74 results match your criteria Canine genetics and epidemiology[Journal]


Pedigree analysis of atrial fibrillation in Irish wolfhounds supports a high heritability with a dominant mode of inheritance.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2019 9;6:11. Epub 2019 Dec 9.

1Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, University of California Davis - School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, CA USA.

Background: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common arrhythmia in dogs. The Irish Wolfhound breed has a high prevalence of AF making them an ideal breed to investigate possible genetic contributions to this disease. The aim of this study was to perform a heritability analysis in North American Irish Wolfhounds using phenotype data from cardiac screenings performed between 2000 and 2019 in order to determine how much of this disease can be attributed to genetics compared to environmental causes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-019-0079-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6902490PMC
December 2019

Association between coat colour and the behaviour of Australian Labrador retrievers.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2019 30;6:10. Epub 2019 Nov 30.

The University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006 Australia.

Background: Making assumptions regarding temperament and intelligence based on the physical appearance of dogs can be a conscious or unconscious human act. Labrador retrievers with chocolate-coloured coats are anecdotally considered to be less trainable and more hyperactive and aggressive than their black or yellow peers. To test these assertions, we analysed the owner-reported behavioural traits of Labradors in relation to both their observable coat colour, and their and genotypes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-019-0078-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6884874PMC
November 2019

Molecular characterization of cytidine monophospho-N-acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase () associated with the erythrocyte antigens in dogs.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2019 7;6. Epub 2019 Nov 7.

Department of Basic Science, Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University, 1-7-1 Kyonan-cho, Musashino-shi, Tokyo, 180-8602 Japan.

Background: N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) is synthesized from its precursor N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) by cytidine-5'-monophospho-N acetylneuraminic acid hydroxylase (CMAH), which is encoded by the gene. Most mammals have both Neu5Gc and Neu5Ac, but humans and ferrets have only Neu5Ac because of loss-of-function mutations. Dogs and cats are polymorphic for Neu5Gc and Neu5Ac expression like cats, in which the gene is responsible for the AB Blood group system. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-019-0076-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6842231PMC
November 2019

Correction to: West Highland White Terriers under primary veterinary care in the UK in 2016: demography, mortality and disorders.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2019;6. Epub 2019 Oct 28.

1Pathobiology and Population Science, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Herts AL9 7TA UK.

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1186/s40575-019-0075-2.]. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-019-0077-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6816200PMC
October 2019

West Highland White Terriers under primary veterinary care in the UK in 2016: demography, mortality and disorders.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2019 3;6. Epub 2019 Sep 3.

1Pathobiology and Population Science, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Herts AL9 7TA UK.

Background: The West Highland White Terrier (WHWT) is a relatively common breed in the UK, although Kennel Club registrations have declined in recent years. The VetCompass™ Programme collates de-identified clinical data from primary-care veterinary practices in the UK for epidemiological research. Using VetCompass clinical data, this study aimed to characterise the demography, longevity and common disorders of WHWTs under primary veterinary care in the UK. Read More

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https://cgejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40575
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-019-0075-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6720841PMC
September 2019
2 Reads

The impact of incorrectly recorded parentage on inferred genotypes over multiple generations.

Authors:
T W Lewis

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2019 19;6. Epub 2019 Jul 19.

The Kennel Club, Clarges Street, London, W1J 8AB England.

The absence of selective pressure against recessive deleterious mutations in the heterozygous state means that virtually every individual will carry several such mutations which have arisen over time. The inflation in frequency of a few of these mutations due to selective processes during domestication and breed formation have left modern domestic dog breeds with a high burden of genetic disease due to mutations at single genes. This has stimulated research into the causal mutations, and a consequential market in DNA tests, which enable breeders to distinguish heterozygotes from wild type homozygotes and determine pairings that will avoid producing diseased progeny. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-019-0074-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6639963PMC
July 2019
5 Reads

Greyhounds under general veterinary care in the UK during 2016: demography and common disorders.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2019 4;6. Epub 2019 Jun 4.

1Pathobiology and Population Science, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Herts AL9 7TA UK.

