40 results match your criteria Catheterization Scalp Vein

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Pre-operative Embolization of Intracranial and Extracranial Tumors: A Review of 37 Cases

J Med Assoc Thai 2016 Jun;99 Suppl 3:S91-119

Objective: To examine the safety and efficacy of pre-operative embolization of intra-and extracranial tumors and determine the selection criteria of patients for this procedure.

Material And Method: Between June 2008 and August 2012, 37 patients (17 males, 20 females; mean age, 44.2+14. Read More

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June 2016
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Pre-operative Embolization of Intracranial and Extracranial Tumors: A Review of 37 Cases.

J Med Assoc Thai 2016 Jun;99 Suppl 3:S91-119

Objective: To examine the safety and efficacy of pre-operative embolization of intra-and extracranial tumors and determine the selection criteria of patients for this procedure.

Material And Method: Between June 2008 and August 2012, 37 patients (17 males, 20 females; mean age, 44.2+14. Read More

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June 2016
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Percutaneously Inserted Central Catheter-Related Pleural Effusion in a Level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: A 5-Year Review (2008-2012).

JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr 2017 09 15;41(7):1234-1239. Epub 2016 Apr 15.

1 Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Canada.

Background: Although peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) provide vascular access in newborns who require parenteral nutrition and medications, they can be associated with complications that lead to significant morbidity and mortality.

Objectives: To describe the characteristics of pleural effusion (PLE) associated with PICC use in a large level III neonatal intensive care unit.

Design/methods: A retrospective review of PICC-related PLE in newborns was conducted over a 5-year period, from 2008-2012. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0148607116644714DOI Listing
September 2017
38 Reads

Use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) via scalp veins in neonates.

J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med 2016 Nov 7;29(21):3434-8. Epub 2016 Mar 7.

a Division of Neonatology , Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia , Vancouver , BC , Canada.

Objective: The objective of this study is to describe the use and complications of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) via scalp veins in neonates.

Methods: A retrospective review of neonates who had PICCs inserted, between January 2010 and June 2013, in the NICU at Children's and Women's Health Center of British Columbia.

Results: During the study period, 689 PICCs were inserted over a total of 46 728 NICU patient days. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3109/14767058.2016.1139567DOI Listing
November 2016
3 Reads

Endovascular correction of an infantile intracranial venous outflow obstruction.

J Neurosurg Pediatr 2013 Dec 18;12(6):660-3. Epub 2013 Oct 18.

Departments of Radiology and.

The authors report on the case of a 7-year-old boy who presented with a reduced level of activity, macrocephaly, prominent scalp veins, and decreased left-sided visual acuity. Imaging workup demonstrated generalized cerebral volume loss, bilateral chronic subdural hematomas, absent left sigmoid sinus, hypoplastic left transverse sinus, and severe focal weblike stenosis of the right sigmoid sinus. Right sigmoid sinus angioplasty and stent insertion was performed, with an immediate reduction in the transduced intracranial venous pressure gradient across the stenosis (from 22 to 3 mm Hg). Read More

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https://thejns.org/view/journals/j-neurosurg-pediatr/12/6/ar
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3171/2013.9.PEDS12232DOI Listing
December 2013
13 Reads

Noninvasive optical measurement of cerebral blood flow in mice using molecular dynamics analysis of indocyanine green.

PLoS One 2012 31;7(10):e48383. Epub 2012 Oct 31.

Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon, Republic of Korea.

In preclinical studies of ischemic brain disorders, it is crucial to measure cerebral blood flow (CBF); however, this requires radiological techniques with heavy instrumentation or invasive procedures. Here, we propose a noninvasive and easy-to-use optical imaging technique for measuring CBF in experimental small animals. Mice were injected with indocyanine green (ICG) via tail-vein catheterization. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0048383PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3485229PMC
April 2013
2 Reads

Optoacoustic monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation though intact scalp in large animals.

Opt Express 2012 Feb;20(4):4159-67

Laboratory for Optical Sensing and Monitoring, Center for Biomedical Engineering, The University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Blvd., Galveston, TX 77555-1156, USA.

Monitoring (currently invasive) of cerebral venous blood oxygenation is a key to avoiding hypoxia-induced brain injury resulting in death or severe disability. Noninvasive, optoacoustic monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation can potentially replace existing invasive methods. To the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time noninvasive monitoring of cerebral venous blood oxygenation through intact scalp that was validated with invasive, "gold standard" measurements. Read More

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http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3482910PMC
http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.20.004159DOI Listing
February 2012
3 Reads

Transvenous balloon-protected embolization of a scalp arteriovenous fistula using Onyx liquid embolic.

