352 results match your criteria Cell Communication And Adhesion[Journal]


Fabrication of nanofiber coated with l-arginine via electrospinning technique: a novel nanomatrix to counter oxidative stress under crosstalk of co-cultured fibroblasts and satellite cells.

Cell Commun Adhes 2018 12 5;24(1):19-32. Epub 2018 Sep 5.

a Department of Animal Biotechnology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences , Chonbuk National University , Jeonju-si , Republic of Korea.

The objective of this study was to synthesize and characterize novel polyurethane (PU)-nanofiber coated with l-arginine by electrospinning technique. This study determined whether l-arginine conjugated with PU-nanofiber could stimulate cell proliferation and prevent HO-induced cell death in satellite cells co-cultured with fibroblasts isolated from Hanwoo (Korean native cattle). Our results showed that l-arginine conjugated with PU nanofiber could reduce cytotoxicity of co-cultured satellite cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15419061.2018.1493107DOI Listing
December 2018
29 Reads

Establishment and characterization of a carcinoma-associated fibroblast cell line derived from a human salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma.

Cell Commun Adhes 2018 12;24(1):11-18

a College of Stomatology , Dalian Medical University , Dalian , China.

Salivary gland adenoid cystic carcinoma (SACC) is one of the most common malignancies in the oral and maxillofacial region. Carcinoma-associated fibroblast (CAF) is an important component in the tumor microenvironment and participates in SACC progression. In this study, we established a CAF cell line derived from a human SACC and named it CAF-SA. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15419061.2018.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15419061.2018.1464000DOI Listing
December 2018
11 Reads

Krüppel-like factor 4 mediates cellular migration and invasion by altering RhoA activity.

Cell Commun Adhes 2018 12;24(1):1-10

a Department of Biology , Colgate University , Hamilton , NY , USA.

Kru¨ppel like factor 4 (KLF4) is a transcription factor that regulates genes related to differentiation and proliferation. KLF4 also plays a role in metastasis via epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Here, we investigate the function of Klf4 in migration and invasion using mouse embryonic fibroblasts and the RKO human colon cancer cell line. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15419061.2018.1444034DOI Listing
December 2018
1 Read

Pannexin1 Single Nucleotide Polymorphism and Platelet Reactivity in a Cohort of Cardiovascular Patients.

Cell Commun Adhes 2017 12;23(1):11-15

c Geneva Platelet Group , University of Geneva , Geneva , Switzerland.

Pannexin1 (Panx1), a membrane channel-forming protein permitting the passage of small-sized molecules, such as ATP, is expressed in human platelets. Recently, we showed that inhibiting Panx1 affects collagen-induced platelet aggregation but not aggregation triggered by other agonists. We also found that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs1138800) in the Panx1 gene encoded for a gain-of-function channel (Panx1-400C) and was associated with enhanced collagen-induced platelet reactivity. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15419061.2017.1282469DOI Listing
December 2017
8 Reads

Phosphatidylethanolamine Deficiency Impairs Escherichia coli Adhesion by Downregulating Lipopolysaccharide Synthesis, Which is Reversible by High Galactose/Lactose Cultivation.

Cell Commun Adhes 2017 12;23(1):1-10

a College of Life Sciences, Nanchang University , Nanchang , Jiangxi , P.R. China.

As the initiation step of bacterial infection or biofouling, bacterial adhesion on cells or substrates is generally an optimal target for antibacterial design. Phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) is the principal phospholipid in bacteria, and its function in bacterial adhesion remains unclear. In this study, four E. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15419061.2017.1282468DOI Listing
December 2017
4 Reads

Cytokine Release Patterns in Mixed Lymphocyte Culture (MLC) of T-Cells with Dendritic Cells (DC) Generated from AML Blasts Contribute to Predict anti-Leukaemic T-Cell Reactions and Patients' Response to Immunotherapy.

Cell Commun Adhes 2015 Apr - Dec;22(2-6):49-65. Epub 2016 Sep 7.

a Department for Haematopoietic Transplantations , University Hospital of Munich , Munich , Germany.