Background: The greyhound is a sighthound known for its speed and agility. Greyhounds were selectively bred as functional racing animals but increasingly are kept as pets in the UK, often after their racing careers are over. The VetCompass™ Programme collates de-identified clinical data from primary-care veterinary practices in the UK for epidemiological research. Read More

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https://cgejournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40575
Publisher Site
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-019-0072-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6547581PMC
June 2019
3 Reads

Glaucoma-causing mutations are also reproducibly associated with height in two domestic dog breeds: selection for short stature may have contributed to increased prevalence of glaucoma.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2019 17;6. Epub 2019 May 17.

2Canine Genetics Research Group, Kennel Club Genetics Centre, Animal Health Trust, Lanwades Park, Kentford, Newmarket, CB8 7UU UK.

Background: In humans, mutations are known to cause Weill-Marchesani-like syndrome, which is characterised by lenticular myopia, ectopia lentis, glaucoma, spherophakia, and short stature. Breed-specific homozygous mutations in are associated with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) in several dog breeds, including the Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen (PBGV) and Shar Pei (SP). We hypothesised that these mutations are associated with short stature in these breeds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-019-0071-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6524303PMC
May 2019
1 Read

vWDI is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with incomplete penetrance, in the Kromfohrländer breed.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2019 16;6. Epub 2019 May 16.

FERAGEN GmbH, Strubergasse 26, 5020 Salzburg, Austria.

Background: Von Willebrand disorder type I (vWDI) is known as an inherited bleeding disorder in different dog breeds following an autosomal recessive inheritance. The Kromfohrländer is a rare dog breed with an increased incidence of unclear bleeding episodes and prolonged coagulation time during/after surgery or injuries, indicating a defect in one or more critical proteins of the coagulation cascade.

Objective: The objective of this study was to determine whether the c. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-019-0073-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6521421PMC
May 2019
5 Reads

DLA class II risk haplotypes for autoimmune diseases in the bearded collie offer insight to autoimmunity signatures across dog breeds.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2019 15;6. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

1Department of Animal Science, University of California, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616 USA.

Background: Primary hypoadrenocorticism (Addison's disease, AD) and symmetrical lupoid onychodystrophy (SLO) are two clinical conditions with an autoimmune etiology that occur in multiple dog breeds. In man, autoimmunity is associated with polymorphisms in immune-related genes that result in a reduced threshold for, or defective regulation of, T cell activation. The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes encode molecules that participate in these functions, and polymorphisms within these genes have been associated with autoimmune conditions in dogs and humans. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-019-0070-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6376674PMC
February 2019
3 Reads

Miniature Schnauzers under primary veterinary care in the UK in 2013: demography, mortality and disorders.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2019 15;6. Epub 2019 Feb 15.

Bath Veterinary Referrals, Rosemary Lodge, Wellsway, Bath, BA2 5RL UK.

Background: Individual dog breeds are often reported as predisposed to specific breed-related disorders but reliable epidemiological data on disease prevalence are sparse. The Miniature Schnauzer in the UK is a popular small breed dog that is often considered as relatively healthy and long-lived, but is this really true? This study aimed to use data from the VetCompass™ Programme at the Royal Veterinary College to characterise the demography, mortality and common disorders of the general population of Miniature Schnauzers under veterinary care in the UK.

Results: The study population of 455,557 dogs from 304 clinics in the VetCompass™ database under veterinary care during 2013 included 3857 Miniature Schnauzers (0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-019-0069-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6376765PMC
February 2019
7 Reads

Heterozygosity testing and multiplex DNA panel screening as a potential tool to monitor health and inbreeding in a small, closed dog population.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2018 28;5:12. Epub 2018 Dec 28.

2Department of Clinical Sciences of Companion Animals, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Utrecht University, Yalelaan 108, 3584 CM Utrecht, The Netherlands.

Background: Selective breeding in populations with a limited effective population size may result in a loss of genetic diversity, which can cause an increased concentration of specific disease liability genes. The Dutch Shepherd Dog (DSD) in the Netherlands is an example of such a breed with a small effective population.

Objective: To evaluate the measurement of genetic diversity and multiplex DNA panel screening for implementation in a breeding strategy for the Dutch Shepherd Dog (DSD) and to investigate the clinical relevance of potentially identified mutations in the multiplex DNA panel screening. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-018-0068-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6309085PMC
December 2018
1 Read

Meeting report from the Companion Animal Genetic Health conference 2018 (CAGH 2018): a healthy companionship: the genetics of health in dogs.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2018 29;5(Suppl 1). Epub 2018 Aug 29.

