46 results match your criteria Caterpillar Envenomation

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Potential distribution and ecological conditions of Lonomia obliqua Walker 1855 (Saturniidae: Hemileucinae) in Brazil.

Acta Trop 2019 Apr 17;192:158-164. Epub 2019 Jan 17.

Universidade Estadual do Oeste do Paraná,Cascavel, Paraná, Brazil.

Lonomia obliqua Walker 1855 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae) is a species of moth which larvae are responsible for the lonomism, a form of envenomation that has been occurring in Brazil since the 1980s. Despite the importance in public health, the geographical distribution and their ecological aspects are unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we present a potential geographical distribution map for L. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.actatropica.2019.01.016DOI Listing
April 2019
1 Read

Management of severe pain after dermal contact with caterpillars (erucism): a prospective case series.

Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2018 Nov 17:1-5. Epub 2018 Nov 17.

a School of Medical Sciences , Campinas Poison Control Center, State University of Campinas (UNICAMP) , Campinas , Brazil.

Context: Erucism, envenomation caused by dermal contact with larval forms of moths, may result in intense local pain, mainly after contact with puss caterpillars (family Megalopygidae).

Objective: To evaluate the response to different treatments for controlling severe pain in a case series of erucism in Campinas, southeastern Brazil.

Patients And Methods: Prospective cohort study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15563650.2018.1520998DOI Listing
November 2018
2 Reads

Venomous caterpillars: From inoculation apparatus to venom composition and envenomation.

Toxicon 2018 Oct 24;153:39-52. Epub 2018 Aug 24.

Immunochemistry Laboratory, Butantan Institute, Av. Vital Brazil, 1500, 05503-900, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Electronic address:

Envenomation by the larval or pupal stages of moths occurs when the victim presses their hairs. They penetrate the subcutaneous tissue, releasing toxins such as proteolytic enzymes, histamine and other pro-inflammatory substances. Cutaneous reactions, including severe pain, oedema and erythema are frequent local manifestations of caterpillar envenomation, but, in some cases, the reactions can evolve into vesicles, bullae, erosions, petechiae, superficial skin necrosis and ulcerations. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2018.08.007DOI Listing
October 2018
2 Reads

Puss Caterpillar Envenomation: Erucism Mimicking Appendicitis in a Young Child.

Pediatr Emerg Care 2018 May 23. Epub 2018 May 23.

Pediatrics, Section of Emergency Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX.

A 4-year-old female presented to the emergency department with 2 days of abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting. She was tachycardic and had abdominal tenderness. Laboratory studies revealed a leukocytosis, hypokalemia, and metabolic acidosis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000001514DOI Listing
May 2018
4 Reads

Effects of Lonomia obliqua Venom on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells: Contribution of NADPH Oxidase-Derived Reactive Oxygen Species.

Toxins (Basel) 2017 11 7;9(11). Epub 2017 Nov 7.

Laboratório de Farmacologia Celular e Molecular, Departamento de Biologia Celular, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro CEP 20550-030, Brazil.

Envenomation caused by human contact with the caterpillar Lonomia is characterized by deleterious effects on coagulation and patency of blood vessels. The cellular effects induced by venom highlights its capacity to activate endothelial cells, leading to a proinflammatory phenotype. Having more knowledge about the mechanisms involved in envenomation may contribute to better treatment. Read More

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http://www.mdpi.com/2072-6651/9/11/360
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http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/toxins9110360DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5705975PMC
November 2017
6 Reads

Pine processionary caterpillar Thaumetopoea pityocampa envenomation in 11 cats: a retrospective study.

J Feline Med Surg 2018 Aug 10;20(8):685-689. Epub 2017 Aug 10.

