4 results match your criteria Catalysis Communications[Journal]

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The effect of precipitants on Ni-Al(2)O(3) catalysts prepared by a co-precipitation method for internal reforming in molten carbonate fuel cells.

Catal Commun 2012 Sep;26(6):103-111

Korea Institute of Energy Research, 71-2 Jang-dong, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-343, South Korea.

Ni-Al(2)O(3) catalysts are prepared via the co-precipitation method using various precipitants: urea, Na(2)CO(3), NaOH, K(2)CO(3), KOH and NH(4)OH. The effects of the precipitants on the physicochemical properties and catalytic activities of the Ni-Al(2)O(3) catalysts are investigated. The Ni50-urea catalyst displays the largest specific surface area and the highest pore volume. Read More

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https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S15667367120018
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.catcom.2012.04.029DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3407876PMC
September 2012
5 Reads

Hydrogenation of quinoline by ruthenium nanoparticles immobilized on poly(4-vinylpyridine).

Catal Commun 2007 Dec;8(12):2115-2118

Department of Chemistry, Brooklyn College and The Graduate Center, The City University of New York, 2900 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11210.

A series of catalysts composed of ruthenium nanoparticles immobilized on poly(4-vinylpyridine) was prepared by NaBH(4) reduction of RuCl(3).3H(2)O in methanol in the presence of the polymer; TEM measurements of a 10 wt % Ru/P4VPy material indicate that ruthenium particles of 1-2 nm predominate. This catalyst is efficient for the selective hydrogenation of quinoline to 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinoline at 100-120 ºC and 30-40 bar H(2). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.catcom.2007.04.006DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2390998PMC
December 2007
3 Reads

Author index volume 5, 2004.

Authors:

Catal Commun 2004 Dec 13;5(12):783-791. Epub 2004 Nov 13.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S1566-7367(04)00207-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7129622PMC
December 2004

Catalytic inactivation of SARS coronavirus, and yeast on solid surface.

Catal Commun 2004 Mar 3;5(3):170-172. Epub 2004 Feb 3.

Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2871, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085, China.

Catalytic oxidation is a potential way to disinfect air through a air-condition system. We find that the SARS coronavirus, bacteria and yeast are completely inactivated in 5 min on Ag catalyst surface and in 20 min on Cu catalyst surface at room temperature in air. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images show that the yeast cells are dramatically destructed on the Ag/AlO and Cu/AlO surfaces, which indicates that the inactivation is caused by catalytic oxidation rather than by toxicity of heavy metals. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.catcom.2003.12.009DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7129964PMC
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