To enlighten interactions between autologous, allogeneic or T-cells from patients after stem cell transplantation with leukaemia-derived-dendritic-cells containing dendritic cells or blast containing mononuclear cells (n = 21, respectively), we determined cytokine-concentrations (interleukin 2, 4, 6, 10, tumor-necrosis-factor-α, interferon-γ) in supernatants of mixed-lymphocyte-culture and in serum (n = 16) of 20 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia and three patients with myelodysplastic syndromes by cytometric-bead-assay. We correlated our data with lytic capabilities of stimulated T-cells in a fluorolysis-assay and clinical data: Dendritic-cell-/mononuclear-cell-stimulation of T-cells resulted in increased cytokine-levels in culture-medium compared to serum. There were no significant differences between cytokine-patterns of cases with/without lytic T-cell-activity, response to immunotherapy (stem cell transplantation/donor-lymphocyte-infusion) or graft-versus-host-disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15419061.2016.1223634DOI Listing
February 2017
40 Reads

Glycolaldehyde-derived advanced glycation end products (glycol-AGEs)-induced vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction is regulated by the AGES-receptor (RAGE) axis in endothelium.

Cell Commun Adhes 2015 Apr - Dec;22(2-6):67-78. Epub 2016 Sep 7.

a Department of Biotechnology , College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Korea University , Seoul , South Korea.

Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are involved in the development of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) dysfunction and the progression of atherosclerosis. However, AGEs may indirectly affect VSMCs via AGEs-induced signal transduction between monocytes and human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs), rather than having a direct influence. This study was designed to elucidate the signaling pathway underlying AGEs-RAGE axis influence on VSMC dysfunction using a co-culture system with monocytes, HUVECs and VSMCs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15419061.2016.1225196DOI Listing
February 2017
35 Reads

Structure, Regulation and Function of Gap Junctions in Liver.

Cell Commun Adhes 2015 Apr - Dec;22(2-6):29-37. Epub 2016 Mar 22.

Department of In Vitro Toxicology and Dermato-Cosmetology, Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium.

Gap junctions are a specialized group of cell-to-cell junctions that mediate direct intercellular communication between cells. They arise from the interaction of two hemichannels of adjacent cells, which in turn are composed of six connexin proteins. In liver, gap junctions are predominantly found in hepatocytes and play critical roles in virtually all phases of the hepatic life cycle, including cell growth, differentiation, liver-specific functionality and cell death. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2016.1151875DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5166969PMC
February 2017
23 Reads

Macrophages Aggravate Hypoxia-Induced Cardiac Microvascular Endothelial Cell Injury via Peroxynitrite: Protection by Tongxinluo.

Cell Commun Adhes 2015 Apr - Dec;22(2-6):39-47. Epub 2016 Mar 22.

b Department of Molecular Biology Hebei Key Lab of Laboratory Animal , Hebei Medical University , Shijiazhuang , P.R. China.

Activated macrophages contribute to endothelial dysfunction; however, it is unclear how peroxynitrite contributes to macrophage-mediated human cardiac microvascular endothelial cell (HCMEC) injury in hypoxia. In macrophage-HCMEC co-cultures subjected to hypoxia, there was an increase in hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α, HIF-2α, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), endothelin-converting enzyme (ECE)-1 and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and concomitant decrease in prostacyclin synthase (PGIS). This was mimicked by a peroxynitrite donor and attenuated by its decomposition catalyst. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2016.1155565DOI Listing
February 2017
9 Reads

150th Anniversary Series: Desmosomes and the Hallmarks of Cancer.

Cell Commun Adhes 2015 2;22(1):15-28. Epub 2015 Jul 2.

c Institute of Pathology, Jena University Hospital, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena , Ziegelmühlenweg 1, 07743 Jena , Germany.

Desmosomes represent adhesive, spot-like intercellular junctions that in association with intermediate filaments mechanically link neighboring cells and stabilize tissue architecture. In addition to this structural function, desmosomes also act as signaling platforms involved in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, morphogenesis, and apoptosis. Thus, deregulation of desmosomal proteins has to be considered to contribute to tumorigenesis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2015.1039642DOI Listing
June 2016
8 Reads

Prognostic Value of the Tumour-Infiltrating Dendritic Cells in Colorectal Cancer: A Systematic Review.

Cell Commun Adhes 2015 30;22(1):9-14. Epub 2015 May 30.

a Antigen Presentation Research Group, Imperial College London, North West London Hospitals Campus , Harrow, Middlesex , UK.