Acta Neurochir (Wien) 2011 Jun 9;153(6):1285-90. Epub 2011 Apr 9.

Cerebrovascular and Endovascular Division, Department of Neurosurgery Tufts Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, 800 Washington Street, Proger 7, Boston, MA, 02111, USA.

Background: Scalp arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) are rare and potentially complex lesions that can be treated in a multimodal fashion. We present here the first successful treatment of a Stage Ib scalp AVF using a balloon-protected, retrograde transvenous embolization with the liquid embolic Onyx.

Method: We describe the case of a 60-year-old man with a scalp AVF that had a fine, diffuse, serpiginous arterial supply, precluding a transarterial approach, and multiple venous drainage paths, including the external jugular vein (EJV). Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s00701-011-0998
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00701-011-0998-1
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00701-011-0998-1DOI Listing
June 2011
5 Reads
1.790 Impact Factor

Postoperative extradural hematoma after removal of a subgaleal drainage catheter--case report.

Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo) 2007 Jul;47(7):314-6

Department of Neurological Surgery, Hiroshima City Hospital, Japan.

A 29-year-old man developed a delayed postoperative extradural hematoma after the craniotomy to treat recurrent malignant glioma and hydrocephalus. The patient became alert on the day after the operation. Computed tomography (CT) 12 hours after the operation showed no intracranial hematoma and the subgaleal drainage catheter was removed 18 hours after the operation. Read More

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July 2007
8 Reads

Skull bone infarctive crisis and deep vein thrombosis in homozygous sickle cell disease- case report and review of the literature.

Hematology 2007 Apr;12(2):169-74

Department of Haematology, National Health Laboratory Service & University of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.

Here we describe an 8-year old male child with homozygous sickle cell disease who presented with left parietal skull bone infarction and, during his stay in hospital, developed a right femoral deep vein thrombosis (DVT), both uncommon complications of the disease. He initially presented with severe headache and generalised tenderness of the calvarium, which did not respond to simple analgesics. Scalp swelling in and around the left frontal (including left orbit) and parietal regions developed 24 h after presentation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/10245330601111912DOI Listing
April 2007
2 Reads

Midline catheter use in the intensive care nursery.

Neonatal Netw 2006 May-Jun;25(3):189-99

Intensive Care Nursery, Children's Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Kansas City, Missouri 64108, USA.

Purpose: To describe the use of midline catheters in a Level IV, 48-bed NICU over a four-and-a-half-year period.

Design: Nonrandomized prospective review of data obtained for quality assurance monitoring.

Sample: 1,130 catheters inserted in 858 patients ranging in age at insertion from 1 to 249 days, 360-8,000 gm in weight, and 23-42 weeks gestational age at birth. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1891/0730-0832.25.3.189DOI Listing
August 2006
40 Reads

Bubbles in the brain veins as a complication of daily management of a scalp vein catheter.

Am J Perinatol 2005 Oct;22(7):361-3

Laboratoire d'Explorations Fonctionnelles Foetopédiatriques, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Angers, France.

Recently, it has been suspected that venous dural sinus air embolisms could occur as a result of scalp vein infusion. The possible mechanism for this complication has not been documented to date, and procedures to avoid venous dural sinus air embolism have not been presented. We report a preterm neonate who demonstrated venous dural sinus air embolism following daily management of a scalp vein catheter. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2005-871526DOI Listing
October 2005
4 Reads

Air emboli in the intracranial venous sinuses of neonates.

Am J Perinatol 2002 Jan;19(1):55-8

Neonatology Division, Department of Pediatrics, King Fahad National Guard Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

Air bubbles in the intracranial venous sinuses are known as a consequence to different causes including trauma, infection, and administration of intravenous contrast. Most of the previous reports demonstrated such cases in adults, with subsequent complications. We are presenting two premature babies who developed asymptomatic air bubbles in the right cavernous and left transverse sinuses, introduced accidentally upon cannulation of scalp veins. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-2002-20174DOI Listing
January 2002
2 Reads

[Intracranial epidural abscess in a newborn secondary to skin catheter].

Neurocirugia (Astur) 2001 Aug;12(4):338-41

Servicio de Pediatría, Hospital Nuestra Señora de Candelaria, Santa Cruz de Tenerife.

Intracranial epidural abscesses are uncommon lesions, being more frequents in older children and adults. They commonly arise as a result of direct extension of a preexisting infection and rarely present with focal deficit. We present a case of a 11-days old preterm infant who developed an intracranial epidural abscess as a result of an infected scalp vein catheter. Read More

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August 2001
4 Reads

[Prospective evaluation of percutaneous central venous catheters in newborn infants. Castrillo Hospital Group].