1 Intensive Care Unit (SIAMU), University of Lyon, VetAgro Sup, APCSe, Marcy l'Etoile, France.

Objectives The aim of this study was to describe the clinical manifestations in cats of contact with caterpillars of the pine processionary moth. Methods Data were retrospectively obtained from the medical records (2004-2016) of cats that had been in contact with caterpillars of the pine processionary moth. Results Eleven cats were included in the study. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1098612X17723776DOI Listing
August 2018
4 Reads

Stinging caterpillars from the genera Podalia, Leucanella and Lonomia in Misiones, Argentina: A preliminary comparative approach to understand their toxicity.

Comp Biochem Physiol C Toxicol Pharmacol 2017 Nov 2;202:55-62. Epub 2017 Aug 2.

Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (CONICET), Ministerio de Ciencia Tecnología e Innovación Productiva, Instituto Nacional de Medicina Tropical (INMeT), Ministerio de Salud de la Nación, Neuquén y Jujuy s/n, 3370 Puerto Iguazú, Argentina. Electronic address:

Dermal contact with Lepidoptera specimens at their larval stage (caterpillar) may cause systemic and/or local envenomation. There are multiple venomous species of them in Argentina, but their overall venom composition is poorly known. Lately, several cases of envenomation have been reported in the Misiones province, Northeastern Argentina. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpc.2017.07.007DOI Listing
November 2017
93 Reads

Oral Mucosal Envenomation of an Infant by a Puss Caterpillar.

Pediatr Emerg Care 2017 Jun;33(6):424-426

From the *East Tennessee Children's Hospital and †Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture, Knoxville, TN.

The term "puss caterpillar" describes the larva of at least two Megalopygidae species common to North America. Accidental contact with the hairs (setae) is intensely painful, and serious systemic effects have been reported. We describe the envenomation of an infant through the face and oral mucosa, resulting in severe discomfort, limited oral intake, and vomiting, but no other untoward effects. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/PEC.0000000000001155DOI Listing
June 2017
2 Reads

Pine processionary caterpillar Thaumetopoea pityocampa envenomation in 109 dogs: A retrospective study.

Toxicon 2017 Jun 27;132:1-5. Epub 2017 Mar 27.

Intensive Care Unit (SIAMU), Univ Lyon, VetAgro Sup, APCSe, F-69280, Marcy l'Etoile, France. Electronic address:

Contact with the caterpillars of the pine processionary moth (CPPM) Thaumetopoea pityocampa induces severe local allergic reactions. The purpose of this large-scale retrospective cohort-study was to describe the clinical manifestations and related risk factors of CPPM exposure. This cohort-study included 109 dogs between the years of 2000 and 2016. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2017.03.014DOI Listing
June 2017
9 Reads

Severe Hemorrhagic Syndrome After Lonomia Caterpillar Envenomation in the Western Brazilian Amazon: How Many More Cases Are There?

Wilderness Environ Med 2017 Mar 10;28(1):46-50. Epub 2017 Jan 10.

School of Health Sciences, Universidade do Estado do Amazonas, Manaus, Brazil (Ms Oliveira, Alves, and Sachett, and Drs Mendonça-da-Silva and Monteiro). Electronic address:

Contact with Lonomia caterpillars can cause a hemorrhagic syndrome. In Brazil, Lonomia obliqua and Lonomia achelous are known to cause this venom-induced disease. In the Brazilian Amazon, descriptions of this kind of envenomation are scarce. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.wem.2016.11.001DOI Listing
March 2017
8 Reads

Role of the inflammatory response in the hemorrhagic syndrome induced by the hemolymph of the caterpillar Lonomia achelous.

Toxicon 2016 Oct 26;121:77-85. Epub 2016 Aug 26.