Dendritic cells (DCs) either boost the immune system (enhancing immunity) or dampen it (leading to tolerance). This dual effect explains their vital role in cancer development and progression. DCs have been tested as a predictor of outcomes for cancer progression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2015.1036859DOI Listing
June 2016
10 Reads

Regulation of Endothelial Cell Adherence and Elastic Modulus by Substrate Stiffness.

Cell Commun Adhes 2015 Apr - Dec;22(2-6):79-89

a Faculty of Biomedical Engineering , Amirkabir University of Technology , Tehran , Iran.

Although substrate stiffness has been previously reported to affect various cellular aspects, such as morphology, migration, viability, growth, and cytoskeletal structure, its influence on cell adherence has not been well examined. Here, we prepared three soft, medium, and hard polyacrylamide (PAAM) substrates and utilized AFM to study substrate elasticity and also the adhesion and mechanical properties of endothelial cells in response to changing substrate stiffness. Maximum detachment force and cell stiffness were increased with increasing substrate stiffness. Read More

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https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15419061.2016.1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15419061.2016.1265949DOI Listing
February 2017
12 Reads

Involvement of retrotransposon L1 in stemness and cellular plasticity.

Cell Commun Adhes 2015 20;22(1):1-7. Epub 2014 Oct 20.

a Research Genetic Cancer Centre Ltd (R.G.C.C. Ltd) , Florina , Greece.

Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) as well as the reverse process, mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) is important during embryogenesis. EMT is also involved in cancer invasion and metastasis, and can generate cells with properties similar to those of stem cells. Retrotransposons can rearrange the genome by inserting DNA in new loci, thus inducing mutations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.970270DOI Listing
June 2016
42 Reads

150(th) anniversary series: Desmosomes and autoimmune disease, perspective of dynamic desmosome remodeling and its impairments in pemphigus.

Authors:
Yasuo Kitajima

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Dec 31;21(6):269-80. Epub 2014 Jul 31.

Department of Dermatology, Kizawa Memorial Hospital, Professor Emeritus Gifu University School of Medicine , Minokamo City, Gifu Prefecture , Japan.

Desmosomes are the most important intercellular adhering junctions that adhere two adjacent keratinocytes directly with desmosomal cadherins, that is, desmogleins (Dsgs) and desmocollins, forming an epidermal sheet. Recently, two cell-cell adhesion states of desmosomes, that is, "stable hyper-adhesion" and "dynamic weak-adhesion" conditions have been recognized. They are mutually reversible through cell signaling events involving protein kinase C (PKC), Src and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) during Ca(2+)-switching and wound healing. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.943397DOI Listing
December 2014

Molecular cloning of peroxinectin gene and its expression in response to peptidoglycan and Vibrio harveyi in Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Dec 29;21(6):281-9. Epub 2014 Jul 29.

Crustacean Molecular Biology & Genomics Lab, Department of Animal Health and Management, Alagappa University , Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu , India.

The cDNA sequence of peroxinectin was obtained from the haemocytes of Indian white shrimp Fenneropenaeus indicus using RT-PCR and RACE. Fenneropenaeus indicus peroxinectin (Fi-Pxn) sequence has an open reading frame (ORF) of 2415 bp encoding a protein of 804 amino acids with 21 residues signal sequence. The mature protein has molecular mass of 89. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.943396DOI Listing
December 2014
17 Reads

Discrete nanoparticles of ruta graveolens induces the bacterial and fungal biofilm inhibition.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Aug;21(4):229-38

Crustacean Molecular Biology and Genomics Lab, Department of Animal Health and Management, Alagappa University , Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu , India.

Ruta graveolens silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) showed the color change within 30 min and characterized using UV-visible spectra, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). UV-visible spectrum of R. graveolens AgNPs showed the sharp peak at the wavelength of 440-560 nm. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.926476DOI Listing
August 2014
10 Reads

Communication of γ phage lysin plyG enzymes binding toward SrtA for inhibition of Bacillus anthracis: protein-protein interaction and molecular dynamics study.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Oct 30;21(5):257-65. Epub 2014 Jun 30.

Department of Bioinformatics, Computer Aided Drug Design and Molecular Modeling Lab, Science Block, Alagappa University , Karaikudi, Tamilnadu , India.

