14 results match your criteria Catscratch Disease

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A retrospective evaluation of lymphadenopathy in children in a single center's experience.

J Pak Med Assoc 2016 06;66(6):654-7

Department of Paediatrics, Haseki Training and Research Hospital, Istanbul, Turkey.

Objective: To determine the causes of lymphadenopathies in children living in our region, and detect the frequency of malignant disease.

Methods: Our study evaluated demographic characteristics, lymph node involvement sites, tests, and viral serologiesperformed to search for the presence of infection, and ultrasonographic, and histologic findings of 1700 children who were referred to the outpatient clinics of the Paediatric Diseases and Paediatric Surgery between January 2012, and January 2015.

Results: Our study population consisted of 1003 (59 %) boys, and 697 (41 %) girls aged less than 18 years. Read More

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June 2016
3 Reads

The natural history of idiopathic neuroretinitis.

Pract Neurol 2015 Oct 26;15(5):387-8. Epub 2015 Jun 26.

Department of Neurology, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK.

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October 2015
2 Reads

[Newly emerging infections: Catscratch disease].

Authors:
Tamotsu Harada

Nihon Jibiinkoka Gakkai Kaiho 2004 Nov;107(11):1016-9

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November 2004
1 Read

[Cat's cratch disease and Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome].

J Fr Ophtalmol 2004 Feb;27(2):179-83

Service d'Ophtalmologie, Cliniques Universitaires St Luc, UCL, 10, avenue Hippocrate, 1200 Bruxelles, Belgique.

By presenting this case report describing Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome, we review the medical literature on its most frequent etiology: catscratch disease, a self-limited, systemic illness caused by a Gram-negative bacillus, Bartonella henselae, principally affecting children under 15 years of age. Typical symptoms include regional lymphadenopathy, fever, malaise, and fatigue, possibly with more severe complications such as splenomegaly, granulomatous hepatitis, and encephalopathy. Ocular manifestations may include follicular conjunctivitis, Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome, neuroretinitis, optic neuritis, and chorioretinitis. Read More

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February 2004
1 Read

[Cutaneous vasculitis disclosing cat-scratch disease].

Ann Dermatol Venereol 1998 Dec;125(12):894-6

Service de Dermatologie, Hôpital d'Instruction des Armées Bégin, Saint-Mandé.

Background: We describe a case of cat-scratch disease ingnaugurated by vascular purpura and discuss the role of the causal agent, Bartonella henselae.

Case Report: A 49-year-old woman presented vascular purpura without fever. Skin biopsy demonstrated leukocytoclasic vasculitis. Read More

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December 1998
2 Reads

Neuroretinitis: an unusual presentation of ocular toxoplasmosis.

Ann Ophthalmol 1992 Feb;24(2):68-70

Department of Ophthalmology, Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center, Lackland AFB, Texas 78236-5300.

Neuroretinitis is a clinical condition usually seen in young healthy adults that is characterized by rapid profound unilateral loss of vision. Funduscopic findings include swollen disc, splinter hemorrhages, and macular star. Catscratch fever and leptospirosis have been suggested as possible etiologies in this condition. Read More

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February 1992
1 Read

Two cases of catscratch disease.

Authors:
H Nathan

Proc Rudolf Virchow Med Soc City N Y 1965 ;24:119-31

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January 1970
1 Read

[So-called catscratch disease].

Authors:
K O SCHMID

Wien Klin Wochenschr 1956 Jul;68(28):568-73

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July 1956
1 Read

Skin-test reactions to catscratch disease among veterinarians.

Authors:
H GIFFORD

AMA Arch Intern Med 1955 Jun;95(6):828-33

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June 1955
1 Read

Benign inoculation lymphoreticulosis, catscratch disease.

Authors:
J N LYSAUGHT

J Okla State Med Assoc 1954 May;47(5):131-2

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May 1954
1 Read
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