Laboratorio de Fisiopatología, Centro de Medicina Experimental, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, IVIC Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020A, Venezuela. Electronic address:

Introduction: Contact with the caterpillar of Lonomia achelous causes a hemorrhagic syndrome in humans prompted by two processes, an initial mild DIC that is later masked by overwhelming fibrinolytic activity. Although the venom affects both the hemostatic and inflammatory systems separately, it is not clear whether the hematological and hemostatic disturbances may in part be due to an indirect effect via inflammatory mediators. Here we report results on the crosstalk between these systems, particularly the effect of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α on hemostatic parameters. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S00410101163025
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2016.08.018DOI Listing
October 2016
10 Reads

The magnitude of severe box jellyfish cases on Koh Samui and Koh Pha-ngan in the Gulf of Thailand.

BMC Res Notes 2016 Feb 17;9:108. Epub 2016 Feb 17.

Epidemiology Bureau, Department of Disease Control, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, 10100, Thailand.

Background: Despite recent deaths caused by box jellyfish envenomation occurring on the islands of Samui and Pha-ngan in the Gulf of Thailand, many people do not believe box jellyfish can kill humans and many people dismiss the problem as insignificant. More evidence has been requested from the communities in order to evaluate the need for and the implementation of sustainable prevention measures. We aimed to determine the magnitude of cases of severe stinging by box jellyfish and describe the characteristics of these cases on the islands of Samui and Pha-ngan in Surat Thani Province from 1997 to 2015. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13104-016-1931-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4756446PMC
February 2016
10 Reads

IMAGES IN CLINICAL MEDICINE. Erucism Due to Lepidoptera Caterpillar Envenomation.

N Engl J Med 2015 Oct;373(18):e21

University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1056/NEJMicm1414613DOI Listing
October 2015
1 Read

A serine protease isolated from the bristles of the Amazonic caterpillar, Premolis semirufa, is a potent complement system activator.

PLoS One 2015 11;10(3):e0118615. Epub 2015 Mar 11.

Immunochemistry Laboratory, Butantan Institute, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Background: The caterpillar of the moth Premolis semirufa, commonly named pararama, is found in the Brazilian Amazon region. Accidental contact with the caterpillar bristles causes an intense itching sensation, followed by symptoms of an acute inflammation, which last for three to seven days after the first incident. After multiple accidents a chronic inflammatory reaction, called "Pararamose", characterized by articular synovial membrane thickening with joint deformities common to chronic synovitis, frequently occurs. Read More

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http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0118615PLOS
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4356561PMC
December 2015
15 Reads

Mechanisms of acute kidney injury induced by experimental Lonomia obliqua envenomation.

Arch Toxicol 2015 Mar 6;89(3):459-83. Epub 2014 May 6.

Laboratório de Bioquímica Farmacológica, Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

Lonomia obliqua caterpillar envenomation causes acute kidney injury (AKI), which can be responsible for its deadly actions. This study evaluates the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of renal dysfunction. To characterize L. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00204-014-1264-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4401067PMC
March 2015
2 Reads

Acute Lonomia obliqua caterpillar envenomation-induced physiopathological alterations in rats: evidence of new toxic venom activities and the efficacy of serum therapy to counteract systemic tissue damage.

Toxicon 2013 Nov 29;74:179-92. Epub 2013 Aug 29.

Laboratório de Bioquímica Farmacológica, Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500, Cep 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

The clinical manifestations of Lonomia obliqua caterpillar envenomation are systemic hemorrhage and acute kidney injury. In an effort to better understand the physiopathological mechanisms of envenomation, a rat model was established to study systemic tissue damage during L. obliqua envenomation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2013.08.061DOI Listing
November 2013
14 Reads

Probable chronic renal failure caused by Lonomia caterpillar envenomation.

J Venom Anim Toxins Incl Trop Dis 2013 Jun 3;19(1):14. Epub 2013 Jun 3.

Universidade Federal de Viçosa (UFV), Viçosa, MG, Brasil.

Erucism is a skin reaction to envenomation from certain poisonous caterpillar bristles. In Brazil, most reports of erucism provoked by Lonomia caterpillars are from the southern region. Most manifestations of erucism are local and include burning pain, itching, local hyperthermia and, rarely, blisters (benign symptoms with spontaneous regression in a few hours). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1678-9199-19-14DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3710195PMC
June 2013
2 Reads

Premolis semirufa (Walker, 1856) envenomation, disease affecting rubber tappers of the Amazon: searching for caterpillar-bristles toxic components.

