins deliver an active domain into the cytosol that interacts with a target localised to the inner face of the plasma membrane. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13213DOI Listing

Two palmitoyl acyltransferases involved sequentially in the biogenesis of the inner membrane complex of Toxoplasma gondii.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr 23:e13212. Epub 2020 Apr 23.

Department of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine, CMU, Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.

The phylum Apicomplexa includes a number of significant human pathogens like Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium species. These obligate intracellular parasites possess a membranous structure, the inner membrane complex (IMC), composed of flattened vesicles apposed to the plasma membrane. Numerous proteins associated with the IMC are anchored via a lipid post-translational modification termed palmitoylation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13212DOI Listing

Induction of neutrophil extracellular traps by Campylobacter jejuni.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Aug 21;22(8):e13210. Epub 2020 May 21.

Department of Microbiology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA.

Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial-derived gastroenteritis worldwide and can lead to several post-infectious inflammatory disorders. Despite the prevalence and health impacts of the bacterium, interactions between the host innate immune system and C. jejuni remain poorly understood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13210DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7354212PMC

The Gli1-Snail axis contributes to Salmonella Typhimurium-induced disruption of intercellular junctions of intestinal epithelial cells.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Aug 15;22(8):e13211. Epub 2020 Jun 15.

Institute of Comparative Medicine, College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou, China.

Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a facultative intracellular pathogen that damages gastrointestinal tissue and causes severe diarrhoea. The mechanisms by which Salmonella disrupts epithelial barrier and increases the paracellular permeability are incompletely understood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13211DOI Listing

Early host-microbe interaction in a peri-implant oral mucosa-biofilm model.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Aug 14;22(8):e13209. Epub 2020 May 14.

Department of Prosthetic Dentistry and Biomedical Materials Science, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.

The host-microbe relationship is pivotal for oral health as well as for peri-implant diseases. Peri-implant mucosa and commensal biofilm play important roles in the maintenance of host-microbe homeostasis, but little is known about how they interact. We have therefore investigated the early host-microbe interaction between commensal multispecies biofilm (Streptococcus oralis, Actinomyces naeslundii, Veillonella dispar, Porphyromonas gingivalis) and organotypic peri-implant mucosa using our three-dimensional model. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13209DOI Listing

The sorting nexin FgAtg20 is involved in the Cvt pathway, non-selective macroautophagy, pexophagy and pathogenesis in Fusarium graminearum.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Aug 30;22(8):e13208. Epub 2020 Apr 30.

State Key Laboratory of Rice Biology and Ministry of Agriculture Key Lab of Molecular Biology of Crop Pathogens and Insects, Institute of Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.

The sorting nexin Atg20/Snx42 plays an important role in autophagy. The wheat head blight pathogen Fusarium graminearum contains an FgAtg20 protein orthologous to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Atg20/Snx42, but its function remains largely unknown. Here, we report a role for FgAtg20 in regulating morphogenesis and fungal pathogenicity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13208DOI Listing

Transmigration of Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes through 3D cultures resembling a physiological environment.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Aug 18;22(8):e13207. Epub 2020 May 18.

Instituto de Investigaciones Biotecnológicas "Dr. R. Ugalde" (IIBIO) Universidad Nacional de San Martín (UNSAM)-CONICET, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

To disseminate and colonise tissues in the mammalian host, Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastogotes should cross several biological barriers. How this process occurs or its impact in the outcome of the disease is largely speculative. We examined the in vitro transmigration of trypomastigotes through three-dimensional cultures (spheroids) to understand the tissular dissemination of different T. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13207DOI Listing

Cell-to-cell spread of vaccinia virus is promoted by TGF-β-independent Smad4 signalling.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Aug 28;22(8):e13206. Epub 2020 Apr 28.

School of Life and Environmental Sciences, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.

The induction of Smad signalling by the extracellular ligand TGF-β promotes tissue plasticity and cell migration in developmental and pathological contexts. Here, we show that vaccinia virus (VACV) stimulates the activity of Smad transcription factors and expression of TGF-β/Smad-responsive genes at the transcript and protein levels. Accordingly, infected cells share characteristics to those undergoing TGF-β/Smad-mediated epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13206DOI Listing

Hepatitis B virus entry into HepG2-NTCP cells requires clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Aug 1;22(8):e13205. Epub 2020 Apr 1.