2The Royal (Dick) School for Veterinary Studies and Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Midlothian, UK.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-018-0061-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6156842PMC
August 2018
3 Reads

Neuter status as a risk factor for canine intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) in dachshunds: a retrospective cohort study.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2018 15;5:11. Epub 2018 Nov 15.

Dachshund Breed Council, Flackwell Heath, Flackwell Heath, Bucks HP10 9LE UK.

Background: Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) involves displacement of the intervertebral disc secondary to disc degeneration and is extremely common in dachshunds. Clinical signs include pain with or without paresis or paralysis. Mortality rate is high and some cases are left with permanent disability even after treatment. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-018-0067-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6236875PMC
November 2018
1 Read

Labrador retrievers under primary veterinary care in the UK: demography, mortality and disorders.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2018 22;5. Epub 2018 Oct 22.

3Pathobiology and Population Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Herts AL9 7TA UK.

Background: Labrador retrievers are reportedly predisposed to many disorders but accurate prevalence information relating to the general population are lacking. This study aimed to describe demography, mortality and commonly recorded diseases in Labrador retrievers under UK veterinary care.

Methods: The VetCompass™ programme collects electronic patient record data on dogs attending UK primary-care veterinary practices. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-018-0064-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6196571PMC
October 2018
4 Reads

Longevity and mortality in Kennel Club registered dog breeds in the UK in 2014.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2018 17;5:10. Epub 2018 Oct 17.

4Pathobiology and Population Health, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, AL9 7TA UK.

Background: The domestic dog is one of the most diverse mammalian species, exhibiting wide variations in morphology, behaviour and morbidity across breeds. Therefore, it is not unexpected that breeds should also exhibit variation in mortality and longevity. While shorter longevity per se may not necessarily be a welfare issue, a generally foreshortened lifespan in a breed that is accompanied by a high prevalence of a particular cause of death may reveal potentially serious welfare concerns and highlight scope to improve breed welfare. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-018-0066-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6191922PMC
October 2018
1 Read

Lipoma in dogs under primary veterinary care in the UK: prevalence and breed associations.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2018 27;5. Epub 2018 Sep 27.

2Clinical Sciences and Services, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Herts AL9 7TA UK.

Background: Lipomas are masses of mesenchymal origin, comprising of adipocytes, and are often clinically unremarkable but can be alarming to owners. Although lipomas are reportedly common in dogs, no studies have specifically investigated risk factors associated with their occurrence. This study was a large-scale retrospective analysis of electronic patient records of dogs attending practices participating in VetCompass™. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-018-0065-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6161450PMC
September 2018
1 Read

Work-type influences perceived livestock herding success in Australian Working Kelpies.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2018 13;5. Epub 2018 Aug 13.

Faculty of Science, University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW 2006 Australia.

Background: Working dog handlers and breeders have very different behavioural requirements in the animals that they employ for managing livestock. The Australian Working Kelpie breed may be used in several working contexts, notably yards, paddocks and a combination of both. The working context influences the skillsets required and gives rise to three corresponding work-types: and Kelpies. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-018-0063-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6090621PMC
August 2018
3 Reads

Demography and disorders of the French Bulldog population under primary veterinary care in the UK in 2013.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2018 3;5. Epub 2018 May 3.

3Clinical Sciences and Services, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Herts AL9 7TA UK.

Background: Despite its Gallic name, the French Bulldog is a breed of both British and French origin that was first recognised by The Kennel Club in 1906. The French Bulldog has demonstrated recent rapid rises in Kennel Club registrations and is now (2017) the second most commonly registered pedigree breed in the UK. However, the breed has been reported to be predisposed to several disorders including ocular, respiratory, neurological and dermatological problems. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-018-0057-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5932866PMC
May 2018
9 Reads

Nationwide genetic testing towards eliminating Lafora disease from Miniature Wirehaired Dachshunds in the United Kingdom.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2018 27;5. Epub 2018 Mar 27.

1Program in Genetics and Genome Biology, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8 Canada.