An Esp Pediatr 2000 Aug;53(2):138-47

Coordinadores, Hospital Central de Asturias, Oviedo.

Aim: To evaluate the current use of percutaneous central venous silastic catheters in newborn infants in Spain by analysing technical characteristics and infections, as well as mechanical and local complications.

Methods: Percutaneous central venous catheters inserted in newborns in the neonatal units of the hospitals in the OCastrillo Hospital GroupO from July 15, 1998 to December 31, 1998 were collected for prospective analysis. Each hospital was able to chose the length of the period of catheter data collection on condition that all inserted catheters were studied during the period. Read More

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August 2000
3 Reads

Differences in pressures of the popliteal, long saphenous, and dorsal foot veins.

Authors:
P Neglén S Raju

J Vasc Surg 2000 Nov;32(5):894-901

River Oaks Hospital, Jackson, MS, USA.

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among pressures obtained simultaneously in the popliteal, long saphenous, and dorsal foot veins.

Method: Eight limbs were studied. One limb had an isolated popliteal vein reflux, and two had moderate long saphenous vein incompetence. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1067/mva.2000.110351DOI Listing
November 2000
1 Read

Peripherally inserted central venous catheters: success of scalp-vein access in infants and newborns.

Radiology 1999 Mar;210(3):858-60

Department of Radiology, Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH 45229-3039, USA.

The authors assessed the feasibility of placing peripherally inserted central venous catheters via scalp veins in infants and newborns. In 60 newborns and infants, aged 3 days to 10 months, placement of 62 2-F peripherally inserted central venous catheters was attempted with scalpvein access. The tip location was central in 30 of the 62 catheters (48%) and long peripheral intravenous in 17 (27%); access failed in 15 (24%). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/radiology.210.3.r99mr14858DOI Listing
March 1999
1 Read

Traumatic bilateral jugular vein thrombosis: case report and review of the literature.

Neurosurgery 1997 Sep;41(3):680-3

Division of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, USA.

Objective And Importance: Thrombosis of the internal jugular vein (IJV) with associated elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) is a rare complication of central venous catheterization but has not been reported as a result of blunt trauma.

Clinical Presentation: An 18-year-old male patient was observed to be obtunded after an assault. The initial examination was remarkable for somnolence, bruising of the anterior neck, and diffuse, edematous swelling of the face and scalp. Read More

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September 1997
2 Reads

Facial Hair on a Woman: Diagnosing and Treating a Pathological Twist on a Common Problem.

Authors:
Marshall

Medscape Womens Health 1997 Apr;2(4)

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Wash.

A 46-year-old woman who had had occasional coarse, dark hairs on her chin and chest since she was 17 years old presented with rapidly progressive hirsutism and new onset of virilization--(eg, for the first time in her life, she had coarse, dark hair on her back and balding in the temporal and occipital areas of her scalp). A thorough evaluation, including laboratory tests, several imaging studies, and ovarian and adrenal vein catheterization, revealed a small ovarian hilus cell tumor that was successfully removed by a laparoscopic approach. During the 30 months after the testosterone-producing ovarian tumor had been diagnosed and the woman's ovary had been removed, her hirsutism progressed no further, hair began to grow back in the temporal and occipital areas of her scalp, and she began to lose some excess weight. Read More

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April 1997
2 Reads

"Cavernous sinus EEG": a new method for the preoperative evaluation of temporal lobe epilepsy.

Epilepsia 1997 Apr;38(4):472-82

Department of Neurosurgery, Kyoto University School of Medicine, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Japan.

Purpose: In presurgical evaluation of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), invasive methods are necessary if results of various noninvasive methods are not sufficiently convergent enough to identify the epileptogenic area accurately. To detect the epileptiform discharges originating specifically from the mesial temporal lobe, we applied the cavernous sinus catheterization technique.

Methods: We placed Seeker Lite-10 guide wire electrodes into bilateral cavernous sinus through the internal jugular veins to record EEG (cavernous sinus EEG) in 6 patients with intractable TLE. Read More

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April 1997
1 Read

Serendipity or morbidity.

Paediatr Anaesth 1996 ;6(6):499

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March 1997
3 Reads

The evaluation of percutaneous central venous catheters--a convenient technique in pediatric patients.

Intensive Care Med 1995 Sep;21(9):759-65

Medical School of National Yang-Ming University, Children's Medical Center, Veterans General Hospital-Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China.

Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of 3 different types of silastic catheters that were used for percutaneous central venous catheterization (PCVC) through peripheral veins.

Design And Setting: The study was prospective and consecutive for 6 years at a pediatric/neonatal intensive care unit and pediatric ward in Veterans General Hospital-Taipei, a university-affiliated medical center, in Taiwan, ROC.