PLoS Negl Trop Dis 2012 28;6(2):e1531. Epub 2012 Feb 28.

Immunochemistry Laboratory, Butantan Institute, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.

Background: The caterpillar of the moth Premolis semirufa (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae), commonly named Pararama, is endemic of the Amazon basin. Accidental contact with these caterpillar bristles causes local symptoms such as intense heat, pain, edema and itching which last for three to seven days; however, after multiples contacts, it may induce joint-space narrowing and bone alteration, as well as degeneration of the articular cartilage and immobilization of the affected joints. Specific treatment for this disease does not exist, but corticosteroids are frequently administered. Read More

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https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0001531
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0001531DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3289609PMC
June 2012
16 Reads

Description of envenomation by the "gusano-pollo" caterpillar (Megalopyge opercularis) in Venezuela.

Invest Clin 2010 Mar;51(1):127-32

Centro de Ingeniería Genética, Laboratorio de Fisiología Animal, Universidad de los Andes, Mérida, Venezuela.

Lepidoptera is a large order of insects, with more than 180,000 species word-wide, showing larval stages of butterflies and moths known as wormlike caterpillars. Almost 12 families of butterflies around the world are capable of causing severe human injuries, varying from dermatitis, renal failure, hemostatic alterations, respiratory failure and neurotoxic symptoms. These caterpillars are coated in long, hair-like setae containing venom to protect themselves against aggressive predators. Read More

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March 2010
9 Reads
0.492 Impact Factor

Lonomia obliqua venomous secretion induces human platelet adhesion and aggregation.

J Thromb Thrombolysis 2010 Oct;30(3):300-10

Laboratório de Bioquímica Farmacológica, Centro de Biotecnologia UFRGS, Av Bento Gonçalves 9500, PO Box 15005, ZIP Code 91501-970 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

The caterpillar Lonomia obliqua is a venomous animal that causes numerous accidents, especially in southern Brazil, where it is considered a public health problem. The clinical manifestations include several haemostatic disturbances that lead to a hemorrhagic syndrome. Considering that platelets play a central role in hemostasis, in this work we investigate the effects of L. Read More

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http://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11239-010-0449
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http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11239-010-0449-5
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11239-010-0449-5DOI Listing
October 2010
7 Reads

Lonomia obliqua (Lepidoptera, Saturniidae) caterpillar bristle extract induces direct lysis by cleaving erythrocyte membrane glycoproteins.

Toxicon 2010 Jun 10;55(7):1323-30. Epub 2010 Feb 10.

Núcleo de Estudos Ambientais, Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Campus de Porto Nacional, TO, Brazil.

Lonomia obliqua caterpillar bristle extract induces hemolysis in vitro on washed human and rat erythrocytes, in either the absence or presence of exogenous lecithin. In the former condition, phospholipases A(2) are key enzymes involved in hemolysis. However, the mechanism whereby this extract causes direct hemolysis is not known. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2010.02.003DOI Listing
June 2010
2 Reads

Lonomia obliqua venom: In vivo effects and molecular aspects associated with the hemorrhagic syndrome.

Toxicon 2010 Dec 28;56(7):1103-12. Epub 2010 Jan 28.

Laboratório de Bioquímica Farmacológica, Centro de Biotecnologia (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

Caterpillar envenomation has been an emergent health issue. Lonomia obliqua is a medically important animal that causes a hemorrhagic syndrome that can progress to acute renal failure, intracranial hemorrhage and death. In the past few years the molecular characterization of L. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2010.01.013DOI Listing
December 2010
21 Reads

Caterpillars and moths: Part II. Dermatologic manifestations of encounters with Lepidoptera.