Background: Canine DNA-testing has become an important tool in purebred dog breeding and many breeders use genetic testing results when planning their breeding strategies. In addition, information obtained from testing of hundreds dogs in one breed gives valuable information about the breed-wide genotype frequency of disease associated allele. Lafora disease is a late onset, recessively inherited genetic disease which is diagnosed in Miniature Wirehaired Dachshunds (MWHD). Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-018-0058-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5869781PMC
March 2018
8 Reads

Assessing the relative importance of health and conformation traits in the cavalier king Charles spaniel.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2018 23;5. Epub 2018 Jan 23.

3KU Leuven Department of Biosystems, Livestock Genetics, Kasteelpark Arenberg 30, box 2456, 3001 Leuven, Belgium.

Background: The selection of a future breeding dog is a complicated task, in which disease characteristics and different traits have to be combined and weighed against one another. Truncation selection, that is the exclusion of affected animals, may be very inefficient when selecting on a large number of traits, and may result in a reduction of the genetic diversity in a population or breed. Selection could be facilitated by the use of a selection index that combines multiple traits or breeding values into one score. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-017-0056-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5778675PMC
January 2018
7 Reads

Moving from information and collaboration to action: report from the 3rd International Dog Health Workshop, Paris in April 2017.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2017 7;4:16. Epub 2017 Dec 7.

International Partnership for Dogs, c/o Svenska Kennelklubben, Rinkebysvängen 70, SE-163 85 Spånga, Sweden.

Background: Breed-related health problems in dogs have received increased focus over the last decade. Responsibility for causing and/or solving these problems has been variously directed towards dog breeders and kennel clubs, the veterinary profession, welfare scientists, owners, regulators, insurance companies and the media. In reality, all these stakeholders are likely to share some responsibility and optimal progress on resolving these challenges requires all key stakeholders to work together. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-017-0054-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5719757PMC
December 2017
19 Reads

Border Terriers under primary veterinary care in England: demography and disorders.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2017 25;4:15. Epub 2017 Nov 25.

Pathobiology and Population Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Herts AL9 7TA UK.

Background: The Border Terrier is a working terrier type that is generally considered to be a relatively healthy and hardy breed. This study aimed to characterise the demography and common disorders of Border Terriers receiving veterinary care in England using de-identified electronic patient record data within the VetCompass™ Programme.

Results: Annual birth proportion for Border Terriers showed a decreasing trend from 1. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-017-0055-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5702187PMC
November 2017
7 Reads

Rottweilers under primary veterinary care in the UK: demography, mortality and disorders.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2017 22;4:13. Epub 2017 Nov 22.

Pathobiology and Population Sciences, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Herts AL9 7TA UK.

Background: Rottweilers are reportedly predisposed to many disorders but accurate prevalence information relating to the general population are lacking. This study aimed to describe demography, mortality and commonly recorded diseases in Rottweilers under UK veterinary care. Clinical health records within the VetCompass Programme were explored for disorders recorded during 2013. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-017-0051-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5698930PMC
November 2017
9 Reads

An autosomal recessive mutation in causing enamel hypoplasia in Samoyed and its relationship to breed-wide genetic diversity.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2017 22;4:11. Epub 2017 Nov 22.

Department of Veterinary Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 65616 USA.

Background: Pure breeding of dogs has led to over 700 heritable disorders, of which almost 300 are Mendelian in nature. Seventy percent of the characterized mutations have an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance, indicative of positive selection during bouts of inbreeding primarily for new desired conformational traits. Samoyed suffer from several common complex genetic disorders, but up to this time only two X-linked and one autosomal dominant disorder have been identified. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-017-0049-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5699110PMC
November 2017
18 Reads

Population characteristics of golden retriever lifetime study enrollees.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2017 15;4:14. Epub 2017 Nov 15.

Colorado State University, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Fort Collins, CO 80523-1620 USA.

Background: Studying cancer and other diseases poses a problem due to their protracted and multifactorial nature. Prospective studies are useful to investigate chronic disease processes since collection of lifestyle information, exposure data and co-incident health issues are collected before the condition manifests. The Golden Retriever Lifetime Study is one of the first prospective studies following privately-owned dogs throughout life to investigate the incidence and risk factors for disease outcomes, especially cancer. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-017-0053-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5688750PMC
November 2017
3 Reads

Lumbosacral stenosis in Labrador retriever military working dogs - an exomic exploratory study.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2017 23;4:12. Epub 2017 Oct 23.