Participants And Interventions: The patients who had PCVC were consecutively enrolled from January 1988 to December 1993. Read More

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September 1995
1 Read

Air in the cavernous sinus following scalp vein cannulation.

Authors:
J Brook E Moss

Anaesthesia 1994 Mar;49(3):219-20

Department of Anaesthetics, General Infirmary at Leeds.

A 7-month-old infant was found to have air in the cavernous sinus during a CT scan under general anaesthesia. An anterior scalp vein had been used to administer atracurium and contrast. The anatomy and precautions to prevent air embolism during scalp vein cannulation are discussed. Read More

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March 1994
2 Reads

Vitamin K deficiency, intracranial hemorrhage, and a subgaleal hematoma: a fatal combination.

Authors:
C A Ryan M Gayle

Pediatr Emerg Care 1992 Jun;8(3):143-5

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, University of Alberta Hospitals, Edmonton, Canada.

An exclusively breast-fed infant, who did not receive vitamin K prophylaxis at birth, presented with signs of raised intracranial pressure. Her clinical course was compounded by a lumbar puncture, which revealed blood in the cerebrospinal fluid, and a large subgaleal hematoma, which developed at the puncture site of an attempted scalp vein catheterization, resulting in coning, hypovolemic shock, and death. A major coagulopathy was present, probably caused by vitamin K deficiency. Read More

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June 1992
1 Read

Congestive heart failure secondary to cerebral arterio-venous fistula.

Childs Nerv Syst 1987 ;3(3):141-4

Department of Pediatrics, University of Padua School of Medicine, Italy.

Arteriovenous fistula is a relatively rare cause of severe congestive heart failure in the newborn. An intracranial arteriovenous malformation associated with an aneurysm of the great vein of Galen is the most frequent of such malformations and, although well known, it remains a difficult diagnosis in the neonate because the clinical picture first presents with findings suggesting cardiac disease. The newborn with a vein of Galen aneurysm has volume and pressure overload on his myocardium; cyanosis is often present due to persistent fetal circulation; peripheral pulses are generally decreased in amplitude except in those arteries near the fistula where they are bounding, as an expression of a hyperdynamic status. Read More

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November 1987
3 Reads

Accidental intracranial hyperalimentation infusion.

JPEN J Parenter Enteral Nutr 1982 Nov-Dec;6(6):532-3

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0148607182006006532DOI Listing
May 1983
3 Reads

Superior vena caval obstruction after Mustard's operation: detection by two-dimensional contrast echocardiography.

Circulation 1981 Aug;64(2):392-6

To assess superior vena caval (SVC) obstruction after the Mustard operation for transposition of the great arteries, we performed two-dimensional contrast echocardiography (2-D contrast echo) in 18 patients, ages 1-9 years. Sterile saline was injected into a peripheral scalp or arm vein while the junction of the inferior vena cava (IVC) and the systemic venous atrium (SVA) was imaged from the subcostal long-axis plane. The results of 2-D contrast echo were compared with those obtained at cardiac catheterization. Read More

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August 1981
1 Read

Long term total parenteral nutrition through peripheral veins.

Int Surg 1976 May;61(5):271-2

Most complications of total parenteral nutrition are directly related to the use of hypertonic glucose and central venous catheters. We describe a system in which hypertonic glucose is omitted from the total parenteral nutrition regimen and is replaced by Intralipid as the main source of calories. Protein hydrolysate and lipid solutions are infused simultaneously via peripheral veins. Read More

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May 1976
1 Read

Femoral percutaneous catheterization in infants and small children for cerebral angiography.

Radiology 1975 Aug;116(02):451

An improved technique of selective cerebral angiography for infants and small chicken is described. The needle is inserted approximately 45 degrees to the skin in order to avoid subintimal placement of the tip. After good backflow is established, the guidewire is advanced to a position in the descending aorta. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1148/116.2.451DOI Listing
August 1975
3 Reads

Bacterial contamination of drip sets.

Authors:
G E Cox

N Z Med J 1973 Jun;77(493):390-2

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June 1973
1 Read

Parenteral nutrition and esophageal anastomotic leak.

Arch Surg 1970 Sep;101(3):436-7

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September 1970
1 Read

Infected "scalp-vein" needles.

JAMA 1970 Aug;213(9):1496-7

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August 1970
3 Reads

Hazard of scalp-vein needles.

Authors:
M Karell

N Engl J Med 1969 Oct;281(18):1021

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJM196910302811824DOI Listing
October 1969
3 Reads

Validity of scalp blood sampling. Comparison of scalp and arterial blood in the newborn.

Am J Obstet Gynecol 1969 Oct;105(4):616-9

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October 1969
2 Reads
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