Bacillus anthracis is a pathogenic, Gram-positive bacterium which chiefly affects the livestock of animals and humans through acute disease anthrax. All around the globe this bio-threat organism damages millions of lives in every year and also most of the drugs were not responding properly in inhibition against this diseased pathogen. In recent development, phage therapy is considered as alternative solution to treat this serious infectious disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.927444DOI Listing
October 2014
1 Read

Hyper-adhesion: a unique property of desmosomes.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Oct 30;21(5):249-56. Epub 2014 Jun 30.

Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester , Manchester , UK.

Hyper-adhesion is a unique, strongly adhesive form of desmosomal adhesion that functions to maintain tissue integrity. In this short review, we define hyper-adhesion, summarise the evidence for it in culture and in vivo, discuss its role in development, wound healing, and skin disease, and speculate about its molecular and cellular basis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.930133DOI Listing
October 2014
8 Reads

Bisphosphonates and connexin 43: a critical review of evidence.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Oct 19;21(5):241-7. Epub 2014 Jun 19.

School of Dentistry, University of California , Los Angeles, CA , USA.

Bisphosphonates (BPs) are drugs commonly used in the treatment of various disease arising or affecting bone tissue. There is a standard use in bone neoplasia and metastasis, hormonal and developmental disorders as well as for compensation of adverse effects in several medical therapies. Many in-vivo and in-vitro studies have assessed the efficacy of this drug and its function in cellular scale. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/15419061.2014.92
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.927869DOI Listing
October 2014
51 Reads

Invadopodia, regulation, and assembly in cancer cell invasion.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Aug 16;21(4):207-12. Epub 2014 Jun 16.

Department of Natural Sciences, The Lebanese American University , Beirut , Lebanon.

The occurrence of invadopodia has been, since its characterization, a hallmark of cancerous cell invasion and metastasis. These structures are now the subject of a controversy concerning their cellular function, molecular regulation, and assembly. The terms invadopodia and podosomes have been used interchangeably since their discovery back in 1980. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.923845DOI Listing
August 2014
6 Reads

Intercellular communication through contacts between continuous pseudopodial extensions in a macrophage-like cell line.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Aug 4;21(4):213-20. Epub 2014 Jun 4.

Departamento de Biomedicina Molecular, Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional (CINVESTAV) , Avenida IPN No. 2508, Colonia San Pedro Zacatenco, México, D. F. , Mexico.

Cell-to-cell information exchange mediated by membrane protrusions in tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) has been widely described in distinct cell lines. Here, we describe a new form of direct intercellular communication in a murine macrophage-like cell line that is mediated by pseudopodial fusions that form over scraped plastic tissue culture surfaces along scratch lines. These structures are capable of forming intercellular, tunnel-like channels (inter-pseudopodial axis connections) that can be differentiated from TNTs based on length, thickness, tandem arrangement along an axis, pseudopodial origin and permanency. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.923993DOI Listing
August 2014
13 Reads

Bringing law and order to the cytoskeleton and cell junctions: an interview with Werner Franke.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Jun;21(3):103-7

The Department of Cell Biology and The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.914786DOI Listing
June 2014
1 Read

Highlighting Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, guest editors of special issue (part 2): junctional targets of skin and heart disease.

Authors:
Pamela Cowin

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Jun;21(3):101-2

The Department of Cell Biology and The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine.

Cell Communication and Adhesion has been fortunate to enlist two pioneers of epidermal and cardiac cell junctions, Kathleen Green and Mario Delmar, as Guest Editors of a two part series on junctional targets of skin and heart disease. Part 2 of this series begins with an overview from Dipal Patel and Kathy Green comparing epidermal desmosomes to cardiac area composita junctions, and surveying the pathogenic mechanisms resulting from mutations in their components in heart disease. This is followed by a review from David Kelsell on the role of desmosomal mutation in inherited syndromes involving skin fragility. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.908062DOI Listing
June 2014
1 Read

Junctions and inflammation in the skin.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Jun 1;21(3):141-7. Epub 2014 May 1.

Department of Otolaryngology - Head & Neck Surgery, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Norris Cancer Center, University of Southern California , Los Angeles, CA , USA.

The skin forms a life-sustaining barrier between the organism and physical environment. The physical barrier of skin is mainly localized in the stratum corneum (SC); however, nucleated epidermis also contributes to the barrier through tight, gap, and adherens junctions (AJs), as well as through desmosomes and cytoskeletal elements. Many inflammatory diseases, such as atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis, are associated with barrier dysfunction. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.905930DOI Listing
June 2014
3 Reads

N-cadherin/catenin complex as a master regulator of intercalated disc function.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Jun 28;21(3):169-79. Epub 2014 Apr 28.