Departments of Animal and Nutritional Sciences, Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Design, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 USA.

Background: Canine lumbosacral stenosis is defined as narrowing of the caudal lumbar and/or sacral vertebral canal. A risk factor for neurologic problems in many large sized breeds, lumbosacral stenosis can also cause early retirement in Labrador retriever military working dogs. Though vital for conservative management of the condition, early detection is complicated by the ambiguous nature of clinical signs of lumbosacral stenosis in stoic and high-drive Labrador retriever military working dogs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-017-0052-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5651560PMC
October 2017
5 Reads

Single nucleotide polymorphisms and microsatellites in the canine glutathione S-transferase pi 1 () gene promoter.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2017 11;4. Epub 2017 Oct 11.

Ellis Pharmacogenomics Laboratory, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Drake University, Des Moines, IA 50311 USA.

Background: Genetic polymorphisms within the glutathione S-transferase P1 () gene affect the elimination of toxic xenobiotics by the GSTP1 enzyme. In dogs, exposure to environmental chemicals that may be GSTP1 substrates is associated with cancer. The objectives of this study were to investigate the genetic variability in the promoter in a diverse population of 278 purebred dogs, compare the incidence of any variants found between breeds, and predict their effects on gene expression. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-017-0050-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5635497PMC
October 2017
16 Reads

Large-scale survey to estimate the prevalence of disorders for 192 Kennel Club registered breeds.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2017 19;4. Epub 2017 Sep 19.

The Kennel Club, Clarges Street, London, W1J 8AB England, UK.

Background: Pedigree or purebred dogs are often stated to have high prevalence of disorders which are commonly assumed to be a consequence of inbreeding and selection for exaggerated features. However, few studies empirically report and rank the prevalence of disorders across breeds although such data are of critical importance in the prioritisation of multiple health concerns, and to provide a baseline against which to explore changes over time. This paper reports an owner survey that gathered disorder information on Kennel Club registered pedigree dogs, regardless of whether these disorders received veterinary care. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-017-0047-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5604186PMC
September 2017
50 Reads

Demography and disorders of German Shepherd Dogs under primary veterinary care in the UK.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2017 28;4. Epub 2017 Jul 28.

Pathobiology and Population Science, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Herts AL9 7TA UK.

Background: The German Shepherd Dog (GSD) has been widely used for a variety of working roles. However, concerns for the health and welfare of the GSD have been widely aired and there is evidence that breed numbers are now in decline in the UK. Accurate demographic and disorder data could assist with breeding and clinical prioritisation. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-017-0046-4DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5532765PMC
July 2017
46 Reads

Corneal ulcerative disease in dogs under primary veterinary care in England: epidemiology and clinical management.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2017 15;4. Epub 2017 Jun 15.

Speciaslistische Dierenkliniek Utrecht, Middenwetering 19, Utrecht, Netherlands.

Background: Corneal ulcerative disease (CUD) has the potential to adversely affect animal welfare by interfering with vision and causing pain. The study aimed to investigate for the first time the prevalence, breed-based risk factors and clinical management of CUD in the general population of dogs under primary veterinary care in England.

Results: Of 104,233 dogs attending 110 clinics participating within the VetCompass Programme from January 1 to December 31 2013, there were 834 confirmed CUD cases (prevalence: 0. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-017-0045-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5471714PMC
June 2017
14 Reads

Correlation of neuter status and expression of heritable disorders.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2017 26;4. Epub 2017 May 26.

Department of Animal Science, University of California, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616 USA.

Background: Gonadectomy, or neutering, is a very common surgery for dogs having many positive effects on behavior, health, and longevity. There are also certain risks associated with neutering including the development of orthopedic conditions, cognitive decline, and a predisposition to some neoplasias. This study was designed specifically to identify if a correlation exists between neuter status and inherited conditions in a large aggregate cohort of dogs representing many different breeds. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-017-0044-6DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5445488PMC
May 2017
59 Reads

Genetic mapping of principal components of canine pelvic morphology.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2017 24;4. Epub 2017 Mar 24.

Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 USA.

Background: Concentrated breeding effort to produce various body structures and behaviors of dogs to suit human demand has inadvertently produced unwanted traits and diseases that accompany the morphological and behavioral phenotypes. We explored the relationship between pelvic conformation and canine hip dysplasia (HD) because purebred dogs which are predisposed, or not, to HD share common morphologic features, respectively. Thirteen unique bilateral anatomical features of the pelvis were measured on 392 dogs of 51 breeds and 95 mixed breed dogs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-017-0043-7DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5364603PMC
March 2017
5 Reads

Osteosarcoma inheritance in two families of Scottish deerhounds.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2017 17;4. Epub 2017 Mar 17.

P.O. Box 2118, Nashville, IN 47448 USA.

Background: Osteosarcoma is the most common neoplastic disease in Scottish Deerhounds. For Deerhounds, a 2007 population-based study concluded that a single dominant genetic factor largely governed disease risk. For Greyhounds, Rottweilers, and Irish Wolfhounds, a 2013 genome-wide association study found multiple genetic markers in each breed, with each marker only weakly associated with the disease. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-017-0042-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5356397PMC
March 2017
2 Reads

mutation status, sex, and sterilization status of a cohort of Labrador retrievers with and without cranial cruciate ligament rupture.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2017 2;4. Epub 2017 Feb 2.

Veterinary Clinical Sciences Department, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108 USA.

Background: Exercise-induced collapse (EIC) due to mutation and rupture of the cranial cruciate ligament are both common syndromes in the Labrador retriever breed. A cohort of 313 Labradors was recruited based on their CCLR status and were subsequently genetically tested for EIC. Epidemiological aspects of the cohort were also described, including sex, sterilization status, and age at sterilization. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-017-0041-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5288950PMC
February 2017
5 Reads

Polymorphisms in the canine monoamine oxidase a () gene: identification and variation among five broad dog breed groups.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2017 13;4. Epub 2017 Jan 13.

Ellis Pharmacogenomics Laboratory, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Drake University, Des Moines, IA 50311 USA.

Background: In humans, reduced activity of the enzyme monoamine oxidase type A (MAOA) due to genetic polymorphisms within the gene leads to increased brain neurotransmitter levels associated with aggression. In order to study MAOA genetic diversity in dogs, we designed a preliminary study whose objectives were to identify novel alleles in functionally important regions of the canine gene, and to investigate whether the frequencies of these polymorphisms varied between five broad breed groups (ancient, herding, mastiff, modern European, and mountain). Fifty dogs representing these five breed groups were sequenced. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-016-0040-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5237129PMC
January 2017
4 Reads

No evidence of prenatal diversifying selection at locus or supertype levels in the dog MHC class II loci.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2016 18;3. Epub 2016 Nov 18.

Department of Genetics and Physiology, University of Oulu, PO Box 3000, Oulu, FIN-90014 Finland.

Background: Despite decades of studying, the mechanisms maintaining high diversity in the genes of the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) are still puzzling scientists. In addition to pathogen recognition and other functions, MHC molecules may act prenatally in mate choice and in maternal-foetal interactions. These interactions are potential selective mechanisms that increase genetic diversity in the MHC. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-016-0038-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5116190PMC
November 2016
27 Reads

DachsLife 2015: an investigation of lifestyle associations with the risk of intervertebral disc disease in Dachshunds.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2016 5;3. Epub 2016 Nov 5.

Department of Clinical Science and Services, Royal Veterinary College, Hatfield, Hertfordshire UK.

Background: Intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) represents a major problem in the Dachshund, with at a relative risk of IVDD 10-12 times higher than other breeds, and an estimated 19-24 % of Dachshunds showing clinical signs related to IVDD during their lifetime. A variety of genetic, physical and lifestyle-related risk factors for IVDD have previously been identified, with some conflicting findings. As such, advising owners and breeders regarding best-practice for IVDD prevention is challenging at present. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-016-0039-8DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5097381PMC
November 2016
23 Reads

A genetic assessment of the English bulldog.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2016 29;3. Epub 2016 Jul 29.

Center for Companion Animal Health, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Davis, CA 95616 USA.