Inserm U1259 MAVIVH, Université de Tours and CHRU de Tours, Tours, France.

Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide, with 250 million individuals chronically infected. Many stages of the HBV infectious cycle have been elucidated, but the mechanisms of HBV entry remain poorly understood. The identification of the sodium taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP) as an HBV receptor and the establishment of NTCP-overexpressing hepatoma cell lines susceptible to HBV infection opens up new possibilities for investigating these mechanisms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13205DOI Listing

The history of septin biology and bacterial infection.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13173

Department of Infection Biology, Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK.

Investigation of cytoskeleton during bacterial infection has significantly contributed to both cell and infection biology. Bacterial pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Shigella flexneri are widely recognised as paradigms for investigation of the cytoskeleton during bacterial entry, actin-based motility, and cell-autonomous immunity. At the turn of the century, septins were a poorly understood component of the cytoskeleton mostly studied in the context of yeast cell division and human cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13173DOI Listing

From neglected to dissected: How technological advances are leading the way to the study of Coxiella burnetii pathogenesis.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13180

IRIM, UMR 9004 CNRS, Université de Montpellier, Montpellier, France.

Coxiella burnetii is an obligate intracellular bacterial pathogen responsible for severe worldwide outbreaks of the zoonosis Q fever. The remarkable resistance to environmental stress, extremely low infectious dose and ease of dissemination, contributed to the classification of C. burnetii as a class B biothreat. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13180DOI Listing

When bacteria meet mitochondria: The strange case of the tick symbiont Midichloria mitochondrii.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13189

Department of Biology and Biotechnology, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.

Mitochondria are key eukaryotic organelles that perform several essential functions. Not surprisingly, many intracellular bacteria directly or indirectly target mitochondria, interfering with innate immunity, energy production or apoptosis, to make the host cell a more hospitable niche for bacterial replication. The alphaproteobacterium Midichloria mitochondrii has taken mitochondrial targeting to another level by physically colonising mitochondria, as shown by transmission electron micrographs of bacteria residing in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13189DOI Listing

Cellular microbiology: Bacterial toxin interference drives understanding of eukaryotic cell function.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13178

Department of Microbiology-Immunology, Northwestern University, Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.

Intimate interactions between the armament of pathogens and their host dictate tissue and host susceptibility to infection also forging specific pathophysiological outcomes. Studying these interactions at the molecular level has provided an invaluable source of knowledge on cellular processes, as ambitioned by the Cellular Microbiology discipline when it emerged in early 90s. Bacterial toxins act on key cell regulators or membranes to produce major diseases and therefore constitute a remarkable toolbox for dissecting basic biological processes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13178DOI Listing

Mammalian membrane trafficking as seen through the lens of bacterial toxins.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13167

Global Health Institute, School of Life Sciences, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland.

A fundamental question of eukaryotic cell biology is how membrane organelles are organised and interact with each other. Cell biologists address these questions by characterising the structural features of membrane compartments and the mechanisms that coordinate their exchange. To do so, they must rely on variety of cargo molecules and treatments that enable targeted perturbation, localisation, and labelling of specific compartments. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13167DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7154709PMC

Meningococcal disease: A paradigm of type-IV pilus dependent pathogenesis.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13185

Inserm, U1016, Institut Cochin, Paris, France.

Neisseria meningitidis (meningococcus) is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for two devastating forms of invasive diseases: purpura fulminans and meningitis. Interaction with both peripheral and cerebral microvascular endothelial cells is at the heart of meningococcal pathogenesis. During the last two decades, an essential role for meningococcal type IV pili in vascular colonisation and disease progression has been unravelled. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13185DOI Listing

Listeria monocytogenes, a model in infection biology.

Authors:
Marc Lecuit

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13186

Institut Pasteur, Biology of Infection Unit, Paris, France.