Department of Medicine, Center for Translational Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University , Philadelphia, PA , USA.

Intercellular adhesive junctions are essential for maintaining the physical integrity of tissues; this is particularly true for the heart that is under constant mechanical load. The correct functionality of the heart is dependent on the electrical and mechanical coordination of its constituent cardiomyocytes. The intercalated disc (ID) structure located at the termini of the rod-shaped adult cardiomyocyte contains various junctional proteins responsible for the integration of structural information and cell-cell communication. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.908853DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6054126PMC
June 2014
13 Reads

Engineering cardiac cell junctions in vitro to study the intercalated disc.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Jun 23;21(3):181-91. Epub 2014 Apr 23.

Department of Biomedical Engineering, Viterbi School of Engineering, University of Southern California , Los Angeles, CA , USA.

This review article discusses a recent work using engineered cardiac cells to study the function of the intercalated disc putting emphasis on mechanical and electrical coupling. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.905931DOI Listing
June 2014
11 Reads

Desmosomes in the heart: a review of clinical and mechanistic analyses.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Jun 23;21(3):109-28. Epub 2014 Apr 23.

Department of Pathology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine , Chicago, IL , USA.

Desmosomes have long been appreciated as intercellular junctions that are vital for maintaining the structural integrity of stratified epithelia. More recent clinical investigations of patients with diseases such as arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy have further highlighted the importance of desmosomes in cardiac tissue, where they help to maintain coordination of cardiac myocytes. Here, we review clinical and mechanistic studies that provide insight into the functions of desmosomal proteins in skin and heart during homeostasis and in disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.906533DOI Listing
June 2014
4 Reads

Force measurement tools to explore cadherin mechanotransduction.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Jun 23;21(3):193-205. Epub 2014 Apr 23.

Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Pennsylvania , Philadelphia, PA , USA.

Cell-cell adhesions serve to mechanically couple cells, allowing for long-range transmission of forces across cells in development, disease, and homeostasis. Recent work has shown that such contacts also play a role in transducing mechanical cues into a wide variety of cellular behaviors important to tissue function. As such, understanding the mechanical regulation of cells through their adhesion molecules has become a point of intense focus. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.905929DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7079283PMC
June 2014
15 Reads

Insights into desmosome biology from inherited human skin disease and cardiocutaneous syndromes.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Jun 16;21(3):129-40. Epub 2014 Apr 16.

Centre for Cutaneous Research, Blizard Institute, Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, Queen Mary University of London , London , UK.

The importance of desmosomes in tissue homeostasis is highlighted by natural and engineered mutations in desmosomal genes, which compromise the skin or heart and in some instances both. Desmosomal gene mutations account for 45-50% of cases of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and are mutated in an array of other disorders such as striate palmoplantar keratoderma, hypotrichosis with or without skin vesicles and lethal acantholytic epidermolysis bullosa. Recently, we reported loss-of-function mutations in the human ADAM17 gene, encoding for the 'sheddase' ADAM17, a transmembrane protein which cleaves extracellular domains of substrate proteins including TNF-α, growth factors and desmoglein (DSG) 2. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.908854DOI Listing
June 2014
6 Reads

Cell junctions in the specialized conduction system of the heart.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Jun 16;21(3):149-59. Epub 2014 Apr 16.

Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology, New York University School of Medicine , New York , New York.

Anchoring cell junctions are integral in maintaining electro-mechanical coupling of ventricular working cardiomyocytes; however, their role in cardiomyocytes of the cardiac conduction system (CCS) remains less clear. Recent studies in genetic mouse models and humans highlight the appearance of these cell junctions alongside gap junctions in the CCS and also show that defects in these structures and their components are associated with conduction impairments in the CCS. Here we outline current evidence supporting an integral relationship between anchoring and gap junctions in the CCS. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.905928DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4291170PMC
June 2014
14 Reads

Intercellular electrical communication in the heart: a new, active role for the intercalated disk.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Jun 15;21(3):161-7. Epub 2014 Apr 15.

Center for Cardiovascular and Regenerative Biology, Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute , Roanoke, VA , USA.