Background: This study examines genetic diversity among 102 registered English Bulldogs used for breeding based on maternal and paternal haplotypes, allele frequencies in 33 highly polymorphic short tandem repeat (STR) loci on 25 chromosomes, STR-linked dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class I and II haplotypes, and the number and size of genome-wide runs of homozygosity (ROH) determined from high density SNP arrays. The objective was to assess whether the breed retains enough genetic diversity to correct the genotypic and phenotypic abnormalities associated with poor health, to allow for the elimination of deleterious recessive mutations, or to make further phenotypic changes in body structure or coat. An additional 37 English bulldogs presented to the UC Davis Veterinary Clinical Services for health problems were also genetically compared with the 102 registered dogs based on the perception that sickly English bulldogs are products of commercial breeders or puppy-mills and genetically different and inferior. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-016-0036-yDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4965900PMC
August 2016
32 Reads

A large deletion in RPGR causes XLPRA in Weimaraner dogs.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2016 8;3. Epub 2016 Jul 8.

Department of Human Genetics, Ruhr-University, Universitätsstraße 150, 44801 Bochum, Germany.

Background: Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) belongs to a group of inherited retinal disorders associated with gradual vision impairment due to degeneration of retinal photoreceptors in various dog breeds. PRA is highly heterogeneous, with autosomal dominant, recessive or X-linked modes of inheritance. In this study we used exome sequencing to investigate the molecular genetic basis of a new type of PRA, which occurred spontaneously in a litter of German short-hair Weimaraner dogs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-016-0037-xDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4938961PMC
July 2016
3 Reads

Demography and health of Pugs under primary veterinary care in England.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2016 10;3. Epub 2016 Jun 10.

Production and Population Health, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Herts AL9 7TA UK.

Background: The Pug is an ancient dog breed and was the fifth most commonly registered UK pedigree breed in 2014. However, the breed has been reported to be predisposed to several disorders including ocular, respiratory and dermatological problems. The VetCompass Programme collates de-identified clinical data from primary-care veterinary practices in the UK for epidemiological research. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-016-0035-zDOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4903005PMC
June 2016
24 Reads

The epidemiology of patellar luxation in dogs attending primary-care veterinary practices in England.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2016 8;3. Epub 2016 Jun 8.

Production and Population Health, The Royal Veterinary College, Hawkshead Lane, North Mymms, Hatfield, Herts AL9 7TA UK.

Background: Canine patellar luxation is one of the most common orthopaedic disorders of dogs and is a potential welfare concern because it can lead to lameness, osteoarthritis and pain. However, there are limited epidemiological data on the disorder relating to the general population of dogs in England. This study aimed to investigate the VetCompass Programme database of dogs attending primary-care veterinary practices in England to report on the prevalence, risk factors and clinical management of diagnosed patellar luxation cases. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-016-0034-0DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4898461PMC
June 2016
19 Reads

Protein expression and genetic variability of canine Can f 1 in golden and Labrador retriever service dogs.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2016 22;3. Epub 2016 Apr 22.

Department of Animal Science, University of California, One Shields Ave, Davis, CA 95616 USA.

Background: Valued for trainability in diverse tasks, dogs are the primary service animal used to assist individuals with disabilities. Despite their utility, many people in need of service dogs are sensitive to the primary dog allergen, Can f 1, encoded by the Lipocalin 1 gene (LCN1). Several organizations specifically breed service dogs to meet special needs and would like to reduce allergenic potential if possible. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-016-0031-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4840867PMC
April 2016
4 Reads

Trends in popularity of some morphological traits of purebred dogs in Australia.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2016 5;3. Epub 2016 Apr 5.

Faculty of Veterinary Science, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, The University of Sydney, JL Shute Building (C01A), 425 Werombi Road, Camden, NSW 2570 Australia.

Background: The morphology of dogs can provide information about their predisposition to some disorders. For example, larger breeds are predisposed to hip dysplasia and many neoplastic diseases. Therefore, longitudinal trends in popularity of dog morphology can reveal potential disease pervasiveness in the future. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-016-0032-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4820977PMC
April 2016
4 Reads

Prevalence of pectinate ligament dysplasia and associations with age, sex and intraocular pressure in the Basset hound, Flatcoated retriever and Dandie Dinmont terrier.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2016 12;3. Epub 2016 Mar 12.