Listeria monocytogenes causes listeriosis, a systemic infection which manifests as bacteremia, often complicated by meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised individuals and the elderly, and fetal-placental infection in pregnant women. It has emerged over the past decades as a major foodborne pathogen, responsible for numerous outbreaks in Western countries, and more recently in Africa. L. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13186DOI Listing

Why is Listeria monocytogenes such a potent inducer of CD8+ T-cells?

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13175

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California.

Listeria monocytogenes is a rapidly growing, Gram-positive, facultative intracellular pathogen that has been used for over 5 decades as a model to study basic aspects of infection and immunity. In a murine intravenous infection model, immunisation with a sublethal infection of L. monocytogenes initially leads to rapid intracellular multiplication followed by clearance of the bacteria and ultimately culminates in the development of long-lived cell-mediated immunity (CMI) mediated by antigen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13175DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7100999PMC

Targeting host epigenetic machinery: The Listeria paradigm.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13169

G5 Chromatin and Infection, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.

By modifying the host cell transcription programme, pathogenic bacteria disrupt a wide range of cellular processes and take control of the host's immune system. Conversely, by mobilising a network of defence genes, the host cells trigger various responses that allow them to tolerate or eliminate invaders. The study of the molecular basis of this crosstalk is crucial to the understanding of infectious diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13169DOI Listing
April 2020
4.915 Impact Factor

From cellular microbiology to bacteria-based next generations of cancer immunotherapies.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13187

Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CNB-CSIC), Madrid, Spain.

Pioneer work by Prof. Cossart among others, studying the interactions between pathogenic bacteria and host cells (this discipline was termed Cellular Microbiology), was fundamental to determine the bacterial infection processes and to improve our knowledge of different cellular mechanisms. The study of bacteria-host interactions also involves in vivo host immune responses, which can be manipulated by bacteria, being these last potent tools for different immunotherapies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13187DOI Listing

Pascale Cossart: Listeria monocytogenes, host-pathogen interactions & beyond.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13165

Yersinia Research Unit, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13165DOI Listing

Three decades of listeriology through the prism of technological advances.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13183

Institut Pasteur, Unité de Recherche Yersinia, Paris, France.

Decades of breakthroughs resulting from cross feeding of microbiological research and technological innovation have promoted Listeria monocytogenes to the rank of model microorganism to study host-pathogen interactions. The extraordinary capacity of this bacterium to interfere with a vast array of host cellular processes uncovered new concepts in microbiology, cell biology and infection biology. Here, we review technological advances that revealed how bacteria and host interact in space and time at the molecular, cellular, tissue and whole body scales, ultimately revolutionising our understanding of Listeria pathogenesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13183DOI Listing

The actin comet guides the way: How Listeria actin subversion has impacted cell biology, infection biology and structural biology.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13190

Unit of Dynamics of Host-Pathogen Interactions, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.

The discovery of the role of ActA to polymerise actin at one pole of Listeria monocytogenes represents a key event in the field of cellular microbiology. It uncovered much more than the molecular principle behind actin-based motility of Listeria within the cytosol of infected cells, and it changed the way how actin dynamics could be studied and eventually understood. The ActA discovery took place at a time when cell biology, biochemistry and microbiology came together in a very fruitful fashion. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13190DOI Listing

Tracking the cargo of extracellular symbionts into host tissues with correlated electron microscopy and nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry imaging.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13177

Kewalo Marine Laboratory, University of Hawai'i at Mānoa, Honolulu, Hawai'i.

Extracellular bacterial symbionts communicate biochemically with their hosts to establish niches that foster the partnership. Using quantitative ion microprobe isotopic imaging (nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry [NanoSIMS]), we surveyed localization of N-labelled molecules produced by the bacterium Vibrio fischeri within the cells of the symbiotic organ of its host, the Hawaiian bobtail squid, and compared that with either labelled non-specific species or amino acids. In all cases, two areas of the organ's epithelia were significantly more N enriched: (a) surface ciliated cells, where environmental symbionts are recruited, and (b) the organ's crypts, where the symbiont population resides in the host. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13177DOI Listing

Vying for the control of inflammasomes: The cytosolic frontier of enteric bacterial pathogen-host interactions.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13184

Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College London, London, UK.