Authors:
Eric W Hossler

J Am Acad Dermatol 2010 Jan;62(1):13-28; quiz 29-30

Department of Dermatology, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pennsylvania 17822, USA.

Caterpillars and moths (order Lepidoptera) are uncommonly recognized causes of adverse cutaneous reactions, such as localized stings, papular dermatitis, and urticarial wheals. These reactions are typically mild and self-limited; however, in South America, the sting of Lonomia caterpillars can cause a potentially fatal hemorrhagic diathesis related to massive fibrinolysis. In addition, ocular inflammation and prominent arthralgias have been reported to be caused by caterpillar exposures. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2009.08.061DOI Listing
January 2010
3 Reads

Caterpillars and moths: Part I. Dermatologic manifestations of encounters with Lepidoptera.

Authors:
Eric W Hossler

J Am Acad Dermatol 2010 Jan;62(1):1-10; quiz 11-2

Department of Dermatology, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pennsylvania 17822, USA.

Caterpillars are the larval forms of moths and butterflies and belong to the order Lepidoptera. Caterpillars, and occasionally moths, have evolved defense mechanisms, including irritating hairs, spines, venoms, and toxins that may cause human disease. The pathologic mechanisms underlying reactions to Lepidoptera are poorly understood. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jaad.2009.08.060DOI Listing
January 2010
4 Reads

Caterpillar stings: a case study.

Authors:
Karen K Paraska

AAOHN J 2009 Oct;57(10):402-3

Duquesne University, USA.

Lepidoptera can cause serious injury from toxic envenomation to humans. This case study involves a report of a caterpillar stinging a greens keeper foreman while working. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3928/08910162-20090928-02DOI Listing
October 2009
6 Reads

Caterpillars and moths.

Authors:
Eric W Hossler

Dermatol Ther 2009 Jul-Aug;22(4):353-66

Department of Dermatology, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, Pennsylvania 17822, USA.

Lepidoptera (moths, butterflies, and caterpillars) are an uncommon cause of adverse reactions in humans. Most reactions to Lepidoptera are mild and self-limited; however, reactions in sensitive individuals and reactions to particular species can be severe and life threatening. Specific syndromes caused by Lepidoptera include erucism (cutaneous reactions from contact with caterpillars, moths, or cocoons), lepidopterism (systemic involvement), ophthalmia nodosa (ocular involvement), dendrolimiasis and pararamose (each with joint symptoms relating to a specific species of caterpillar), lonomism (a severe hemorrhagic disease related to Lonomia species), and seasonal ataxia (related to ingestion of Anaphe venata). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1529-8019.2009.01247.xDOI Listing
September 2009
27 Reads

Lonomia obliqua caterpillar envenomation causes platelet hypoaggregation and blood incoagulability in rats.

Toxicon 2010 Jan 3;55(1):33-44. Epub 2009 Jul 3.

Laboratório de Bioquímica Farmacológica, Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonçalves, 9500, Cx. Postal 15005, Cep 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

Envenomation caused by Lonomia obliqua is a public health hazard in Southern Brazil. Envenomed victims present severe hemorrhagic syndrome that can progress to intracranial hemorrhage and death. To understand the mechanisms that lead to hemorrhage, we investigated the platelet dysfunction and blood coagulation disturbances following experimental envenomation in rats. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S004101010900336
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2009.06.033DOI Listing
January 2010
6 Reads

Novel perspectives on the pathogenesis of Lonomia obliqua caterpillar envenomation based on assessment of host response by gene expression analysis.

Toxicon 2008 May 13;51(6):1119-28. Epub 2008 Feb 13.

Department of Microbiology, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 800734, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0734, USA.

Animal venomous secretions have been explored as source of active substances affecting mammal hemostasis. These active principles impinge on key elements of almost all physiologic pathways and have an enormous potential in the development of new therapeutic drugs. The envenomation caused by the caterpillar Lonomia obliqua (lonomism) is characterized by a hemorrhagic clinical profile. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2008.01.010DOI Listing
May 2008
1 Read

Envenomation by the asp caterpillar (Megalopyge opercularis).