Centre of Preventive Medicine, Animal Health Trust, Lanwades Park, Kentford, Newmarket, Suffolk, CB8 7UU UK.

Background: The aims of this study were to: determine the prevalence of pectinate ligament dysplasia (PLD) in populations of Basset hounds (BH), Flatcoated retrievers (FCR) and Dandie Dinmont terriers (DDT) resident in the UK; investigate possible associations between the degree of PLD and age, sex and intraocular pressure (IOP) and; investigate possible associations between IOP and age and sex. Gonioscopy was performed in both eyes of 198 BH, 170 FCR and 95 DDT and the percentage of iridocorneal angle affected by PLD was estimated and classified as unaffected (0 %), mildly affected (<20 %), moderately affected (20-90 %) or severely affected (>90 %). Rebound tonometry was performed bilaterally in the majority of enrolled dogs. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-016-0033-1DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4788888PMC
March 2016
35 Reads

A search for genetic diversity among Italian Greyhounds from Continental Europe and the USA and the effect of inbreeding on susceptibility to autoimmune disease.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2015 30;2:17. Epub 2015 Oct 30.

6687 S 1530 E, Salt lake city, UT 84121 USA.

Background: Previous studies documented the problem of inbreeding among Italian Greyhounds (IG) from the USA and its possible role in a multiple autoimmune disease syndrome. The present study is an extension of these earlier experiments and had two objectives: 1) to identify pockets of additional genetic diversity that might still exist among IG from the USA and Continental Europe, and 2) to determine how loss of genetic diversity within the genome and in the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) complex relates to the problem of autoimmune disease in IG from the USA. Genetic testing was conducted using 33 short tandem repeat (STR) loci across 25 chromosomes and 7 STR loci that associated with specific dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) class I and II haplotypes. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-015-0030-9DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4628233PMC
November 2015
22 Reads

Evaluation of whole-genome sequencing of four Chinese crested dogs for variant detection using the ion proton system.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2015 8;2:16. Epub 2015 Oct 8.

Department of Animal Breeding and Genetics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.

Background: Next generation sequencing (NGS) has traditionally been performed by large genome centers, but in recent years, the costs for whole-genome sequencing (WGS) have decreased substantially. With the introduction of smaller and less expensive "desktop" systems, NGS is now moving into the general laboratory. To evaluate the Ion Proton system for WGS we sequenced four Chinese Crested dogs and analyzed the data quality in terms of genome and exome coverage, the number of detected single nucleotide variants (SNVs) and insertions and deletions (INDELs) and the genotype concordance with the Illumina HD canine SNP array. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-015-0029-2DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4599337PMC
October 2015
3 Reads

A cultured approach to canine urothelial carcinoma: molecular characterization of five cell lines.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2015 17;2:15. Epub 2015 Sep 17.

Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, 1060 William Moore Drive, Raleigh, NC 27607 USA ; Center for Comparative Medicine and Translational Research, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC USA ; Center for Human Health and the Environment, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC USA ; Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC USA.

Background: Urothelial carcinoma (UC), also known as transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), of the bladder is the most common neoplasm affecting the canine urogenital system. To facilitate study of the disease in vitro, cell line models have been established from primary tumor biopsies. Their resemblance to the primary disease, however, has not been well defined. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-015-0028-3DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4579363PMC
September 2015
1 Read

The effect of genetic bottlenecks and inbreeding on the incidence of two major autoimmune diseases in standard poodles, sebaceous adenitis and Addison's disease.

Canine Genet Epidemiol 2015 27;2:14. Epub 2015 Aug 27.

Veterinary Genetics Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, One Shields Avenue, 95616 Davis, CA USA.

Background: Sebaceous adenitis (SA) and Addison's disease (AD) increased rapidly in incidence among Standard Poodles after the mid-twentieth century. Previous attempts to identify specific genetic causes using genome wide association studies and interrogation of the dog leukocyte antigen (DLA) region have been non-productive. However, such studies led us to hypothesize that positive selection for desired phenotypic traits that arose in the mid-twentieth century led to intense inbreeding and the inadvertent amplification of AD and SA associated traits. Read More

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s40575-015-0026-5DOI Listing
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4579369PMC
September 2015
11 Reads