Cardiac conduction is the propagation of electrical excitation through the heart and is responsible for triggering individual myocytes to contract in synchrony. Canonically, this process has been thought to occur electrotonically, by means of direct flow of ions from cell to cell. The intercalated disk (ID), the site of contact between adjacent myocytes, has been viewed as a structure composed of mechanical junctions that stabilize the apposition of cell membranes and gap junctions which constitute low resistance pathways between cells. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.905932DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5146986PMC
June 2014
8 Reads

150th anniversary series: desmosomes in physiology and disease.

Authors:
Nicola Cirillo

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Apr 7;21(2):85-8. Epub 2014 Feb 7.

Cell-cell adhesion is essential for life in multicellular organisms. One of the prominent adhesive structures acting as stabilizing element in tissues is the desmosome. In addition to providing cohesion strength to tissues subjected to high mechanical stress, it has been recently recognized that desmosomes are also essential for tissue morphogenesis and differentiation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.863281DOI Listing
April 2014
15 Reads

Desmosomal cadherins and signaling: lessons from autoimmune disease.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Feb;21(1):77-84

Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) Munich, Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Department I , Munich , Germany.

Autoantibodies from patients suffering from the autoimmune blistering skin disease pemphigus can be applied as tools to study desmosomal adhesion. These autoantibodies targeting the desmosomal cadherins desmoglein (Dsg) 1 and Dsg3 cause disruption of desmosomes and loss of intercellular cohesion. Although pemphigus autoantibodies were initially proposed to sterically hinder desmosomes, many groups have shown that they activate signaling pathways which cause disruption of desmosomes and loss of intercellular cohesion by uncoupling the desmosomal plaque from the intermediate filament cytoskeleton and/or by interfering with desmosome turnover. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.877000DOI Listing
February 2014
3 Reads

Desmosomal adhesion in vivo.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Feb;21(1):65-75

Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University , Mansoura City , Egypt.

Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that provide strong adhesion or hyper-adhesion in tissues. Here, we discuss the molecular and structural basis of this with particular reference to the desmosomal cadherins (DCs), their isoforms and evolution. We also assess the role of DCs as regulators of epithelial differentiation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.876018DOI Listing
February 2014
3 Reads

Integrating animal models and in vitro tissue models to elucidate the role of desmosomal proteins in diseases.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Feb;21(1):55-63

Department of Dermatology, University of Colorado School of Medicine and Charles C Gates Center for Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Biology, University of Colorado School of Medicine , Aurora, CO , USA.

Desmosomes are intercellular junctions that provide tissues with structural stability. These junctions might also act as signaling centers that transmit environmental clues to the cell, thereby affecting cell differentiation, migration, and proliferation. The importance of desmosomes is underscored by devastating skin and heart diseases caused by mutations in desmosomal genes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.876015DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4117210PMC
February 2014
19 Reads

Trafficking highways to the intercalated disc: new insights unlocking the specificity of connexin 43 localization.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Feb;21(1):43-54

Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute , Los Angeles, CA , USA.

With each heartbeat, billions of cardiomyocytes work in concert to propagate the electrical excitation needed to effectively circulate blood. Regulated expression and timely delivery of connexin proteins to form gap junctions at the specialized cell-cell contact region, known as the intercalated disc, is essential to ventricular cardiomyocyte coupling. We focus this review on several regulatory mechanisms that have been recently found to govern the lifecycle of connexin 43 (Cx43), the short-lived and most abundantly expressed connexin in cardiac ventricular muscle. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/15419061.2013.87
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.876014DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4950511PMC
February 2014
4 Reads

Plakophilins in desmosomal adhesion and signaling.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Feb;21(1):25-42

Division of Pathobiochemistry, Institute of Molecular Medicine, Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg , Halle , Germany.

The regulation of adhesion and growth is important for epithelial function and dysfunction. β-catenin (armadillo in Drosophila) is the prototype of a multifunctional molecule that regulates cell adhesion via adherens junctions and cell signaling via LEF/TCF transcription factors. Desmosomal armadillo proteins comprise plakoglobin and the plakophilins 1, 2, and 3. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.876017DOI Listing
February 2014
18 Reads

Remodeling of cell-cell junctions in arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Feb;21(1):13-23

Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School , Boston, MA , USA.

Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (AC) is a primary myocardial disorder characterized by a high incidence of ventricular arrhythmias often preceding the onset of ventricular remodeling and dysfunction. Approximately 50% of patients diagnosed with AC have one or more mutations in genes encoding desmosomal proteins, although non-desmosomal genes have also been associated with the disease. Increasing evidence implicates remodeling of intercalated disk proteins reflecting abnormal responses to mechanical load and aberrant cell signaling pathways in the pathogenesis of AC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.876016DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4466113PMC
February 2014
7 Reads

When rare illuminates common: how cardiocutaneous syndromes transformed our perspective on arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Feb;21(1):3-11

Inherited Cardiovascular Disease Group, Institute of Cardiovascular Science, University College London , UK.

The classic cardiocutaneous syndromes of Naxos and Carvajal are rare. The myocardial disorder integral to their pathology - arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy - is arguably not uncommon, with a prevalence of up to 1 in 1,000 despite almost certain under-recognition. Yet the study of cardiocutaneous syndromes has been integral to evolution of the contemporary perspective of arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy - its clinical course, disease spectrum, genetics, and cellular and molecular mechanisms. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.876415DOI Listing
February 2014
9 Reads

Highlights from special issue: junctional targets of skin and heart diseases.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Feb;21(1)

In this issue, guest editors Kathy Green and Mario Delmar, who are leaders in the fields of epidermal desmosomes and heart intercalated discs respectively, have joined forces to collate a two-part series of reviews focused on junctional proteins and genes that are targets of skin and heart diseases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2014.876847DOI Listing
February 2014
5 Reads

Contribution of the α8 integrin chain to the expression of extracellular matrix components.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Apr 24;21(2):89-98. Epub 2014 Jan 24.

Department for Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University Hospital of Erlangen , Erlangen , Germany.

In the kidney, the α8 integrin chain (itga8) is expressed in mesenchymal cells and is upregulated in fibrotic disease. We hypothesized that itga8 mediates a profibrotic phenotype of renal cells by promoting extracellular matrix and cytokine expression. Genetic itga8 deficiency caused complex changes in matrix expression patterns in mesangial and smooth-muscle cells, with the only concordant effect in both cell types being a reduction of collagen III expression. Read More

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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/15419061.2013.87
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.876012DOI Listing
April 2014
17 Reads

CXCL12-CXCR7 signaling activates ERK and Akt pathways in human choriocarcinoma cells.

Cell Commun Adhes 2014 Aug 23;21(4):221-8. Epub 2014 Jan 23.

Department of Biochemistry, All India Institute of Medical Sciences , New Delhi , India.

Abstract CXCL12 acts as a physiological ligand for the chemokine receptor CXCR7. Chemokine receptor expression by human trophoblast and other placental cells have important implications for understanding the regulation of placental growth and development. We had previously reported the differential expression of CXCR7 in different stages of the human placenta suggesting its possible role in regulation of placental growth and development. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.876013DOI Listing
August 2014
42 Reads

Leaders in cell adhesion: an interview with Richard Hynes, pioneer of cell-matrix interactions. Interview by Pamela Cowin.

Authors:
Richard Hynes

Cell Commun Adhes 2013 Dec 25;20(6):139-46. Epub 2013 Nov 25.

Department of Cell Biology, New York University School of Medicine , New York, NY , USA and The Ronald O Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine , New York, NY , USA.

On a recent visit Richard O Hynes, FRS, HHMI, Daniel K. Ludwig Professor for Cancer Research at the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, MIT, graciously agreed to be interviewed in person for the first in Cell Communication and Adhesion's series on "Leaders in Cell Adhesion". In this interview we discussed three things: 1) the early role of family, mentors, and luck on his career path; 2) his major discoveries of fibronectin, integrins and the evolution of extracellular matrix proteins; and 3) his role in, and thoughts on, current science policy. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.857662DOI Listing
December 2013
2 Reads

Highlighting young investigators: guest editor Ramanuj DasGupta. Ram DasGupta: pushing the boundaries of β-catenin signaling and drug development.

Authors:
Pamela Cowin

Cell Commun Adhes 2013 Dec 25;20(6):151-3. Epub 2013 Nov 25.

The Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology and Department of Cell Biology, NYU Medical Center , New York, NY , USA.

From generating the TOP-GAL mouse to pioneering high-throughput RNAi, and small molecule chemical genetic screens in Drosophila and mammalian cells, Ram DasGupta has consistently developed innovative technological tools of immense value to the fields in which he has chosen to work. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.858134DOI Listing
December 2013

A century of cell adhesion: from the blastomere to the clinic part 1: conceptual and experimental foundations and the pre-molecular era.