Enteric pathogen-host interactions occur at multiple interfaces, including the intestinal epithelium and deeper organs of the immune system. Microbial ligands and activities are detected by host sensors that elicit a range of immune responses. Membrane-bound toll-like receptors and cytosolic inflammasome pathways are key signal transducers that trigger the production of pro-inflammatory molecules, such as cytokines and chemokines, and regulate cell death in response to infection. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13184DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7154749PMC

Involvement of caspase-1 in inflammasomes activation and bacterial clearance in S. aureus-infected osteoblast-like MG-63 cells.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Aug 6;22(8):e13204. Epub 2020 Apr 6.

INRAE, Institut Agro, STLO, F-35000, Rennes, France.

Staphylococcus aureus, a versatile Gram-positive bacterium, is the main cause of bone and joint infections (BJI), which are prone to recurrence. The inflammasome is an immune signaling platform that assembles after pathogen recognition. It activates proteases, most notably caspase-1 that proteolytically matures and promotes the secretion of mature IL-1β and IL-18. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13204DOI Listing

Insights into amebiasis using a human 3D-intestinal model.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Aug 20;22(8):e13203. Epub 2020 Apr 20.

Institut Pasteur, Paris, France.

Entamoeba histolytica is the causative agent of amebiasis, an infectious disease targeting the intestine and the liver in humans. Two types of intestinal infection are caused by this parasite: silent infection, which occurs in the majority of cases, and invasive disease, which affects 10% of infected persons. To understand the intestinal pathogenic process, several in vitro models, such as cell cultures, human tissue explants or human intestine xenografts in mice, have been employed. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13203DOI Listing

Interview with Professor Edze Westra, NERC Independent Fellow. University of Exeter.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jun 20;22(6):e13202. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Biosciences, University of Exeter, Penryn, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13202DOI Listing

Intravital imaging of host-parasite interactions in organs of the thoracic and abdominopelvic cavities.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jun 5;22(6):e13201. Epub 2020 Apr 5.

Institute of Cell Biology, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.

Infections with protozoan and helminthic parasites affect multiple organs in the mammalian host. Imaging pathogens in their natural environment takes a more holistic view on biomedical aspects of parasitic infections. Here, we focus on selected organs of the thoracic and abdominopelvic cavities most commonly affected by parasites. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13201DOI Listing

Aedes aegypti lachesin protein binds to the domain III of envelop protein of Dengue virus-2 and inhibits viral replication.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jul 20;22(7):e13200. Epub 2020 Mar 20.

Gut Biology Laboratory, Department of Zoology, University of Delhi, Delhi, India.

Dengue virus (DENV) comprises of four serotypes (DENV-1 to -4) and is medically one of the most important arboviruses (arthropod-borne virus). DENV infection is a major human health burden and is transmitted between humans by the insect vector, Aedes aegypti. Ae. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13200DOI Listing
July 2020
4.915 Impact Factor

Virulence properties of Campylobacter jejuni are enhanced by displaying a mycobacterial TlyA methylation pattern in its rRNA.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Jul 24;22(7):e13199. Epub 2020 Mar 24.

Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense M, Denmark.

Campylobacter jejuni is a bacterial pathogen that is generally acquired as a zoonotic infection from poultry and animals. Adhesion of C. jejuni to human colorectal epithelial cells is weakened after loss of its cj0588 gene. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13199DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7317525PMC

Components of the endocytic and recycling trafficking pathways interfere with the integrity of the Legionella-containing vacuole.

Cell Microbiol 2020 Apr;22(4):e13151

Department of Molecular Biology and Microbiology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.

Legionella pneumophila requires the Dot/Icm translocation system to replicate in a vacuolar compartment within host cells. Strains lacking the translocated substrate SdhA form a permeable vacuole during residence in the host cell, exposing bacteria to the host cytoplasm. In primary macrophages, mutants are defective for intracellular growth, with a pyroptotic cell death response mounted due to bacterial exposure to the cytosol. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/cmi.13151DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7154685PMC