Authors:
David M Eagleman

Clin Toxicol (Phila) 2008 Mar;46(3):201-5

Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

Background: The Asp Caterpillar, Megalopyge opercularis, is endemic to the southern United States and causes hundreds of human envenomations annually. Envenomation from the spines of the caterpillar causes severe pain, burning, swelling, nausea, abdominal distress, and headache. Despite the high prevalence of envenomations, little is known about the caterpillars, their geographical distribution, and the symptoms they engender. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15563650701227729DOI Listing
March 2008
63 Reads

Efficacy of serum therapy on the treatment of rats experimentally envenomed by bristle extract of the caterpillar Lonomia obliqua: comparison with epsilon-aminocaproic acid therapy.

Toxicon 2007 Sep 21;50(3):349-56. Epub 2007 Apr 21.

Laboratório de Fisiopatologia, Instituto Butantan, Av. Vital Brazil, 1500, 05503-900, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Large number of accidents caused by contact with Lonomia obliqua caterpillars, with hemorrhagic complications, have occurred in southern Brazil. Based on Venezuelan expertise to treat Lonomia achelous envenomation, the use of the antifibrinolytic drug epsilon-aminocaproic acid (EACA) has been indicated to treat L. obliqua envenomation, although no evidence has been presented to justify its use. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2007.04.004DOI Listing
September 2007
2 Reads

The venom of the Lonomia caterpillar: an overview.

Toxicon 2007 May 10;49(6):741-57. Epub 2007 Jan 10.

Laboratory of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Butantan Institute, Av Vital Brazil 1500, São Paulo, SP, Brazil.

Contact with the Lonomia caterpillar causes numerous accidents, especially in Venezuela and the southern region of Brazil, where it is considered a public health problem. The Lonomia obliqua venom causes disseminated intravascular coagulation and a consumptive coagulopathy, which can lead to a hemorrhagic syndrome. The venom of Lonomia achelous also causes hemorrhage, but through increased fibrinolysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2006.11.033DOI Listing
May 2007
49 Reads

Kallikrein-kinin system activation by Lonomia obliqua caterpillar bristles: involvement in edema and hypotension responses to envenomation.

Toxicon 2007 Apr 21;49(5):663-9. Epub 2006 Nov 21.

Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.

Lonomia obliqua envenomation induces an intense burning sensation at the site of contact and severe hemorrhage followed by edema and hypotension, and after few days death can occur usually due to acute renal failure. In order to understand more about the envenomation syndrome, the present study investigates the role played by kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) in edematogenic and hypotensive responses to the envenomation by L. obliqua. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2006.11.005DOI Listing
April 2007
1 Read

Exploring new molecules and activities from Lonomia obliqua caterpillars.

Pathophysiol Haemost Thromb 2005 ;34(4-5):228-33

Biochemistry and Biophysics Laboratory, Butantan Institute, São Paulo, Brazil.

Skin contact with Lonomia caterpillar bristles causes a consumptive coagulopathy. From a cDNA library we cloned and expressed a prothrombin activator (rLopap) in active form, and from the bristles extract we characterized a FX activator (Losac). Several clones were sequenced and analyzed by expressed sequence tags. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000092429DOI Listing
July 2006
5 Reads

A catalog for the transcripts from the venomous structures of the caterpillar Lonomia obliqua: identification of the proteins potentially involved in the coagulation disorder and hemorrhagic syndrome.

Gene 2005 Aug;355:11-27

Vector Biology Section, Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, National Institutes of Health, Twinbrook III, Room 2E-28, Rockville, MD 20892-8132, USA.