Cell Commun Adhes 2013 Dec 19;20(6):127-38. Epub 2013 Nov 19.

Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology of Jefferson Medical College, and Jefferson Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Thomas Jefferson University , Philadelphia, PA , USA.

The historical roots of cell adhesion research stretch back over a hundred years, commencing with fundamental questions from the advent of experimental embryology in the late nineteenth century. The transition of embryology from a descriptive to an experimentally driven and mechanistic branch of the biological sciences included investigations focused on the interactions of the first cells of the newly developing embryo, the blastomeres, and followed the movement, interactions and fate of these cells as the tissues and organs of the growing embryo took form. Of special interest to early investigators were cell-cell contacts, which were obviously dynamic but of an obscure nature. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.858713DOI Listing
December 2013
1 Read

Adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors: elusive hybrids come of age.

Cell Commun Adhes 2013 Dec 14;20(6):213-26. Epub 2013 Nov 14.

Department of Cell Biology and the Ronald O Perelman Department of Dermatology, New York University School of Medicine , New York, NY , USA.

Adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the most recently identified and least understood subfamily of GPCRs. Adhesion GPCRs are characterized by unusually long ectodomains with adhesion-related repeats that facilitate cell- cell and cell-cell matrix contact, as well as a proteolytic cleavage site-containing domain that is a structural hallmark of the family. Their unusual chimeric structure of adhesion-related ectodomain with a seven-pass transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic signaling makes these proteins highly versatile in mediating cellular signaling in response to extracellular adhesion or cell motility events. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.855727DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4165398PMC
December 2013
20 Reads

Signaling and mechanical roles of E-cadherin.

Cell Commun Adhes 2013 Dec 8;20(6):189-99. Epub 2013 Nov 8.

IFOM-inStem Joint Research Laboratory, Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine , Bangalore , India.

The epithelium comprises an important tissue that lines the internal and external surfaces of metazoan organs. In order to organize sheets of epithelial cells into three-dimensional tissues, it requires the coordination of basic cellular processes such as polarity, adhesion, growth, and differentiation. Moreover, as a primary barrier to the external environment, epithelial tissues are often subjected to physical forces and damage. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.854778DOI Listing
December 2013
12 Reads

Patterns in space: coordinating adhesion and actomyosin contractility at E-cadherin junctions.

Cell Commun Adhes 2013 Dec 8;20(6):201-12. Epub 2013 Nov 8.

Division of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute for Molecular Bioscience, The University of Queensland , St. Lucia, Queensland , Australia.

Cadherin adhesion receptors are fundamental determinants of tissue organization in health and disease. Increasingly, we have come to appreciate that classical cadherins exert their biological actions through active cooperation with the contractile actin cytoskeleton. Rather than being passive resistors of detachment forces, cadherins can regulate the assembly and mechanics of the contractile apparatus itself. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.856889DOI Listing
December 2013
19 Reads

Structural and functional diversity of desmosomes.

Cell Commun Adhes 2013 Dec 8;20(6):171-87. Epub 2013 Nov 8.

Department of Pathology, Northwestern University Feinberg, School of Medicine , Chicago, IL , USA.

Desmosomes anchor intermediate filaments at sites of cell contact established by the interaction of cadherins extending from opposing cells. The incorporation of cadherins, catenin adaptors, and cytoskeletal elements resembles the closely related adherens junction. However, the recruitment of intermediate filaments distinguishes desmosomes and imparts a unique function. Read More

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http://jcb.rupress.org/content/193/7/1137.full.pdf
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http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/15419061.2013.85
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.855204DOI Listing
December 2013
25 Reads

A skin-depth analysis of integrins: role of the integrin network in health and disease.

Cell Commun Adhes 2013 Dec 8;20(6):155-69. Epub 2013 Nov 8.

Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Center for Inflammation and Tissue Homeostasis, National Center for Biological Sciences , Bangalore , India.

In the skin epidermis, adhesion to the underlying basement membrane is mediated through trans-membrane integrin receptors. In addition to a structural role, integrins can signal in a bi-directional manner though the membrane and thus play a crucial role in cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. In this review we will discuss the role of integrins and their network of partner proteins in normal skin development, and how dysregulation influences disease states such as skin blistering disorders and cancers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/15419061.2013.854334DOI Listing
December 2013
3 Reads