Accidents with the caterpillar Lonomia obliqua are often associated with a coagulation disorder and hemorrhagic syndrome in humans. In the present study, we have constructed cDNA libraries from two venomous structures of the caterpillar, namely the tegument and the bristle. High-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analyses were performed in parallel. Read More

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http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S037811190500255
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.gene.2005.05.002DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2909119PMC
August 2005
3 Reads

Intravascular hemolysis induced by Lonomia obliqua caterpillar bristle extract: an experimental model of envenomation in rats.

Toxicon 2004 Dec;44(7):793-9

Laboratório de Fisiopatologia, Instituto Butantan, Av. Vital Brazil, 1500, 05503-900 São Paulo, Brazil.

Hemostatic disturbances are frequent findings in human accidents caused by Lonomia obliqua caterpillars in the southern region of Brazil. In severe envenomation, patients may present life-threatening bleedings. Such disturbances may be mimicked in rats, which also develop intravascular hemolysis. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.toxicon.2004.08.019DOI Listing
December 2004
1 Read

Lonomia obliqua venom action on fibrinolytic system.

Thromb Res 2003 ;112(1-2):105-10

Laboratório de Bioquímica e Biofísica, Instituto Butantan, Av. Vital Brazil 1500, CEP 05503-900, São Paulo SP, Brazil.

Accidental skin contact with the Lonomia caterpillar bristles causes a severe hemorrhagic syndrome. While fibrinolytic activation is considered to be the main cause of hemorrhage in Lonomia achelous envenomation, a consumptive coagulopathy was found to be a major component involved in the bleeding complications observed in patients envenomed by contact with Lonomia obliqua. Although we have previously observed that in L. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.thromres.2003.11.005DOI Listing
June 2004
69 Reads

In vitro hemolytic activity of Lonomia obliqua caterpillar bristle extract on human and Wistar rat erythrocytes.

Toxicon 2003 Jun;41(7):831-9

Laboratório de Fisiopatologia, Instituto Butantan, Avenida Vital Brazil, 1500, CEP 05503-900, São Paulo SP, Brazil.

Human accidental envenomation caused by skin contact with the bristles of Lonomia obliqua caterpillar causes coagulation and fibrinolysis disorders. Alterations of hematologic parameters are observed only in severe cases of envenomation, but with no clinical evidence of intravascular hemolysis. However, since we have observed intravascular hemolysis in preliminary studies using Wistar rats as an experimental model for investigating L. Read More

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June 2003
5 Reads

"Puss caterpillar" envenomation: a report from North Carolina.

Wilderness Environ Med 1998 ;9(4):213-6

Cabarrus Family Medicine Residency Program, Concord, NC, USA.

A 41-year-old white man with no specific past medical history presented to the Emergency Department on October 13, 1997, following what he described as a "caterpillar bite." The insect was subsequently identified as a "puss caterpillar" (Megalopyge opercularis). The patient experienced immediate excruciating pain that radiated throughout his left arm and gradually spread to the left chest area. Read More

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June 2002
5 Reads

Lonomia genus caterpillar envenomation: clinical and biological aspects.

Haemostasis 2001 May-Dec;31(3-6):288-93

Centro de Medicina Experimental, Laboratorio de Fisiopatologia, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Apartado 21827, Caracas 1020A, Venezuela.

Persons who have been in contact with Lonomia achelous or Lonomia obliqua caterpillars present external and internal bleeding and opening of recently healed wounds. Hematological tests show normal platelet count, prolonged prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and thrombin time, totally corrected by normal plasma. Decreased fibrinogen (Fg), factor (F) V, FXIII, plasminogen and alpha(2)-antiplasmin with increased FVIII: C, von Willebrand factor, Fg degradation products and D dimers. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1159/000048075DOI Listing
September 2003
4 Reads

Structures involved in production, secretion and injection of the venom produced by the caterpillar Lonomia obliqua (Lepidoptera, Saturniidae).

Toxicon 2001 Sep;39(9):1343-51

Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Gonçalves, C.P. 15005, CEP 91501-970, RS, Porto Alegre, Brazil.

The number of accidents caused by injection of the venom of Lonomia obliqua caterpillars in Southern Brazil has increased in the last years. Even though this kind of envenomation has an important social and medical impact, nothing is known about the cellular structures responsible for the production and secretion of this venom. Here we identify and analyse morphological structures possibly responsible for the production and secretion of the active principles of the venom, as well as the histological relationship of these structures with the urticating spines of L. Read More

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September 2001
2 Reads

Envenomation by the billygoat plum stinging caterpillar (Thosea penthima).

Med J Aust 2000 Dec 4-18;173(11-12):654-5

Royal Darwin Hospital, Darwin, NT.

We report the first case of envenomation by the billygoat plum stinging caterpillar, Thosea penthima Turner (Limacodidae). The sting, on the forearm, caused immediate burning pain and local wheal formation. Pain radiated up the arm and there was severe "crushing" chest pain lasting four hours. Read More

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July 2001
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A retrospective analysis of 96 "asp" (Megalopyge opercularis) envenomations in Central Texas during 1996.

J Toxicol Clin Toxicol 1999 ;37(4):457-62

Central Texas Poison Center, Texas A&M University Health Science Center, College of Medicine, Temple 76508, USA.

Background: The most frequently reported caterpillar envenomation in Central Texas is by the puss caterpillar or "asp," Megalopyge opercularis. This caterpillar is described by patients and physicians as inflicting intense radiating pain. The intensity of symptoms may be underestimated leading to undertreatment. Read More

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September 1999
7 Reads

[Poisonous caterpillars in French Guyana. 5 cases].

Ann Dermatol Venereol 1998 Aug;125(8):489-91

Institut guyanais de Dermatologie Tropicale (ER 133-UFR Médecine Antilles-Guyane), Centre Hospitalier de Cayenne.

Background: Certain caterpillars produce venomous substances and cases of human envenomation are regularly published.

Case Reports: We report 5 cases of caterpillar-induced envenomation observed in French Guyana. The caterpillar bites produced variable clinical manifestations. Read More

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August 1998
25 Reads

Lonomia obliqua caterpillar spicules trigger human blood coagulation via activation of factor X and prothrombin.

Thromb Haemost 1998 Mar;79(3):539-42

Department of Pharmacology, UNICAMP, Campinas, SP, Brazil.

In southern Brazil, envenomation by larvae of the moth Lonomia obliqua (Walker) may result in blood clotting factor depletion, leading to disseminated intravascular coagulation with subsequent haemorrhage and acute renal failure which may prove fatal. We have examined the effect of a crude extract of spicules from these caterpillars on in vitro hemostasis. The extract alone did not aggregate platelets and had no detectable effect on purified fibrinogen, suggesting that extract induces clot formation by triggering activation of the clotting cascade. Read More

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March 1998
13 Reads

Envenomation by the puss caterpillar (Megalopyge opercularis).

Ann Emerg Med 1991 May;20(5):562-4

Department of Emergency Medicine, Darnall Army Community Hospital, Ft Hood, Texas.

We discuss the case of a 52-year-old woman who developed urticarial lesions after the acute envenomation of a puss caterpillar (Megalopyge opercularis). The puss caterpillar, one of more than 50 species of caterpillars that can cause envenomation in the United States, is considered to be one of the most serious. Its clinical presentation and current recommended treatments are reviewed. Read More

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May 1991
12 Reads

Caterpillar envenomations: a prospective study of 112 cases.

Vet Hum Toxicol 1990 Apr;32(2):114-9

Louisiana Regional Poison Center, Shreveport.

A 1-year prospective study was conducted to identify epidemiological factors associated with caterpillar envenomations. Of 117 envenomations, 112 were included in the study. Identification of the caterpillars involved was accomplished in 68% of the cases. Read More

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April 1990
3 Reads
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